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Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on sale now at $35

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-3-model-bplus-sale-now-35/

Here’s a long post. We think you’ll find it interesting. If you don’t have time to read it all, we recommend you watch this video, which will fill you in with everything you need, and then head straight to the product page to fill yer boots. (We recommend the video anyway, even if you do have time for a long read. ‘Cos it’s fab.)

A BRAND-NEW PI FOR π DAY

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

If you’ve been a Raspberry Pi watcher for a while now, you’ll have a bit of a feel for how we update our products. Just over two years ago, we released Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. This was our first 64-bit product, and our first product to feature integrated wireless connectivity. Since then, we’ve sold over nine million Raspberry Pi 3 units (we’ve sold 19 million Raspberry Pis in total), which have been put to work in schools, homes, offices and factories all over the globe.

Those Raspberry Pi watchers will know that we have a history of releasing improved versions of our products a couple of years into their lives. The first example was Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+, which added two additional USB ports, introduced our current form factor, and rolled up a variety of other feedback from the community. Raspberry Pi 2 didn’t get this treatment, of course, as it was superseded after only one year; but it feels like it’s high time that Raspberry Pi 3 received the “plus” treatment.

So, without further ado, Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Raspberry Pi 3 Model B), featuring:

  • A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2
  • Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0)
  • Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT)
  • Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting
  • Improved thermal management

Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

Behold the shiny

Raspberry Pi 3B+ is available to buy today from our network of Approved Resellers.

New features, new chips

Roger Thornton did the design work on this revision of the Raspberry Pi. Here, he and I have a chat about what’s new.

Introducing the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

The new product is built around BCM2837B0, an updated version of the 64-bit Broadcom application processor used in Raspberry Pi 3B, which incorporates power integrity optimisations, and a heat spreader (that’s the shiny metal bit you can see in the photos). Together these allow us to reach higher clock frequencies (or to run at lower voltages to reduce power consumption), and to more accurately monitor and control the temperature of the chip.

Dual-band wireless LAN and Bluetooth are provided by the Cypress CYW43455 “combo” chip, connected to a Proant PCB antenna similar to the one used on Raspberry Pi Zero W. Compared to its predecessor, Raspberry Pi 3B+ delivers somewhat better performance in the 2.4GHz band, and far better performance in the 5GHz band, as demonstrated by these iperf results from LibreELEC developer Milhouse.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B35.735.6
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (2.4GHz)46.746.3
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (5GHz)102102

The wireless circuitry is encapsulated under a metal shield, rather fetchingly embossed with our logo. This has allowed us to certify the entire board as a radio module under FCC rules, which in turn will significantly reduce the cost of conformance testing Raspberry Pi-based products.

We’ll be teaching metalwork next.

Previous Raspberry Pi devices have used the LAN951x family of chips, which combine a USB hub and 10/100 Ethernet controller. For Raspberry Pi 3B+, Microchip have supported us with an upgraded version, LAN7515, which supports Gigabit Ethernet. While the USB 2.0 connection to the application processor limits the available bandwidth, we still see roughly a threefold increase in throughput compared to Raspberry Pi 3B. Again, here are some typical iperf results.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B94.195.5
Raspberry Pi 3B+315315

We use a magjack that supports Power over Ethernet (PoE), and bring the relevant signals to a new 4-pin header. We will shortly launch a PoE HAT which can generate the 5V necessary to power the Raspberry Pi from the 48V PoE supply.

There… are… four… pins!

Coming soon to a Raspberry Pi 3B+ near you

Raspberry Pi 3B was our first product to support PXE Ethernet boot. Testing it in the wild shook out a number of compatibility issues with particular switches and traffic environments. Gordon has rolled up fixes for all known issues into the BCM2837B0 boot ROM, and PXE boot is now enabled by default.

Clocking, voltages and thermals

The improved power integrity of the BCM2837B0 package, and the improved regulation accuracy of our new MaxLinear MxL7704 power management IC, have allowed us to tune our clocking and voltage rules for both better peak performance and longer-duration sustained performance.

Below 70°C, we use the improvements to increase the core frequency to 1.4GHz. Above 70°C, we drop to 1.2GHz, and use the improvements to decrease the core voltage, increasing the period of time before we reach our 80°C thermal throttle; the reduction in power consumption is such that many use cases will never reach the throttle. Like a modern smartphone, we treat the thermal mass of the device as a resource, to be spent carefully with the goal of optimising user experience.

This graph, courtesy of Gareth Halfacree, demonstrates that Raspberry Pi 3B+ runs faster and at a lower temperature for the duration of an eight‑minute quad‑core Sysbench CPU test.

Note that Raspberry Pi 3B+ does consume substantially more power than its predecessor. We strongly encourage you to use a high-quality 2.5A power supply, such as the official Raspberry Pi Universal Power Supply.

FAQs

We’ll keep updating this list over the next couple of days, but here are a few to get you started.

Are you discontinuing earlier Raspberry Pi models?

No. We have a lot of industrial customers who will want to stick with the existing products for the time being. We’ll keep building these models for as long as there’s demand. Raspberry Pi 1B+, Raspberry Pi 2B, and Raspberry Pi 3B will continue to sell for $25, $35, and $35 respectively.

What about Model A+?

Raspberry Pi 1A+ continues to be the $20 entry-level “big” Raspberry Pi for the time being. We are considering the possibility of producing a Raspberry Pi 3A+ in due course.

What about the Compute Module?

CM1, CM3 and CM3L will continue to be available. We may offer versions of CM3 and CM3L with BCM2837B0 in due course, depending on customer demand.

Are you still using VideoCore?

Yes. VideoCore IV 3D is the only publicly-documented 3D graphics core for ARM‑based SoCs, and we want to make Raspberry Pi more open over time, not less.

