NIST Starts Planning for Post-Quantum Cryptography

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/05/nist_starts_pla.html

Last year, the NSA announced its plans for transitioning to cryptography that is resistant to a quantum computer. Now, it’s NIST’s turn. Its just-released report talks about the importance of algorithm agility and quantum resistance. Sometime soon, it’s going to have a competition for quantum-resistant public-key algorithms:

Creating those newer, safer algorithms is the longer-term goal, Moody says. A key part of this effort will be an open collaboration with the public, which will be invited to devise and vet cryptographic methods that — to the best of experts’ knowledge — ­will be resistant to quantum attack. NIST plans to launch this collaboration formally sometime in the next few months, but in general, Moody says it will resemble past competitions such as the one for developing the SHA-3 hash algorithm, used in part for authenticating digital messages.

“It will be a long process involving public vetting of quantum-resistant algorithms,” Moody said. “And we’re not expecting to have just one winner. There are several systems in use that could be broken by a quantum computer­ — public-key encryption and digital signatures, to take two examples­ — and we will need different solutions for each of those systems.”

The report rightly states that we’re okay in the symmetric cryptography world; the key lengths are long enough.

This is an excellent development. NIST has done an excellent job with their previous cryptographic standards, giving us a couple of good, strong, well-reviewed, and patent-free algorithms. I have no doubt this process will be equally excellent. (If NIST is keeping a list, aside from post-quantum public-key algorithms, I would like to see competitions for a larger-block-size block cipher and a super-fast stream cipher as well.)

Two news articles.