AWS Security Profile (and re:Invent 2018 wrap-up): Eric Docktor, VP of AWS Cryptography

Post Syndicated from Becca Crockett original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-security-profile-and-reinvent-2018-wrap-up-eric-docktor-vp-of-aws-cryptography/

Eric Docktor

We sat down with Eric Docktor to learn more about his 19-year career at Amazon, what’s new with cryptography, and to get his take on this year’s re:Invent conference. (Need a re:Invent recap? Check out this post by AWS CISO Steve Schmidt.)


How long have you been at AWS, and what do you do in your current role?

I’ve been at Amazon for over nineteen years, but I joined AWS in April 2015. I’m the VP of AWS Cryptography, and I lead a set of teams that develops services related to encryption and cryptography. We own three services and a tool kit: AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS), AWS CloudHSM, AWS Certificate Manager, plus the AWS Encryption SDK that we produce for our customers.

Our mission is to help people get encryption right. Encryption algorithms themselves are open source, and generally pretty well understood. But just implementing encryption isn’t enough to meet security standards. For instance, it’s great to encrypt data before you write it to disk, but where are you going to store the encryption key? In the real world, developers join and leave teams all the time, and new applications will need access to your data—so how do you make a key available to those who really need it, without worrying about someone walking away with it?

We build tools that help our customers navigate this process, whether we’re helping them secure the encryption keys that they use in the algorithms or the certificates that they use in asymmetric cryptography.

What did AWS Cryptography launch at re:Invent?

We’re really excited about the launch of KMS custom key store. We’ve received very positive feedback about how KMS makes it easy for people to control access to encryption keys. KMS lets you set up IAM policies that give developers or applications the ability to use a key to encrypt or decrypt, and you can also write policies which specify that a particular application—like an Amazon EMR job running in a given account—is allowed to use the encryption key to decrypt data. This makes it really easy to encrypt data without worrying about writing massive decrypt jobs if you want to perform analytics later.

But, some customers have told us that for regulatory or compliance reasons, they need encryption keys stored in single-tenant hardware security modules (HSMs) that they manage. This is where the new KMS custom key store feature comes in. Custom key store combines the ease of using KMS with the ability to run your own CloudHSM cluster to store your keys. You can create a CloudHSM cluster and link it to KMS. After setting that up, any time you want to generate a new master key, you can choose to have it generated and stored in your CloudHSM cluster instead of using a KMS multi-tenant HSM. The keys are stored in an HSM under your control, and they never leave that HSM. You can reference the key by its Amazon Resource Name (ARN), which allows it to be shared with users and applications, but KMS will handle the integration with your CloudHSM cluster so that all crypto operations stay in your single-tenant HSM.

You can read our blog post about custom key store for more details.

If both AWS KMS and AWS CloudHSM allow customers to store encryption keys, what’s the difference between the services?

Well, at a high level, sure, both services offer customers a high level of security when it comes to storing encryption keys in FIPS 140-2 validated hardware security modules. But there are some important differences, so we offer both services to allow customers to select the right tool for their workloads.

AWS KMS is a multi-tenant, managed service that allows you to use and manage encryption keys. It is integrated with over 50 AWS services, so you can use familiar APIs and IAM policies to manage your encryption keys, and you can allow them to be used in applications and by members of your organization. AWS CloudHSM provides a dedicated, FIPS 140-2 Level 3 HSM under your exclusive control, directly in your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). You control the HSM, but it’s up to you to build the availability and durability you get out of the box with KMS. You also have to manage permissions for users and applications.

Other than helping customers store encryption keys, what else does the AWS Cryptography team do?

You can use CloudHSM for all sorts of cryptographic operations, not just key management. But we definitely do more than KMS and CloudHSM!

AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) is another offering from the cryptography team that’s popular with customers, who use it to generate and renew TLS certificates. Once you’ve got your certificate and you’ve told us where you want it deployed, we take care of renewing it and binding the new certificate for you. Earlier this year, we extended ACM to support private certificates as well, with the launch of ACM Private Certificate Authority.

We also helped the AWS IoT team launch support for cryptographically signing software updates sent to IoT devices. For IoT devices, and for software installation in general, it’s a best practice to only accept software updates from known publishers, and to validate that the new software has been correctly signed by the publisher before installing. We think all IoT devices should require software updates to be signed, so we’ve made this really easy for AWS IoT customers to implement.

What’s the most challenging part of your job?

