All posts by Alex Bate

Build a Raspberry Pi chartplotter for your boat

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-chartplotter-for-your-boat/

Earlier this year, James Conger built a chartplotter for his boat using a Raspberry Pi. Here he is with a detailed explanation of how everything works:

Building your own Chartplotter with a Raspberry Pi and OpenCPN

Provides an overview of the hardware and software needed to put together a home-made Chartplotter with its own GPS and AIS receiver. Cost for this project was about $350 US in 2019.

The entire build cost approximately $350. It incorporates a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, dAISy AIS receiver HAT, USB GPS module, and touchscreen display, all hooked up to his boat.



Perfect for navigating the often foggy San Francisco Bay, the chartplotter allows James to track the position, speed, and direction of major vessels in the area, superimposed over high-quality NOAA nautical charts.

Raspberry Pi at sea

For more nautically themed Raspberry Pi projects, check out Rekka Bellum and Devine Lu Linvega’s stunning Barometer and Ufuk Arslan’s battery-saving IoT boat hack.

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Rob’s Raspberry Pi Dungeons and Dragons table

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/robs-raspberry-pi-dungeons-and-dragons-table/

Rob made an interactive Dungeons and Dragons table using a Raspberry Pi and an old TV. He thought it best to remind me, just in case I had forgotten. I hadn’t forgotten. Honest. Here’s a photo of it.

The table connects to Roll20 via Chromium, displaying the quest maps while the GM edits and reveals the layout using their laptop. Yes, they could just plug their laptop directly into the monitor, but using the Raspberry Pi as a bridge means there aren’t any awkward wires in the way, and the GM can sit anywhere they want around the table.

Rob wrote up an entire project how-to for The MagPi magazine. Go forth and read it!

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The grilled cheese-making robot of your dreams

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-grilled-cheese-making-robot-of-your-dreams/

Ummm…YES PLEASE!

Cheeseborg: The Grilled Cheese Robot!

More cool stuff at http://www.tabb.me and http://www.evankhill.com Cheeseborg has one purpose: to create the best grilled cheese it possibly can! Cheeseborg is fully automated, voice activated, and easy to move. With Google Assistant SDK integration, Cheeseborg can even be used as a part of your smart home.

Does it use a Raspberry Pi, please?

Sometimes we’ll see a project online and find ourselves hoping and praying that it uses a Raspberry Pi, just so we have a reason to share it with you all.

That’s how it was when I saw Cheeseborg, the grilled cheese robot, earlier this week. “Please, please, please…” I prayed to the robot gods, as I chowed down on a grilled cheese at my desk (true story), and, by the grace of all that is good in this world, my plea was answered.

Cheeseborg: the grilled cheese robot

Cheeseborg uses both an Arduino Mega and a Raspberry Pi 3 in its quest to be the best ever automated chef in the world. The Arduino handles the mechanics, while our deliciously green wonder board runs the Google Assistant SDK, allowing you to make grilled cheese via voice command.

Saying “Google, make me a grilled cheese” will set in motion a series of events leading to the production of a perfectly pressed sammie, ideal for soup dunking or solo snacking.

The robot uses a vacuum lifter to pick up a slice of bread, dropping it onto an acrylic tray before repeating the process with a slice of cheese and then a second slice of bread. Then the whole thing is pushed into a panini press that has been liberally coated in butter spray (not shown for video aesthetics), and the sandwich is toasted, producing delicious ooey-gooey numminess out the other side.

Pareidolia much?

Here at Raspberry Pi, we give the Cheeseborg five slices out of five, and look forward to one day meeting Cheeseborg for real, so we can try out its scrummy wares.

ooooey-gooey numminess

You can find out more about Cheeseborg here.

Toastie or grilled cheese


Yes, there’s a difference: but which do you prefer? What makes them different? And what’s your favourite filling for this crispy, cheesy delight?

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Raspberry Pi retro gaming on Reddit

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-retro-gaming-on-reddit/

Reddit was alive with the sound of retro gaming this weekend.

First out to bat is this lovely minimalist, wall-mounted design built by u/sturnus-vulgaris, who states:

I had planned on making a bar top arcade, but after I built the control panel, I kind of liked the simplicity. I mounted a frame of standard 2×4s cut with a miter saw. Might trim out in black eventually (I have several panels I already purchased), but I do like the look of wood.

Next up, a build with Lego bricks, because who doesn’t love Lego bricks?

