Tag Archives: Amazon Simple Notification Service

Use Slack ChatOps to Deploy Your Code – How to Integrate Your Pipeline in AWS CodePipeline with Your Slack Channel

Post Syndicated from Rumi Olsen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/use-slack-chatops-to-deploy-your-code-how-to-integrate-your-pipeline-in-aws-codepipeline-with-your-slack-channel/

Slack is widely used by DevOps and development teams to communicate status. Typically, when a build has been tested and is ready to be promoted to a staging environment, a QA engineer or DevOps engineer kicks off the deployment. Using Slack in a ChatOps collaboration model, the promotion can be done in a single click from a Slack channel. And because the promotion happens through a Slack channel, the whole development team knows what’s happening without checking email.

In this blog post, I will show you how to integrate AWS services with a Slack application. I use an interactive message button and incoming webhook to promote a stage with a single click.

To follow along with the steps in this post, you’ll need a pipeline in AWS CodePipeline. If you don’t have a pipeline, the fastest way to create one for this use case is to use AWS CodeStar. Go to the AWS CodeStar console and select the Static Website template (shown in the screenshot). AWS CodeStar will create a pipeline with an AWS CodeCommit repository and an AWS CodeDeploy deployment for you. After the pipeline is created, you will need to add a manual approval stage.

You’ll also need to build a Slack app with webhooks and interactive components, write two Lambda functions, and create an API Gateway API and a SNS topic.

As you’ll see in the following diagram, when I make a change and merge a new feature into the master branch in AWS CodeCommit, the check-in kicks off my CI/CD pipeline in AWS CodePipeline. When CodePipeline reaches the approval stage, it sends a notification to Amazon SNS, which triggers an AWS Lambda function (ApprovalRequester).

The Slack channel receives a prompt that looks like the following screenshot. When I click Yes to approve the build promotion, the approval result is sent to CodePipeline through API Gateway and Lambda (ApprovalHandler). The pipeline continues on to deploy the build to the next environment.

Create a Slack app

For App Name, type a name for your app. For Development Slack Workspace, choose the name of your workspace. You’ll see in the following screenshot that my workspace is AWS ChatOps.

After the Slack application has been created, you will see the Basic Information page, where you can create incoming webhooks and enable interactive components.

To add incoming webhooks:

  1. Under Add features and functionality, choose Incoming Webhooks. Turn the feature on by selecting Off, as shown in the following screenshot.
  2. Now that the feature is turned on, choose Add New Webhook to Workspace. In the process of creating the webhook, Slack lets you choose the channel where messages will be posted.
  3. After the webhook has been created, you’ll see its URL. You will use this URL when you create the Lambda function.

If you followed the steps in the post, the pipeline should look like the following.

Write the Lambda function for approval requests

This Lambda function is invoked by the SNS notification. It sends a request that consists of an interactive message button to the incoming webhook you created earlier.  The following sample code sends the request to the incoming webhook. WEBHOOK_URL and SLACK_CHANNEL are the environment variables that hold values of the webhook URL that you created and the Slack channel where you want the interactive message button to appear.

# This function is invoked via SNS when the CodePipeline manual approval action starts.
# It will take the details from this approval notification and sent an interactive message to Slack that allows users to approve or cancel the deployment.

import os
import json
import logging
import urllib.parse

from base64 import b64decode
from urllib.request import Request, urlopen
from urllib.error import URLError, HTTPError

# This is passed as a plain-text environment variable for ease of demonstration.
# Consider encrypting the value with KMS or use an encrypted parameter in Parameter Store for production deployments.
SLACK_WEBHOOK_URL = os.environ['SLACK_WEBHOOK_URL']
SLACK_CHANNEL = os.environ['SLACK_CHANNEL']

