How to migrate symmetric exportable keys from AWS CloudHSM Classic to AWS CloudHSM

Post Syndicated from Mohamed AboElKheir original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/migrate-symmetric-exportable-keys-aws-cloudhsm-classic-aws-cloudhsm/

In August 2017, we announced the “new” AWS CloudHSM service, which had a lot of improvements over AWS CloudHSM Classic (for clarity in this post I will refer to the services as New CloudHSM and CloudHSM Classic). These advantages in security, scalability, usability, and economy, included FIPS 140-2 Level 3 certification, fully managed high availability and backup, a management console, and lower costs.

Now, we turn another page. The Luna 5 HSMs used for CloudHSM Classic are reaching end of life, and the CloudHSM Classic service is being subsequently decommissioned, so CloudHSM Classic users must migrate cryptographic key material to the New CloudHSM.

In this post, I’ll show you how to use the RSA OAEP (optimal asymmetric encryption padding) wrapping mechanism, which was introduced in the CloudHSM client version 2.0.0, to move key material from CloudHSM Classic to New CloudHSM without exposing the plain text of the key material outside the HSM boundaries. You’ll use an RSA public key to wrap the key material (export it in encrypted form) on CloudHSM Classic, then use the corresponding RSA Private Key to unwrap it on New CloudHSM.

NOTE: This solution only works for symmetric exportable keys. Asymmetric keys on CloudHSM Classic can’t be exported. To replace non-exportable and asymmetric keys, you must generate new keys on New CloudHSM, then use the old keys to decrypt and the new keys to re-encrypt your data.

Solution overview

My solution shows you how to use the CKDemo utility on CloudHSM Classic, and key_mgmt_util on New CloudHSM, to: generate an RSA wrapping key pair; use it to wrap keys on CloudHSM Classic; and then unwrap the keys on New CloudHSM. These are all done via the RSA OAEP mechanism.
The following diagram provides a summary of the steps involved in the solution:

Figure 1: Solution overview

Figure 1: Solution overview

  1. Generate the RSA wrapping key pair on New CloudHSM.
  2. Export the RSA Public Key to the New CloudHSM client instance.
  3. Move the RSA public key to the CloudHSM Classic client instance.
  4. Import the RSA public key to CloudHSM Classic.
  5. Wrap the key using the imported RSA public key.
  6. Move the wrapped key to the New CloudHSM client instance.
  7. Unwrap the key on New CloudHSM with the RSA Private Key.

NOTE: You can perform the same procedure using supported libraries, such as JCE (Java Cryptography Extension) and PKCS#11. For example, you can use the wrap_with_imported_rsa_key sample to import an RSA public key into CloudHSM Classic, use that key to wrap your CloudHSM Classic keys, and then use the rsa_wrapping sample (specifically the rsa_oaep_unwrap_key function) to unwrap the keys into New CloudHSM using the RSA OAEP mechanism.

Prerequisites

  1. An active New CloudHSM cluster with at least one active hardware security module (HSM). Follow the Getting Started Guide to create and initialize a New CloudHSM cluster.
  2. An Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance with the New CloudHSM client installed and configured to connect to the New CloudHSM cluster. You can refer to the Getting Started Guide to configure and connect the client instance.
  3. New CloudHSM CU (crypto user) credentials.
  4. An EC2 instance with the CloudHSM Classic client installed and configured to connect to the CloudHSM Classic partition or the high-availability (HA) partition group that contains the keys you want to migrate. You can refer to this guide to install and configure a CloudHSM Classic Client.
  5. The Password of the CloudHSM Classic partition or HA partition group that contains the keys you want to migrate.
  6. The handle of the symmetric key on CloudHSM Classic you want to migrate.

Step 1: Generate the RSA wrapping key pair on CloudHSM

1.1. On the New CloudHSM client instance, run the key_mgmt_util command line tool, and log in as the CU, as described in Getting Started with key_mgmt_util.


Command:  loginHSM -u CU -s <CU user> -p <CU password>
    
	Cfm3LoginHSM returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

	Cluster Error Status
	Node id 0 and err state 0x00000000 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

1.2. Run the following
genRSAKeyPair command to generate an RSA key pair with the label
classic_wrap. Take note of the private and public key handles, as they’ll be used in the coming steps.


Command:  genRSAKeyPair -m 2048 -e 65537 -l classic_wrap

	Cfm3GenerateKeyPair returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

	Cfm3GenerateKeyPair:    public key handle: 407    private key handle: 408

	Cluster Error Status
	Node id 0 and err state 0x00000000 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

Step 2: Export the RSA public key to the New CloudHSM client instance

2.1. Run the following exportPubKey command to export the RSA public key to the New CloudHSM client instance using the public key handle you received in step 1.2 (407, in my example). This will export the public key to a file named wrapping_public.pem.