Just completed my mini arcade cabinet that consists of approximately 1,000 [Lego bricks], a Raspberry Pi, a SNES style controller, Amazon Basics computer speakers, and a 3.5″ HDMI display.

u/RealMagicman03 shared the build here, so be sure to give them an upvote and leave a comment if, like us, you love Raspberry Pi projects that involve Lego bricks.

And lastly, this wonderful use of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, proving yet again how versatile the form factor can be.

CM3+Lite cartridge for GPi case. I made this cartridge for fun at first, and it works as all I expected. Now I can play more games l like on this lovely portable stuff. And CM3+ is as powerful as RPi3B+, I really like it.

Creator u/martinx72 goes into far more detail in their post, so be sure to check it out.

What other projects did you see this weekend? Share your links with us in the comments below.

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We love a good pen plotter

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/we-love-a-good-pen-plotter/

BrachioGraph touts itself as the cheapest, simplest possible pen plotter, so, obviously, we were keen to find out more. Because, if there’s one thing we like about our community, it’s your ability to recreate large, expensive pieces of tech with a few cheap components and, of course, a Raspberry Pi.

So, does BrachioGraph have what it takes? Let’s find out.

Raspberry Pi pen plotter

The project ingredients list calls for two sticks or pieces of stiff card and, right off the bat, we’re already impressed with the household item ingenuity that had gone into building BrachioGraph. It’s always fun to see Popsicle sticks used in tech projects, and we reckon that a couple of emery boards would also do the job  although a robot with add-on nail files sounds a little too Simone Giertz, if you ask us. Simone, if you’re reading this…

You’ll also need a pencil or ballpoint pen, a peg, three servomotors, and a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero. That’s it. They weren’t joking when they said this plotter was simple.

The plotter runs on a Python script, and all the code for the project has been supplied for free. You can find it all on the BrachioGraph website, here.

We’ll be trying out the plotter for ourselves here at Pi Towers, and we’d love to see if any of you give it a go, so let us know in the comments.

 

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Musically synced car windscreen wipers using Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/musically-synced-car-windscreen-wipers-using-raspberry-pi/

Hey there! I’ve just come back from a two-week vacation, Liz and Helen are both off sick, and I’m not 100% sure I remember how to do my job.

So, while I figure out how to social media and word write, here’s this absolutely wonderful video from Ian Charnas, showing how he hacked his car windscreen wipers to sync with his stereo.

FINALLY! Wipers Sync to Music

In this video, I modify my car so the windshield wipers sync to the beat of whatever music I’m listening to. You can own this idea!

Ian will be auctioning off the intellectual property rights to his dancing wipers on eBay, will all proceeds going to a charity supporting young makers.

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Fantastic Star Wars-themed Raspberry Pi projects

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fantastic-star-wars-themed-raspberry-pi-projects/

The weekend’s nearly here and the weather’s not looking too fantastic around these parts – we’re going to need some project ideas. Here’s a fun roundup of some of my favourite Star Wars-themed makes from the archive that I reckon you’ll really like.

Because, well, who doesn’t like Star Wars, right? Tell us which is your favourite in the comments.

Make your own custom LEDs using hot glue!

Grab a glue gun and your favourite Star Wars-themed ice cube trays to create your own custom LEDs, perfect for upping the wow factor of your next Raspberry Pi project. Learn how.

Build your own Star Wars droid

She may just have won a billion awards for Fleabag, but Phoebe Waller-Bridge is also known to some as the voice of L3-37, the salty droid companion of Lando Calrissian in Solo: A Star Wars Story.

Thanks to Patrick PatchBOTS Stefanski, you can build your own. Find out more.

Solo Star Wars Story L3-37 droid PatchBOTS

Darth Beats: Star Wars LEGO gets a musical upgrade

LEGO + Star Wars + Raspberry Pi? Yes please! Upgrade your favourite Star Wars merch to play music via the Pimoroni Speaker pHAT, thanks to Dan Aldred.

Darth Beats dremel

Star Wars Minecraft

There’s a reason Martin O’Hanlon is part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation team. This recreation of Star Wars Episode IV may or may not have been it – you decide.

Build your own Death Star… sort of

LED rings spinning at 300rpm around a Raspberry Pi? Yes please. Not only is this project an impressive feat of engineering, but it’s also super pretty! Find out more, young Padawan.

POV Globe Death Star

Do. Or do not. There is no Pi (sorry)

Are there any Star Wars-related Raspberry Pi projects we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below!