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    print("Received event: " + json.dumps(event, indent=2))
    message = event["Records"][0]["Sns"]["Message"]
    
    data = json.loads(message) 
    token = data["approval"]["token"]
    codepipeline_name = data["approval"]["pipelineName"]
    
    slack_message = {
        "channel": SLACK_CHANNEL,
        "text": "Would you like to promote the build to production?",
        "attachments": [
            {
                "text": "Yes to deploy your build to production",
                "fallback": "You are unable to promote a build",
                "callback_id": "wopr_game",
                "color": "#3AA3E3",
                "attachment_type": "default",
                "actions": [
                    {
                        "name": "deployment",
                        "text": "Yes",
                        "style": "danger",
                        "type": "button",
                        "value": json.dumps({"approve": True, "codePipelineToken": token, "codePipelineName": codepipeline_name}),
                        "confirm": {
                            "title": "Are you sure?",
                            "text": "This will deploy the build to production",
                            "ok_text": "Yes",
                            "dismiss_text": "No"
                        }
                    },
                    {
                        "name": "deployment",
                        "text": "No",
                        "type": "button",
                        "value": json.dumps({"approve": False, "codePipelineToken": token, "codePipelineName": codepipeline_name})
                    }  
                ]
            }
        ]
    }

    req = Request(SLACK_WEBHOOK_URL, json.dumps(slack_message).encode('utf-8'))

    response = urlopen(req)
    response.read()
    
    return None

 

Create a SNS topic

Create a topic and then create a subscription that invokes the ApprovalRequester Lambda function. You can configure the manual approval action in the pipeline to send a message to this SNS topic when an approval action is required. When the pipeline reaches the approval stage, it sends a notification to this SNS topic. SNS publishes a notification to all of the subscribed endpoints. In this case, the Lambda function is the endpoint. Therefore, it invokes and executes the Lambda function. For information about how to create a SNS topic, see Create a Topic in the Amazon SNS Developer Guide.

Write the Lambda function for handling the interactive message button

This Lambda function is invoked by API Gateway. It receives the result of the interactive message button whether or not the build promotion was approved. If approved, an API call is made to CodePipeline to promote the build to the next environment. If not approved, the pipeline stops and does not move to the next stage.

The Lambda function code might look like the following. SLACK_VERIFICATION_TOKEN is the environment variable that contains your Slack verification token. You can find your verification token under Basic Information on Slack manage app page. When you scroll down, you will see App Credential. Verification token is found under the section.

# This function is triggered via API Gateway when a user acts on the Slack interactive message sent by approval_requester.py.

from urllib.parse import parse_qs
import json
import os
import boto3

SLACK_VERIFICATION_TOKEN = os.environ['SLACK_VERIFICATION_TOKEN']

#Triggered by API Gateway
#It kicks off a particular CodePipeline project
def lambda_handler(event, context):
	#print("Received event: " + json.dumps(event, indent=2))
	body = parse_qs(event['body'])
	payload = json.loads(body['payload'][0])

	# Validate Slack token
	if SLACK_VERIFICATION_TOKEN == payload['token']:
		send_slack_message(json.loads(payload['actions'][0]['value']))
		
		# This will replace the interactive message with a simple text response.
		# You can implement a more complex message update if you would like.
		return  {
			"isBase64Encoded": "false",
			"statusCode": 200,
			"body": "{\"text\": \"The approval has been processed\"}"
		}
	else:
		return  {
			"isBase64Encoded": "false",
			"statusCode": 403,
			"body": "{\"error\": \"This request does not include a vailid verification token.\"}"
		}


def send_slack_message(action_details):
	codepipeline_status = "Approved" if action_details["approve"] else "Rejected"
	codepipeline_name = action_details["codePipelineName"]
	token = action_details["codePipelineToken"] 

	client = boto3.client('codepipeline')
	response_approval = client.put_approval_result(
							pipelineName=codepipeline_name,
							stageName='Approval',
							actionName='ApprovalOrDeny',
							result={'summary':'','status':codepipeline_status},
							token=token)
	print(response_approval)

 

Create the API Gateway API

  1. In the Amazon API Gateway console, create a resource called InteractiveMessageHandler.
  2. Create a POST method.
    • For Integration type, choose Lambda Function.
    • Select Use Lambda Proxy integration.
    • From Lambda Region, choose a region.
    • In Lambda Function, type a name for your function.
  3.  Deploy to a stage.

