Tag Archives: Addons

Неделя, 3 Юни 2018

Post Syndicated from georgi original http://georgi.unixsol.org/diary/archive.php/2018-06-03

Всеки има нужда да бъде спасен от свинщината, наречена “реклама” във
всичките и форми. За хората с компютър и бразуер, това отдавна е решен
проблем благодарение на AdBlock и подобни плъгини (стига да не
използвате браузер като Chrome, но в този случай си заслужавате
всичко дето ви се случва).

По-принцип не оставям компютър без инсталиран AdBlock, това си е направо
обществено полезна дейност. Кофтито е, че на мобилния телефон, дори и да
използвате Firefox и да имате подходящите Addons, програмчетата пак
се изхитряват и ви спамят.

Сега, ако сте root-нали телефона (което никой не прави), можете да
направите нещо по въпроса, но си е разправия, а както всички знаем,
удобството винаги печели пред сигурността.

За щастие има има много лесен начин, да се отървете от долните
спамери в две прости стъпки:

1. Инсталирате си Blokada.

2. Активирате я.

Et voilà – никъде повече няма да ви изкача спам,

Как работи нещото? Прави се на vpn защото това му дава възможност
да филтрира dns заявките и съответно когато някоя програма пита
за pagead.doubleclick.net и подобни – просто му отговаря с 0.0.0.0

Просто, ефективно, не изисква root и бърка директно в джоба на
всичката интернет паплач, която си въобразява, че може да ви залива
с лайна 24/7.

Announcement: IPS code

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/08/announcement-ips-code.html

So after 20 years, IBM is killing off my BlackICE code created in April 1998. So it’s time that I rewrite it.

BlackICE was the first “inline” intrusion-detection system, aka. an “intrusion prevention system” or IPS. ISS purchased my company in 2001 and replaced their RealSecure engine with it, and later renamed it Proventia. Then IBM purchased ISS in 2006. Now, they are formally canceling the project and moving customers onto Cisco’s products, which are based on Snort.

So now is a good time to write a replacement. The reason is that BlackICE worked fundamentally differently than Snort, using protocol analysis rather than pattern-matching. In this way, it worked more like Bro than Snort. The biggest benefit of protocol-analysis is speed, making it many times faster than Snort. The second benefit is better detection ability, as I describe in this post on Heartbleed.

So my plan is to create a new project. I’ll be checking in the starter bits into GitHub starting a couple weeks from now. I need to figure out a new name for the project, so I don’t have to rip off a name from William Gibson like I did last time :).

Some notes:

  • Yes, it’ll be GNU open source. I’m a capitalist, so I’ll earn money like snort/nmap dual-licensing it, charging companies who don’t want to open-source their addons. All capitalists GNU license their code.
  • C, not Rust. Sorry, I’m going for extreme scalability. We’ll re-visit this decision later when looking at building protocol parsers.
  • It’ll be 95% compatible with Snort signatures. Their language definition leaves so much ambiguous it’ll be hard to be 100% compatible.
  • It’ll support Snort output as well, though really, Snort’s events suck.
  • Protocol parsers in Lua, so you can use it as a replacement for Bro, writing parsers to extract data you are interested in.
  • Protocol state machine parsers in C, like you see in my Masscan project for X.509.
  • First version IDS only. These days, “inline” means also being able to MitM the SSL stack, so I’m gong to have to think harder on that.
  • Mutli-core worker threads off PF_RING/DPDK/netmap receive queues. Should handle 10gbps, tracking 10 million concurrent connections, with quad-core CPU.
So if you want to contribute to the project, here’s what I need:
  • Requirements from people who work daily with IDS/IPS today. I need you to write up what your products do well that you really like. I need to you write up what they suck at that needs to be fixed. These need to be in some detail.
  • Testing environment to play with. This means having a small server plugged into a real-world link running at a minimum of several gigabits-per-second available for the next year. I’ll sign NDAs related to the data I might see on the network.
  • Coders. I’ll be doing the basic architecture, but protocol parsers, output plugins, etc. will need work. Code will be in C and Lua for the near term. Unfortunately, since I’m going to dual-license, I’ll need waivers before accepting pull requests.
Anyway, follow me on Twitter @erratarob if you want to contribute.