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View Stonehenge in real time via Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/view-stonehenge-in-real-time-via-raspberry-pi/

You can see how the skies above Stonehenge affect the iconic stones via a web browser thanks to a Raspberry Pi computer.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is Britain’s greatest monument and it currently attracts more than 1.5 million visitors each year. It’s possible to walk around the iconic stone circle and visit the Neolithic houses outside the visitor centre. Yet, worries about potential damage have forced preservationists to limit access.

With that in mind, Eric Winbolt, Interim Head of Digital/Innovation at English Heritage, had a brainwave. “We decided to give people an idea of what it’s like to see the sunrise and sunset within the circle, and allow them to enjoy the skies over Stonehenge in real time without actually stepping inside,” he explains.

This could have been achieved by permanently positioning a camera within the stone circle, but this was ruled out for fear of being too intrusive. Instead, Eric and developers from The Bespoke Pixel agency snapped a single panoramic shot of the circle’s interior using a large 8K high-res, 360-degree camera when the shadows and light were quite neutral.

“We then took the sky out of the image with the aim of capturing an approximation of the view without impacting on the actual stones themselves,” Eric says.

Stone me

By taking a separate hemispherical snapshot of the sky from a nearby position and merging it with the master photograph of the stones, the team discovered they could create a near real-time effect for online visitors. They used an off-the-shelf, upwards-pointing, 220-degree fish-eye lens camera connected to a Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ computer, taking images once every four minutes.

This Raspberry Pi was also fitted with a Pimoroni Enviro pHAT containing atmospheric, air pressure, and light sensors. Captured light values from the sky image were then used to alter the colour values of the master image of the stones so that the light on Stonehenge, as seen via the web, reflected the ambient light of the sky.

What can you see?

“What it does is give a view of the stones as it looks right now, or at least within a few minutes,” says Eric. “It also means the effect doesn’t look like two images simply Photoshopped together.”

Indeed, coder Mark Griffiths says the magic all runs from Node.js. “It uses a Python shell to get the sensor data and integrates with Amazon’s AWS and an IoT messaging service called DweetPro to tie all the events together,” he adds.

There was also a lot of experimentation. “We used the HAT via the I2C connectors so that we could mount it away from the main board to get better temperature readings,” says Mark, “We also tried a number of experiments with different cameras, lenses, and connections and it became clear that just connecting the camera via USB didnít allow access to the full functionality and resolutions.”

Mark reverse-engineered the camera’s WiFi connection and binary protocol to work out how to communicate with it via Raspberry Pi so that full-quality images could be taken and downloaded. “We also found the camera’s WiFi connection would time out after several days,” reveals Mark, “so we had to use a relay board connected via the GPIO pins.”
With such issues resolved, the team then created an easy-to-use online interface that lets users click boxes and see the view over the past 24 hours. They also added a computer model to depict the night sky.

“Visitors can go to the website day and night and allow the tool to pan around Stonehenge or pause it and pan manually, viewing the stones as they would be at the time of visiting,” Eric says. “It can look especially good on a smart television. It’s very relaxing.”

View the stones in realtime right now by visiting the English Heritage website.

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Tinkernut’s Raspberry Pi video guide

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tinkernuts-raspberry-pi-video-guide/

“If you’ve ever been curious about electronics or programming, then the Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool to have in your arsenal,” enthuses Tinkernut in his latest video, Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know.

And we aren’t going to argue with that.

Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know

If you keep your ear to the Tinkering community, I’m sure you’ve heard whispers (and shouts) of the Raspberry Pi. And if you wanted to get into making, tinkering, computing, or electronics, the Raspberry Pi is a great tool to have in your tool belt. But what is it?

“This Pi can knit a Hogwarts sweater while saving a cat from a tree,” he declares. “It can recite the Canterbury Tales while rebuilding an engine.” Tinkernut’s new explainer comes after a short hiatus from content creation, and it’s a cracking little intro to what Raspberry Pi is, what it can do, and which model is right for you.

“This little pincushion, right here”

Tinkernut, we’re glad you’re back. And thank you for making us your first subject in your new format.

If you like what you see, be sure to check out more Tinkernut videos, and subscribe.

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Another snazzy Raspberry Pi wallpaper for your phone and computer

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/another-snazzy-raspberry-pi-wallpaper-for-your-phone-and-computer/

After the success of our last snazzy wallpaper for your computer and smartphone, Fiacre is back with another visual delight.

Click one of the images below to visit the appropriate download page!



Standard rules apply: these images are for personal use only and are not to be manipulated, printed, turned into t-shirts, glazed onto mugs or sold.

