All posts by Rob Zwetsloot

Incredible Raspberry Pi projects in issue 56 of The MagPi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-magazine-56/

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! It’s the last Thursday of the month and that means there’s a new issue of the official Raspberry Pi magazine: yay!

MagPi Magazine 56 cover image

Grab your copy today!

The MagPi Magazine 56

The MagPi 56 covers some incredible Raspberry Pi projects built by members of our community, from simple things you can make quickly, like an easy robot or LEGO Pi case, to more advanced projects to experiment with, like a set of Pinoculars.

Our news section looks at some great new happenings in the world of Pi, such as the new Pimoroni kits for Zero W, the Cambridge theme for PIXEL, and our fifth birthday celebrations.

Also not to be missed in this issue is our lowdown of every Raspberry Pi operating system: which is your favourite? While you’re weighing up the pros and cons of Raspbian vs. Ubuntu MATE, you can also read about our DJ Hero harmonograph, some hot command line tips, and much more.

The MagPi is the only monthly magazine written by and for the Pi community. Regardless of your experience with the Raspberry Pi, there’s something for everyone.

Get your copy

You can grab the latest issue of The MagPi today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively, you can order your copy online, or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

We also have a fantastic subscription offer to celebrate the new Raspberry Pi Zero W: grab a twelve-month subscription and you’ll get a Raspberry Pi Zero W absolutely free, along with a free official case and a bundle of adapter cables. Get yours online right now!

MagPi Magazine Free Pi Zero W

Free Creative Commons download

As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 56.

Don’t forget, though, that, as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue! That’s it until next month…

The post Incredible Raspberry Pi projects in issue 56 of The MagPi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 55 is out, with plenty about the Pi Zero W

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-55-pi-zero-w/

Rob from The MagPi here! We’re still incredibly excited about the brand-new, wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi Zero W, and it’s in our latest issue, out now. Here’s a video of me talking about it.

Introducing Raspberry Pi Zero W

The Raspberry Pi Zero W, the new wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi, is out now! Rob from The MagPi, the official Raspberry Pi magazine, reveals the specifications, price, and more. Get a free Pi Zero W with a twelve-month print sub to The MagPi – http://magpi.cc/SubsNew The subscription offer includes a free Raspberry Pi Zero W, an official case with three covers, and a cable bundle.

We have not just one, but two, big articles about the Raspberry Pi Zero W in issue 55 of The MagPi. Our Big Build feature teaches you how to make a modified PiGRRL handheld retro console, and you’ll also find a full ten-page breakdown of everything that’s cool and new with the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

As usual we have loads of other excellent articles in the magazine, from tutorials on how to create an Amazon Alexa-powered robot to reviews of the brand new version of Kodi.

Pi Zero W, back-ups, advanced GPIO, 3D modelling, and more. We think issue 55 is fabulous!

Get your copy
You can grab a copy of The MagPi 55 in stores now at WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can order your copy online, or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

We also have a new subscription offer to celebrate the new Raspberry Pi Zero W: grab a twelve-month subscription and you’ll get a Raspberry Pi Zero W absolutely free, along with a free official case and a bundle of adapter cables. Get yours online right now!

New Subs Banner_new

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 55.

Don’t forget, though, that as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

Lastly, here’s a full zip of the code from this issue, to help you get off to a flying start with your projects. We hope you enjoy it!

The post The MagPi 55 is out, with plenty about the Pi Zero W appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a magic mirror in issue 54 of The MagPi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-magic-mirror-in-issue-54-of-the-magpi/

Hey there folks! It’s Rob from The MagPi again. Did you miss me? I missed you.