Credits

A project like this requires a vast amount of focused work from a large team over an extended period. Particular credit is due to Roger Thornton, who designed the board and ran the exhaustive (and exhausting) RF compliance campaign, and to the team at the Sony UK Technology Centre in Pencoed, South Wales. A partial list of others who made major direct contributions to the BCM2837B0 chip program, CYW43455 integration, LAN7515 and MxL7704 developments, and Raspberry Pi 3B+ itself follows:

James Adams, David Armour, Jonathan Bell, Maria Blazquez, Jamie Brogan-Shaw, Mike Buffham, Rob Campling, Cindy Cao, Victor Carmon, KK Chan, Nick Chase, Nigel Cheetham, Scott Clark, Nigel Clift, Dominic Cobley, Peter Coyle, John Cronk, Di Dai, Kurt Dennis, David Doyle, Andrew Edwards, Phil Elwell, John Ferdinand, Doug Freegard, Ian Furlong, Shawn Guo, Philip Harrison, Jason Hicks, Stefan Ho, Andrew Hoare, Gordon Hollingworth, Tuomas Hollman, EikPei Hu, James Hughes, Andy Hulbert, Anand Jain, David John, Prasanna Kerekoppa, Shaik Labeeb, Trevor Latham, Steve Le, David Lee, David Lewsey, Sherman Li, Xizhe Li, Simon Long, Fu Luo Larson, Juan Martinez, Sandhya Menon, Ben Mercer, James Mills, Max Passell, Mark Perry, Eric Phiri, Ashwin Rao, Justin Rees, James Reilly, Matt Rowley, Akshaye Sama, Ian Saturley, Serge Schneider, Manuel Sedlmair, Shawn Shadburn, Veeresh Shivashimper, Graham Smith, Ben Stephens, Mike Stimson, Yuree Tchong, Stuart Thomson, John Wadsworth, Ian Watch, Sarah Williams, Jason Zhu.

If you’re not on this list and think you should be, please let me know, and accept my apologies.

The post Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on sale now at $35 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to Patch Linux Workloads on AWS

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-linux-workloads-on-aws/

Most malware tries to compromise your systems by using a known vulnerability that the operating system maker has already patched. As best practices to help prevent malware from affecting your systems, you should apply all operating system patches and actively monitor your systems for missing patches.

In this blog post, I show you how to patch Linux workloads using AWS Systems Manager. To accomplish this, I will show you how to use the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) to:

  1. Launch an Amazon EC2 instance for use with Systems Manager.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to patch your Amazon EC2 Linux instances.

In two previous blog posts (Part 1 and Part 2), I showed how to use the AWS Management Console to perform the necessary steps to patch, inspect, and protect Microsoft Windows workloads. You can implement those same processes for your Linux instances running in AWS by changing the instance tags and types shown in the previous blog posts.

Because most Linux system administrators are more familiar with using a command line, I show how to patch Linux workloads by using the AWS CLI in this blog post. The steps to use the Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler and Amazon Inspector are identical for both Microsoft Windows and Linux.

What you should know first

To follow along with the solution in this post, you need one or more Amazon EC2 instances. You may use existing instances or create new instances. For this post, I assume this is an Amazon EC2 for Amazon Linux instance installed from Amazon Machine Images (AMIs).

Systems Manager is a collection of capabilities that helps you automate management tasks for AWS-hosted instances on Amazon EC2 and your on-premises servers. In this post, I use Systems Manager for two purposes: to run remote commands and apply operating system patches. To learn about the full capabilities of Systems Manager, see What Is AWS Systems Manager?

As of Amazon Linux 2017.09, the AMI comes preinstalled with the Systems Manager agent. Systems Manager Patch Manager also supports Red Hat and Ubuntu. To install the agent on these Linux distributions or an older version of Amazon Linux, see Installing and Configuring SSM Agent on Linux Instances.

If you are not familiar with how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance, see Launching an Instance. I also assume you launched or will launch your instance in a private subnet. You must make sure that the Amazon EC2 instance can connect to the internet using a network address translation (NAT) instance or NAT gateway to communicate with Systems Manager. The following diagram shows how you should structure your VPC.

Diagram showing how to structure your VPC

Later in this post, you will assign tasks to a maintenance window to patch your instances with Systems Manager. To do this, the IAM user you are using for this post must have the iam:PassRole permission. This permission allows the IAM user assigning tasks to pass his own IAM permissions to the AWS service. In this example, when you assign a task to a maintenance window, IAM passes your credentials to Systems Manager. You also should authorize your IAM user to use Amazon EC2 and Systems Manager. As mentioned before, you will be using the AWS CLI for most of the steps in this blog post. Our documentation shows you how to get started with the AWS CLI. Make sure you have the AWS CLI installed and configured with an AWS access key and secret access key that belong to an IAM user that have the following AWS managed policies attached to the IAM user you are using for this example: AmazonEC2FullAccess and AmazonSSMFullAccess.

Step 1: Launch an Amazon EC2 Linux instance

In this section, I show you how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance so that you can use Systems Manager with the instance. This step requires you to do three things:

  1. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager before launching your Amazon EC2 instance.
  2. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance with Amazon EBS and the IAM role for Systems Manager.
  3. Add tags to the instances so that you can add your instances to a Systems Manager maintenance window based on tags.

A. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager

Before launching an Amazon EC2 instance, I recommend that you first create an IAM role for Systems Manager, which you will use to update the Amazon EC2 instance. AWS already provides a preconfigured policy that you can use for the new role and it is called AmazonEC2RoleforSSM.

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal (an entity that can take action on an AWS resource) is allowed to assume the role we are going to create. In this example, the principal is the Amazon EC2 service.
    {
      "Version": "2012-10-17",
      "Statement": {
        "Effect": "Allow",
        "Principal": {"Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"},
        "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
      }
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named EC2SSM that has the AWS managed policy AmazonEC2RoleforSSM attached to it. This generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name EC2SSM --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name EC2SSM --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonEC2RoleforSSM

  1. Use the following commands to create the IAM instance profile and add the role to the instance profile. The instance profile is needed to attach the role we created earlier to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws iam create-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP
    $ aws iam add-role-to-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP --role-name EC2SSM

B. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance

To follow along, you need an Amazon EC2 instance that is running Amazon Linux. You can use any existing instance you may have or create a new instance.

