Running Java applications on Amazon EC2 A1 instances with Amazon Corretto

Post Syndicated from Neelay Thaker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/running-java-applications-on-amazon-ec2-a1-instances-with-amazon-corretto/

This post is contributed by Jeff Underhill | EC2 Principal Business Development Manager

Amazon Corretto is a no-cost, multiplatform, production-ready distribution of the Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK). Production-ready Linux builds of JDK8 and JDK 11 for the 64-bit Arm architecture were released Sep 17, 2019. Scale-out Java applications can get significant cost savings using the Arm-based Amazon EC2 A1 instances. Read on to learn more about Amazon EC2 A1 instances, Amazon Corretto, and how support for 64-bit Arm in Amazon Corretto is a significant development for Java developers building cloud native applications.

What are Amazon EC2 A1 instances?

Last year at re:Invent Amazon Web Services (AWS) introduced Amazon EC2 A1 instances powered by AWS Graviton Processors that feature 64-bit Arm Neoverse cores and custom silicon designed by AWS. The A1 instances deliver up to 45% cost savings for scale-out and Arm-based applications such as web servers, containerized microservices, caching fleets, distributed data stores, and Arm-native software development workflows that are supported by the extensive, and growing Arm software ecosystem.

Why Java and Amazon EC2 A1 instances?
The majority of customers we’ve spoken to have experienced a seamless transition and are realizing cost benefits with A1 instances, especially customers that are transitioning architecture-agnostic applications that often run seamlessly on Arm-based platforms. Today, there are many examples of architecture-agnostic programming languages, such as PHP, Python, node.js, and GoLang, and all of these are well supported on Arm-based A1 instances. The Java programming language has been around for almost 25 years and is one of the most broadly adopted programming languages. The TIOBE Programming Community Index (as of Sept’19) shows Java ranked as the #1 or #2 programming language between 2004-2019, and the annual GitHub Octoverse report shows Java has consistently ranked #2 between 2014 and 2018. Java was designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible, which enables portability of Java applications regardless of processor architectures. This portability enables choice of how and where to run your Java-based workloads.

What is Amazon Corretto?
Java is one of the most popular languages in use by AWS customers, and AWS is committed to supporting Java and keeping it free. That’s why AWS introduced Amazon Corretto, a no-cost, multi-platform, production-ready distribution of OpenJDK from Amazon. AWS runs Corretto internally on thousands of production services, and has committed to distributing security updates to Corretto 8 at no cost until at least June, 2023. Amazon Corretto is available for both JDK 8 and JDK 11 – you can learn more in the documentation and if you’re curious about what goes into building Java in the open and specifically the Amazon Corretto OpenJDK distribution then check out this OSCON video.

What’s new?
Java provides you with the choice of how and where to run your applications, and Amazon EC2 provides you with the broadest and deepest portfolio of compute instances available in the cloud. AWS wants its customers to be able to run their workloads in the most efficient way as defined by their specific use case and business requirements and that includes providing a consistent platform experience across the Amazon EC2 instance portfolio. We’re fortunate to have James Gosling, the designer of Java, as a member of the Amazon team, and he recently took to Twitter to announce the General Availability (GA) of Amazon Corretto for the Arm architecture:

For those of you that like playing with Linux on ARM, the Corretto build for ARM64 is now GA. Fully production ready. Both JDK8 and JDK11

 

Open Source – “It takes a village”
It’s important to recognize the significance of Open Source Software (OSS) and the community of people involved to develop, build and test a production ready piece of software as complex as Java. So, because I couldn’t have said it better myself, here’s a tweet from my colleague Matt Wilson who took a moment to recognize all the hard work of the Red Hat and Java community developers:

Many thanks to all the hard work from @redhatopen developers, and all the #OpenSource Java community that played a part in making 64 bit Arm support in OpenJDK distributions a reality!

Ready to cost optimize your scale-out Java applications?
With the 8.222.10.4 and 11.0.4.11.1 releases of Amazon Corretto that became generally available Sep 17, 2019, new and existing AWS Corretto users can now deploy their production Java applications on Arm-based EC2 A1 instances. If you have scale-out applications and are interested in optimizing cost then you’ll want to take the A1 instances for a test-drive to see if they’re a fit for your specific use case. You can learn more at the Amazon Corretto website, and the downloads are all available here for Amazon Corretto 8Amazon Corretto 11 and if you’re using containers here’s the Docker Official image.  If you have any questions about your own workloads running on Amazon EC2 A1 instances, contact us at [email protected].