All posts by Ana Visneski

AWS Contributes to Milestone 1.0 Release and Adds Model Serving Capability for Apache MXNet

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-contributes-to-milestone-1-0-release-and-adds-model-serving-capability-for-apache-mxnet/

Post by Dr. Matt Wood

Today AWS announced contributions to the milestone 1.0 release of the Apache MXNet deep learning engine including the introduction of a new model-serving capability for MXNet. The new capabilities in MXNet provide the following benefits to users:

1) MXNet is easier to use: The model server for MXNet is a new capability introduced by AWS, and it packages, runs, and serves deep learning models in seconds with just a few lines of code, making them accessible over the internet via an API endpoint and thus easy to integrate into applications. The 1.0 release also includes an advanced indexing capability that enables users to perform matrix operations in a more intuitive manner.

  • Model Serving enables set up of an API endpoint for prediction: It saves developers time and effort by condensing the task of setting up an API endpoint for running and integrating prediction functionality into an application to just a few lines of code. It bridges the barrier between Python-based deep learning frameworks and production systems through a Docker container-based deployment model.
  • Advanced indexing for array operations in MXNet: It is now more intuitive for developers to leverage the powerful array operations in MXNet. They can use the advanced indexing capability by leveraging existing knowledge of NumPy/SciPy arrays. For example, it supports MXNet NDArray and Numpy ndarray as index, e.g. (a[mx.nd.array([1,2], dtype = ‘int32’]).

2) MXNet is faster: The 1.0 release includes implementation of cutting-edge features that optimize the performance of training and inference. Gradient compression enables users to train models up to five times faster by reducing communication bandwidth between compute nodes without loss in convergence rate or accuracy. For speech recognition acoustic modeling like the Alexa voice, this feature can reduce network bandwidth by up to three orders of magnitude during training. With the support of NVIDIA Collective Communication Library (NCCL), users can train a model 20% faster on multi-GPU systems.

  • Optimize network bandwidth with gradient compression: In distributed training, each machine must communicate frequently with others to update the weight-vectors and thereby collectively build a single model, leading to high network traffic. Gradient compression algorithm enables users to train models up to five times faster by compressing the model changes communicated by each instance.
  • Optimize the training performance by taking advantage of NCCL: NCCL implements multi-GPU and multi-node collective communication primitives that are performance optimized for NVIDIA GPUs. NCCL provides communication routines that are optimized to achieve high bandwidth over interconnection between multi-GPUs. MXNet supports NCCL to train models about 20% faster on multi-GPU systems.

3) MXNet provides easy interoperability: MXNet now includes a tool for converting neural network code written with the Caffe framework to MXNet code, making it easier for users to take advantage of MXNet’s scalability and performance.

  • Migrate Caffe models to MXNet: It is now possible to easily migrate Caffe code to MXNet, using the new source code translation tool for converting Caffe code to MXNet code.

MXNet has helped developers and researchers make progress with everything from language translation to autonomous vehicles and behavioral biometric security. We are excited to see the broad base of users that are building production artificial intelligence applications powered by neural network models developed and trained with MXNet. For example, the autonomous driving company TuSimple recently piloted a self-driving truck on a 200-mile journey from Yuma, Arizona to San Diego, California using MXNet. This release also includes a full-featured and performance optimized version of the Gluon programming interface. The ease-of-use associated with it combined with the extensive set of tutorials has led significant adoption among developers new to deep learning. The flexibility of the interface has driven interest within the research community, especially in the natural language processing domain.

Getting started with MXNet
Getting started with MXNet is simple. To learn more about the Gluon interface and deep learning, you can reference this comprehensive set of tutorials, which covers everything from an introduction to deep learning to how to implement cutting-edge neural network models. If you’re a contributor to a machine learning framework, check out the interface specs on GitHub.

To get started with the Model Server for Apache MXNet, install the library with the following command:

$ pip install mxnet-model-server

The Model Server library has a Model Zoo with 10 pre-trained deep learning models, including the SqueezeNet 1.1 object classification model. You can start serving the SqueezeNet model with just the following command:

$ mxnet-model-server \
  --models squeezenet=https://s3.amazonaws.com/model-server/models/squeezenet_v1.1/squeezenet_v1.1.model \
  --service dms/model_service/mxnet_vision_service.py

Learn more about the Model Server and view the source code, reference examples, and tutorials here: https://github.com/awslabs/mxnet-model-server/

-Dr. Matt Wood

New – AWS PrivateLink for AWS Services: Kinesis, Service Catalog, EC2 Systems Manager, Amazon EC2 APIs, and ELB APIs in your VPC

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-privatelink-endpoints-kinesis-ec2-systems-manager-and-elb-apis-in-your-vpc/

This guest post is by Colm MacCárthaigh, Senior Engineer for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud.


Since VPC Endpoints launched in 2015, creating Endpoints has been a popular way to securely access S3 and DynamoDB from an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) without the need for an Internet gateway, a NAT gateway, or firewall proxies. With VPC Endpoints, the routing between the VPC and the AWS service is handled by the AWS network, and IAM policies can be used to control access to service resources.

Today we are announcing AWS PrivateLink, the newest generation of VPC Endpoints which is designed for customers to access AWS services in a highly available and scalable manner, while keeping all the traffic within the AWS network. Kinesis, Service Catalog, Amazon EC2, EC2 Systems Manager (SSM), and Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) APIs are now available to use inside your VPC, with support for more services coming soon such as Key Management Service (KMS) and Amazon Cloudwatch.

With traditional endpoints, it’s very much like connecting a virtual cable between your VPC and the AWS service. Connectivity to the AWS service does not require an Internet or NAT gateway, but the endpoint remains outside of your VPC. With PrivateLink, endpoints are instead created directly inside of your VPC, using Elastic Network Interfaces (ENIs) and IP addresses in your VPC’s subnets. The service is now in your VPC, enabling connectivity to AWS services via private IP addresses. That means that VPC Security Groups can be used to manage access to the endpoints and that PrivateLink endpoints can also be accessed from your premises via AWS Direct Connect.

Using the services powered by PrivateLink, customers can now manage fleets of instances, create and manage catalogs of IT services as well as store and process data, without requiring the traffic to traverse the Internet.

Creating a PrivateLink Endpoint
To create a PrivateLink endpoint, I navigate to the VPC Console, select Endpoints, and choose Create Endpoint.

I then choose which service I’d like to access. New PrivateLink endpoints have an “interface” type. In this case I’d like to use the Kinesis service directly from my VPC and I choose the kinesis-streams service.

At this point I can choose which of my VPCs I’d like to launch my new endpoint in, and select the subnets that the ENIs and IP addresses will be placed in. I can also associate the endpoint with a new or existing Security Group, allowing me to control which of my instances can access the Endpoint.

Because PrivateLink endpoints will use IP addresses from my VPC, I have the option to over-ride DNS for the AWS service DNS name by using VPC Private DNS. By leaving Enable Private DNS Name checked, lookups from within my VPC for “kinesis.us-east-1.amazonaws.com” will resolve to the IP addresses for the endpoint that I’m creating. This makes the transition to the endpoint seamless without requiring any changes to my applications. If I’d prefer to test or configure the endpoint before handling traffic by default, I can leave this disabled and then change it at any time by editing the endpoint.

Once I’m ready and happy with the VPC, subnets and DNS settings, I click Create Endpoint to complete the process.

Using a PrivateLink Endpoint

By default, with the Private DNS Name enabled, using a PrivateLink endpoint is as straight-forward as using the SDK, AWS CLI or other software that accesses the service API from within your VPC. There’s no need to change any code or configurations.

To support testing and advanced configurations, every endpoint also gets a set of DNS names that are unique and dedicated to your endpoint. There’s a primary name for the endpoint and zonal names.

The primary name is particularly useful for accessing your endpoint via Direct Connect, without having to use any DNS over-rides on-premises. Naturally, the primary name can also be used inside of your VPC.
The primary name, and the main service name – since I chose to over-ride it – include zonal fault-tolerance and will balance traffic between the Availability Zones. If I had an architecture that uses zonal isolation techniques, either for fault containment and compartmentalization, low latency, or for minimizing regional data transfer I could also use the zonal names to explicitly control whether my traffic flows between or stays within zones.

Pricing & Availability
AWS PrivateLink is available today in all AWS commercial regions except China (Beijing). For the region availability of individual services, please check our documentation.

Pricing starts at $0.01 / hour plus a data processing charge at $0.01 / GB. Data transferred between availability zones, or between your Endpoint and your premises via Direct Connect will also incur the usual EC2 Regional and Direct Connect data transfer charges. For more information, see VPC Pricing.

Colm MacCárthaigh

 

Introducing Gluon: a new library for machine learning from AWS and Microsoft

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-gluon-a-new-library-for-machine-learning-from-aws-and-microsoft/

Post by Dr. Matt Wood

Today, AWS and Microsoft announced Gluon, a new open source deep learning interface which allows developers to more easily and quickly build machine learning models, without compromising performance.

Gluon Logo

Gluon provides a clear, concise API for defining machine learning models using a collection of pre-built, optimized neural network components. Developers who are new to machine learning will find this interface more familiar to traditional code, since machine learning models can be defined and manipulated just like any other data structure. More seasoned data scientists and researchers will value the ability to build prototypes quickly and utilize dynamic neural network graphs for entirely new model architectures, all without sacrificing training speed.

Gluon is available in Apache MXNet today, a forthcoming Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit release, and in more frameworks over time.

Neural Networks vs Developers
Machine learning with neural networks (including ‘deep learning’) has three main components: data for training; a neural network model, and an algorithm which trains the neural network. You can think of the neural network in a similar way to a directed graph; it has a series of inputs (which represent the data), which connect to a series of outputs (the prediction), through a series of connected layers and weights. During training, the algorithm adjusts the weights in the network based on the error in the network output. This is the process by which the network learns; it is a memory and compute intensive process which can take days.

Deep learning frameworks such as Caffe2, Cognitive Toolkit, TensorFlow, and Apache MXNet are, in part, an answer to the question ‘how can we speed this process up? Just like query optimizers in databases, the more a training engine knows about the network and the algorithm, the more optimizations it can make to the training process (for example, it can infer what needs to be re-computed on the graph based on what else has changed, and skip the unaffected weights to speed things up). These frameworks also provide parallelization to distribute the computation process, and reduce the overall training time.