When launching a new Amazon EC2 instance, be sure that:

  1. Use the following command to launch a new Amazon EC2 instance using an Amazon Linux AMI available in the US East (N. Virginia) Region (also known as us-east-1). Replace YourKeyPair and YourSubnetId with your information. For more information about creating a key pair, see the create-key-pair documentation. Write down the InstanceId that is in the output because you will need it later in this post.
    $ aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-cb9ec1b1 --instance-type t2.micro --key-name YourKeyPair --subnet-id YourSubnetId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

  1. If you are using an existing Amazon EC2 instance, you can use the following command to attach the instance profile you created earlier to your instance.
    $ aws ec2 associate-iam-instance-profile --instance-id YourInstanceId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

C. Add tags

The final step of configuring your Amazon EC2 instances is to add tags. You will use these tags to configure Systems Manager in Step 2 of this post. For this example, I add a tag named Patch Group and set the value to Linux Servers. I could have other groups of Amazon EC2 instances that I treat differently by having the same tag name but a different tag value. For example, I might have a collection of other servers with the tag name Patch Group with a value of Web Servers.

  • Use the following command to add the Patch Group tag to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ec2 create-tags --resources YourInstanceId --tags --tags Key="Patch Group",Value="Linux Servers"

Note: You must wait a few minutes until the Amazon EC2 instance is available before you can proceed to the next section. To make sure your Amazon EC2 instance is online and ready, you can use the following AWS CLI command:

$ aws ec2 describe-instance-status --instance-ids YourInstanceId

At this point, you now have at least one Amazon EC2 instance you can use to configure Systems Manager.

Step 2: Configure Systems Manager

In this section, I show you how to configure and use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches to your Amazon EC2 instances, and how to manage patch compliance.

To start, I provide some background information about Systems Manager. Then, I cover how to:

  1. Create the Systems Manager IAM role so that Systems Manager is able to perform patch operations.
  2. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance to define which patches Systems Manager should apply.
  3. Define a maintenance window to make sure Systems Manager patches your instance when you tell it to.
  4. Monitor patch compliance to verify the patch state of your instances.

You must meet two prerequisites to use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches. First, you must attach the IAM role you created in the previous section, EC2SSM, to your Amazon EC2 instance. Second, you must install the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. If you have used a recent Amazon Linux AMI, Amazon has already installed the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. You can confirm this by logging in to an Amazon EC2 instance and checking the Systems Manager agent log files that are located at /var/log/amazon/ssm/.

To install the Systems Manager agent on an instance that does not have the agent preinstalled or if you want to use the Systems Manager agent on your on-premises servers, see Installing and Configuring the Systems Manager Agent on Linux Instances. If you forgot to attach the newly created role when launching your Amazon EC2 instance or if you want to attach the role to already running Amazon EC2 instances, see Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI or use the AWS Management Console.

A. Create the Systems Manager IAM role

For a maintenance window to be able to run any tasks, you must create a new role for Systems Manager. This role is a different kind of role than the one you created earlier: this role will be used by Systems Manager instead of Amazon EC2. Earlier, you created the role, EC2SSM, with the policy, AmazonEC2RoleforSSM, which allowed the Systems Manager agent on your instance to communicate with Systems Manager. In this section, you need a new role with the policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, so that the Systems Manager service can execute commands on your instance.

To create the new IAM role for Systems Manager:

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal is allowed to assume the role you are going to create. This trust policy allows not only Amazon EC2 to assume this role, but also Systems Manager.
    {
       "Version":"2012-10-17",
       "Statement":[
          {
             "Sid":"",
             "Effect":"Allow",
             "Principal":{
                "Service":[
                   "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                   "ssm.amazonaws.com"
               ]
             },
             "Action":"sts:AssumeRole"
          }
       ]
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named MaintenanceWindowRole that has the AWS managed policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, attached to it. This command generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole

B. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance

Next, you will create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your Amazon EC2 instance. A patch baseline defines which patches Systems Manager should apply to your instance. Before you can associate the patch baseline with your instance, though, you must determine if Systems Manager recognizes your Amazon EC2 instance. Use the following command to list all instances managed by Systems Manager. The --filters option ensures you look only for your newly created Amazon EC2 instance.

$ aws ssm describe-instance-information --filters Key=InstanceIds,Values= YourInstanceId

{
    "InstanceInformationList": [
        {
            "IsLatestVersion": true,
            "ComputerName": "ip-10-50-2-245",
            "PingStatus": "Online",
            "InstanceId": "YourInstanceId",
            "IPAddress": "10.50.2.245",
            "ResourceType": "EC2Instance",
            "AgentVersion": "2.2.120.0",
            "PlatformVersion": "2017.09",
            "PlatformName": "Amazon Linux AMI",
            "PlatformType": "Linux",
            "LastPingDateTime": 1515759143.826
        }
    ]
}

If your instance is missing from the list, verify that:

  1. Your instance is running.
  2. You attached the Systems Manager IAM role, EC2SSM.
  3. You deployed a NAT gateway in your public subnet to ensure your VPC reflects the diagram shown earlier in this post so that the Systems Manager agent can connect to the Systems Manager internet endpoint.
  4. The Systems Manager agent logs don’t include any unaddressed errors.

Now that you have checked that Systems Manager can manage your Amazon EC2 instance, it is time to create a patch baseline. With a patch baseline, you define which patches are approved to be installed on all Amazon EC2 instances associated with the patch baseline. The Patch Group resource tag you defined earlier will determine to which patch group an instance belongs. If you do not specifically define a patch baseline, the default AWS-managed patch baseline is used.