Anyway, I’m here today to tell you that we’ve finally gone and done it: we’ve got a build-your-own-magic-mirror feature in the magazine. Not only that, it’s our cover feature. This amazing project won the community vote in our top 50 Raspberry Pi projects poll, so we decided to go all out and worked closely with Michael Teeuw (the creator of the winning project) to put together this definitive guide.

magic mirror

The latest issue is packed with excellent content

We also have a follow-up to our beginner’s guide to coding from last issue, as Lucy Hattersley delves deeper into object-oriented programming by using examples in Scratch and Python. And we continue our popular Learn to code with C series from Simon Long, along with our usual selection of finely crafted tutorials, guides, project focus articles, and reviews.

As well as all that, we have a new regular extra for you: starting from this issue, you can grab all the code from the magazine in one handy zip from our website or from our GitHub page for each issue of the mag. We’ve started doing this after a reader request: if you have any ideas that would make The MagPi even better, drop us an email and we’ll see what we can do.

The MagPi 54 is available in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively, you can buy The MagPi online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 54.

Don’t forget, though, that as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this issue!

The post Build a magic mirror in issue 54 of The MagPi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-remote-control-robot-magpi-51/

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! Issue 51 is out and just in case you weren’t sold on it already, here’s a little something to tempt you.

issue51-issue-cover

Brian Corteil, writer of the feature, has christened this robot ‘Tiny’

Over the past few years, Raspberry Pi robotics has really come into its own, taking strides to make building robots just that little bit more fun and accessible. This month in The MagPi, we’ve decided to take all these advances and use them to create an incredible little robot.

We’ll guide you through the process of making your robot while also giving you top advice on other methods for robot construction, in case you feel the spark of inspiration once the build is over. It’s not just robots we’re building this issue though. We have some amazing tutorials on the following:

  • Building an underwater camera
  • Finishing up our RaspCade arcade cabinet build
  • A guide to NOOBS for beginners
  • Using WiFi signals as a people detector

There’s lots more to enjoy, including reviews, columns, and a series of spooky and simple Halloween projects.

You can get hold of the latest issue in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can grab an issue online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well! You’re spoilt for choice…

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 51.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue!

The post Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fix-dirty-cow-raspberry-pi/

Hi gang, Rob from The MagPi here. We have a new issue out on Thursday but before that, here comes a PSA.

You may have seen the news recently about a bug in the Linux kernel called Dirty COW – it’s a vulnerability that affects the ‘copy-on-write’ mechanism in Linux, which is also known as COW. This bug can be used to gain full control over a device running a version of Linux, including Android phones, web servers, and even the Raspberry Pi.

We're not sure why a bug got a logo but we're running with it

We’re not sure why a bug got a logo but we’re running with it

You don’t need to worry though, as a patch for Raspbian Jessie to fix Dirty COW has already been released, and you can get it right now. Open up a terminal window and type the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel

Once the install is done, make sure to reboot your Raspberry Pi and you’ll be Dirty COW-free!

The post Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Learn C in our brand new MagPi Essentials book!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-c-in-our-brand-new-magpi-essentials-book/

Rob from The MagPi here again! As I’m sure you’ve noticed, Python is the preferred programming language around these parts. It’s powerful, it’s easy to read, and it’s excellent for teaching coding in general. It isn’t the only language in the world though. We’re happy to reveal that our latest Essentials book will help you learn one of these other languages: C.

4718_essentials-08-code-with-c-cover

Our handy guide to learning C, out now!

If you’ve read the magazine for a while, you’ll have seen pieces on Processing and Node-RED in there. We’ve also been running an ongoing series teaching you C. If getting your learning fix in monthly instalments is too slow for you, though, then Learn to Code with C from the author of that series, Raspberry Pi’s Simon Long, should be just the ticket.

It’s a substantial book, packed with solid, non-gimmicky information. You’ll learn the basics of using C: working with variables, using loops, creating functions and arrays, having user input, controlling your code flow, and much more. You should come away from the book bursting with top-notch knowledge, ready to hack the planet.

Learn to Code with C is available right this instant from our app (which has recently had an overhaul); you can find it on Google Play and the App Store. You can also get the free PDF as usual. I know we’ve been saying that the new range of books will be available in print soon for a while now, but this time we mean really soon. Keep an eye out for future updates.