However, in order to achieve these optimizations, most frameworks require the developer to do some extra work: specifically, by providing a formal definition of the network graph, up-front, and then ‘freezing’ the graph, and just adjusting the weights.

The network definition, which can be large and complex with millions of connections, usually has to be constructed by hand. Not only are deep learning networks unwieldy, but they can be difficult to debug and it’s hard to re-use the code between projects.

The result of this complexity can be difficult for beginners and is a time-consuming task for more experienced researchers. At AWS, we’ve been experimenting with some ideas in MXNet around new, flexible, more approachable ways to define and train neural networks. Microsoft is also a contributor to the open source MXNet project, and were interested in some of these same ideas. Based on this, we got talking, and found we had a similar vision: to use these techniques to reduce the complexity of machine learning, making it accessible to more developers.

Enter Gluon: dynamic graphs, rapid iteration, scalable training
Gluon introduces four key innovations.

  1. Friendly API: Gluon networks can be defined using a simple, clear, concise code – this is easier for developers to learn, and much easier to understand than some of the more arcane and formal ways of defining networks and their associated weighted scoring functions.
  2. Dynamic networks: the network definition in Gluon is dynamic: it can bend and flex just like any other data structure. This is in contrast to the more common, formal, symbolic definition of a network which the deep learning framework has to effectively carve into stone in order to be able to effectively optimizing computation during training. Dynamic networks are easier to manage, and with Gluon, developers can easily ‘hybridize’ between these fast symbolic representations and the more friendly, dynamic ‘imperative’ definitions of the network and algorithms.
  3. The algorithm can define the network: the model and the training algorithm are brought much closer together. Instead of separate definitions, the algorithm can adjust the network dynamically during definition and training. Not only does this mean that developers can use standard programming loops, and conditionals to create these networks, but researchers can now define even more sophisticated algorithms and models which were not possible before. They are all easier to create, change, and debug.
  4. High performance operators for training: which makes it possible to have a friendly, concise API and dynamic graphs, without sacrificing training speed. This is a huge step forward in machine learning. Some frameworks bring a friendly API or dynamic graphs to deep learning, but these previous methods all incur a cost in terms of training speed. As with other areas of software, abstraction can slow down computation since it needs to be negotiated and interpreted at run time. Gluon can efficiently blend together a concise API with the formal definition under the hood, without the developer having to know about the specific details or to accommodate the compiler optimizations manually.

The team here at AWS, and our collaborators at Microsoft, couldn’t be more excited to bring these improvements to developers through Gluon. We’re already seeing quite a bit of excitement from developers and researchers alike.

Getting started with Gluon
Gluon is available today in Apache MXNet, with support coming for the Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit in a future release. We’re also publishing the front-end interface and the low-level API specifications so it can be included in other frameworks in the fullness of time.

You can get started with Gluon today. Fire up the AWS Deep Learning AMI with a single click and jump into one of 50 fully worked, notebook examples. If you’re a contributor to a machine learning framework, check out the interface specs on GitHub.

-Dr. Matt Wood

AWS Partner Webinar Series – August 2017

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-partner-webinar-series-august-2017/

We love bringing our customers helpful information and we have another cool series we are excited to tell you about. The AWS Partner Webinar Series is a selection of live and recorded presentations covering a broad range of topics at varying technical levels and scale. A little different from our AWS Online TechTalks, each AWS Partner Webinar is hosted by an AWS solutions architect and an AWS Competency Partner who has successfully helped customers evaluate and implement the tools, techniques, and technologies of AWS.

Check out this month’s webinars and let us know which ones you found the most helpful! All schedule times are shown in the Pacific Time (PDT) time zone.

Security Webinars

Sophos
Seeing More Clearly: ATLO Software Secures Online Training Solutions for Correctional Facilities with SophosUTM on AWS Link.
August 17th, 2017 | 10:00 AM PDT

F5
F5 on AWS: How MailControl Improved their Application Visibility and Security
August 23, 2017 | 10:00 AM PDT

Big Data Webinars

Tableau, Matillion, 47Lining, NorthBay
Unlock Insights and Reduce Costs by Modernizing Your Data Warehouse on AWS
August 22, 2017 | 10:00 AM PDT

Storage Webinars

StorReduce
How Globe Telecom does Primary Backups via StorReduce to the AWS Cloud
August 29, 2017 | 8:00 AM PDT

Commvault
Moving Forward Faster: How Monash University Automated Data Movement for 3500 Virtual Machines to AWS with Commvault
August 29, 2017 | 1:00 PM PDT

Dell EMC
Moving Forward Faster: Protect Your Workloads on AWS With Increased Scale and Performance
August 30, 2017 | 11:00 AM PDT

Druva
How Hatco Protects Against Ransomware with Druva on AWS
September 13, 2017 | 10:00 AM PDT

Hightail — Empowering Creative Collaboration in the Cloud

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/hightail-empowering-creative-collaboration-in-the-cloud/

Hightail – formerly YouSendIt – streamlines how creative work is reviewed, improved, and approved by helping more than 50 million professionals around the world get great content in front of their audiences faster. Since its debut in 2004 as a file sharing company, Hightail shifted its strategic direction to focus on delivering value-added creative collaboTagsration services and boasts a strong lineup of name-brand customers.

In today’s guest post, Hightail’s SVP of Technology Shiva Paranandi tells the company’s migration story, moving petabytes of data from on-premises to the cloud. He highlights their cloud vendor evaluation process and reasons for going all-in on AWS.


Hightail started as a way to help people easily share and store large files, but has since evolved into a creative collaboration tool. We became a place where users could not only control and share their digital assets, but also assemble their creative teams, connect with clients, develop creative workflows, and manage projects from start to finish. We now power collaboration services for major brands such as Lionsgate and Jimmy Kimmel Live!. With a growing list of domestic and international clients, we required more internal focus on product development and serving the users. We found that running our own data centers consumed more time, money, and manpower than we were willing to devote.

We needed an approach that would help us iterate more rapidly to meet customer needs and dramatically improve our time to market. We wanted to reduce data center costs and have the flexibility to scale up quickly in any given region around the globe. Setting up a data center in a new location took so long that it was limiting the pace of growth that we could achieve. In addition, we were tired of buying ahead of our needs, which meant we had storage capacity that we did not even use. We required a storage solution that was both tiered and highly scalable to reduce costs by allowing us to keep infrequently used data in inactive storage while also allowing us to resurface it quickly at the customer’s request. Our main drivers were agility and innovation, and the cloud enables these in a significant way. Given that, we decided to adopt a cloud-first policy that would enable us to spend time and money on initiatives that differentiate our business, instead of putting resources into managing our storage and computing infrastructure.

Comparing AWS Against Cloud Competitors

To kick off the migration, we did our due diligence by evaluating a variety of cloud vendors, including AWS, Google, IBM, and Microsoft. AWS stuck out as the clear winner for us. At one point, we considered combining services from multiple cloud providers to meet our needs, but decided the best route was to use AWS exclusively. When we factored in training, synchronization, support, and system availability along with other migration and management elements, it was just not practical to take a multi-cloud approach. With the best cost savings and an unmatched ecosystem of partner solutions, we did not need anyone else and chose to go all-in on AWS.

By migrating to AWS, we were able to secure the lowest cost-per-gigabyte pricing, gain access to a rich ecosystem, quickly develop in-house talent, and maintain SOC II compliance. The ecosystem was particularly important to us and set AWS apart from its competitors with its expansive list of partners. In fact, all the vendors we depend on for services such as previewing images, encoding videos, and serving up presentations were already a part of the network so we were easily able to leverage our existing investments and expertise. If we went with a different provider, it would have meant moving away from a platform that was already working so well for which was not the desired outcome for us. Also, the amount of talent we were able to build up in house on AWS technologies was astounding. Training our internal team to work with AWS was a simple process using available tools such as AWS conferences, training materials, and support.

Migrating Petabytes of Data

Going with AWS made things easier. In many instances, it gave us better functionality than what we were using in house. We moved multiple petabytes of data from on-premises storage to AWS with ease. AWS gave us great speeds with Direct Connect, so we were able to push all the data in a little more than three months with no user impact. We employed AWS Key Management Service to keep our data secure, which eased our minds through the move. We performed extensive QA testing before flipping users over to ensure low customer impact, using methods such as checksums between our data center and the data that got pushed to AWS.

Our new platform on AWS has greatly improved our user experience. We have seen huge improvement in reliability, performance, and uptime—all critical in our line of business. We are now able to achieve upload and download speeds up to 17 times faster than our previous data centers, and uptime has increased by orders of magnitude. Also, the time it takes us to deploy services to a new region has been cut by more than 90%. It used to take us at least six months to get a new region online, and now we can get a region up and running in less than three weeks. On AWS, we can even replicate data at the bucket level across regions for disaster recovery purposes.

To cut costs, we were successfully able to divide our storage infrastructure into frequently and infrequently accessed data. Tiered storage in Amazon S3 has been a huge advantage, allowing us to optimize our storage costs so we have more to invest in product development. We can now move data from inactive to active tiers instantly to meet customer needs and eliminated the need to overprovision our storage infrastructure. It is refreshing to see services automatically scale up or down during peak load times, and know that we are only paying for what we need.

Overall, we achieved our key strategic goal of focusing more on development and less on infrastructure. Our migration felt seamless, and the progress we were able to share is a true testament to how easy it has been for us to run our workloads on AWS. We attribute part of our successful migration to the dedicated support provided by the AWS team. They were pretty awesome. We had a couple of their technicians available 24/7 via chat, which proved to be essential during this large-scale migration.

-Shiva Paranandi, SVP of Technology at Hightail

Learning More

Learn more about cost-effective tiered data storage with Amazon S3, or dive deeper into our AWS Partner Ecosystem to see which solutions could best serve the needs of your company.

DevOps Practices- Two New Webinars with Puppet and New Relic

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/devops-practices-two-new-webinars-with-puppet-and-new-relic/

This month we are hosting two joint AWS-Partner webinars about how executing DevOps practices on AWS can automate configuration management and leave time for innovation. Many organizations adopt DevOps practices to manage their cloud and on-premises environments for greater scalability, speed, and reliability and these webinars give you a chance to hear directly from the partners and customers on how they did it.