To create a patch baseline:

  1. Use the following command to create a patch baseline named AmazonLinuxServers. With approval rules, you can determine the approved patches that will be included in your patch baseline. In this example, you add all Critical severity patches to the patch baseline as soon as they are released, by setting the Auto approval delay to 0 days. By setting the Auto approval delay to 2 days, you add to this patch baseline the Important, Medium, and Low severity patches two days after they are released.
    $ aws ssm create-patch-baseline --name "AmazonLinuxServers" --description "Baseline containing all updates for Amazon Linux" --operating-system AMAZON_LINUX --approval-rules "PatchRules=[{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Critical],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=0,ComplianceLevel=CRITICAL},{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Important,Medium,Low],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=2,ComplianceLevel=HIGH}]"
    
    {
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

  1. Use the following command to register the patch baseline you created with your instance. To do so, you use the Patch Group tag that you added to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ssm register-patch-baseline-for-patch-group --baseline-id YourPatchBaselineId --patch-group "Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "PatchGroup": "Linux Servers",
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

C.  Define a maintenance window

Now that you have successfully set up a role, created a patch baseline, and registered your Amazon EC2 instance with your patch baseline, you will define a maintenance window so that you can control when your Amazon EC2 instances will receive patches. By creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

To define a maintenance window:

  1. Use the following command to define a maintenance window. In this example command, the maintenance window will start every Saturday at 10:00 P.M. UTC. It will have a duration of 4 hours and will not start any new tasks 1 hour before the end of the maintenance window.
    $ aws ssm create-maintenance-window --name SaturdayNight --schedule "cron(0 0 22 ? * SAT *)" --duration 4 --cutoff 1 --allow-unassociated-targets
    
    {
        "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId"
    }

For more information about defining a cron-based schedule for maintenance windows, see Cron and Rate Expressions for Maintenance Windows.

  1. After defining the maintenance window, you must register the Amazon EC2 instance with the maintenance window so that Systems Manager knows which Amazon EC2 instance it should patch in this maintenance window. You can register the instance by using the same Patch Group tag you used to associate the Amazon EC2 instance with the AWS-provided patch baseline, as shown in the following command.
    $ aws ssm register-target-with-maintenance-window --window-id YourMaintenanceWindowId --resource-type INSTANCE --targets "Key=tag:Patch Group,Values=Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "WindowTargetId": "YourWindowTargetId"
    }

  1. Assign a task to the maintenance window that will install the operating system patches on your Amazon EC2 instance. The following command includes the following options.
    1. name is the name of your task and is optional. I named mine Patching.
    2. task-arn is the name of the task document you want to run.
    3. max-concurrency allows you to specify how many of your Amazon EC2 instances Systems Manager should patch at the same time. max-errors determines when Systems Manager should abort the task. For patching, this number should not be too low, because you do not want your entire patch task to stop on all instances if one instance fails. You can set this, for example, to 20%.
    4. service-role-arn is the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole role you created earlier in this blog post.
    5. task-invocation-parameters defines the parameters that are specific to the AWS-RunPatchBaseline task document and tells Systems Manager that you want to install patches with a timeout of 600 seconds (10 minutes).
      $ aws ssm register-task-with-maintenance-window --name "Patching" --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId" --targets "Key=WindowTargetIds,Values=YourWindowTargetId" --task-arn AWS-RunPatchBaseline --service-role-arn "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/MaintenanceWindowRole" --task-type "RUN_COMMAND" --task-invocation-parameters "RunCommand={Comment=,TimeoutSeconds=600,Parameters={SnapshotId=[''],Operation=[Install]}}" --max-concurrency "500" --max-errors "20%"
      
      {
          "WindowTaskId": "YourWindowTaskId"
      }

Now, you must wait for the maintenance window to run at least once according to the schedule you defined earlier. If your maintenance window has expired, you can check the status of any maintenance tasks Systems Manager has performed by using the following command.

$ aws ssm describe-maintenance-window-executions --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId"

{
    "WindowExecutions": [
        {
            "Status": "SUCCESS",
            "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId",
            "WindowExecutionId": "b594984b-430e-4ffa-a44c-a2e171de9dd3",
            "EndTime": 1515766467.487,
            "StartTime": 1515766457.691
        }
    ]
}

D.  Monitor patch compliance

You also can see the overall patch compliance of all Amazon EC2 instances using the following command in the AWS CLI.

$ aws ssm list-compliance-summaries

This command shows you the number of instances that are compliant with each category and the number of instances that are not in JSON format.

You also can see overall patch compliance by choosing Compliance under Insights in the navigation pane of the Systems Manager console. You will see a visual representation of how many Amazon EC2 instances are up to date, how many Amazon EC2 instances are noncompliant, and how many Amazon EC2 instances are compliant in relation to the earlier defined patch baseline.

Screenshot of the Compliance page of the Systems Manager console

In this section, you have set everything up for patch management on your instance. Now you know how to patch your Amazon EC2 instance in a controlled manner and how to check if your Amazon EC2 instance is compliant with the patch baseline you have defined. Of course, I recommend that you apply these steps to all Amazon EC2 instances you manage.

Summary

In this blog post, I showed how to use Systems Manager to create a patch baseline and maintenance window to keep your Amazon EC2 Linux instances up to date with the latest security patches. Remember that by creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing any part of this solution, start a new thread on the Amazon EC2 forum or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

Me on the Equifax Breach

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/11/me_on_the_equif.html

Testimony and Statement for the Record of Bruce Schneier
Fellow and Lecturer, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School

Hearing on “Securing Consumers’ Credit Data in the Age of Digital Commerce”

Before the

Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection
Committee on Energy and Commerce
United States House of Representatives

1 November 2017
2125 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Mister Chairman and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to testify today concerning the security of credit data. My name is Bruce Schneier, and I am a security technologist. For over 30 years I have studied the technologies of security and privacy. I have authored 13 books on these subjects, including Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World (Norton, 2015). My popular newsletter CryptoGram and my blog Schneier on Security are read by over 250,000 people.

Additionally, I am a Fellow and Lecturer at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government –where I teach Internet security policy — and a Fellow at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School. I am a board member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, AccessNow, and the Tor Project; and an advisory board member of Electronic Privacy Information Center and VerifiedVoting.org. I am also a special advisor to IBM Security and the Chief Technology Officer of IBM Resilient.

I am here representing none of those organizations, and speak only for myself based on my own expertise and experience.

I have eleven main points:

1. The Equifax breach was a serious security breach that puts millions of Americans at risk.

Equifax reported that 145.5 million US customers, about 44% of the population, were impacted by the breach. (That’s the original 143 million plus the additional 2.5 million disclosed a month later.) The attackers got access to full names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver’s license numbers.

This is exactly the sort of information criminals can use to impersonate victims to banks, credit card companies, insurance companies, cell phone companies and other businesses vulnerable to fraud. As a result, all 143 million US victims are at greater risk of identity theft, and will remain at risk for years to come. And those who suffer identify theft will have problems for months, if not years, as they work to clean up their name and credit rating.