For more information, see Getting Started with Amazon API Gateway in the Amazon API Developer Guide.

Now go back to your Slack application and enable interactive components.

To enable interactive components for the interactive message (Yes) button:

  1. Under Features, choose Interactive Components.
  2. Choose Enable Interactive Components.
  3. Type a request URL in the text box. Use the invoke URL in Amazon API Gateway that will be called when the approval button is clicked.

Now that all the pieces have been created, run the solution by checking in a code change to your CodeCommit repo. That will release the change through CodePipeline. When the CodePipeline comes to the approval stage, it will prompt to your Slack channel to see if you want to promote the build to your staging or production environment. Choose Yes and then see if your change was deployed to the environment.

Conclusion

That is it! You have now created a Slack ChatOps solution using AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodePipeline, AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, and Amazon Simple Notification Service.

Now that you know how to do this Slack and CodePipeline integration, you can use the same method to interact with other AWS services using API Gateway and Lambda. You can also use Slack’s slash command to initiate an action from a Slack channel, rather than responding in the way demonstrated in this post.

The End of Google Cloud Messaging, and What it Means for Your Apps

Post Syndicated from Zach Barbitta original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/messaging-and-targeting/the-end-of-google-cloud-messaging-and-what-it-means-for-your-apps/

On April 10, 2018, Google announced the deprecation of its Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) platform. Specifically, the GCM server and client APIs are deprecated and will be removed as soon as April 11, 2019.  What does this mean for you and your applications that use Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) or Amazon Pinpoint?

First, nothing will break now or after April 11, 2019. GCM device tokens are completely interchangeable with the newer Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM) device tokens. If you have existing GCM tokens, you’ll still be able to use them to send notifications. This statement is also true for GCM tokens that you generate in the future.

On the back end, we’ve already migrated Amazon SNS and Amazon Pinpoint to the server endpoint for FCM (https://fcm.googleapis.com/fcm/send). As a developer, you don’t need to make any changes as a result of this deprecation.

We created the following mini-FAQ to address some of the questions you may have as a developer who uses Amazon SNS or Amazon Pinpoint.

If I migrate to FCM from GCM, can I still use Amazon Pinpoint and Amazon SNS?

Yes. Your ability to connect to your applications and send messages through both Amazon SNS and Amazon Pinpoint doesn’t change. We’ll update the documentation for Amazon SNS and Amazon Pinpoint soon to reflect these changes.

If I don’t migrate to FCM from GCM, can I still use Amazon Pinpoint and Amazon SNS?

Yes. If you do nothing, your existing credentials and GCM tokens will still be valid. All applications that you previously set up to use Amazon Pinpoint or Amazon SNS will continue to work normally. When you call the API for Amazon Pinpoint or Amazon SNS, we initiate a request to the FCM server endpoint directly.

What are the differences between Amazon SNS and Amazon Pinpoint?

Amazon SNS makes it easy for developers to set up, operate, and send notifications at scale, affordably and with a high degree of flexibility. Amazon Pinpoint has many of the same messaging capabilities as Amazon SNS, with the same levels of scalability and flexibility.

The main difference between the two services is that Amazon Pinpoint provides both transactional and targeted messaging capabilities. By using Amazon Pinpoint, marketers and developers can not only send transactional messages to their customers, but can also segment their audiences, create campaigns, and analyze both application and message metrics.

How do I migrate from GCM to FCM?

For more information about migrating from GCM to FCM, see Migrate a GCM Client App for Android to Firebase Cloud Messaging on the Google Developers site.

If you have any questions, please post them in the comments section, or in the Amazon Pinpoint or Amazon SNS forums.

Securing messages published to Amazon SNS with AWS PrivateLink

Post Syndicated from Otavio Ferreira original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/securing-messages-published-to-amazon-sns-with-aws-privatelink/

Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) now supports VPC Endpoints (VPCE) via AWS PrivateLink. You can use VPC Endpoints to privately publish messages to SNS topics, from an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), without traversing the public internet. When you use AWS PrivateLink, you don’t need to set up an Internet Gateway (IGW), Network Address Translation (NAT) device, or Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. You don’t need to use public IP addresses, either.