Puppet

Puppet helped ServiceChannel automate their cloud configuration management to take advantage of the scalability of AWS, achieve greater flexibility, and improve their customers’ ability to connect and collaborate more frequently.

Webinar Topic: How ServiceChannel Automated Their AWS Environment with Puppet
Customer Presenter: Brian Engler, CIO, ServiceChannel
AWS Presenter: Kevin Cochran, Partner Solutions Architect
Partner Presenter: Chris Barker, Principal Solutions Engineer, Puppet
Time: July 20th, 2017 10am – 11am PDT | 1pm – 2pm EDT

Register

New Relic

New Relic helped MLBAM utilize the scalability of AWS and the visibility provided by New Relic to create the “gold standard” for digital streaming video infrastructure.

Webinar Topic: MLB Advanced Media: Delivering a Digital Experience to 25 Million Fans with New Relic and AWS
Customer Presenter: Christian Villoslada, VP of Software Engineering, MLBAM & Brandon San Giovanni, Senior Operations Manager, Core Media Operations, MLBAM
AWS Presenter:
Kevin Cochran, Partner Solutions Architect
Partner Presenter: Lee Atchison, Senior Director of Strategic Architecture, New Relic
Time: July 25th, 2017 10am – 11am PDT | 1pm – 2pm EDT

Register

Roundup of AWS HIPAA Eligible Service Announcements

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/roundup-of-aws-hipaa-eligible-service-announcements/

At AWS we have had a number of HIPAA eligible service announcements. Patrick Combes, the Healthcare and Life Sciences Global Technical Leader at AWS, and Aaron Friedman, a Healthcare and Life Sciences Partner Solutions Architect at AWS, have written this post to tell you all about it.

-Ana


We are pleased to announce that the following AWS services have been added to the BAA in recent weeks: Amazon API Gateway, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Database Migration Service, and Amazon SQS. All four of these services facilitate moving data into and through AWS, and we are excited to see how customers will be using these services to advance their solutions in healthcare. While we know the use cases for each of these services are vast, we wanted to highlight some ways that customers might use these services with Protected Health Information (PHI).

As with all HIPAA-eligible services covered under the AWS Business Associate Addendum (BAA), PHI must be encrypted while at-rest or in-transit. We encourage you to reference our HIPAA whitepaper, which details how you might configure each of AWS’ HIPAA-eligible services to store, process, and transmit PHI. And of course, for any portion of your application that does not touch PHI, you can use any of our 90+ services to deliver the best possible experience to your users. You can find some ideas on architecting for HIPAA on our website.

Amazon API Gateway
Amazon API Gateway is a web service that makes it easy for developers to create, publish, monitor, and secure APIs at any scale. With PHI now able to securely transit API Gateway, applications such as patient/provider directories, patient dashboards, medical device reports/telemetry, HL7 message processing and more can securely accept and deliver information to any number and type of applications running within AWS or client presentation layers.

One particular area we are excited to see how our customers leverage Amazon API Gateway is with the exchange of healthcare information. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) specification will likely become the next-generation standard for how health information is shared between entities. With strong support for RESTful architectures, FHIR can be easily codified within an API on Amazon API Gateway. For more information on FHIR, our AWS Healthcare Competency partner, Datica, has an excellent primer.

AWS Direct Connect
Some of our healthcare and life sciences customers, such as Johnson & Johnson, leverage hybrid architectures and need to connect their on-premises infrastructure to the AWS Cloud. Using AWS Direct Connect, you can establish private connectivity between AWS and your datacenter, office, or colocation environment, which in many cases can reduce your network costs, increase bandwidth throughput, and provide a more consistent network experience than Internet-based connections.

In addition to a hybrid-architecture strategy, AWS Direct Connect can assist with the secure migration of data to AWS, which is the first step to using the wide array of our HIPAA-eligible services to store and process PHI, such as Amazon S3 and Amazon EMR. Additionally, you can connect to third-party/externally-hosted applications or partner-provided solutions as well as securely and reliably connect end users to those same healthcare applications, such as a cloud-based Electronic Medical Record system.

AWS Database Migration Service (DMS)
To date, customers have migrated over 20,000 databases to AWS through the AWS Database Migration Service. Customers often use DMS as part of their cloud migration strategy, and now it can be used to securely and easily migrate your core databases containing PHI to the AWS Cloud. As your source database remains fully operational during the migration with DMS, you minimize downtime for these business-critical applications as you migrate your databases to AWS. This service can now be utilized to securely transfer such items as patient directories, payment/transaction record databases, revenue management databases and more into AWS.

Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS)
Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) is a message queueing service for reliably communicating among distributed software components and microservices at any scale. One way that we envision customers using SQS with PHI is to buffer requests between application components that pass HL7 or FHIR messages to other parts of their application. You can leverage features like SQS FIFO to ensure your messages containing PHI are passed in the order they are received and delivered in the order they are received, and available until a consumer processes and deletes it. This is important for applications with patient record updates or processing payment information in a hospital.

Let’s get building!
We are beyond excited to see how our customers will use our newly HIPAA-eligible services as part of their healthcare applications. What are you most excited for? Leave a comment below.

AWS Hot Startups – April 2017

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-april-2017/

Spring is here, the flowers are blooming and Tina Barr is back with more great startups for you to check out!

-Ana


Welcome back to another month of hot AWS-powered startups! Today we have three exciting startups:

  • Beekeeper – simplifying employee communication in the workplace.
  • Betterment – making investing easier for everyone.
  • ClearSlide – a leading sales engagement platform.

Be sure to check out our March hot startups in case you missed them.

Beekeeper (Zurich, Switzerland)
Beekeeper logoFlavio Pfaffhauser and Christian Grossmann, both graduates of ETH Zurich, were passionate about building a technology that would connect and bring people together. What started as a student’s social community soon turned into Beekeeper – a communication platform for the workplace that allows employees to interact wherever they are. As Flavio and Christian learned how to build a social platform that engaged people properly, businesses began requesting a platform that could be adapted to their specific processes and needs. The platform started with the concept of helping people feel as if they are sitting right next to each other, whether they’re at a desk or in the field. Founded in 2012, Beekeeper is focused on improving information sharing, communication and peer collaboration, and the company strongly believes that listening to employees is crucial for organizations.

The “Mobile First, Desktop Friendly” platform has a simple and intuitive interface that easily integrates multiple operating systems into one ecosystem. The interface can be styled and customized to match a company’s brand and identity. Employees can connect with their colleagues anytime and anywhere with private and group chats, video and file sharing, and feedback surveys. With Beekeeper’s analytical dashboard leadership teams can identify trending topics of discussion and track employee engagement and app usage in real-time. Beekeeper is currently connecting users in 137 countries across industries including hospitality, construction, transportation, and more.

Beekeeper likes using AWS because it allows their engineers to focus on the things that really matter; solving customer issues. The company builds its infrastructure using services like Amazon EC2, Amazon S3, and Amazon RDS, all of which allow the technical teams to offload administrative tasks. Amazon Elastic Transcoder and Amazon QuickSight are used to build analytical dashboards and Amazon Redshift for data warehousing.

Check out the Beekeeper blog to keep up with their latest news!

Betterment (New York, NY)
Betterment logo
Betterment is on a mission to make investing easier and more accessible for everyone, no matter their financial goal. In 2008, Jon Stein founded Betterment with the intent to reinvent the industry and save future investors from making the same common mistakes he had been making. At that time, most people only had a couple of options when it came to investing their money – either do it yourself or hire another person to do it for you. Unfortunately, financial advisors are sometimes paid to recommend certain investments even if it’s not what is best for their clients. Betterment only chooses investments that are in their customer’s best interest and align with their financial goals. Today, they are the largest, independent online investment advisor managing more than $8 billion in assets for over 240,000 customers.

Betterment uses technology to make investing easier and more efficient, while also helping to increase after-tax returns. They offer a wide range of financial planning services that are personalized to their customer’s life goals. To start an investment plan, customers can input their age, retirement status, and annual income and Betterment will recommend how much money to invest and which type of account is the right choice. They will invest and manage it in a way that many traditional investment services can’t at a lower cost.

The engineers at Betterment are constantly working to build industry-changing technology as quickly as possible to help customers maximize their money. AWS gives Betterment the flexibility to easily provision infrastructure and offload functions to various services that once required entire teams to manage. When they first started in the cloud, Betterment was using standard implementations of Amazon EC2, Amazon RDS, and Amazon S3. Since they’ve gone all in with AWS, they have been leveraging services like Amazon Redshift, AWS Lambda, AWS Database Migration Service, Amazon Kinesis, Amazon DynamoDB, and more. Today, they are using over 20 AWS services to develop, test, and deploy features and enhancements on a daily basis.

Learn more about Betterment here.

ClearSlide (San Francisco, CA)
ClearSlide is one of today’s leading sales engagement platforms, offering a complete and integrated tool that makes every customer interaction successful. Since their founding in 2009, ClearSlide has looked for ways to improve customer experiences and have developed numerous enablement tools for sales leaders and teams, marketing, customer support teams, and more. The platform puts content, communication channels, and insights at their customer’s fingertips to help drive better decisions and manage opportunities. ClearSlide serves thousands of companies including Comcast, the Sacramento Kings, The Economist, and so far their customers have generated over 750 million minutes of engagement!

ClearSlide offers a solution for all parts of the sales process. For sales leaders, ClearSlide provides engagement dashboards to improve deal visibility, coaching, and sales forecast accuracy. For marketing and sales enablement teams, they guide sellers to the right content, at the right time, in the right context, and provide insight to maximize content ROI. For sales reps, ClearSlide integrates communications, content, and analytics in a single platform experience. Communications can be made across email, in-person or online meetings, web, or social. Today, ClearSlide customers report a 10-20% increase in closed deals, 25% decrease in onboarding time for new reps, and a 50-80% reduction in selling costs.

ClearSlide uses a range of AWS services, but Amazon EC2 and Amazon RDS have made the biggest impact on their business. EC2 enables them to easily scale compute capacity, which is critical for a fast-growing startup. It also provides consistency during deployment – from development and integration to staging and production. RDS reduces overhead and allows ClearSlide to scale their database infrastructure. Since AWS takes care of time-consuming database management tasks, ClearSlide sees a reduction in operations costs and can focus on being more strategic with their customers.