2. Equifax was solely at fault.

This was not a sophisticated attack. The security breach was a result of a vulnerability in the software for their websites: a program called Apache Struts. The particular vulnerability was fixed by Apache in a security patch that was made available on March 6, 2017. This was not a minor vulnerability; the computer press at the time called it “critical.” Within days, it was being used by attackers to break into web servers. Equifax was notified by Apache, US CERT, and the Department of Homeland Security about the vulnerability, and was provided instructions to make the fix.

Two months later, Equifax had still failed to patch its systems. It eventually got around to it on July 29. The attackers used the vulnerability to access the company’s databases and steal consumer information on May 13, over two months after Equifax should have patched the vulnerability.

The company’s incident response after the breach was similarly damaging. It waited nearly six weeks before informing victims that their personal information had been stolen and they were at increased risk of identity theft. Equifax opened a website to help aid customers, but the poor security around that — the site was at a domain separate from the Equifax domain — invited fraudulent imitators and even more damage to victims. At one point, the official Equifax communications even directed people to that fraudulent site.

This is not the first time Equifax failed to take computer security seriously. It confessed to another data leak in January 2017. In May 2016, one of its websites was hacked, resulting in 430,000 people having their personal information stolen. Also in 2016, a security researcher found and reported a basic security vulnerability in its main website. And in 2014, the company reported yet another security breach of consumer information. There are more.

3. There are thousands of data brokers with similarly intimate information, similarly at risk.

Equifax is more than a credit reporting agency. It’s a data broker. It collects information about all of us, analyzes it all, and then sells those insights. It might be one of the biggest, but there are 2,500 to 4,000 other data brokers that are collecting, storing, and selling information about us — almost all of them companies you’ve never heard of and have no business relationship with.

The breadth and depth of information that data brokers have is astonishing. Data brokers collect and store billions of data elements covering nearly every US consumer. Just one of the data brokers studied holds information on more than 1.4 billion consumer transactions and 700 billion data elements, and another adds more than 3 billion new data points to its database each month.

These brokers collect demographic information: names, addresses, telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, gender, age, marital status, presence and ages of children in household, education level, profession, income level, political affiliation, cars driven, and information about homes and other property. They collect lists of things we’ve purchased, when we’ve purchased them, and how we paid for them. They keep track of deaths, divorces, and diseases in our families. They collect everything about what we do on the Internet.

4. These data brokers deliberately hide their actions, and make it difficult for consumers to learn about or control their data.

If there were a dozen people who stood behind us and took notes of everything we purchased, read, searched for, or said, we would be alarmed at the privacy invasion. But because these companies operate in secret, inside our browsers and financial transactions, we don’t see them and we don’t know they’re there.

Regarding Equifax, few consumers have any idea what the company knows about them, who they sell personal data to or why. If anyone knows about them at all, it’s about their business as a credit bureau, not their business as a data broker. Their website lists 57 different offerings for business: products for industries like automotive, education, health care, insurance, and restaurants.

In general, options to “opt-out” don’t work with data brokers. It’s a confusing process, and doesn’t result in your data being deleted. Data brokers will still collect data about consumers who opt out. It will still be in those companies’ databases, and will still be vulnerable. It just don’t be included individually when they sell data to their customers.

5. The existing regulatory structure is inadequate.

Right now, there is no way for consumers to protect themselves. Their data has been harvested and analyzed by these companies without their knowledge or consent. They cannot improve the security of their personal data, and have no control over how vulnerable it is. They only learn about data breaches when the companies announce them — which can be months after the breaches occur — and at that point the onus is on them to obtain credit monitoring services or credit freezes. And even those only protect consumers from some of the harms, and only those suffered after Equifax admitted to the breach.

Right now, the press is reporting “dozens” of lawsuits against Equifax from shareholders, consumers, and banks. Massachusetts has sued Equifax for violating state consumer protection and privacy laws. Other states may follow suit.

If any of these plaintiffs win in the court, it will be a rare victory for victims of privacy breaches against the companies that have our personal information. Current law is too narrowly focused on people who have suffered financial losses directly traceable to a specific breach. Proving this is difficult. If you are the victim of identity theft in the next month, is it because of Equifax or does the blame belong to another of the thousands of companies who have your personal data? As long as one can’t prove it one way or the other, data brokers remain blameless and liability free.

Additionally, much of this market in our personal data falls outside the protections of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. And in order for the Federal Trade Commission to levy a fine against Equifax, it needs to have a consent order and then a subsequent violation. Any fines will be limited to credit information, which is a small portion of the enormous amount of information these companies know about us. In reality, this is not an effective enforcement regime.

Although the FTC is investigating Equifax, it is unclear if it has a viable case.

6. The market cannot fix this because we are not the customers of data brokers.

The customers of these companies are people and organizations who want to buy information: banks looking to lend you money, landlords deciding whether to rent you an apartment, employers deciding whether to hire you, companies trying to figure out whether you’d be a profitable customer — everyone who wants to sell you something, even governments.

Markets work because buyers choose from a choice of sellers, and sellers compete for buyers. None of us are Equifax’s customers. None of us are the customers of any of these data brokers. We can’t refuse to do business with the companies. We can’t remove our data from their databases. With few limited exceptions, we can’t even see what data these companies have about us or correct any mistakes.

We are the product that these companies sell to their customers: those who want to use our personal information to understand us, categorize us, make decisions about us, and persuade us.

Worse, the financial markets reward bad security. Given the choice between increasing their cybersecurity budget by 5%, or saving that money and taking the chance, a rational CEO chooses to save the money. Wall Street rewards those whose balance sheets look good, not those who are secure. And if senior management gets unlucky and the a public breach happens, they end up okay. Equifax’s CEO didn’t get his $5.2 million severance pay, but he did keep his $18.4 million pension. Any company that spends more on security than absolutely necessary is immediately penalized by shareholders when its profits decrease.

Even the negative PR that Equifax is currently suffering will fade. Unless we expect data brokers to put public interest ahead of profits, the security of this industry will never improve without government regulation.

7. We need effective regulation of data brokers.

In 2014, the Federal Trade Commission recommended that Congress require data brokers be more transparent and give consumers more control over their personal information. That report contains good suggestions on how to regulate this industry.