Let us know in the comments if you decide to use the wallpaper, or tag a photo with #SnazzyRPi on Twitter and Instagram.

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Using data to help a school garden

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/using-data-to-help-a-school-garden/

Chris Aviles, aka the teacher we all wish we’d had when we were at school, discusses how his school is in New Jersey is directly linking data with life itself…

Over to you, Chris.

Every year, our students take federal or state-mandated testing, but what significant changes have we made to their education with the results of these tests? We have never collected more data about our students and society in general. The problem is most people and institutions do a poor job interpreting data and using it to make meaningful change. This problem was something I wanted to tackle in FH Grows.

FH Grows is the name of my seventh-grade class, and is a student-run agriculture business at Knollwood Middle School in Fair Haven, New Jersey. In FH Grows, we sell our produce both online and through our student-run farmers markets. Any produce we don’t sell is donated to our local soup kitchen. To get the most out of our school gardens, students have built sensors and monitors using Raspberry Pis. These sensors collect data which then allows me to help students learn to better interpret data themselves and turn it into action.

Turning data into action

In the greenhouse, our gardens, and alternative growing stations (hydroponics, aquaponics, aeroponics) we have sensors that log the temperature, humidity, and other important data points that we want to know about our garden. This data is then streamed in real time, online at FHGrows.com. When students come into the classroom, one of the first things we look at is the current, live data on the site and find out what is going on in our gardens. Over the course of the semester, students are taught about the ideal growing conditions of our garden. When looking at the data, if we see that the conditions in our gardens aren’t ideal, we get to work.

If we see that the greenhouse is too hot, over 85 degrees, students will go and open the greenhouse door. We check the temperature a little bit later, and if it’s still too hot, students will go turn on the fan. But how many fans do you turn on? After experimenting, we know that each fan lowers the greenhouse temperature between 7-10 degrees Fahrenheit. Opening the door and turning on both fans can bring a greenhouse than can push close to 100 degrees in late May or early June down to a manageable 80 degrees.

Turning data into action can allow for some creativity as well. Over-watering plants can be a real problem. We found that our plants were turning yellow because we were watering them every day when we didn’t need to. How could we solve this problem and become more efficient at watering? Students built a Raspberry Pi that used a moisture sensor to find out when a plant needed to be watered. We used a plant with the moisture sensor in the soil as our control plant. We figured that if we watered the control plant at the same time we watered all our other plants, when the control plant was dry (gave a negative moisture signal) the rest of the plants in the greenhouse would need to be watered as well.

Chris Aviles Innovation Lab Raspberry Pi Certified Educator

This method of determining when to water our plants worked well. We rarely ever saw our plants turn yellow from overwatering. Here is where the creativity came in. Since we received a signal from the Raspberry Pi when the soil was not wet enough, we played around with what we could do with that signal. We displayed it on the dashboard along with our other data, but we also decided to make the signal send as an email from the plant. When I showed students how this worked, they decided to write the message from the plant in the first person. Every week or so, we received an email from Carl the Control Plant asking us to come out and water him!

 

If students don’t honour Carl’s request for water, use data to know when to cool our greenhouse, or had not done the fan experiments to see how much cooler they make the greenhouse, all our plants, like the basil we sell to the pizza places in town, would die. This is the beauty of combining data literacy with a school garden: failure to interpret data then act based on their interpretation has real consequences: our produce could die. When it takes 60-120 days to grow the average vegetable, the loss of plants is a significant event. We lose all the time and energy that went into growing those plants as well as lose all the revenue they would have brought in for us. Further, I love the urgency that combining data and the school garden creates because many students have learned the valuable life lesson that not making a decision is making a decision. If students freeze or do nothing when confronted with the data about the garden, that too has consequences.

Using data to spot trends and make predictions

The other major way we use data in FH Grows is to spot trends and make predictions. Different to using data to create the ideal growing conditions in our garden every day, the sensors that we use also provide a way for us to use information about the past to predict the future. FH Grows has about two years’ worth of weather data from our Raspberry Pi weather station (there are guides online if you wish to build a weather station of your own). Using weather data year over year, we can start to determine important events like when it is best to plant our veggies in our garden.

For example, one of the most useful data points on the Raspberry Pi weather station is the ground temperature sensor. Last semester, we wanted to squeeze in a cool weather grow in our garden. This post-winter grow can be done between March and June if you time it right. Getting an extra growing cycle from our garden is incredibly valuable, not only to FH Grows as business (since we would be growing more produce to turn around and sell) but as a way to get an additional learning cycle out of the garden.