Watch this video to learn how LiveIntent reduced sales cycles by 22% using ClearSlide. Get all the latest updates by following them on Twitter!

Thanks for checking out another month of awesome AWS-powered startups!

-Tina

 

Announcing 5 Partners That Have Achieved AWS Service Partner Status for AWS Service Catalog

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/announcing-5-partners-that-have-achieved-aws-service-partner-status-for-aws-service-catalog/

Allison Johnson from the AWS Marketplace wrote the guest post below to share some important APN news.

-Ana


At last November’s re:Invent, we announced the AWS Service Delivery Program to help AWS customers find partners in the AWS Partner Network (APN) with expertise in specific AWS services and skills.  Today we are adding Management Tools as a new Partner Solution to the Service Delivery program, and AWS Service Catalog is the first product to launch in that category.  APN Service Catalog partners help create catalogs of IT services that are approved by the customer’s organization for use on AWS.  With AWS Service Catalog, customers and APN partners can centrally manage commonly deployed IT services to help achieve consistent governance and meet compliance requirements while enabling users to self-provision approved services.

We have an enormous APN partner ecosystem, with thousands of consulting partners, and this program simplifies the process of finding partners experienced in implementing Service Catalog.  The consulting partners we are launching this program with today are BizCloud Experts, Cloudticity, Flux7, Logicworks, and Wipro.

The process our partners go through to achieve the Service Catalog designation is not easy.  All of the partners must have publicly referenceable customers using Service Catalog, and there is a technical review to ensure that they understand Service Catalog almost as well as our own Solution Architects do!

One common theme from all of the partner’s technical applications was the requirement to help their customers meet HIPAA compliance objectives.  HIPAA requires three essential components: 1) establishment of processes, 2) enforcement of processes, and 3) separation of roles.  Service Catalog helps with all three.  Using AWS CloudFormation templates, Service Catalog Launch constraints, and identity and access management (IAM) based permission to Service Catalog portfolios, partners are able to establish and strictly enforce a process for infrastructure delivery for their customers.  Separation of roles is achieved by using Service Catalog’s launch constraints and IAM, and our partners were able to create separation of roles such that developers were agile but were only allowed to do what their policies permitted them to.

Another common theme was the use of Service Catalog for self-service discovery and launch of AWS services.  Customers can navigate to the Service Catalog to view the dashboard of products available to them, and they are empowered to launch their own resources.

Customers also use Service Catalog for standardization and central management.  The customer’s service catalog manager can manage resource updates and changes via the Service Catalog dashboard.  Tags can be standardized across instances launched from the Service Catalog.

Below are visual diagrams of Service Catalog workflows created for two of BizCloud Expert’s customers.

Ready to learn more?  If you are an AWS customer looking for a consulting partner with Service Catalog expertise, click here for more information about our launch partners.  If you are a consulting partner and would like to apply for membership, contact us.

-Allison Johnson

 

Pollexy – Building a Special Needs Voice Assistant with Amazon Polly and Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/pollexy-building-a-special-needs-voice-assistant-with-amazon-polly-and-raspberry-pi/

April is Autism Awareness month and about 1 in 68 children in the U.S. have been identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (CDC 2014). In this post from Troy Larson, a Sr. Devops Cloud Architect here at AWS, you get an introduction to a project he has been working on to help his son Calvin.

I have been asked how the minds at AWS come up with so many different ideas. Sometimes they come from a deeply personal place, where someone sees a way to help others. Pollexy is an amazing example of just that. Read about Pollexy and then watch the video here.

-Ana


Background

As a computer programming parent of a 16-year old non-verbal teenage boy with autism, I have been constantly searching over the years to find ways to use technology to make our lives together safer, happier and more comfortable. At the core of this challenge is the most basic of all human interaction—communication. While Calvin is able to respond to verbal instruction, he is not able to speak responsively. In his entire life, we’ve never had a conversation. He is able to be left alone in his room to play, but most every task or set of tasks requires a human to verbally prompt him along the way. Having other children and responsibilities in the home, at times the intensity of supervision can be negatively impactful on the home dynamic.

Genesis

When I saw the announcement of Amazon Polly and Amazon Lex at re:Invent last year, I immediately started churning on how we could leverage these technologies to assist Calvin. He responds well to human verbal prompts, but would he understand a digital voice? So one Saturday, I setup a Raspberry Pi in his room and closed his door and crouched around the corner with other family members so Calvin couldn’t see us. I connected to the Raspberry Pi and instructed Polly to speak in Joanna’s familiar pacific tone, “Calvin, it’s time to take a potty break. Go out of your bedroom and go to the bathroom.” In a few seconds, we heard his doorknob turn and I poked my head out of my hiding place. Calvin passed by, looking at me quizzically, then went into the bathroom as Joanna had instructed. We all looked at each other in amazement—he had listened and responded perfectly to the completely invisible voice of someone he’d never heard before. After discussing some ideas around this with co-workers, a colleague suggested I enter the IoT and AI Science Fair at our annual AWS Sales Kick-Off meeting. Less than two months after the Polly and Lex announcement and 3500 lines of code later, Pollexy—along with Calvin–debuted at the Science Fair.

Overview

Pollexy (“Polly” + “Lex”) is a Raspberry Pi and mobile-based special needs verbal assistant that lets caretakers schedule audio task prompts and messages both on a recurring schedule and/or on-demand. Caretakers can schedule regular medicine reminder messages or hourly bathroom break messages, for example, and at the same time use their Amazon Echo and mobile device to request a specific message be played immediately. Caretakers can even set it up so that the person needs to confirm that they’ve heard the message. For example, my son won’t pay attention to Pollexy unless Pollexy first asks him to “Push the blue button.” Pollexy will wait until he has pushed the button and then speak the actual message. Other people may be able to respond verbally using Lex, or not require a confirmation at all. Pollexy can be tailored to what works best.

And then most importantly—and most challenging—in a large house, how do we make sure the person is in the room where we play the message? What if we have a special needs adult living in an in-law suite? Are they in the living room or the kitchen? And what about multiple people? What if we have multiple people in different areas of the house, each of whom has a message? Let’s explore the basic elements and tie the pieces together.

Basic Elements of Pollexy

In the spirit of Amazon’s Leadership Principle “Invent and Simplify,” we want to minimize the complexity of the Pollexy architecture. We can break Pollexy down into three types of objects and three components, all of which work together in a way that’s easily explainable.

Object #1: Person

Pollexy can support any number of people. A person is a uniquely identifiable name. We can set basic preferences such as “requires confirmation” and most importantly, we can define a location schedule. This means that we can create an Outlook-like schedule that sets preferences where someone should be in the house.

Object #2: Location

A location is simply a uniquely identifiable location where a device is physically sitting. Based on the user’s location schedule, Pollexy will know which device to contact first, second, third, etc. We can also “mute” devices if needed (naptime, etc.)

Object #3: Message

Obviously, this is the actual message we want to play. Attached to each message is a person and a recurring schedule (only if it’s not a one-time message). We don’t store location with the message, because Pollexy figures out the person’s location when the message is ready to be delivered.

Component #1: Scheduler

Every message needs to be scheduled. This is a command-line tool where you basically say Tell “Calvin” that “you need to brush your teeth” every night at 8 p.m. This message is then stored in DynamoDB, waiting to be picked up by the queueing Lambda function.

Component #2: Queueing Engine

Every minute, a Lambda runs and checks the scheduler to see if there is a message or messages ready to be delivered. If a message is ready, it looks up the person’s location schedule and figures out where they are and then pushes the message or messages into an SQS queue for that location.

Component #3: Speaker Engine

Every minute on the Raspberry Pi device, the speaker engine spins up and checks the SQS for its location. If there are messages, then the speaker engine looks at the user’s preferences and initiates communication to convey the message. If the person doesn’t respond, the speaker engine will check if the person has a secondary location in their schedule and drop the message in the SQS Queue for that location. In the end, a message will either be delivered or eventually just timeout (if someone is out of the house for the day).

Respect and Freedom are the Keys

We often take our personal privacy and respect for granted, so imagine even for a special needs person, the lack of privacy and freedom around having a person constantly in your presence. This is exaggerated for those in the autism spectrum where invasion of personal space can escalate a sense of invasion, turning into anger and frustration. Pollexy becomes their own personal, gentle and never-flustered friend to coach to them along the way, giving them confidence, respect and the sense of privacy and freedom we all want to enjoy.

-Troy Larson

Data Compression Improvements in Amazon Redshift Bring Compression Ratios Up to 4x

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/data-compression-improvements-in-amazon-redshift/

Maor Kleider, Senior Product Manager with Amazon Redshift, wrote today’s guest post.

-Ana


Amazon Redshift, is a fast, fully managed, petabyte-scale data warehousing service that makes it simple and cost-effective to analyze all of your data. Many of our customers, including Scholastic, King.com, Electronic Arts, TripAdvisor and Yelp, migrated to Amazon Redshift and achieved agility and faster time to insight, while dramatically reducing costs.

Columnar compression is an important technology in Amazon Redshift. It both helps reduce customer costs by increasing the effective storage capacity of our nodes and improves performance by reducing I/O needed to process SQL requests. Improving I/O efficiency is very important for data warehousing. Last year, our I/O enhancements doubled query throughput. Let’s talk about some of the new compression improvements we’ve recently added to Amazon Redshift.

First, we added support for the Zstandard compression algorithm, which offers a good balance between a high compression ratio and speed in build 1.0.1172. When applied to raw data in the standard TPC-DS, 3 TB benchmark, Zstandard achieves 65% reduction in disk space. Zstandard is broadly applicable. You can apply it to any of the following data types: SMALLINT, INTEGER, BIGINT, DECIMAL, REAL, DOUBLE PRECISION, BOOLEAN, CHAR, VARCHAR, DATE, TIMESTAMP and TIMESTAMPTZ.

Second, we’ve improved the automation of compression on tables created by the CREATE TABLE AS, CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE ADD COLUMN commands. Starting with Build 1.0.1161, Amazon Redshift automatically chooses a default compression for the columns created by those commands. Automated compression happens when we estimate that we can reduce disk space without degrading query performance. Our customers have seen up to 40% reduction in disk space.