First, Congress should help plaintiffs in data breach cases by authorizing and funding empirical research on the harm individuals receive from these breaches.

Specifically, Congress should move forward legislative proposals that establish a nationwide “credit freeze” — which is better described as changing the default for disclosure from opt-out to opt-in — and free lifetime credit monitoring services. By this I do not mean giving customers free credit-freeze options, a proposal by Senators Warren and Schatz, but that the default should be a credit freeze.

The credit card industry routinely notifies consumers when there are suspicious charges. It is obvious that credit reporting agencies should have a similar obligation to notify consumers when there is suspicious activity concerning their credit report.

On the technology side, more could be done to limit the amount of personal data companies are allowed to collect. Increasingly, privacy safeguards impose “data minimization” requirements to ensure that only the data that is actually needed is collected. On the other hand, Congress should not create a new national identifier to replace the Social Security Numbers. That would make the system of identification even more brittle. Better is to reduce dependence on systems of identification and to create contextual identification where necessary.

Finally, Congress needs to give the Federal Trade Commission the authority to set minimum security standards for data brokers and to give consumers more control over their personal information. This is essential as long as consumers are these companies’ products and not their customers.

8. Resist complaints from the industry that this is “too hard.”

The credit bureaus and data brokers, and their lobbyists and trade-association representatives, will claim that many of these measures are too hard. They’re not telling you the truth.

Take one example: credit freezes. This is an effective security measure that protects consumers, but the process of getting one and of temporarily unfreezing credit is made deliberately onerous by the credit bureaus. Why isn’t there a smartphone app that alerts me when someone wants to access my credit rating, and lets me freeze and unfreeze my credit at the touch of the screen? Too hard? Today, you can have an app on your phone that does something similar if you try to log into a computer network, or if someone tries to use your credit card at a physical location different from where you are.

Moreover, any credit bureau or data broker operating in Europe is already obligated to follow the more rigorous EU privacy laws. The EU General Data Protection Regulation will come into force, requiring even more security and privacy controls for companies collecting storing the personal data of EU citizens. Those companies have already demonstrated that they can comply with those more stringent regulations.

Credit bureaus, and data brokers in general, are deliberately not implementing these 21st-century security solutions, because they want their services to be as easy and useful as possible for their actual customers: those who are buying your information. Similarly, companies that use this personal information to open accounts are not implementing more stringent security because they want their services to be as easy-to-use and convenient as possible.

9. This has foreign trade implications.

The Canadian Broadcast Corporation reported that 100,000 Canadians had their data stolen in the Equifax breach. The British Broadcasting Corporation originally reported that 400,000 UK consumers were affected; Equifax has since revised that to 15.2 million.

Many American Internet companies have significant numbers of European users and customers, and rely on negotiated safe harbor agreements to legally collect and store personal data of EU citizens.

The European Union is in the middle of a massive regulatory shift in its privacy laws, and those agreements are coming under renewed scrutiny. Breaches such as Equifax give these European regulators a powerful argument that US privacy regulations are inadequate to protect their citizens’ data, and that they should require that data to remain in Europe. This could significantly harm American Internet companies.

10. This has national security implications.

Although it is still unknown who compromised the Equifax database, it could easily have been a foreign adversary that routinely attacks the servers of US companies and US federal agencies with the goal of exploiting security vulnerabilities and obtaining personal data.

When the Fair Credit Reporting Act was passed in 1970, the concern was that the credit bureaus might misuse our data. That is still a concern, but the world has changed since then. Credit bureaus and data brokers have far more intimate data about all of us. And it is valuable not only to companies wanting to advertise to us, but foreign governments as well. In 2015, the Chinese breached the database of the Office of Personal Management and stole the detailed security clearance information of 21 million Americans. North Korea routinely engages in cybercrime as way to fund its other activities. In a world where foreign governments use cyber capabilities to attack US assets, requiring data brokers to limit collection of personal data, securely store the data they collect, and delete data about consumers when it is no longer needed is a matter of national security.

11. We need to do something about it.

Yes, this breach is a huge black eye and a temporary stock dip for Equifax — this month. Soon, another company will have suffered a massive data breach and few will remember Equifax’s problem. Does anyone remember last year when Yahoo admitted that it exposed personal information of a billion users in 2013 and another half billion in 2014?

Unless Congress acts to protect consumer information in the digital age, these breaches will continue.

Thank you for the opportunity to testify today. I will be pleased to answer your questions.

Journalists Generally Do Not Use Secure Communication

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/08/journalists_gen.html

This should come as no surprise:

Alas, our findings suggest that secure communications haven’t yet attracted mass adoption among journalists. We looked at 2,515 Washington journalists with permanent credentials to cover Congress, and we found only 2.5 percent of them solicit end-to-end encrypted communication via their Twitter bios. That’s just 62 out of all the broadcast, newspaper, wire service, and digital reporters. Just 28 list a way to reach them via Signal or another secure messaging app. Only 22 provide a PGP public key, a method that allows sources to send encrypted messages. A paltry seven advertise a secure email address. In an era when anything that can be hacked will be and when the president has declared outright war on the media, this should serve as a frightening wake-up call.

[…]

When journalists don’t step up, sources with sensitive information face the burden of using riskier modes of communication to initiate contact­ — and possibly conduct all of their exchanges­ — with reporters. It increases their chances of getting caught, putting them in danger of losing their job or facing prosecution. It’s burden enough to make them think twice about whistleblowing.

I forgive them for not using secure e-mail. It’s hard to use and confusing. But secure messaging is easy.

Create Multiple Builds from the Same Source Using Different AWS CodeBuild Build Specification Files

Post Syndicated from Prakash Palanisamy original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/create-multiple-builds-from-the-same-source-using-different-aws-codebuild-build-specification-files/

In June 2017, AWS CodeBuild announced you can now specify an alternate build specification file name or location in an AWS CodeBuild project.

In this post, I’ll show you how to use different build specification files in the same repository to create different builds. You’ll find the source code for this post in our GitHub repo.

Requirements

The AWS CLI must be installed and configured.