So, using two seasons’ worth of ground temperature data, we set out to predict when the ground in our garden would be cool enough to do this cool veggie grow. Students looked at the data we had from our weather station and compared it to different websites that predicted the last frost of the season in our area. We found that the ground right outside our door warmed up two weeks earlier than the more general prediction given by websites. With this information we were able to get a full cool crop grow at a time where our garden used to lay dormant.

We also used our Raspberry Pi to help us predict whether or not it was going to rain over the weekend. Using a Raspberry Pi connected to Weather Underground and previous years’ data, if we believed it would not rain over the weekend we would water our gardens on Friday. If it looked like rain over the weekend, we let Mother Nature water our garden for us. Our prediction using the Pi and previous data was more accurate for our immediate area than compared to the more general weather reports you would get on the radio or an app, since those considered a much larger area when making their prediction.

It seems like we are going to be collecting even more data in the future, not less. It is important that we get our students comfortable working with data. The school garden supported by Raspberry Pi’s amazing ability to collect data is a boon for any teacher who wants to help students learn how to interpret data and turn it into action.
 

Hello World issue 10

Issue 10 of Hello World magazine is out today, and it’s free. 100% free.

Click here to download the PDF right now. Right this second. If you want to be a love, click here to subscribe, again for free. Subscribers will receive an email when the latest issue is out, and we won’t use your details for anything nasty.

If you’re an educator in the UK, click here and you’ll receive the printed version of Hello World direct to your door. And, guess what? Yup, that’s free too!

What I’m trying to say here is that there is a group of hard-working, passionate educators who take the time to write incredible content for Hello World, for free, and you would be doing them (and us, and your students, kids and/or friends) a solid by reading it 🙂

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Raspberry Pi interactive wind chimes

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/interactive-wind-chimes/

Grab yourself a Raspberry Pi, a Makey Makey, and some copper pipes: it’s interactive wind chime time!

Perpetual Chimes

Perpetual Chimes is a set of augmented wind chimes that offer an escapist experience where your collaboration composes the soundscape. Since there is no wind indoors, the chimes require audience interaction to gently tap or waft them and encourage/nurture the hidden sounds within – triggering sounds as the chimes strike one another.

Normal wind chimes pale in comparison

I don’t like wind chimes. There, I said it. I also don’t like the ticking of the second hand of analogue clocks, and I think these two dislikes might be related. There’s probably a name for this type of dislike, but I’ll leave the Googling to you.

Sound designer Frazer Merrick’s interactive wind chimes may actually be the only wind chimes I can stand. And this is due, I believe, to the wonderful sounds they create when they touch, much more wonderful than regular wind chime sounds. And, obviously, because these wind chimes incorporate a Raspberry Pi 3.

Perpetual Chimes is a set of augmented wind chimes that offer an escapist experience where your collaboration composes the soundscape. Since there is no wind indoors, the chimes require audience interaction to gently tap or waft them and encourage/nurture the hidden sounds within — triggering sounds as the chimes strike one another. Since the chimes make little acoustic noise, essentially they’re broken until you collaborate with them.

Follow the Instructables tutorial to create your own!

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Raspberry Pi has partnered with Shaun the Sheep!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-has-partnered-with-shaun-the-sheep/

We’re super excited to announce our new partnership with Studiocanal and Aardman Animations celebrating their new film A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, in cinemas this autumn.

Raspberry Pi has partnered with Shaun the Sheep!

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

Aardman has created so many characters that the members of Raspberry Pi hold dear in our hearts. From the early days of Morph’s interactions with Tony Hart, or Christmas evenings sat watching the adventures of Wallace and Gromit, through to their grand cinema-screen epics, we all have a soft spot for the wonderful creatures this talented bunch have invented.

So when Aardman approached us to ask if we’d like to be the Educational Partner for their new film A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, we obviously jumped at the chance. Aardman are passionate about education, and we are too, so this really was a no-brainer.

Shaun the Sheep: Mission to Space

Today we are launching the brand-new, global Code Club competition ‘Shaun the Sheep: Mission to Space’.

We’re asking young people in registered Code Clubs across the world to create awe-inspiring animations featuring Shaun the Sheep and his new friend Lu-La’s adventures, by following our specially themed ‘Shaun the Sheep: Mission to Space’ Scratch project guide!

The ‘Shaun the Sheep: Mission to Space’ competition closes October 25 2019, and you can find more information on the Code Club website.