Third, we’ve been optimizing our internal on-disk data structures. Our preview customers averaged a 7% reduction in disk space usage with this improvement. This feature is delivered starting with Build 1.0.1271.

Finally, we have enhanced the ANALYZE COMPRESSION command to estimate disk space reduction. You can now easily identify opportunities to further compress data and improve performance. Behind the scenes, we sample your data and suggest the most effective compression. You can then specify the recommended encodings or your preferred encodings based on your own evaluation.

“Before all the recent compression features, our largest table was over 7 TB. It’s now only 4.85 TB, which is an additional 30.7% reduction in disk space. This allows us to reduce our disk space by 4X in total and our effective cost to less than $250/TB/Year on an uncompressed data basis. We’re now able to analyze more data with Amazon Redshift, and our query performance has gotten even better.” Chuong Do, Director of Analytics, Coursera

Of course, the actual benefits you see on your clusters will depend upon your workload and your data. In combination, these improvements may reduce your data sets by up to 4x vs. the 3x most of our customers saw before.

You may have heard us talk about how an Amazon Redshift data warehouse can cost as little as $1,000 per terabyte per year. It is important to realize that we’re talking about compressed data in this number. After all, that’s what we store. Not all vendors do this – many compress your data under the covers but describe per-terabyte costs in terms of uncompressed data. That’s unfortunate – the difference between talking in terms of uncompressed data and compressed data can be a significant overstatement.

-Maor Kleider

Welcome to the Newest AWS Community Heroes (Spring 2017)

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/welcome-to-the-newest-aws-community-heroes-spring-2017/

We would like to extend a very warm welcome to the newest AWS Community Heroes:

AWS Community Heroes share their knowledge and demonstrate their enthusiasm for AWS in a plethora of ways. They go above and beyond to share AWS insights via social media, blog posts, open source projects, and through in-person events, user groups, and workshops.


Mark Nunnikhoven
Mark Nunnikhoven explores the impact of technology on individuals, organizations, and communities through the lens of privacy and security. Asking the question, “How can we better protect our information?” Mark studies the world of cybercrime to better understand the risks and threats to our digital world.

As the Vice President of Cloud Research at Trend Micro, a long time Amazon Web Services Advanced Technology Partner and provider of security tools for the AWS Cloud, Mark uses that knowledge to help organizations around the world modernize their security practices by taking advantage of the power of the AWS Cloud.

With a strong focus on automation, he helps bridge the gap between DevOps and traditional security through his writing, speaking, teaching, and by engaging with the AWS community.

 

SangUk Park
SangUk Park is a Chief Solutions Architect at Megazone, which became Korea’s first AWS Partner in 2012 and is the only AWS Premier Consulting Partner to provide AWS support in Korean.

He served as a System Architect for KT’s public cloud and VDI design, and led the system operation of YDOnline and Nexon Japan, one of the leading online gaming companies. Certified both as an AWS Solutions Architect – Professional and AWS DevOps Engineer – Professional, SangUk has authored AWS books, including DevOps and AWS Cloud Design Patterns, and translated four books related to the AWS Cloud.

He’s been making efforts to revitalize the local AWS Korea User Group community as co-leader by presenting at AWS Korea User Group meetings and AWS Summits, and helping to establish small group gatherings such as the AWSKRUG System Engineers in Gangnam. Also, he has done many hands-on labs and has been running a booth as a leader of the user groups at AWS events to cultivate developers and system engineers.

SangUk maintains a close relationship with the Japanese AWS User Group (JAWS UG), using his excellent Japanese communication skills and experiences in Japan. He makes every effort to participate in events held between Japanese and Korean user groups as a facilitator and translator, and will promote cross-regional communications beyond APAC going forward.

 

James Hall
James Hall has been working in the digital sector for over a decade. He is the author of the popular jsPDF library, and is a founder/Director of Parallax, a digital agency in the UK. He’s worked as a software developer on a wide variety of projects, from LED Billboards, car unlocking apps, to large web applications and tools.

Parallax built an online recording studio for David Guetta and UEFA using Serverless technology shortly after API Gateway was released. Since then they have consulted on various serverless projects and technologies. They run the AWS Meetup in Leeds, and help companies around the world build their businesses online. James has contributed to and promotes the Serverless Framework which allows you to elegantly build web applications on top of Lambda and related services.

 

Drew Firment
Drew Firment works with business leaders and technology teams from organizations that seek to accelerate cloud adoption. He has over twenty years of experience leading large-scale technology programs, enterprise platforms, and cultural transformations in a fast-paced agile environment.

After migrating Capital One’s early adopters of AWS into production, his focus shifted toward accelerating a scaleable and sustainable transition to cloud computing. Drew pioneered the intersection of strategy, governance, engineering, agile, and education to drive an enterprise-wide talent transformation. He founded Capital One’s cloud engineering college, and implemented an innovative outcome-based curriculum oriented towards learning communities. Several thousand employees have enrolled in his cloud-fluency program, enabling well over 1,000 AWS certifications since its inception.

Drew has earned all three of the AWS associate-level certifications, enjoys developing custom Amazon Alexa skills using AWS Lambda, and believes serverless is the future of cloud computing. He also serves as an advisory partner to A Cloud Guru and is editor-in-chief of the their community-sourced publication.

Welcome
Please join me in welcoming to our newest AWS Community Heroes!

-Ana

AWS Hot Startups – March 2017

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-march-2017/

As the madness of March rounds up, take a break from all the basketball and check out the cool startups Tina Barr brings you for this month!

-Ana


The arrival of spring brings five new startups this month:

  • Amino Apps – providing social networks for hundreds of thousands of communities.
  • Appboy – empowering brands to strengthen customer relationships.
  • Arterys – revolutionizing the medical imaging industry.
  • Protenus – protecting patient data for healthcare organizations.
  • Syapse – improving targeted cancer care with shared data from across the country.

In case you missed them, check out February’s hot startups here.

Amino Apps (New York, NY)
Amino Logo
Amino Apps was founded on the belief that interest-based communities were underdeveloped and outdated, particularly when it came to mobile. CEO Ben Anderson and CTO Yin Wang created the app to give users access to hundreds of thousands of communities, each of them a complete social network dedicated to a single topic. Some of the largest communities have over 1 million members and are built around topics like popular TV shows, video games, sports, and an endless number of hobbies and other interests. Amino hosts communities from around the world and is currently available in six languages with many more on the way.

Navigating the Amino app is easy. Simply download the app (iOS or Android), sign up with a valid email address, choose a profile picture, and start exploring. Users can search for communities and join any that fit their interests. Each community has chatrooms, multimedia content, quizzes, and a seamless commenting system. If a community doesn’t exist yet, users can create it in minutes using the Amino Creator and Manager app (ACM). The largest user-generated communities are turned into their own apps, which gives communities their own piece of real estate on members’ phones, as well as in app stores.

Amino’s vast global network of hundreds of thousands of communities is run on AWS services. Every day users generate, share, and engage with an enormous amount of content across hundreds of mobile applications. By leveraging AWS services including Amazon EC2, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, Amazon SQS, and Amazon CloudFront, Amino can continue to provide new features to their users while scaling their service capacity to keep up with user growth.

Interested in joining Amino? Check out their jobs page here.

Appboy (New York, NY)
In 2011, Bill Magnuson, Jon Hyman, and Mark Ghermezian saw a unique opportunity to strengthen and humanize relationships between brands and their customers through technology. The trio created Appboy to empower brands to build long-term relationships with their customers and today they are the leading lifecycle engagement platform for marketing, growth, and engagement teams. The team recognized that as rapid mobile growth became undeniable, many brands were becoming frustrated with the lack of compelling and seamless cross-channel experiences offered by existing marketing clouds. Many of today’s top mobile apps and enterprise companies trust Appboy to take their marketing to the next level. Appboy manages user profiles for nearly 700 million monthly active users, and is used to power more than 10 billion personalized messages monthly across a multitude of channels and devices.

Appboy creates a holistic user profile that offers a single view of each customer. That user profile in turn powers contextual cross-channel messaging, lifecycle engagement automation, and robust campaign insights and optimization opportunities. Appboy offers solutions that allow brands to create push notifications, targeted emails, in-app and in-browser messages, news feed cards, and webhooks to enhance the user experience and increase customer engagement. The company prides itself on its interoperability, connecting to a variety of complimentary marketing tools and technologies so brands can build the perfect stack to enable their strategies and experiments in real time.

AWS makes it easy for Appboy to dynamically size all of their service components and automatically scale up and down as needed. They use an array of services including Elastic Load Balancing, AWS Lambda, Amazon CloudWatch, Auto Scaling groups, and Amazon S3 to help scale capacity and better deal with unpredictable customer loads.

To keep up with the latest marketing trends and tactics, visit the Appboy digital magazine, Relate. Appboy was also recently featured in the #StartupsOnAir video series where they gave insight into their AWS usage.

Arterys (San Francisco, CA)
Getting test results back from a physician can often be a time consuming and tedious process. Clinicians typically employ a variety of techniques to manually measure medical images and then make their assessments. Arterys founders Fabien Beckers, John Axerio-Cilies, Albert Hsiao, and Shreyas Vasanawala realized that much more computation and advanced analytics were needed to harness all of the valuable information in medical images, especially those generated by MRI and CT scanners. Clinicians were often skipping measurements and making assessments based mostly on qualitative data. Their solution was to start a cloud/AI software company focused on accelerating data-driven medicine with advanced software products for post-processing of medical images.

Arterys’ products provide timely, accurate, and consistent quantification of images, improve speed to results, and improve the quality of the information offered to the treating physician. This allows for much better tracking of a patient’s condition, and thus better decisions about their care. Advanced analytics, such as deep learning and distributed cloud computing, are used to process images. The first Arterys product can contour cardiac anatomy as accurately as experts, but takes only 15-20 seconds instead of the 45-60 minutes required to do it manually. Their computing cloud platform is also fully HIPAA compliant.

Arterys relies on a variety of AWS services to process their medical images. Using deep learning and other advanced analytic tools, Arterys is able to render images without latency over a web browser using AWS G2 instances. They use Amazon EC2 extensively for all of their compute needs, including inference and rendering, and Amazon S3 is used to archive images that aren’t needed immediately, as well as manage costs. Arterys also employs Amazon Route 53, AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon EC2 Container Service.