VPC Endpoints doesn’t require code changes and can bring additional security to Pub/Sub Messaging use cases that rely on SNS. VPC Endpoints helps promote data privacy and is aligned with assurance programs, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), FedRAMP, and others discussed below.

VPC Endpoints for SNS in action

Here’s how VPC Endpoints for SNS works. The following example is based on a banking system that processes mortgage applications. This banking system, which has been deployed to a VPC, publishes each mortgage application to an SNS topic. The SNS topic then fans out the mortgage application message to two subscribing AWS Lambda functions:

  • Save-Mortgage-Application stores the application in an Amazon DynamoDB table. As the mortgage application contains personally identifiable information (PII), the message must not traverse the public internet.
  • Save-Credit-Report checks the applicant’s credit history against an external Credit Reporting Agency (CRA), then stores the final credit report in an Amazon S3 bucket.

The following diagram depicts the underlying architecture for this banking system:
 
Diagram depicting the architecture for the example banking system
 
To protect applicants’ data, the financial institution responsible for developing this banking system needed a mechanism to prevent PII data from traversing the internet when publishing mortgage applications from their VPC to the SNS topic. Therefore, they created a VPC endpoint to enable their publisher Amazon EC2 instance to privately connect to the SNS API. As shown in the diagram, when the VPC endpoint is created, an Elastic Network Interface (ENI) is automatically placed in the same VPC subnet as the publisher EC2 instance. This ENI exposes a private IP address that is used as the entry point for traffic destined to SNS. This ensures that traffic between the VPC and SNS doesn’t leave the Amazon network.

Set up VPC Endpoints for SNS

The process for creating a VPC endpoint to privately connect to SNS doesn’t require code changes: access the VPC Management Console, navigate to the Endpoints section, and create a new Endpoint. Three attributes are required:

  • The SNS service name.
  • The VPC and Availability Zones (AZs) from which you’ll publish your messages.
  • The Security Group (SG) to be associated with the endpoint network interface. The Security Group controls the traffic to the endpoint network interface from resources in your VPC. If you don’t specify a Security Group, the default Security Group for your VPC will be associated.

Help ensure your security and compliance

SNS can support messaging use cases in regulated market segments, such as healthcare provider systems subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and financial systems subject to the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), and is also in-scope with the following Assurance Programs:

The SNS API is served through HTTP Secure (HTTPS), and encrypts all messages in transit with Transport Layer Security (TLS) certificates issued by Amazon Trust Services (ATS). The certificates verify the identity of the SNS API server when encrypted connections are established. The certificates help establish proof that your SNS API client (SDK, CLI) is communicating securely with the SNS API server. A Certificate Authority (CA) issues the certificate to a specific domain. Hence, when a domain presents a certificate that’s issued by a trusted CA, the SNS API client knows it’s safe to make the connection.

Summary

VPC Endpoints can increase the security of your pub/sub messaging use cases by allowing you to publish messages to SNS topics, from instances in your VPC, without traversing the internet. Setting up VPC Endpoints for SNS doesn’t require any code changes because the SNS API address remains the same.

VPC Endpoints for SNS is now available in all AWS Regions where AWS PrivateLink is available. For information on pricing and regional availability, visit the VPC pricing page.
For more information and on-boarding, see Publishing to Amazon SNS Topics from Amazon Virtual Private Cloud in the SNS documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the Comments section below. If you have questions about anything in this post, start a new thread on the Amazon SNS forum or contact AWS Support.

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AWS Adds 16 More Services to Its PCI DSS Compliance Program

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-adds-16-more-services-to-its-pci-dss-compliance-program/

PCI logo

AWS has added 16 more AWS services to its Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliance program, giving you more options, flexibility, and functionality to process and store sensitive payment card data in the AWS Cloud. The services were audited by Coalfire to ensure that they meet strict PCI DSS standards.

The newly compliant AWS services are:

AWS now offers 58 services that are officially PCI DSS compliant, giving administrators more service options for implementing a PCI-compliant cardholder environment.

For more information about the AWS PCI DSS compliance program, see Compliance ResourcesAWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program, and PCI DSS Compliance.