We’ve built a suite of tools to help customers manage encryption, and we’re thrilled to see so many customers using services like AWS KMS to secure their data. But when I sit down with customers, especially large customers looking seriously at moving from on-premises systems to AWS, I often learn that they have years and years of investment into their on-prem security systems. Migrating to the cloud isn’t easy. It forces them to think differently about their security models. Helping customers think this through and map a strategy can be challenging, but it leads to innovation—for our customers, and for us. For instance, the idea for KMS custom key store actually came out of a conversation with a customer!

What’s your favorite part of your job?

Ironically, I think it’s the same thing! Working with customers on how they can securely migrate and manage their data in AWS can be challenging, but it’s really rewarding once the customer starts building momentum. One of my favorite moments of my AWS career was when Goldman Sachs went on stage at re:Invent last year and talked about how they use KMS to secure their data.

Five years from now, what changes do you think we’ll see within the field of encryption?

The cryptography community is in the early stages of developing a new cryptographic algorithm that will underpin encryption for data moving across the internet. The current standard is RSA, and it’s widely used. That little padlock you see in your web browser telling you that your connection is secure uses the RSA algorithm to set up an encrypted connection between the website and your browser. But, like all good things, RSA’s time may be coming to an end—the quantum computer could be its undoing. It’s not yet certain that quantum computers will ever achieve the scale and performance necessary for practical applications, but if one did, it could be used to attack the RSA algorithm. So cryptographers are preparing for this. Last year, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) put out a call for algorithms that might be able to replace RSA, and got 68 responses. NIST is working through those ideas now and will likely select a smaller number of algorithms for further study. AWS participated in two of those submissions and we’re keeping a close eye on NIST’s process. New cryptographic algorithms take years of testing and vetting before they make it into any standards, but we want to be ready, and we want to be on the forefront. Internally, we’re already considering what it would look like to make this change. We believe it’s our job to look around corners and prepare for changes like this, so our customers don’t have to.

What’s the most common misconception you encounter about encryption?

Encryption technology itself is decades-old and fairly well understood. That’s both the beauty and the curse of encryption standards: By the time anything becomes a standard, there are years and years of research and proof points into the stability and the security of the algorithm. But just because you have a really good encryption algorithm that takes an encryption key and a piece of data you want to secure and spits out an impenetrable cipher text, it doesn’t mean that you’re done. What did you do with the encryption key? Did you check it into source code? Did you write it on a piece of paper and leave it in the conference room? It’s these practices around the encryption that can be difficult to navigate.

Security-conscious customers know they need to encrypt sensitive data before writing it to disk. But, if you want your application to run smoothly, sometimes you need that data in clear text. Maybe you need the data in a cache. But who has access to the cache? And what logging might have accidentally leaked that information while the application was running and interacting with the cache?

Or take TLS certificates. Each TLS certificate has a public piece—the certificate—and a private piece—a private key. If an adversary got ahold of the private key, they could use it to impersonate your website or your API. So, how do you secure that key after you’ve procured the certificate?

It’s practices like this that some customers still struggle with. You have to think about all the places that your sensitive data is moving, and about real-world realities, like the fact that the data has to be unecrypted somewhere. That’s where AWS can help with the tooling.

Which re:Invent session videos would you recommend for someone interested in learning more about encryption?

Ken Beer’s encryption talk is a very popular session that I recommend to people year after year. If you want to learn more about KMS custom key store, you should also check out the video from the LaunchPad event, where we talked with Box about how they’re using custom key store.

People do a lot of networking during re:Invent. Any tips for maintaining those connections after everyone’s gone home?

Some of the people that I meet at re:Invent I get to see again every year. With these customers, I tend to stay in touch through email, and through Executive Briefing Center sessions. That contact is important since it lets us bounce ideas off each other and we use that feedback to refine AWS offerings. One conference I went to also created a Slack channel for attendees—and all the attendees are still on it. It’s quiet most of the time, but people have a way to re-engage with each other and ask a question, and it’ll be just like we’re all together again.

If you had to pick any other job, what would you want to do with your life?

If I could do anything, I’d be a backcountry ski guide. Now, I’m not a good enough skier to actually have this job! But I like being outside, in the mountains. If there was a way to make a living out of that, I would!

Author photo

Erick Docktor

Eric joined Amazon in 1999 and has worked in a variety of Amazon’s businesses, including being part of the teams that launched Amazon Marketplace, Amazon Prime, the first Kindle, and Fire Phone. Eric has also worked in Supply Chain planning systems and in Ordering. Since 2015, Eric has led the AWS Cryptography team that builds tools to make it easy for AWS customers to encrypt their data in AWS. Prior to Amazon, Eric was a journalist and worked for newspapers including the Oakland Tribune and the Doylestown (PA) Intelligencer.