Solution Overview

I have created a C program (cbsamplelib.c) that will be used to create a shared library and another utility program (cbsampleutil.c) to use that library. I’ll use a Makefile to compile these files.

I need to put this sample application in RPM and DEB packages so end users can easily deploy them. I have created a build specification file for RPM. It will use make to compile this code and the RPM specification file (cbsample.rpmspec) configured in the build specification to create the RPM package. Similarly, I have created a build specification file for DEB. It will create the DEB package based on the control specification file (cbsample.control) configured in this build specification.

RPM Build Project:

The following build specification file (buildspec-rpm.yml) uses build specification version 0.2. As described in the documentation, this version has different syntax for environment variables. This build specification includes multiple phases:

  • As part of the install phase, the required packages is installed using yum.
  • During the pre_build phase, the required directories are created and the required files, including the RPM build specification file, are copied to the appropriate location.
  • During the build phase, the code is compiled, and then the RPM package is created based on the RPM specification.

As defined in the artifact section, the RPM file will be uploaded as a build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using cb-centos-project.json as a reference, create the input JSON file for the CLI command. This project uses an AWS CodeCommit repository named codebuild-multispec and a file named buildspec-rpm.yml as the build specification file. To create the RPM package, we need to specify a custom image name. I’m using the latest CentOS 7 image available in the Docker Hub. I’m using a role named CodeBuildServiceRole. It contains permissions similar to those defined in CodeBuildServiceRole.json. (You need to change the resource fields in the policy, as appropriate.)

{
    "name": "rpm-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "centos:7",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "RPM Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

After the cli-input-json file is ready, execute the following command to create the build project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-centos-project.json

{
    "project": {
        "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole", 
        "tags": [
            {
                "value": "RPM Demo Build", 
                "key": "Name"
            }
        ], 
        "artifacts": {
            "namespaceType": "NONE", 
            "packaging": "NONE", 
            "type": "S3", 
            "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository", 
            "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "lastModified": 1500559811.13, 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "created": 1500559811.13, 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:project/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source."
    }
}

When the project is created, run the following command to start the build. After the build has started, get the build ID. You can use the build ID to get the status of the build.

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1: 012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    }
}

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "ids": [
        "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    ]
}

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc
{
    "buildsNotFound": [], 
    "builds": [
        {
            "buildComplete": true, 
            "phases": [
                {
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "endTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "phaseType": "SUBMITTED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560156.761
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PROVISIONING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 24, 
                    "startTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "endTime": 1500560182.066
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "DOWNLOAD_SOURCE", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 15, 
                    "startTime": 1500560182.066, 
                    "endTime": 1500560197.906
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "INSTALL", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 19, 
                    "startTime": 1500560197.906, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.515
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PRE_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.515, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.662
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.662, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.995
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "POST_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.995, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.074
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "UPLOAD_ARTIFACTS", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.074, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.542
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "FINALIZING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 4, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.542, 
                    "endTime": 1500560223.128
                }, 
                {
                    "phaseType": "COMPLETED", 
                    "startTime": 1500560223.128
                }
            ], 
            "logs": {
                "groupName": "/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
                "deepLink": "https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudwatch/home?region=eu-west-1#logEvent:group=/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo;stream=57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
                "streamName": "57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
            }, 
            "artifacts": {
                "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
            }, 
            "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
            "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
            "initiator": "prakash", 
            "buildStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
            "environment": {
                "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
                "privilegedMode": false, 
                "image": "centos:7", 
                "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
                "environmentVariables": []
            }, 
            "source": {
                "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
                "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
                "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
            }, 
            "currentPhase": "COMPLETED", 
            "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
            "endTime": 1500560223.128, 
            "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
            "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
        }
    ]
}

DEB Build Project:

In this project, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-deb.yml. Like the RPM build project, this specification includes multiple phases. Here I use a Debian control file to create the package in DEB format. After a successful build, the DEB package will be uploaded as build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - apt-get install gcc make -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - cp -f cbsample.control ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN/control
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Building the application"
      - make
      - cp libcbsamplelib.so ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - cp cbsamplelib.h ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - cp cbsampleutil ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - chmod +x ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin/cbsampleutil
      - dpkg-deb --build ./cbsample-$build_version

artifacts:
  files:
    - cbsample-*.deb

Here we use cb-ubuntu-project.json as a reference to create the CLI input JSON file. This project uses the same AWS CodeCommit repository (codebuild-multispec) but a different buildspec file in the same repository (buildspec-deb.yml). We use the default CodeBuild image to create the DEB package. We use the same IAM role (CodeBuildServiceRole).

{
    "name": "deb-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build DEB from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-deb.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "aws/codebuild/ubuntu-base:14.04",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "Debian Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

Using the CLI input JSON file, create the project, start the build, and check the status of the project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-ubuntu-project.json

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-DEB-Demo:e535c4b0-7067-4fbe-8060-9bb9de203789

After successful completion of the RPM and DEB builds, check the S3 bucket configured in the artifacts section for the build packages. Build projects will create a directory in the name of the build project and copy the artifacts inside it.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-DEB-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:37:22       5420 cbsample-0.1.deb

Override Buildspec During Build Start:

It’s also possible to override the build specification file of an existing project when starting a build. If we want to create the libs RPM package instead of the whole RPM, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-libs-rpm.yml. This build specification file is similar to the earlier RPM build. The only difference is that it uses a different RPM specification file to create libs RPM.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-libs-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample-libs.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample-libs.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample-libs*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using the same RPM build project that we created earlier, start a new build and set the value of the `–buildspec-override` parameter to buildspec-libs-rpm.yml .

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --buildspec-override buildspec-libs-rpm.yml
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-libs-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500562366.239, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567"
    }
}

After the build is completed successfully, check to see if the package appears in the artifact S3 bucket under the CodeBuild-RPM-Demo build project folder.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm
2017-07-20 16:53:54       5320 cbsample-libs-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

Conclusion

In this post, I have shown you how multiple buildspec files in the same source repository can be used to run multiple AWS CodeBuild build projects. I have also shown you how to provide a different buildspec file when starting the build.

For more information about AWS CodeBuild, see the AWS CodeBuild documentation. You can get started with AWS CodeBuild by using this step by step guide.