Any thoughts on the book to close us out, Captain?

The post Learn C in our brand new MagPi Essentials book! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/50-greatest-pi-projects-ever-magpi-50/

Rob from The MagPi here! We’re absolutely thrilled finally to be able to share with you The MagPi 50, our landmark issue with a super special feature on the 50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects of all time, the top 20 of which were voted on by you, the Raspberry Pi community.

The MagPi magazine issue 50: silver text on the cover reads "50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects"

The MagPi 50, out right this instant

As well as the thousands who voted, we had a panel of judges choosing the best projects in a few special categories. Eben Upton, the man behind Raspberry Pi, gave us his picks of software projects. Philip Colligan, CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, carefully selected some incredible humanitarian projects. Liz Upton, Director of Communications/my boss, made some tough decisions in the young makers category. Finally, Michael Horne and Tim Richardson of CamJam and Pi Wars fame presided over the Pi robots.

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Hopefully your favourite project made its way into the top 50! It was a hard task whittling it down to this number, and to be perfectly honest we could probably feature another 50 projects next month that are equally good. The Raspberry Pi community has done some incredible things over the last four years and change, and I’m immensely proud that we can share some of the outstanding work you folk have done in this issue.

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But wait, there’s more! As well as our big community celebration, we also have our usual selection of excellent tutorials, news, and reviews. If the reveal of USB and Ethernet booting on Pi 3 piqued your interest a few weeks ago, we have a full eight-page guide on how you can do that yourself. We cover the #10MillionPi event at the Houses of Parliament in the news, along with some wonderful Raspberry Pi-powered tech that’s being used in the health industry.

Also, here’s Mike’s dancing skeleton from the Pi Bakery, in plenty of time for you to get your own spooky version ready for Halloween. We love it.

Danse Macabre

Danse Macabre or Skeleton Dance is a project in the MagPi Magazine No.50 October 2016. It uses the spectrum board from The MagPi No. 46 June 2016 ( https://vimeo.com/167914646 ) , to make one to three skeletons dance to music.

You can grab The MagPi 50 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 50.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this issue. We’re off for a cup of tea. See you soon!

The post The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Begin your journey with Raspberry Pi in The MagPi 49

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/begin-your-journey-with-raspberry-pi-in-the-magpi-49/

We’ve all seen the numbers. The Raspberry Pi is selling faster and faster every year, which means there are new people getting Raspberry Pis every day. With this in mind, we decided to make a brand new beginner’s guide in issue 49 of The MagPi, out now.

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

The Raspberry Pi beginner’s guide takes you from selecting your Raspberry Pi all the way through setting it up and getting to know the Raspbian OS that powers it. We’re also using it to jump-start a beginner’s tutorial that will be a monthly feature in The MagPi from now on.

#49 Apollo Pi

Set your Pi up so it can take you to the moon! (Moon rocket not included)

As well as the cover feature, we also have a feature on the recently released Apollo 11 source code and how you can emulate a virtual Apollo computer on your Raspberry Pi, along with some historical factoids about making and programming a computer to take people to the moon. There’s also our usual range of amazing tutorials, projects, and product reviews for you to read about as well, including Mike Cook’s rhythmic gymnastics project in the Pi Bakery.

Rhythmic Gymnastics Ribbons

Inspired by the Rio Olympics Gymnastic display of ribbon twirling. In the MagPi 49 – September 2016, https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/ twirl your own virtual ribbons.

You can grab the latest issue of The MagPi in stores today from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. It’s also available in print online from our store, and digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to get not only the Astro Pi poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 49.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

I also want to remind you that we’re running a poll to find out what you, the community, think are the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects to be included in our 50th issue spectacular. Get voting!