Shaun the Sheep character hunt

For those of you who aren’t in a Code Club, we’re also running a second giveaway here on the Raspberry Pi blog. For your chance to enter, you need to find three characters from the film that we’ve hidden throughout the Raspberry Pi and Code Club websites. Once you’ve found three, fill in this form, and we’ll pick ten winners to receive some A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon goodies, including stickers and a pair of Shaun the Sheep ears.

Please note: at least one of the characters you submit must be from the Code Club website, so get hunting!

The closing date for the character hunt is 4 October 2019.

Both competitions are open to everyone, no matter where in the world you are.

We’ll also be uploading the ‘Shaun the Sheep: Mission to Space’ Scratch project to the Raspberry Pi desktops at the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge, so make sure you stop by this coming half-term to try your hand at coding your own Shaun the Sheep adventure.

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How you, an adult, can take part in the European Astro Pi Challenge

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-you-an-adult-take-part-in-european-astro-pi-challenge/

So, yesterday we announced the launch of the 2019/2020 European Astro Pi Challenge, and adults across the globe groaned with jealousy as a result. It’s OK, we did too.

The Astro Pi Challenge is the coolest thing ever

The European Astro Pi Challenge is ridiculously cool. It’s definitely one of the most interesting, awesome, spectacular uses of a Raspberry Pi in the known universe. Two Raspberry Pis in stellar, space-grade aluminium cases are currently sat aboard the International Space Station, waiting for students in ESA Member States to write code to run on them to take part in the Astro Pi Challenge.

But what if, like us, you’re too old to take part in the challenge? How can you get that great sense of space wonderment when you’re no longer at school?

You’re never too old…even when you’re too old

If you’re too old to take part in the challenge, it means you’re old enough to be a team mentor. Team mentors are responsible for helping students navigate the Astro Pi Challenge, ensuring that everyone is where they’re meant to be, doing what they’re meant to be doing. You’ll also also the contact between the team and us, Raspberry Pi and ESA. You’re basically a team member.

You’re basically taking part.

Mission Zero requires no coding knowledge

Mission Zero requires very little of its participants:

  • They don’t need to have any prior knowledge of coding
  • They don’t need a Raspberry Pi

And while they need an adult to supervise them, said adult doesn’t need any coding experience either.

(Spoiler alert: you’re said adult.)

Instead, you just need an hour to sit down with your team at a computer and work through some directions. And the result? Your team’s completed code will run aboard the International Space Station, and they’ll get a certificate to prove it.

You really have no excuse

If you live in an ESA Member State and know anyone aged 14 years or younger, there is absolutely no reason for them not to take part in Astro Pi Mission Zero. And, since they’re probably not reading this blog post right now, it’s your responsibility to tell them about Astro Pi. This is how you take part in the European Astro Pi Challenge: you become the bearer of amazing news when you sit your favourite kids down and tell them they’re going to be writing code that will run on the International Space Station…IN SPACE!

To find out more about Mission Zero, click here. We want to see you pledging your support to your favourite non-adults, so make sure to tell us you’re going to be taking part by leaving a comment below.

There really is no excuse.

 

 

*ESA Member States: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Residents of Slovenia, Canada, or Malta can also take part.

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Run your code aboard the International Space Station with Astro Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/run-your-code-aboard-the-international-space-station-with-astro-pi/

Each year, the European Astro Pi Challenge allows students and young people in ESA Member States (or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta) to write code for their own experiments, which could run on two Raspberry Pi units aboard the International Space Station.

The Astro Pi Challenge is a lot of fun, it’s about space, and so that we in the Raspberry Pi team don’t have to miss out despite being adults, many of us mentor their own Astro Pi teams — and you should too!

So, gather your team, stock up on freeze-dried ice cream, and let’s do it again: the European Astro Pi Challenge 2019/2020 launches today!

Luca Parmitano launches the 2019-20 European Astro Pi Challenge

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is this year’s ambassador of the European Astro Pi Challenge. In this video, he welcomes students to the challenge and gives an overview of the project. Learn more about Astro Pi: http://bit.ly/AstroPiESA ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe and click twice on the bell button to receive our notifications.

The European Astro Pi Challenge 2019/2020 is made up of two missions: Mission Zero and Mission Space Lab.