Check out this quick video about the technology that Arterys is creating. They were also recently featured in the #StartupsOnAir video series and offered a quick demo of their product.

Protenus (Baltimore, MD)
Protenus Logo
Protenus founders Nick Culbertson and Robert Lord were medical students at Johns Hopkins Medical School when they saw first-hand how Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could be used to improve patient care and share clinical data more efficiently. With increased efficiency came a huge issue – an onslaught of serious security and privacy concerns. Over the past two years, 140 million medical records have been breached, meaning that approximately 1 in 3 Americans have had their health data compromised. Health records contain a repository of sensitive information and a breach of that data can cause major havoc in a patient’s life – namely identity theft, prescription fraud, Medicare/Medicaid fraud, and improper performance of medical procedures. Using their experience and knowledge from former careers in the intelligence community and involvement in a leading hedge fund, Nick and Robert developed the prototype and algorithms that launched Protenus.

Today, Protenus offers a number of solutions that detect breaches and misuse of patient data for healthcare organizations nationwide. Using advanced analytics and AI, Protenus’ health data insights platform understands appropriate vs. inappropriate use of patient data in the EHR. It also protects privacy, aids compliance with HIPAA regulations, and ensures trust for patients and providers alike.

Protenus built and operates its SaaS offering atop Amazon EC2, where Dedicated Hosts and encrypted Amazon EBS volume are used to ensure compliance with HIPAA regulation for the storage of Protected Health Information. They use Elastic Load Balancing and Amazon Route 53 for DNS, enabling unique, secure client specific access points to their Protenus instance.

To learn more about threats to patient data, read Hospitals’ Biggest Threat to Patient Data is Hiding in Plain Sight on the Protenus blog. Also be sure to check out their recent video in the #StartupsOnAir series for more insight into their product.

Syapse (Palo Alto, CA)
Syapse provides a comprehensive software solution that enables clinicians to treat patients with precision medicine for targeted cancer therapies — treatments that are designed and chosen using genetic or molecular profiling. Existing hospital IT doesn’t support the robust infrastructure and clinical workflows required to treat patients with precision medicine at scale, but Syapse centralizes and organizes patient data to clinicians at the point of care. Syapse offers a variety of solutions for oncologists that allow them to access the full scope of patient data longitudinally, view recommended treatments or clinical trials for similar patients, and track outcomes over time. These solutions are helping health systems across the country to improve patient outcomes by offering the most innovative care to cancer patients.

Leading health systems such as Stanford Health Care, Providence St. Joseph Health, and Intermountain Healthcare are using Syapse to improve patient outcomes, streamline clinical workflows, and scale their precision medicine programs. A group of experts known as the Molecular Tumor Board (MTB) reviews complex cases and evaluates patient data, documents notes, and disseminates treatment recommendations to the treating physician. Syapse also provides reports that give health system staff insight into their institution’s oncology care, which can be used toward quality improvement, business goals, and understanding variables in the oncology service line.

Syapse uses Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Amazon EC2 Dedicated Instances, and Amazon Elastic Block Store to build a high-performance, scalable, and HIPAA-compliant data platform that enables health systems to make precision medicine part of routine cancer care for patients throughout the country.

Be sure to check out the Syapse blog to learn more and also their recent video on the #StartupsOnAir video series where they discuss their product, HIPAA compliance, and more about how they are using AWS.

Thank you for checking out another month of awesome hot startups!

-Tina Barr

 

AWS Global Summits are Coming!

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-global-summits-are-coming/

One of the first things I got to do when I joined the AWS Blog team was to attend the summit in New York City last August. Meeting all of our customers, checking out Game Day, and getting to see the enthusiasm of the AWS community made me even more excited to be starting my adventure working on the blog with Jeff.

This year’s AWS Summit dates have been announced and whether you are new to the cloud or an experienced user, you can always learn something new at an AWS Summit. These free events, held around the world, are designed to educate you about the AWS platform. Our team has built a program that offers a multitude of learning opportunities covering a broad range of topics, and technical depth. Join us to develop the skills needed to design, deploy, and operate infrastructure and applications on AWS.

We have Summits taking place across North America, Latin America, Asia Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, Japan, and Greater China. To see the full list of cities and dates, check out the AWS Summits page.

Registration is now open for six locations including; San Francisco, Sydney, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Seoul, Manila, and Bangkok. You can also subscribe to the AWS Events RSS feed, follow @awscloud, and find us on Facebook.

And you never know, along with learning all sorts of new things at the summit, you just might run into me or Jeff and snag a blog sticker too!

-Ana

Streamline AMI Maintenance and Patching Using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager | Automation

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/streamline-ami-maintenance-and-patching-using-amazon-ec2-systems-manager-automation/

Here to tell you about using Automation for streamline AMI maintenance and patching is Taylor Anderson, a Senior Product Manager with EC2.

-Ana


 

Last December at re:Invent, we launched Amazon EC2 Systems Manager, which helps you automatically collect software inventory, apply OS patches, create system images, and configure Windows and Linux operating systems. These capabilities enable automated configuration and ongoing management of systems at scale, and help maintain software compliance for instances running in Amazon EC2 or on-premises.

One feature within Systems Manager is Automation, which can be used to patch, update agents, or bake applications into an Amazon Machine Image (AMI). With Automation, you can avoid the time and effort associated with manual image updates, and instead build AMIs through a streamlined, repeatable, and auditable process.

Recently, we released the first public document for Automation: AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi. This document allows you to automate patching of Ubuntu, CentOS, RHEL, and Amazon Linux AMIs, as well as automating the installation of additional site-specific packages and configurations.

More importantly, it makes it easy to get started with Automation, eliminating the need to first write an Automation document. AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi can also be used as a template when building your own Automation workflow. Windows users can expect the equivalent document―AWS-UpdateWindowsAmi―in the coming weeks.

AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi automates the following workflow:

  1. Launch a temporary EC2 instance from a source Linux AMI.
  2. Update the instance.
    • Invoke a user-provided, pre-update hook script on the instance (optional).
    • Update any AWS tools and agents on the instance, if present.
    • Update the instance’s distribution packages using the native package manager.
    • Invoke a user-provided post-update hook script on the instance (optional).
  3. Stop the temporary instance.
  4. Create a new AMI from the stopped instance.
  5. Terminate the instance.

Warning: Creation of an AMI from a running instance carries a risk that credentials, secrets, or other confidential information from that instance may be recorded to the new image. Use caution when managing AMIs created by this process.

Configuring roles and permissions for Automation

If you haven’t used Automation before, you need to configure IAM roles and permissions. This includes creating a service role for Automation, assigning a passrole to authorize a user to provide the service role, and creating an instance role to enable instance management under Systems Manager. For more details, see Configuring Access to Automation.

Executing Automation

      1. In the EC2 console, choose Systems Manager Services, Automations.
      2. Choose Run automation document
      3. Expand Document name and choose AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi.
      4. Choose the latest document version.
      5.  For SourceAmiId, enter the ID of the Linux AMI to update.
      6. For InstanceIamRole, enter the name of the instance role you created enabling Systems Manager to manage an instance (that is, it includes the AmazonEC2RoleforSSM managed policy). For more details, see Configuring Access to Automation.
      7.  For AutomationAssumeRole, enter the ARN of the service role you created for Automation. For more details, see Configuring Access to Automation.
      8.  Choose Run Automation.
      9. Monitor progress in the Automation Steps tab, and view step-level outputs.

After execution is complete, choose Description to view any outputs returned by the workflow. In this example, AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi returns the new AMI ID.

Next, choose Images, AMIs to view your new AMI.

There is no additional charge to use the Automation service, and any resources created by a workflow incur nominal charges. Note that if you terminate AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi before reaching the “Terminate Instance” step, shut down the temporary instance created by the workflow.

A CLI walkthrough of the above steps can be found at Automation CLI Walkthrough: Patch a Linux AMI.

Conclusion

Now that you’ve successfully run AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi, you may want to create default values for the service and instance roles. You can customize your workflow by creating your own Automation document based on AWS-UpdateLinuxAmi. For more details, see Create an Automaton Document. After you’ve created your document, you can write additional steps and add them to the workflow.

Example steps include:

      • Updating an Auto Scaling group with the new AMI ID (aws:invokeLambdaFunction action type)
      • Creating an encrypted copy of your new AMI (aws:encrypedCopy action type)
      • Validating your new AMI using Run Command with the RunPowerShellScript document (aws:runCommand action type)

Automation also makes a great addition to a CI/CD pipeline for application bake-in, and can be invoked as a CLI build step in Jenkins. For details on these examples, be sure to check out the Automation technical documentation. For updates on Automation, Amazon EC2 Systems Manager, Amazon CloudFormation, AWS Config, AWS OpsWorks and other management services, be sure to follow the all-new Management Tools blog.

 

AWS and Healthcare: View From the Floor of HIMSS17

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-and-healthcare-view-from-the-floor-of-himss17/

Jordin Green is our guest writer today, with an inside view from the floor of HIMSS17.

-Ana


HIMMS1Empathy. It’s not always a word you hear associated with technology but one might argue it should be a central tenet for the application of technology in healthcare, and I was reminded of that fact as I wandered the halls representing AWS at HIMSS17, the Healthcare Information and Management System Society annual meeting.

At Amazon, we’re taught to obsess over our customers, but this obsession takes on a new level of responsibility when those customers are directly working on improving the lives of patients and the overall wellness of society. Thinking about the challenges that healthcare professionals are dealing with every day drives home how important it is for AWS to ensure that using the cloud in healthcare is as frictionless as possible. So with that in mind I wanted to share some of the things I saw in and around HIMSS17 regarding healthcare and AWS.

I started my week at the HIMSS Cloud Computing Forum, which was a new full-day HIMSS pre-day focused on educating the healthcare community on cloud. I was particularly struck by the breadth of cloud use cases being explored throughout the industry, even compared to a few years ago. The program featured presentations on cloud-based care coordination, precision medicine, and security. Perhaps one of the most interesting presentations came from Jessica Kahn from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), talking about the analytics platform that CMS has built in the cloud along with Nuna. Jessica talked about how a cloud-based platform allows CMS to make decisions based on data that is a month old, rather than a year or years old. Additionally, using an automated, rules-based approach, policymakers can directly query the data without having to rely on developers, bringing agility. Nuna has already gained a number of insights from hosting this de-identified Medicaid data for policy research, and is now looking to expand its services to private insurance.