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The post Begin your journey with Raspberry Pi in The MagPi 49 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Vote for the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects in The MagPi!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/vote-top-20-raspberry-pi-projects-magpi/

Although this Thursday will see the release of issue 49 of The MagPi, we’re already hard at work putting together our 50th issue spectacular. As part of this issue we’re going to be covering 50 of the best Raspberry Pi projects ever and we want you, the community, to vote for the top 20.

Below we have listed the 30 projects that we think represent the best of the best. All we ask is that you vote for your favourite. We will have a few special categories with some other amazing projects in the final article, but if you think we’ve missed out something truly excellent, let us know in the comments. Here’s the list so you can remind yourselves of the projects, with the poll posted at the bottom.

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

  1. SeeMore – a huge sculpture of 256 Raspberry Pis connected as a cluster
  2. BeetBox – beets (vegetable) you can use to play sick beats (music)
  3. Voyage – 300 paper boats (actually polypropylene) span a river, and you control how they light up
  4. Aquarium – a huge aquarium with Pi-powered weather control simulating the environment of the Cayman Islands
  5. ramanPi – a Raman spectrometer used to identify different types of molecules
  6. Joytone – an electronic musical instrument operated by 72 back-lit joysticks
  7. Internet of LEGO – a city of LEGO, connected to and controlled by the internet
  8. McMaster Formula Hybrid – a Raspberry Pi provides telemetry on this hybrid racing car
  9. PiGRRL – Adafruit show us how to make an upgraded, 3D-printed Game Boy
  10. Magic Mirror – check out how you look while getting some at-a-glance info about your day
Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

  1. 4bot – play a game of Connect 4 with a Raspberry Pi robot
  2. Blackgang Chine dinosaurs – these theme park attractions use the diminutive Pi to make them larger than life
  3. Sound Fighter – challenge your friend to the ultimate Street Fight, controlled by pianos
  4. Astro Pi – Raspberry Pis go to space with code written by school kids
  5. Pi in the Sky – Raspberry Pis go to near space and send back live images
  6. BrewPi – a microbrewery controlled by a micro-computer
  7. LED Mirror – a sci-fi effect comes to life as you’re represented on a wall of lights
  8. Raspberry Pi VCR – a retro VCR-player is turned into a pink media playing machine
  9. #OZWall – Contemporary art in the form of many TVs from throughout the ages
  10. #HiutMusic – you choose the music for a Welsh denim factory through Twitter
Robots and arcade machines make the cut

Robots and arcade machines make the cut

  1. CandyPi – control a jelly bean dispenser from your browser without the need to twist the dial
  2. Digital Zoetrope – still images rotated to create animation, updated for the 21st century
  3. LifeBox – create virtual life inside this box and watch it adapt and survive
  4. Coffee Table Pi – classy coffee table by name, arcade cabinet by nature. Tea and Pac-Man, anyone?
  5. Raspberry Pi Notebook – this handheld Raspberry Pi is many people’s dream machine
  6. Pip-Boy 3000A – turn life into a Bethesda RPG with this custom Pip-Boy
  7. Mason Jar Preserve – Mason jars are used to preserve things, so this one is a beautiful backup server to preserve your data
  8. Pi glass – Google Glass may be gone but you can still make your own amazing Raspberry Pi facsimile
  9. DoodleBorg – a powerful PiBorg robot that can tow a caravan
  10. BigHak – a Big Trak that is truly big: it’s large enough for you to ride in

Now you’ve refreshed your memory of all these amazing projects, it’s time to vote for the one you think is best!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

The vote is running over the next two weeks, and the results will be in The MagPi 50. We’ll see you again on Thursday for the release of the excellent MagPi 49: don’t miss it!

The post Vote for the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects in The MagPi! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-make-windows-10-iot-core-magpi-48/

Rob here from The MagPi. It’s the last Thursday of the month, which can only mean one thing: a new issue is out!

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Whenever a new piece of hardware comes out, there are always people trying to port or emulate different operating systems onto them. The Raspberry Pi was no different, with several attempts at porting differing operating systems when it was first launched. For over a year now though, Microsoft has officially supported Windows on the Raspberry Pi through Windows 10 IoT Core.