About the author

Prakash Palanisamy is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps or Alexa, he will be solving problems in Project Euler. He also enjoys watching educational documentaries.

Measuring Lock Contention

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/mutrace.html

When naively profiling multi-threaded applications the time spent waiting
for mutexes is not necessarily visible in the generated output. However lock
contention can have a big impact on the runtime behaviour of applications. On
Linux valgrind’s
drd
can be used to track down mutex contention. Unfortunately running
applications under valgrind/drd slows them down massively, often having the
effect of itself generating many of the contentions one is trying to track
down. Also due to its slowness it is very time consuming work.

To improve the situation if have now written a mutex profiler called
mutrace
. In contrast to valgrind/drd it does not virtualize the
CPU instruction set, making it a lot faster. In fact, the hooks mutrace
relies on to profile mutex operations should only minimally influence
application runtime. mutrace is not useful for finding
synchronizations bugs, it is solely useful for profiling locks.

Now, enough of this introductionary blabla. Let’s have a look on the data
mutrace can generate for you. As an example we’ll look at
gedit as a bit of a prototypical Gnome application. Gtk+ and the other
Gnome libraries are not really known for their heavy use of multi-threading,
and the APIs are generally not thread-safe (for a good reason). However,
internally subsytems such as gio do use threading quite extensibly.
And as it turns out there are a few hotspots that can be discovered with
mutrace:

$ LD_PRELOAD=/home/lennart/projects/mutrace/libmutrace.so gedit
mutrace: 0.1 sucessfully initialized.

gedit is now running and its mutex use is being profiled. For this example
I have now opened a file with it, typed a few letters and then quit the program
again without saving. As soon as gedit exits mutrace will print the
profiling data it gathered to stderr. The full output you can see
here.
The most interesting part is at the end of the generated output, a
breakdown of the most contended mutexes:

mutrace: 10 most contended mutexes:

 Mutex #   Locked  Changed    Cont. tot.Time[ms] avg.Time[ms] max.Time[ms]       Type
      35   368268      407      275      120,822        0,000        0,894     normal
       5   234645      100       21       86,855        0,000        0,494     normal
      26   177324       47        4       98,610        0,001        0,150     normal
      19    55758       53        2       23,931        0,000        0,092     normal
      53      106       73        1        0,769        0,007        0,160     normal
      25    15156       70        1        6,633        0,000        0,019     normal
       4      973       10        1        4,376        0,004        0,174     normal
      75       68       62        0        0,038        0,001        0,004     normal
       9     1663       52        0        1,068        0,001        0,412     normal
       3   136553       41        0       61,408        0,000        0,281     normal
     ...      ...      ...      ...          ...          ...          ...        ...

mutrace: Total runtime 9678,142 ms.

(Sorry, LC_NUMERIC was set to de_DE.UTF-8, so if you can’t make sense of
all the commas, think s/,/./g!)

For each mutex a line is printed. The ‘Locked’ column tells how often the
mutex was locked during the entire runtime of about 10s. The ‘Changed’ column
tells us how often the owning thread of the mutex changed. The ‘Cont.’ column
tells us how often the lock was already taken when we tried to take it and we
had to wait. The fifth column tell us for how long during the entire runtime
the lock was locked, the sixth tells us the average lock time, and the seventh
column tells us the longest time the lock was held. Finally, the last column
tells us what kind of mutex this is (recursive, normal or otherwise).

The most contended lock in the example above is #35. 275 times during the
runtime a thread had to wait until another thread released this mutex. All in
all more then 120ms of the entire runtime (about 10s) were spent with this
lock taken!

In the full output we can now look up which mutex #35 actually is:

Mutex #35 (0x0x7f48c7057d28) first referenced by:
	/home/lennart/projects/mutrace/libmutrace.so(pthread_mutex_lock+0x70) [0x7f48c97dc900]
	/lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0(g_static_rw_lock_writer_lock+0x6a) [0x7f48c674a03a]
	/lib64/libgobject-2.0.so.0(g_type_init_with_debug_flags+0x4b) [0x7f48c6e38ddb]
	/usr/lib64/libgdk-x11-2.0.so.0(gdk_pre_parse_libgtk_only+0x8c) [0x7f48c853171c]
	/usr/lib64/libgtk-x11-2.0.so.0(+0x14b31f) [0x7f48c891831f]
	/lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0(g_option_context_parse+0x90) [0x7f48c67308e0]
	/usr/lib64/libgtk-x11-2.0.so.0(gtk_parse_args+0xa1) [0x7f48c8918021]
	/usr/lib64/libgtk-x11-2.0.so.0(gtk_init_check+0x9) [0x7f48c8918079]
	/usr/lib64/libgtk-x11-2.0.so.0(gtk_init+0x9) [0x7f48c89180a9]
	/usr/bin/gedit(main+0x166) [0x427fc6]
	/lib64/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xfd) [0x7f48c5b42b4d]
	/usr/bin/gedit() [0x4276c9]

As it appears in this Gtk+ program the rwlock type_rw_lock
(defined in glib’s gobject/gtype.c) is a hotspot. GLib’s rwlocks are
implemented on top of mutexes, so an obvious attempt in improving this could
be to actually make them use the operating system’s rwlock primitives.

If a mutex is used often but only ever by the same thread it cannot starve
other threads. The ‘Changed.’ column lists how often a specific mutex changed
the owning thread. If the number is high this means the risk of contention is
also high. The ‘Cont.’ column tells you about contention that actually took
place.

Due to the way mutrace works we cannot profile mutexes that are
used internally in glibc, such as those used for synchronizing stdio
and suchlike.

mutrace is implemented entirely in userspace. It
uses all kinds of exotic GCC, glibc and kernel features, so you might have a
hard time compiling and running it on anything but a very recent Linux
distribution. I have tested it on Rawhide but it should work on slightly older
distributions, too.

Make sure to build your application with -rdynamic to make the
backtraces mutrace generates useful.

As of now, mutrace only profiles mutexes. Adding support for
rwlocks should be easy to add though. Patches welcome.

The output mutrace generates can be influenced by various
MUTRACE_xxx environment variables. See the sources for more
information.

And now, please take mutrace and profile and speed up your application!

You may find the sources in my
git repository.