Astro Pi Mission Zero

Mission Zero has been designed for beginners/younger participants up to 14 years old and can be completed in a single session. It’s great for coding clubs or any groups of students don’t have coding experience but still want to do something cool — because having confirmation that code you wrote has run aboard the International Space Station is really, really cool! Teams write a simple Python program to display a message and temperature reading on an Astro Pi computer, for the astronauts to see as they go about their daily tasks on the ISS. No special hardware or prior coding skills are needed, and all teams that follow the challenge rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space!

Astro Pi Mission Zero logo

Mission Zero eligibility

  • Participants must be no older than 14 years
  • 2 to 4 people per team
  • Participants must be supervised by a teacher, mentor, or educator, who will be the point of contact with the Astro Pi team
  • Teams must be made up of at least 50% team members who are citizens of an ESA Member* State, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab is aimed at more experienced/older participants up to 19 years old, and it takes place in 4 phases over the course of 8 months. The challenge is to design and write a program for a scientific experiment to be run on an Astro Pi computer. The best experiments will be deployed to the ISS, and teams will have the opportunity to analyse and report on their results.

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab logo

Mission Space Lab eligibility

  • Participants must be no older than 19 years
  • 2 to 6 people per team
  • Participants must be supervised by a teacher, mentor, or educator, who will be the point of contact with the Astro Pi team
  • Teams must be made up of at least 50% team members who are citizens of an ESA Member State*, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

How to plan your Astro Pi Mission Space Lab experiment

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

For both missions, each member of the team has to be at least one of the following:

  • Enrolled full-time in a primary or secondary school in an ESA Member State, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta
  • Homeschooled (certified by the National Ministry of Education or delegated authority in an ESA Member State or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta)
  • A member of a club or after-school group (such as Code Club, CoderDojo, or Scouts) located in an ESA Member State*, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

Take part

To take part in the European Astro Pi Challenge, head over to the Astro Pi website, where you’ll find more information on how to get started getting your team’s code into SPACE!

Obligatory photo of Raspberry Pis floating in space!

*ESA Member States: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

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Raspberry Pi in space!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-in-space/

We love ‘Raspberry Pi + space’ stuff. There, I’ve said it. No taksies backsies.

From high-altitude balloon projects transporting Raspberry Pis to near space, to our two Astro Pi units living aboard the International Space Station, we simply can’t get enough.

Seriously, if you’ve created anything space-related using a Raspberry Pi, please tell us!

Capturing Earth from low orbit

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) sent a Raspberry Pi Zero to space as part of their Demonstration of Technology (DoT-1) satellite, launched aboard a Soyuz rocket in July.

Earth captured from Low Earth Orbit by a Raspberry Pi

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

So, not that we’re complaining, but why did they send the Raspberry Pi Zero to space to begin with? Well, why not? As SSTL state:

Whilst the primary objective of the 17.5kg self-funded DoT-1 satellite is to demonstrate SSTL’s new Core Data Handling System (Core-DHS), accommodation was made available for some additional experimental payloads including the Raspberry Pi camera experiment which was designed and implemented in conjunction with the Surrey Space Centre.

Essentially, if you can fit a Raspberry Pi into your satellite, you should.


Managing Director of SSTL Sarah Parker went on to say that “the success of the Raspberry Pi camera experiment is an added bonus which we can now evaluate for future missions where it could be utilised for spacecraft ‘selfies’ to check the operation of key equipments, and also for outreach activities.”

SSTL’s very snazzy-looking Demonstration of Technology (DoT-1) satellite

The onboard Raspberry Pi Zero was equipped with a Raspberry Pi Camera Module and a DesignSpark M12 Mount Lens. Image data captured on the space-bound Raspberry Pi was sent back to the SSTL ground station via the Core-DHS.

So, have you sent a Raspberry Pi to space? Or anywhere else we wouldn’t expect a Raspberry Pi to go? Let us know in the comments!

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A rather snazzy Raspberry Pi 4 wallpaper for your phone and computer

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/snazzy-raspberry-pi-4-wallpaper-phone-computer/

Fiacre took a rather snazzy photo of a Raspberry Pi 4, and he liked it so much that he set it as his iPhone’s wallpaper.

And we liked it so much that we asked him to produce size variants so we could share them with all of you.

You’ll find three variants of the image below: smartphone, 1920×1200, 4K. Just click on the appropriate image to be redirected to the full-resolution version.



Standard rules apply: these images are for personal use only and are not to be manipulated or sold.

Should we create more snazzy wallpapers of Raspberry Pi? Lets us know in the comments, and we’ll get Fiacre to work.