In The MagPi 48 we cover the latest developments in Windows 10 IoT Core that have come about since the Raspberry Pi 3 was launched, and how to make use of them in your own projects. We’ve also got exclusive news on an upcoming kit specifically for the Raspberry Pi 3 that lets you create amazing projects right out of the box.

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don't even have to leave your house

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don’t even have to leave your house.

As well as all the Windows talk, we invite you to take part in the Scratch Olympics, continue building the arcade machine of your dreams, learn about Twitch-controlled robots, and read a review of the long-awaited NatureBytes wildlife camera.

You can also learn how to make this swimming game from the legendary Mike Cook, which involves paddling your arms wildly in the air in the general direction of a home-built sensor board to control your character.

Raspberry Pi Olympic swimming

From the The MagPi 48 – August 2016 – an Olympic swimming simulator for the Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 48 is out today in WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda in the UK and will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble when it comes to America. You can also buy a copy online from our store, or get it digitally on our app that’s available for iOS and Android.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 48.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue! We’re off for a haircut.

The post Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Mod Minecraft Pi with our latest Essentials books

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/mod-minecraft-pi-latest-essentials-books/

We’re back again with yet another amazing book in our Essentials series. We know you love them, and we also know that a lot of you love Minecraft. So here is Hacking and Making with Minecraft, the best place to learn about how to mod Minecraft Pi using the power of code.

Hacking and Making with Minecraft is out this very second for you to go and get online.

Make games and mod the world with Minecraft Essentials

Make games and mod the world with Minecraft Essentials

Packed into its pages, which you can download for free as a PDF, are a load of chapters based on articles in the magazine, as well as plenty of brand new tutorials created by the Minecraft Pi Mastermind himself, Martin O’Hanlon. You may have heard of him – he helped get the SpaceCRAFT code working that was run on the International Space Station by Tim Peake!

Here’s some of the amazing things you’ll find in the 13 chapters squeezed into the book:

  • Play the game and write your first program
  • Learn how to control blocks using code
  • Create your first mini games
  • Interact with the GPIO pins through Minecraft
  • Control Minecraft with Node-RED and Sonic Pi
  • And lots more exciting stuff!

We reckon it will help improve your coding skills, which you should remember when your parents start asking why you’re playing a bit more Minecraft than usual.

You can buy Hacking and Making with Minecraft in our app for Android and iOS, as well as grabbing the free PDF. Print versions are coming soon too.

Now if you’ll excuse us, we need to go try it out ourselves in the Holodeck.

Hacking and Making with Minecraft is freely licensed under Creative Commons (BY-SA-NC 3.0). You can download the PDF for free now and forever, but buying digitally supports the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable mission to democratise computing and educate kids all over the world – so please consider it!

The post Mod Minecraft Pi with our latest Essentials books appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/blast-off-magpi-47-astro-pi-special/

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

We’ve been avidly following Tim Peake’s adventures in space in The MagPi for the last six months, especially all the excellent work he’s been doing with the Astro Pis running code from school students across the UK. Tim returned to Earth a couple of weeks ago, so we thought we’d celebrate in The MagPi 47 with a massive feature about his time in space, along with the results of the Astro Pi experiments and the project’s future…

The space celebration doesn’t stop there: print copies of The MagPi 47 come with an exclusive Astro Pi mission patch and a Tim Peake Astro Pi poster!

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The issue also has our usual range of excellent tutorials, from programming dinosaurs to creating motion sensor games and optical illusions. We also have the hottest news on high-altitude balloons and how you can get involved in sending a Pi to the edge of space, as well as the details on the next Pi Wars Pi-powered robot competition.