– Chad Woolf

AWS Updated Its ISO Certifications and Now Has 67 Services Under ISO Compliance

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-updated-its-iso-certifications-and-now-has-67-services-under-iso-compliance/

ISO logo

AWS has updated its certifications against ISO 9001, ISO 27001, ISO 27017, and ISO 27018 standards, bringing the total to 67 services now under ISO compliance. We added the following 29 services this cycle:

Amazon Aurora Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration AWS [email protected]
Amazon Cloud Directory Amazon SageMaker AWS Managed Services
Amazon CloudWatch Logs Amazon Simple Notification Service AWS OpsWorks Stacks
Amazon Cognito Auto Scaling AWS Shield
Amazon Connect AWS Batch AWS Snowball Edge
Amazon Elastic Container Registry AWS CodeBuild AWS Snowmobile
Amazon Inspector AWS CodeCommit AWS Step Functions
Amazon Kinesis Data Streams AWS CodeDeploy AWS Systems Manager (formerly Amazon EC2 Systems Manager)
Amazon Macie AWS CodePipeline AWS X-Ray
Amazon QuickSight AWS IoT Core

For the complete list of services under ISO compliance, see AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program.

AWS maintains certifications through extensive audits of its controls to ensure that information security risks that affect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of company and customer information are appropriately managed.

You can download copies of the AWS ISO certificates that contain AWS’s in-scope services and Regions, and use these certificates to jump-start your own certification efforts:

AWS does not increase service costs in any AWS Region as a result of updating its certifications.

To learn more about compliance in the AWS Cloud, see AWS Cloud Compliance.

– Chad

Now Open AWS EU (Paris) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-eu-paris-region/

Today we are launching our 18th AWS Region, our fourth in Europe. Located in the Paris area, AWS customers can use this Region to better serve customers in and around France.

The Details
The new EU (Paris) Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon API Gateway, Amazon Aurora, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon CloudWatch, CloudWatch Events, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon ECS, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Polly, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Lambda, AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks Stacks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Server Migration Service, AWS Service Catalog, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowball Edge, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support (including AWS Trusted Advisor), Elastic Load Balancing, and VM Import.

The Paris Region supports all sizes of C5, M5, R4, T2, D2, I3, and X1 instances.

There are also four edge locations for Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront: three in Paris and one in Marseille, all with AWS WAF and AWS Shield. Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

The Paris Region will benefit from three AWS Direct Connect locations. Telehouse Voltaire is available today. AWS Direct Connect will also become available at Equinix Paris in early 2018, followed by Interxion Paris.

All AWS infrastructure regions around the world are designed, built, and regularly audited to meet the most rigorous compliance standards and to provide high levels of security for all AWS customers. These include ISO 27001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1 (Formerly SAS 70), SOC 2 and SOC 3 Security & Availability, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. This means customers benefit from all the best practices of AWS policies, architecture, and operational processes built to satisfy the needs of even the most security sensitive customers.

AWS is certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield, and the AWS Data Processing Addendum (DPA) is GDPR-ready and available now to all AWS customers to help them prepare for May 25, 2018 when the GDPR becomes enforceable. The current AWS DPA, as well as the AWS GDPR DPA, allows customers to transfer personal data to countries outside the European Economic Area (EEA) in compliance with European Union (EU) data protection laws. AWS also adheres to the Cloud Infrastructure Service Providers in Europe (CISPE) Code of Conduct. The CISPE Code of Conduct helps customers ensure that AWS is using appropriate data protection standards to protect their data, consistent with the GDPR. In addition, AWS offers a wide range of services and features to help customers meet the requirements of the GDPR, including services for access controls, monitoring, logging, and encryption.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are preparing to use this new Region. Here’s a small sample:

Societe Generale, one of the largest banks in France and the world, has accelerated their digital transformation while working with AWS. They developed SG Research, an application that makes reports from Societe Generale’s analysts available to corporate customers in order to improve the decision-making process for investments. The new AWS Region will reduce latency between applications running in the cloud and in their French data centers.