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Save the date for Coolest Projects 2020

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/save-the-date-for-coolest-projects-2020/

Coolest Projects is the world’s leading technology fair for young people. It’s our event series where young creators, makers, and innovators share their projects with fellow creators and the public, and they explore each others’ work. And it’s awesome!

Launching Coolest Projects 2020!

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that enables and inspires the next generation of digital creators and innovators to present the projects that they have created with code. Find out more: http://coolestprojects.org/ Sign up for the latest Coolest Projects news: http://eepurl.com/dG4UJb

Coolest Projects 2020

In 2020, we’ll run three Coolest Projects events:

  • USA, Discovery Cube Orange County, CA: 7 March 2020
  • UK, The Sharp Project, Manchester: 4 April 2020
  • International, RDS Main Hall, Dublin, Ireland: 6 June 2020

Mark the dates of the UK, USA, and International events in your diary today! Our community also runs regional Coolest Projects events in Belgium, Malaysia, and beyond.

Get involved in Coolest Projects

Visit a Coolest Projects event

You’ll get to see first-hand what the next generation is creating with technology. Young people in our community are brimming with new, cutting-edge ideas and enjoy expressing their creativity through making digital projects.

You’ll also get to flex your own technical and maker skills: our Coolest Projects events have a Discovery Zone, where the maker community and local organisations run unique, hands-on activities!

Support a young person to participate

If you’re an educator, maker, or tech professional, you can support young people you know to participate, as individuals or in teams with their friends. Whether you know young tech enthusiasts through Code Club, CoderDojo, another club, or your school — anyone aged 7–18 can enter Coolest Projects, and you can help them get showcase-ready!

Check out our ‘How to make a project’ workbook, which is perfect for supporting young people through the project building process step by step.

Encourage your company to become a partner or give a donation

Help us continue to make Coolest Projects events free to enter and attend for young people so they can dream big and be inspired by their peers’ creations!

Email [email protected] to learn more about supporting Coolest Projects.

Stay up to date

Project registration and visitor tickets aren’t available just yet — sign up to the Coolest Projects newsletter to be the first to hear when we launch them!

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Control a vintage Roland pen plotter with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/control-vintage-roland-pen-plotter/

By refitting a vintage Roland DG DXY-990 pen plotter using Raspberry Pi, the members of Liege Hackerspace in Belgium have produced a rather nifty build that writes out every tweet mentioning a specific hashtag.

Liege Hackerspace member u/iooner first shared an image of the plotter yesterday, and fellow Redditors called for video of the project in action immediately.

Watch the full video here. And to see the code code for the project, visit the Liege Hackerspace GitHub.

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Picademy Bytes: free physical computing training for teachers

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/picademy-bytes-free-physical-computing-training-for-teachers/

Five years ago, the Raspberry Pi Foundation recognised a need for free, high-quality CPD for educators. In response, we started running Picademy, a two-day training event that provides educators all over the UK and North America with the knowledge and skills they need to teach computing with confidence, creativity, and excitement.

We are delighted to now bring you a new free training programme called Picademy Bytes for teachers in the UK who are unable to attend the two-day Picademy events. Picademy Bytes training sessions are 60- to 90-minute community-led events taking place at various UK locations, led by Community Trainers who we ourselves have inducted.

The aim of Picademy Bytes is to highlight the value of delivering curriculum objectives through physical computing activities: the programme provides teachers with the opportunity to experiment with physical computing in a short, face-to-face training session. Teachers can then take what they’ve learned back to their schools, to use or adapt for their own Computing lessons.

Introducing our Community Trainers

In June this year, we invited our first four Community Trainers to attend an induction session, where we introduced them to the resources for their Picademy Bytes sessions, and they gave us feedback on our plans and the session content.


All four Community Trainers are teachers and Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, having attended Picademy in the past. They volunteered to become Community Trainers because they are enthusiastic to help other teachers in their local areas to deliver exciting learning experiences for their students.

The first Picademy Bytes session took place in July at the Computer Science in Schools Conference 2019 at Staffordshire University in Stoke-on-Trent, and most attendees were secondary school teachers. Attendees described the session as “well-balanced [between] theory and practical” and said that it was “very informative and provided ideas for the classroom”.

Look out for Picademy Bytes sessions in a city near you!

Upcoming Picademy Bytes sessions will soon be listed on the Computing at School website and on the Raspberry Pi Foundation website. If you are based in or near Belfast, Bradford, South Wales, Hull, London, North Devon, or Plymouth, look out for events near you from this month! And there will be plenty more events in locations across the UK after that. We look forward to seeing you there!

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