The exhibition opened on Monday, and I was really excited to talk to customers about the new Healthcare & Life Sciences category in the AWS Marketplace. AWS Marketplace is a managed and curated software catalog that helps customers innovate faster and reduce costs, by making it easy to discover, evaluate, procure, immediately deploy and manage 3rd party software solutions. When a customer purchases software via the Marketplace, all of the infrastructure needed to run on AWS is deployed automatically, using the same pay-as-you-go pricing model that AWS uses. Creation of a dedicated category of healthcare is a huge step forward in making it easier for our customers to deploy cloud-based solutions. Our new category features telehealth solutions, products for managing HIPAA compliance, and products that can be used for revenue cycle management from AWS Partner Network (APN) such as PokitDok. We’re just getting started with this category; look for new additions throughout the year.

Later in the week, I tried to spend time at the number of APN Partners exhibiting at HIMSS this year, and it’s safe to say our ecosystem also had lots of moments to shine. Orion Health announced that they will migrate their Amadeus precision medicine platform to the AWS Cloud. Orion has been deploying on top of AWS for a while now, including notably the California-wide Health Information Exchange CalINDEX. Amadeus currently manages 110 million patient records; the migration will represent a significant volume of clinical data running on AWS. New APN Partner Merck announced a new Alexa skill challenge, asking developers to come up with new, innovative ways to use Alexa in the management of chronic disease. Healthcare Competency Partner ClearDATA announced its new fully-managed Containers-as-a-Service product, which simplifies development of healthcare applications by providing developers with a HIPAA-compliant environment for building, testing, and deployment.

This is only a small sample of the activity going on at HIMSS this year, and it’s impossible to capture everything in one post. You learn more about healthcare on AWS on our Cloud Computing in Healthcare page. Nonetheless, after spending four days diving in to healthcare IT, it was great to see how AWS is enabling our healthcare customers and partners deliver solutions that are impacting millions of lives across the globe.

Jordin Green

Announcing the AWS Health Tools Repository

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/announcing-the-aws-health-tools-repository/

Tipu Qureshi and Ram Atur join us today with really cool news about a Git repository for AWS Health / Personal Health Dashboard.

-Ana


Today, we’re happy to release the AWS Health Tools repository, a community-based source of tools to automate remediation actions and customize Health alerts.

The AWS Health service provides personalized information about events that can affect your AWS infrastructure, guides you through scheduled changes, and accelerates the troubleshooting of issues that affect your AWS resources and accounts.  The AWS Health API also powers the Personal Health Dashboard, which gives you a personalized view into the performance and availability of the AWS services underlying your AWS resources. You can use Amazon CloudWatch Events to detect and react to changes in the status of AWS Personal Health Dashboard (AWS Health) events.

AWS Health Tools takes advantage of the integration of AWS Health, Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Lambda to implement customized automation in response to events regarding your AWS infrastructure. As an example, you can use AWS Health Tools to pause your deployments that are part of AWS CodePipeline when a CloudWatch event is generated in response to an AWS Health issue.

AWSHealthToolsArchitecture

The AWS Health Tools repository empowers customers to effectively utilize AWS Health events by tapping in to the collective ingenuity and expertise of the AWS community. The repository is free, public, and hosted on an independent platform. Furthermore, the repository contains full source code, allowing you to learn and contribute. We look forward to working together to leverage the combined wisdom and lessons learned by our experts and experts in the broader AWS user base.

Here’s a sample of the AWS Health tools that you now have access to:

To get started using these tools in your AWS account, see the readme file on GitHub. We encourage you to use this repository to share with the AWS community the AWS Health Tools you have written

-Tipu Qureshi and Ram Atur

AWS Hot Startups – February 2017

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-february-2017-2/

As we finish up the month of February, Tina Barr is back with some awesome startups.

-Ana


This month we are bringing you five innovative hot startups:

  • GumGum – Creating and popularizing the field of in-image advertising.
  • Jiobit – Smart tags to help parents keep track of kids.
  • Parsec – Offers flexibility in hardware and location for PC gamers.
  • Peloton – Revolutionizing indoor cycling and fitness classes at home.
  • Tendril – Reducing energy consumption for homeowners.

If you missed any of our January startups, make sure to check them out here.

GumGum (Santa Monica, CA)
GumGum logo1GumGum is best known for inventing and popularizing the field of in-image advertising. Founded in 2008 by Ophir Tanz, the company is on a mission to unlock the value held within the vast content produced daily via social media, editorials, and broadcasts in a variety of industries. GumGum powers campaigns across more than 2,000 premium publishers, which are seen by over 400 million users.

In-image advertising was pioneered by GumGum and has given companies a platform to deliver highly visible ads to a place where the consumer’s attention is already focused. Using image recognition technology, GumGum delivers targeted placements as contextual overlays on related pictures, as banners that fit on all screen sizes, or as In-Feed placements that blend seamlessly into the surrounding content. Using Visual Intelligence, GumGum can scour social media and broadcast TV for all images and videos related to a brand, allowing companies to gain a stronger understanding of their audience and how they are relating to that brand on social media.

GumGum relies on AWS for its Image Processing and Ad Serving operations. Using AWS infrastructure, GumGum currently processes 13 million requests per minute across the globe and generates 30 TB of new data every day. The company uses a suite of services including but not limited to Amazon EC2, Amazon S3, Amazon Kinesis, Amazon EMR, AWS Data Pipeline, and Amazon SNS. AWS edge locations allow GumGum to serve its customers in the US, Europe, Australia, and Japan and the company has plans to expand its infrastructure to Australia and APAC regions in the future.

For a look inside GumGum’s startup culture, check out their first Hackathon!

Jiobit (Chicago, IL)
Jiobit Team1
Jiobit was inspired by a real event that took place in a crowded Chicago park. A couple of summers ago, John Renaldi experienced every parent’s worst nightmare – he lost track of his then 6-year-old son in a public park for almost 30 minutes. John knew he wasn’t the only parent with this problem. After months of research, he determined that over 50% of parents have had a similar experience and an even greater percentage are actively looking for a way to prevent it.

Jiobit is the world’s smallest and longest lasting smart tag that helps parents keep track of their kids in every location – indoors and outdoors. The small device is kid-proof: lightweight, durable, and waterproof. It acts as a virtual “safety harness” as it uses a combination of Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Multiple Cellular Networks, GPS, and sensors to provide accurate locations in real-time. Jiobit can automatically learn routes and locations, and will send parents an alert if their child does not arrive at their destination on time. The talented team of experienced engineers, designers, marketers, and parents has over 150 patents and has shipped dozens of hardware and software products worldwide.

The Jiobit team is utilizing a number of AWS services in the development of their product. Security is critical to the overall product experience, and they are over-engineering security on both the hardware and software side with the help of AWS. Jiobit is also working towards being the first child monitoring device that will have implemented an Alexa Skill via the Amazon Echo device (see here for a demo!). The devices use AWS IoT to send and receive data from the Jio Cloud over the MQTT protocol. Once data is received, they use AWS Lambda to parse the received data and take appropriate actions, including storing relevant data using Amazon DynamoDB, and sending location data to Amazon Machine Learning processing jobs.

Visit the Jiobit blog for more information.

Parsec (New York, NY)
Parsec logo large1
Parsec operates under the notion that everyone should have access to the best computing in the world because access to technology creates endless opportunities. Founded in 2016 by Benjy Boxer and Chris Dickson, Parsec aims to eliminate the burden of hardware upgrades that users frequently experience by building the technology to make a computer in the cloud available anywhere, at any time. Today, they are using their technology to enable greater flexibility in the hardware and location that PC gamers choose to play their favorite games on. Check out this interview with Benjy and our Startups team for a look at how Parsec works.

Parsec built their first product to improve the gaming experience; gamers no longer have to purchase consoles or expensive PCs to access the entertainment they love. Their low latency video streaming and networking technologies allow gamers to remotely access their gaming rig and play on any Windows, Mac, Android, or Raspberry Pi device. With the global reach of AWS, Parsec is able to deliver cloud gaming to the median user in the US and Europe with less than 30 milliseconds of network latency.

Parsec users currently have two options available to start gaming with cloud resources. They can either set up their own machines with the Parsec AMI in their region or rely on Parsec to manage everything for a seamless experience. In either case, Parsec uses the g2.2xlarge EC2 instance type. Parsec is using Amazon Elastic Block Storage to store games, Amazon DynamoDB for scalability, and Amazon EC2 for its web servers and various APIs. They also deal with a high volume of logs and take advantage of the Amazon Elasticsearch Service to analyze the data.

Be sure to check out Parsec’s blog to keep up with the latest news.

Peloton (New York, NY)
Peloton image 3
The idea for Peloton was born in 2012 when John Foley, Founder and CEO, and his wife Jill started realizing the challenge of balancing work, raising young children, and keeping up with personal fitness. This is a common challenge people face – they want to work out, but there are a lot of obstacles that stand in their way. Peloton offers a solution that enables people to join indoor cycling and fitness classes anywhere, anytime.

Peloton has created a cutting-edge indoor bike that streams up to 14 hours of live classes daily and has over 4,000 on-demand classes. Users can access live classes from world-class instructors from the convenience of their home or gym. The bike tracks progress with in-depth ride metrics and allows people to compete in real-time with other users who have taken a specific ride. The live classes even feature top DJs that play current playlists to keep users motivated.

With an aggressive marketing campaign, which has included high-visibility TV advertising, Peloton made the decision to run its entire platform in the cloud. Most recently, they ran an ad during an NFL playoff game and their rate of requests per minute to their site increased from ~2k/min to ~32.2k/min within 60 seconds. As they continue to grow and diversify, they are utilizing services such as Amazon S3 for thousands of hours of archived on-demand video content, Amazon Redshift for data warehousing, and Application Load Balancer for intelligent request routing.

Learn more about Peloton’s engineering team here.

Tendril (Denver, CO)
Tendril logo1
Tendril was founded in 2004 with the goal of helping homeowners better manage and reduce their energy consumption. Today, electric and gas utilities use Tendril’s data analytics platform on more than 140 million homes to deliver a personalized energy experience for consumers around the world. Using the latest technology in decision science and analytics, Tendril can gain access to real-time, ever evolving data about energy consumers and their homes so they can improve customer acquisition, increase engagement, and orchestrate home energy experiences. In turn, Tendril helps its customers unlock the true value of energy interactions.