You can get your latest spaceworthy issue in-store from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda. Our American cousins will be able to buy issues from Barnes & Noble and Micro Center when the issue makes its way over there. It’s also available right now in print on our online store, which delivers internationally. If you prefer digital, it’s ready to download on the Android and iOS apps.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 47.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

This is not the end of Astro Pi. It’s only the beginning.

The post Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Learn all about the new Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 in The MagPi 45

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-new-raspberry-pi-camera-module-v2-magpi-45/

Earlier this week, the brand new Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 was revealed to the world, its headline feature being an 8-megapixel sensor. It’s been a few years since the original came out and the new camera is an excellent little upgrade to the existing model; you can find out all the details in our complete breakdown in Issue 45 of The MagPi magazine, which is out today.

Picture perfect, the new Pi Camera Module v2

Picture perfect, the new Pi Camera Module v2

As well as covering the camera and giving you some projects to start you off with it, we also have a look at the ten best Pi-powered arcade machines, which should give you some ideas for a retro games system of your own. There are also tutorials on creating lighting effects for costumes with a Pi and some NeoPixels, making an Asteroids clone in Basic, and building an IoT thermometer. We also have Astro Pi news, excellent projects, reviews, and everything else you’d expect from your monthly MagPi.

A model railway, in-part powered by Pi Zero

A model railway, powered in-part by Pi Zero

Highlights from issue 45:

  • Replicate an Astro Pi experiment
    Create a humidity sensor, similar to the Sweaty Astronaut code
  • Hacking with dinosaurs
    The MagPi heads to the Isle of Wight to see how some animatronic dinos are being hacked with Pi
  • Original games on the Pi
    Play three brand-new games on your Pi thanks to YoYo and GameMaker Studio
  • Moon pictures
    Find out how to use the camera board to take amazing photos of the moon
  • And much, much more!

How to buy
As usual, you can get The MagPi in store from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda as well as buying copies online from our store. It’s also available digitally via our app on Android and iOS. If you fancy subscribing to the magazine to make sure you never miss an issue, you can do that to on our subscription site.

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 45.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this month’s issue! Before anyone asks, no, the magazine unfortunately does not come with a free camera. Sorry!

The post Learn all about the new Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 in The MagPi 45 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Meet the 314GB PiDrive

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/meet-314gb-pidrive/

I’ve been writing for tech mags for as long as the Raspberry Pi has existed, and one of the most popular Pi tutorials I’ve seen in the last four years or so is the classic Raspberry Pi fileserver. It’s a no-brainer really, due to the Pi’s size and power requirements; the only thing you need to add is a USB hard drive. On Pi Day Western Digital, popular purveyors of hard drives, released PiDrive, a Raspberry Pi-optimised USB hard drive that you may want to consider for the job.
You may want to get an enclosure for itYou might want to get an enclosure for it
You see, while the Raspberry Pi may be low power, hard drives are basically a chunk of metal spinning at several thousand RPM; this, as you might expect, needs a little more juice. While in the grand scheme of things a Pi fileserver is still a relatively low-power solution, it does make you wonder. The PiDrive, on the other hand, is designed around the Raspberry Pi. It draws all the power it needs straight from the separately available USB power cable [this article originally implied that the cable was included – we’re sorry for the inaccuracy] which then also fits into the Raspberry Pi. With this and optimisations to the way data is transferred, the power draw of the entire system ends up being lower than the usual methods.
As it was released on Pi Day, WD have gone all-in with the Pi references. It has 314 GB of storage and currently costs $31.42 (£22), which is 31.4% off its RRP of $45.81 (£32).
It comes in a lovely box that reminds you what it's good forIt comes in a lovely box that reminds you what it’s good for
At that size it’s probably most useful for your day-to-day Pi use, offering more storage than your standard 8GB SD card. However, there are four USB ports on a Raspberry Pi and you can connect a drive to each of them if you want to go down the fileserver/NAS route – WD reckons PiDrive will work just fine for that kind of purpose.
The PiDrive is on sale now. Give it a look!

The post Meet the 314GB PiDrive appeared first on Raspberry Pi.