SNCF is the national railway company of France. Their mobile app, powered by AWS, delivers real-time traffic information to 14 million riders. Extreme weather, traffic events, holidays, and engineering works can cause usage to peak at hundreds of thousands of users per second. They are planning to use machine learning and big data to add predictive features to the app.

Radio France, the French public radio broadcaster, offers seven national networks, and uses AWS to accelerate its innovation and stay competitive.

Les Restos du Coeur, a French charity that provides assistance to the needy, delivering food packages and participating in their social and economic integration back into French society. Les Restos du Coeur is using AWS for its CRM system to track the assistance given to each of their beneficiaries and the impact this is having on their lives.

AlloResto by JustEat (a leader in the French FoodTech industry), is using AWS to to scale during traffic peaks and to accelerate their innovation process.

AWS Consulting and Technology Partners
We are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in France. Here’s a partial list:

AWS Premier Consulting PartnersAccenture, Capgemini, Claranet, CloudReach, DXC, and Edifixio.

AWS Consulting PartnersABC Systemes, Atos International SAS, CoreExpert, Cycloid, Devoteam, LINKBYNET, Oxalide, Ozones, Scaleo Information Systems, and Sopra Steria.

AWS Technology PartnersAxway, Commerce Guys, MicroStrategy, Sage, Software AG, Splunk, Tibco, and Zerolight.

AWS in France
We have been investing in Europe, with a focus on France, for the last 11 years. We have also been developing documentation and training programs to help our customers to improve their skills and to accelerate their journey to the AWS Cloud.

As part of our commitment to AWS customers in France, we plan to train more than 25,000 people in the coming years, helping them develop highly sought after cloud skills. They will have access to AWS training resources in France via AWS Academy, AWSome days, AWS Educate, and webinars, all delivered in French by AWS Technical Trainers and AWS Certified Trainers.

Use it Today
The EU (Paris) Region is open for business now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

 

Now Open – AWS China (Ningxia) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-china-ningxia-region/

Today we launched our 17th Region globally, and the second in China. The AWS China (Ningxia) Region, operated by Ningxia Western Cloud Data Technology Co. Ltd. (NWCD), is generally available now and provides customers another option to run applications and store data on AWS in China.

The Details
At launch, the new China (Ningxia) Region, operated by NWCD, supports Auto Scaling, AWS Config, AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch, CloudWatch Events, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon EC2 Systems Manager, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Elastic Load Balancing, Amazon EMR, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), Amazon Kinesis Streams, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), AWS Support API, AWS Trusted Advisor, Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, and VM Import. Visit the AWS China Products page for additional information on these services.

The Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, R4, I3, and X1 instances.

Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

Operating Partner
To comply with China’s legal and regulatory requirements, AWS has formed a strategic technology collaboration with NWCD to operate and provide services from the AWS China (Ningxia) Region. Founded in 2015, NWCD is a licensed datacenter and cloud services provider, based in Ningxia, China. NWCD joins Sinnet, the operator of the AWS China China (Beijing) Region, as an AWS operating partner in China. Through these relationships, AWS provides its industry-leading technology, guidance, and expertise to NWCD and Sinnet, while NWCD and Sinnet operate and provide AWS cloud services to local customers. While the cloud services offered in both AWS China Regions are the same as those available in other AWS Regions, the AWS China Regions are different in that they are isolated from all other AWS Regions and operated by AWS’s Chinese partners separately from all other AWS Regions. Customers using the AWS China Regions enter into customer agreements with Sinnet and NWCD, rather than with AWS.

Use it Today
The AWS China (Ningxia) Region, operated by NWCD, is open for business, and you can start using it now! Starting today, Chinese developers, startups, and enterprises, as well as government, education, and non-profit organizations, can leverage AWS to run their applications and store their data in the new AWS China (Ningxia) Region, operated by NWCD. Customers already using the AWS China (Beijing) Region, operated by Sinnet, can select the AWS China (Ningxia) Region directly from the AWS Management Console, while new customers can request an account at www.amazonaws.cn to begin using both AWS China Regions.