Burner laptops for DEF CON

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/07/burner-laptops-for-def-con.html

Hacker summer camp (Defcon, Blackhat, BSidesLV) is upon us, so I thought I’d write up some quick notes about bringing a “burner” laptop. Chrome is your best choice in terms of security, but I need Windows/Linux tools, so I got a Windows laptop.

I chose the Asus e200ha for $199 from Amazon with free (and fast) shipping. There are similar notebooks with roughly the same hardware and price from other manufacturers (HP, Dell, etc.), so I’m not sure how this compares against those other ones. However, it fits my needs as a “burner” laptop, namely:

  • cheap
  • lasts 10 hours easily on battery
  • weighs 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram)
  • 11.6 inch and thin

Some other specs are:

  • 4 gigs of RAM
  • 32 gigs of eMMC flash memory
  • quad core 1.44 GHz Intel Atom CPU
  • Windows 10
  • free Microsoft Office 365 for one year
  • good, large keyboard
  • good, large touchpad
  • USB 3.0
  • microSD
  • WiFi ac
  • no fans, completely silent

There are compromises, of course.

  • The Atom CPU is slow, thought it’s only noticeable when churning through heavy webpages. Adblocking addons or Brave are a necessity. Most things are usably fast, such as using Microsoft Word.
  • Crappy sound and video, though VLC does a fine job playing movies with headphones on the airplane. Using in bright sunlight will be difficult.
  • micro-HDMI, keep in mind if intending to do presos from it, you’ll need an HDMI adapter
  • It has limited storage, 32gigs in theory, about half that usable.
  • Does special Windows 10 compressed install that you can’t actually upgrade without a completely new install. It doesn’t have the latest Windows 10 Creators update. I lost a gig thinking I could compress system files.

Copying files across the 802.11ac WiFi to the disk was quite fast, several hundred megabits-per-second. The eMMC isn’t as fast as an SSD, but its a lot faster than typical SD card speeds.

The first thing I did once I got the notebook was to install the free VeraCrypt full disk encryption. The CPU has AES acceleration, so it’s fast. There is a problem with the keyboard driver during boot that makes it really hard to enter long passwords — you have to carefully type one key at a time to prevent extra keystrokes from being entered.

You can’t really install Linux on this computer, but you can use virtual machines. I installed VirtualBox and downloaded the Kali VM. I had some problems attaching USB devices to the VM. First of all, VirtualBox requires a separate downloaded extension to get USB working. Second, it conflicts with USBpcap that I installed for Wireshark.

It comes with one year of free Office 365. Obviously, Microsoft is hoping to hook the user into a longer term commitment, but in practice next year at this time I’d get another burner $200 laptop rather than spend $99 on extending the Office 365 license.

Let’s talk about the CPU. It’s Intel’s “Atom” processor, not their mainstream (Core i3 etc.) processor. Even though it has roughly the same GHz as the processor in a 11inch MacBook Air and twice the cores, it’s noticeably and painfully slower. This is especially noticeable on ad-heavy web pages, while other things seem to work just fine. It has hardware acceleration for most video formats, though I had trouble getting Netflix to work.

The tradeoff for a slow CPU is phenomenal battery life. It seems to last forever on battery. It’s really pretty cool.

Conclusion

A Chromebook is likely more secure, but for my needs, this $200 is perfect.

Konecny: Anaconda modularisation

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/725623/rss

On his blog, Jiri Konecny writes about plans for modularizing Anaconda, which is the installer for Fedora and other Linux distributions. Anaconda is written in Python 3, but is all contained in one monolithic program.
The current Anaconda has one significant problem: all of the code is in one place–the monolith. It is more difficult to trace bugs and to a have a stable API. Implementing new features or modifying existing code in Anaconda is also more challenging. Modularisation should help with these things mainly because of isolation between the modules. It will be much easier to create tests for modules or to add new functionality.

Modularisation also opens up new possibilities to developers. They should be able to create a new user interface easily. Since developers can rely on the existing API documentation, it should not be necessary to browse the source code tree very often. Another benefit is that an addon is like another module, communicating with other modules, so it has the same capabilities. Developers can use the public API to write their addons in their favourite programming language which supports DBus.”