AWS helps Tendril run its services globally, while scaling capacity up and down as needed, and in real-time. This has been especially important in support of Tendril’s newest solution, Orchestrated Energy, a continuous demand management platform that calculates a home’s thermal mass, predicts consumer behavior, and integrates with smart thermostats and other connected home devices. This solution allows millions of consumers to create a personalized energy plan for their home based on their individual needs.

Tendril builds and maintains most of its infrastructure services with open sources tools running on Amazon EC2 instances, while also making use of AWS services such as Elastic Load Balancing, Amazon API Gateway, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Queue Service, and Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL.

Visit the Tendril Blog for more information!

— Tina Barr

AWS Marketplace Adds Healthcare & Life Sciences Category

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-marketplace-adds-healthcare-life-sciences-category/

Wilson To and Luis Daniel Soto are our guest bloggers today, telling you about a new industry vertical category that is being added to the AWS Marketplace.Check it out!

-Ana


AWS Marketplace is a managed and curated software catalog that helps customers innovate faster and reduce costs, by making it easy to discover, evaluate, procure, immediately deploy and manage 3rd party software solutions.  To continue supporting our customers, we’re now adding a new industry vertical category: Healthcare & Life Sciences.

healthpost

This new category brings together best-of-breed software tools and solutions from our growing vendor ecosystem that have been adapted to, or built from the ground up, to serve the healthcare and life sciences industry.

Healthcare
Within the AWS Marketplace HCLS category, you can find solutions for Clinical information systems, population health and analytics, health administration and compliance services. Some offerings include:

  1. Allgress GetCompliant HIPAA Edition – Reduce the cost of compliance management and adherence by providing compliance professionals improved efficiency by automating the management of their compliance processes around HIPAA.
  2. ZH Healthcare BlueEHS – Deploy a customizable, ONC-certified EHR that empowers doctors to define their clinical workflows and treatment plans to enhance patient outcomes.
  3. Dicom Systems DCMSYS CloudVNA – DCMSYS Vendor Neutral Archive offers a cost-effective means of consolidating disparate imaging systems into a single repository, while providing enterprise-wide access and archiving of all medical images and other medical records.

Life Sciences

  1. National Instruments LabVIEW – Graphical system design software that provides scientists and engineers with the tools needed to create and deploy measurement and control systems through simple yet powerful networks.
  2. NCBI Blast – Analysis tools and datasets that allow users to perform flexible sequence similarity searches.
  3. Acellera AceCloud – Innovative tools and technologies for the study of biophysical phenomena. Acellera leverages the power of AWS Cloud to enable molecular dynamics simulations.

Healthcare and life sciences companies deal with huge amounts of data, and many of their data sets are some of the most complex in the world. From physicians and nurses to researchers and analysts, these users are typically hampered by their current systems. Their legacy software cannot let them efficiently store or effectively make use of the immense amounts of data they work with. And protracted and complex software purchasing cycles keep them from innovating at speed to stay ahead of market and industry trends. Data analytics and business intelligence solutions in AWS Marketplace offer specialized support for these industries, including:

  • Tableau Server – Enable teams to visualize across costs, needs, and outcomes at once to make the most of resources. The solution helps hospitals identify the impact of evidence-based medicine, wellness programs, and patient engagement.
  • TIBCO Spotfire and JasperSoft. TIBCO provides technical teams powerful data visualization, data analytics, and predictive analytics for Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS, and popular database sources via AWS Marketplace.
  • Qlik Sense Enterprise. Qlik enables healthcare organizations to explore clinical, financial and operational data through visual analytics to discover insights which lead to improvements in care, reduced costs and delivering higher value to patients.

With more than 5,000 listings across more than 35 categories, AWS Marketplace simplifies software licensing and procurement by enabling customers to accept user agreements, choose pricing options, and automate the deployment of software and associated AWS resources with just a few clicks. AWS Marketplace also simplifies billing for customers by delivering a single invoice detailing business software and AWS resource usage on a monthly basis.

With AWS Marketplace, we can help drive operational efficiencies and reduce costs in these ways:

  • Easily bring in new solutions to solve increasingly complex issues, gain quick insight into the huge amounts of data users handle.
  • Healthcare data will be more actionable. We offer pay-as-you-go solutions that make it considerably easier and more cost-effective to ingest, store, analyze, and disseminate data.
  • Deploy healthcare and life sciences software with 1-Click ease — then evaluate and deploy it in minutes. Users can now speed up their historically slow cycles in software procurement and implementation.
  • Pay only for what’s consumed — and manage software costs on your AWS bill.
  • In addition to the already secure AWS Cloud, AWS Marketplace offers industry-leading solutions to help you secure operating systems, platforms, applications and data that can integrate with existing controls in your AWS Cloud and hybrid environment.

Click here to see who the current list of vendors are in our new Healthcare & Life Sciences category.

Come on In
If you are a healthcare ISV and would like to list and sell your products on AWS, visit our Sell in AWS Marketplace page.

– Wilson To and Luis Daniel Soto

Introducing Allgress Regulatory Product Mapping

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-allgress-regulatory-product-mapping/

This guest post is brought to you by Andrew Benjamin and Tim Sandage.

-Ana


It’s increasingly difficult for organizations within regulated industries (such as government, financial, and healthcare) to demonstrate compliance with security requirements. The burden to comply is compounded by the use of legacy security frameworks and a lack of understanding of which services enable appropriate threat mitigations. It is further complicated by security responsibilities in relation to cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), and mobile applications.

Allgress helps minimize this burden by helping enterprise security and risk professionals assess, understand, and manage corporate risk. Allgress and AWS are working to offer a way to establish clear mappings from AWS services and 3rd party software solutions in AWS Marketplace to common security frameworks. The result for regulated customers within the AWS Cloud will be minimized business impact, increased security effectiveness, and reduced risk.

The name of this new solution is Allgress Marketplace Regulatory Product Mapping Tool (RPM) Allgress designed this tool specifically for customers deployed within AWS who want to reduce the complexity, increase the speed, and shorten the time frame of achieving compliance, including compliance with legislation such as Sarbanes Oxley, HIPAA, and FISMA. Allgress RPM is designed to achieve these results by letting customers quickly map their regulatory security frameworks (such as ISO, NIST, and PCI-DSS controls) to AWS services, solutions in AWS Markeplace, and APN technology partner solutions. The tool even guides customers through the compliance process, providing focused content every step of the way.

Here are the four simple steps to get a regulatory assessment:

  1. If you’re a new user, you can Login as a guest into the tool. Registration is not required. If you’re an existing user, you can log in using your Username and Password to return to a saved assessment:

01[1]

  1. Once you’ve logged in, you can select your Regulatory Security Framework (e.g. FedRAMP or PCI). After you’ve selected your framework, you have two explorer options: Coverage Overview and Product Explorer (explained in detail below).02[1]

The Coverage Overview includes three use cases: AWS customer controls review, regulatory requirement mapping, and gap-assessment planning. The Product Explorer tool provides detailed control coverage for the AWS services selected and/or all available AWS Marketplace vendor solutions.

  1. You can select Coverage Overview to review AWS Inherited, Shared, Operation, and AWS Marketplace Control mappings.03[1]

Coverage overview – This view breaks down security frameworks into four categories:

  1. AWS Inherited Controls — Controls that you fully inherit from AWS.
  2. AWS Shared Controls — AWS provides the control implementation for the infrastructure, and you provide your own control implementation within its use of AWS services. (e.g. Fault Tolerance)
  3. Operational Controls – These are procedural controls that AWS or an AWS consulting partner can help you implement within your AWS environment.
  4. AWS Marketplace Controls — These are technical controls that can be implemented (partially or fully) with an AWS technology partner and vendors from AWS Marketplace.

Note: Features in this tool include the ability to zoom into the controls using your mouse. With point-and-click ease, you can zoom in at the domain (Control Family) level, or into individual controls:

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  1. The additional capabilities within RPM is Product Explorer, which Identifies solutions in AWS Marketplace that can partially or fully implement the requirements of a security control. The screen below illustrates the 327 control for FedRAMP moderate — as well as several solutions available from software vendors on AWS Marketplace that can help remediate the control requirements.

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The Product Explorer page has several capabilities to highlight both service and control association:

  1. At the top of the page you can remove controls that do not currently have associated mapping.
  2. You can also zoom into Domains, Sub-domains, and Controls.
  3. You can select single products or multiple products with quick view options.
  4. You can select single or multiple products, and then select Product Cart to review detailed control implementations.

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Product Explorer Note: Non-associated controls have been removed in order to clearly see potential product mappings.

08[1]

Product Explorer — Zoom function for a specific control (e.g. AU-11) identifies all potential AWS services and associated products which can be leveraged for control implementation.

 09[1]

Product Explorer – Single product control coverage view. For a detail view you can Click on the Product Cart and view detailed implementation notes.

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Product Explorer – You can also add multiple services and solutions into a product cart and then connect to Marketplace for each software vendor solution available through our public managed software catalog.

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More about Allgres RPM
The AWS Services, Consulting, and Technology vendors that Allgress RPM is designed to map, have all demonstrated technical proficiency as a security solution, and can treat security controls across multiple regulated industries. At launch, RPM includes 10 vendors who all have deep experience working with regulated customers to deliver mission-critical workloads and applications on AWS. You can reach Allgress here.

View more Security solutions in AWS Marketplace. Please note that many of the products available in AWS Marketplace offer free trials. You can request free credits here: AWS Marketplace – Get Infrastructure Credits.

We wish to thank our launch partners, who worked with AWS and the Allgress team to map their products and services: Allgress, Alert Logic, Barracuda, Trend Micro, Splunk, Palo Alto Networks, OKTA, CloudCheckr, Evident.io and CIS (Center for Internet Security).

We wish to thank our launch partners, who worked with AWS and the Allgress team to map their products and services: Allgress, Alert Logic, Barracuda, Trend Micro, Splunk, Palo Alto Networks, OKTA, CloudCheckr, Evident.io and CIS (Center for Internet Security).

-Andrew Benjamin and Tim Sandage.