Command:  exportPubKey -k <public key handle> -out wrapping_public.pem

PEM formatted public key is written to wrapping_public.pem

	Cfm3ExportPubKey returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

Step 3: Move the RSA public key to the CloudHSM Classic client instance

Move the RSA Public Key to the CloudHSM Classic client instance using scp (or any other tool you prefer).

Step 4: Import the RSA public key to CloudHSM Classic

4.1. On the CloudHSM Classic instance, use the cmu command as shown below to import the RSA public key with the label classic_wrap. You’ll need the partition or HA partition group password for this command, plus the slot number of the partition or HA partition group (you can get the slot number of your partition or HA partition group using the vtl listSlots command).


# cmu import -inputFile=wrapping_public.pem -label classic_wrap
Select token
 [1] Token Label: partition1
 [2] Token Label: partition2
 [3] Token Label: partition3
 Enter choice: <slot number>
Please enter password for token in slot 1 : <password>

4.2. Run the below command to get the handle (highlighted below) of the imported key.


# cmu list -label classic_wrap
Select token
 [1] Token Label: partition1
 [2] Token Label: partition2
 [3] Token Label: partition3
 Enter choice: <slot number>
Please enter password for token in slot 1 : <password>
handle=149	label=classic_wrap

4.3. Run the CKDemo utility.


# ckdemo

4.4. Open a session to the partition or HA partition group slot.


Enter your choice : 1

Slots available:
	slot#1 - LunaNet Slot
	slot#2 - LunaNet Slot
	...
Select a slot: <slot number>

SO[0], normal user[1], or audit user[2]? 1

Status: Doing great, no errors (CKR_OK)

4.5. Log in using the partition or HA partition group pin.


Enter your choice : 3
Security Officer[0]
Crypto-Officer  [1]
Crypto-User     [2]:
Audit-User      [3]: 1
Enter PIN          : <password>

Status: Doing great, no errors (CKR_OK)

4.6. Change the CKA_WRAP attribute of the imported RSA public key to be able to use it for wrapping using the imported public key handle you received in step 4.2 above (149, in my example).


Enter your choice : 25

Which object do you want to modify (-1 to list available objects) : <imported public key handle>

Edit template for set attribute operation.

(1) Add Attribute   (2) Remove Attribute   (0) Accept Template :1

 0 - CKA_CLASS                  1 - CKA_TOKEN
 2 - CKA_PRIVATE                3 - CKA_LABEL
 4 - CKA_APPLICATION            5 - CKA_VALUE
 6 - CKA_XXX                    7 - CKA_CERTIFICATE_TYPE
 8 - CKA_ISSUER                 9 - CKA_SERIAL_NUMBER
10 - CKA_KEY_TYPE              11 - CKA_SUBJECT
12 - CKA_ID                    13 - CKA_SENSITIVE
14 - CKA_ENCRYPT               15 - CKA_DECRYPT
16 - CKA_WRAP                  17 - CKA_UNWRAP
18 - CKA_SIGN                  19 - CKA_SIGN_RECOVER
20 - CKA_VERIFY                21 - CKA_VERIFY_RECOVER
22 - CKA_DERIVE                23 - CKA_START_DATE
24 - CKA_END_DATE              25 - CKA_MODULUS
26 - CKA_MODULUS_BITS          27 - CKA_PUBLIC_EXPONENT
28 - CKA_PRIVATE_EXPONENT      29 - CKA_PRIME_1
30 - CKA_PRIME_2               31 - CKA_EXPONENT_1
32 - CKA_EXPONENT_2            33 - CKA_COEFFICIENT
34 - CKA_PRIME                 35 - CKA_SUBPRIME
36 - CKA_BASE                  37 - CKA_VALUE_BITS
38 - CKA_VALUE_LEN             39 - CKA_LOCAL
40 - CKA_MODIFIABLE            41 - CKA_ECDSA_PARAMS
42 - CKA_EC_POINT              43 - CKA_EXTRACTABLE
44 - CKA_ALWAYS_SENSITIVE      45 - CKA_NEVER_EXTRACTABLE
46 - CKA_CCM_PRIVATE           47 - CKA_FINGERPRINT_SHA1
48 - CKA_OUID                  49 - CKA_X9_31_GENERATED
50 - CKA_PRIME_BITS            51 - CKA_SUBPRIME_BITS
52 - CKA_USAGE_COUNT           53 - CKA_USAGE_LIMIT
54 - CKA_EKM_UID               55 - CKA_GENERIC_1
56 - CKA_GENERIC_2             57 - CKA_GENERIC_3
58 - CKA_FINGERPRINT_SHA256
Select which one: 16
Enter boolean value: 1

CKA_WRAP=01

(1) Add Attribute   (2) Remove Attribute   (0) Accept Template :0

Status: Doing great, no errors (CKR_OK)

Step 5: Wrap the key using the imported RSA public key

5.1. Check whether the symmetric key you want to migrate is exportable. This can be done by following the below command using the handle of the key you want to migrate, and confirming the value of the CKA_EXTRACTABLE attribute (highlighted below) is equal to 1. Otherwise, the key can’t be exported.


Enter your choice : 27

Enter handle of object to display (-1 to list available objects): <handle of the key to be migrated>
Object handle=120
CKA_CLASS=00000004
CKA_TOKEN=01
CKA_PRIVATE=01
CKA_LABEL=Generated AES Key
CKA_KEY_TYPE=0000001f
CKA_ID=
CKA_SENSITIVE=01
CKA_ENCRYPT=01
CKA_DECRYPT=01
CKA_WRAP=01
CKA_UNWRAP=01
CKA_SIGN=01
CKA_VERIFY=01
CKA_DERIVE=01
CKA_START_DATE=
CKA_END_DATE=
CKA_VALUE_LEN=00000020
CKA_LOCAL=01
CKA_MODIFIABLE=01
CKA_EXTRACTABLE=01
CKA_ALWAYS_SENSITIVE=01
CKA_NEVER_EXTRACTABLE=00
CKA_CCM_PRIVATE=00
CKA_FINGERPRINT_SHA1=f8babf341748ba5810be21acc95c6d4d9fac75aa
CKA_OUID=29010002f90900005e850700
CKA_EKM_UID=
CKA_GENERIC_1=
CKA_GENERIC_2=
CKA_GENERIC_3=
CKA_FINGERPRINT_SHA256=7a8efcbff27703e281617be3c3d484dc58df6a78f6b144207c1a54ad32a98c00

Status: Doing great, no errors (CKR_OK)

5.2. Wrap the key using the imported RSA public key. This will create a file called wrapped.key that contains the wrapped key. Make sure to use handles of public key handle you received in step 4.2 above (149, in my example), and the handle of the key you want to migrate.


Enter your choice : 60
[1]DES-ECB        [2]DES-CBC        [3]DES3-ECB       [4]DES3-CBC
                                    [7]CAST3-ECB      [8]CAST3-CBC
[9]RSA            [10]TRANSLA       [11]DES3-CBC-PAD  [12]DES3-CBC-PAD-IPSEC
[13]SEED-ECB      [14]SEED-CBC      [15]SEED-CBC-PAD  [16]DES-CBC-PAD
[17]CAST3-CBC-PAD [18]CAST5-CBC-PAD [19]AES-ECB       [20]AES-CBC
[21]AES-CBC-PAD   [22]AES-CBC-PAD-IPSEC [23]ARIA-ECB  [24]ARIA-CBC
[25]ARIA-CBC-PAD
[26]RSA_OAEP    [27]SET_OAEP
Select mechanism for wrapping: 26

Enter filename of OAEP Source Data [0 for none]: 0

Enter handle of wrapping key (-1 to list available objects) : <imported public key handle>

Enter handle of key to wrap (-1 to list available objects) : <handle of the key to be migrated>
Wrapped key was saved in file wrapped.key

Status: Doing great, no errors (CKR_OK)

Step 6: Move the wrapped key to the New CloudHSM client instance

Move the wrapped key to the New CloudHSM client instance using scp (or any other tool you prefer).

Step 7: Unwrap the key on New CloudHSM with the RSA Private Key

7.1. On the New CloudHSM client instance, run the key_mgmt_util and login as the CU.


Command:  loginHSM -s <CU user> -p <CU password>

	Cfm3LoginHSM returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

	Cluster Error Status
	Node id 0 and err state 0x00000000 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

7.2. Run the following unWrapKey command to unwrap the key using the RSA private key handle you received in step 1.2 (408, in my example). The output of the command should show the handle of the wrapped key (highlighted below).


Command:  unWrapKey -f wrapped.key -w <private key handle> -m 8 -noheader -l unwrapped_aes -kc 4 -kt 31

	Cfm3CreateUnwrapTemplate2 returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

	Cfm2UnWrapWithTemplate3 returned: 0x00 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

	Key Unwrapped.  Key Handle: 410

	Cluster Error Status
	Node id 0 and err state 0x00000000 : HSM Return: SUCCESS

Conclusion

Using RSA OAEP for key migration ensures that your key material doesn’t leave the HSM boundary in plain text, as it’s encrypted using an RSA public key before being exported from CloudHSM Classic, and it can only be decrypted by New CloudHSM through the RSA private key that is generated and kept on New CloudHSM.

My post provides an example of how to use the ckdemo and key_mgmt_util utilities for the migration, but the same procedure can also be performed using the supported software libraries, such as the Java JCE library or the PKCS#11 library,a to migrate larger volumes of keys in an automated manner.

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Author photo

Mohamed AboElKheir

Mohamed AboElKheir is an Application Security Engineer who worksa with different team to ensure AWS services, applications, and websites are designed and implemented to the highest security standards. He is a subject matter expert for CloudHSM and is always enthusiastic about assisting CloudHSM customers with advanced issues and use cases. Mohamed is passionate about InfoSec, specifically cryptography, penetration testing (he’s OSCP certified), application security, and cloud security (he’s AWS Security Specialty certified).