Jeff;

 

 

Amazon MQ – Managed Message Broker Service for ActiveMQ

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-mq-managed-message-broker-service-for-activemq/

Messaging holds the parts of a distributed application together, while also adding resiliency and enabling the implementation of highly scalable architectures. For example, earlier this year, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) and Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) supported the processing of customer orders on Prime Day, collectively processing 40 billion messages at a rate of 10 million per second, with no customer-visible issues.

SQS and SNS have been used extensively for applications that were born in the cloud. However, many of our larger customers are already making use of open-sourced or commercially-licensed message brokers. Their applications are mission-critical, and so is the messaging that powers them. Our customers describe the setup and on-going maintenance of their messaging infrastructure as “painful” and report that they spend at least 10 staff-hours per week on this chore.

New Amazon MQ
Today we are launching Amazon MQ – a managed message broker service for Apache ActiveMQ that lets you get started in minutes with just three clicks! As you may know, ActiveMQ is a popular open-source message broker that is fast & feature-rich. It offers queues and topics, durable and non-durable subscriptions, push-based and poll-based messaging, and filtering.

As a managed service, Amazon MQ takes care of the administration and maintenance of ActiveMQ. This includes responsibility for broker provisioning, patching, failure detection & recovery for high availability, and message durability. With Amazon MQ, you get direct access to the ActiveMQ console and industry standard APIs and protocols for messaging, including JMS, NMS, AMQP, STOMP, MQTT, and WebSocket. This allows you to move from any message broker that uses these standards to Amazon MQ–along with the supported applications–without rewriting code.

You can create a single-instance Amazon MQ broker for development and testing, or an active/standby pair that spans AZs, with quick, automatic failover. Either way, you get data replication across AZs and a pay-as-you-go model for the broker instance and message storage.

Amazon MQ is a full-fledged part of the AWS family, including the use of AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) for authentication and authorization to use the service API. You can use Amazon CloudWatch metrics to keep a watchful eye metrics such as queue depth and initiate Auto Scaling of your consumer fleet as needed.

Launching an Amazon MQ Broker
To get started, I open up the Amazon MQ Console, select the desired AWS Region, enter a name for my broker, and click on Next step:

Then I choose the instance type, indicate that I want to create a standby , and click on Create broker (I can select a VPC and fine-tune other settings in the Advanced settings section):

My broker will be created and ready to use in 5-10 minutes:

The URLs and endpoints that I use to access my broker are all available at a click:

I can access the ActiveMQ Web Console at the link provided:

The broker publishes instance, topic, and queue metrics to CloudWatch. Here are the instance metrics:

Available Now
Amazon MQ is available now and you can start using it today in the US East (Northern Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), EU (Frankfurt), and Asia Pacific (Sydney) Regions.

The AWS Free Tier lets you use a single-AZ micro instance for up to 750 hours and to store up to 1 gigabyte each month, for one year. After that, billing is based on instance-hours and message storage, plus charges Internet data transfer if the broker is accessed from outside of AWS.

Jeff;

AWS IoT Update – Better Value with New Pricing Model

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-update-better-value-with-new-pricing-model/

Our customers are using AWS IoT to make their connected devices more intelligent. These devices collect & measure data in the field (below the ground, in the air, in the water, on factory floors and in hospital rooms) and use AWS IoT as their gateway to the AWS Cloud. Once connected to the cloud, customers can write device data to Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon DynamoDB, process data using Amazon Kinesis and AWS Lambda functions, initiate Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) push notifications, and much more.

New Pricing Model (20-40% Reduction)
Today we are making a change to the AWS IoT pricing model that will make it an even better value for you. Most customers will see a price reduction of 20-40%, with some receiving a significantly larger discount depending on their workload.

The original model was based on a charge for the number of messages that were sent to or from the service. This all-inclusive model was a good starting point, but also meant that some customers were effectively paying for parts of AWS IoT that they did not actually use. For example, some customers have devices that ping AWS IoT very frequently, with sparse rule sets that fire infrequently. Our new model is more fine-grained, with independent charges for each component (all prices are for devices that connect to the US East (Northern Virginia) Region):

Connectivity – Metered in 1 minute increments and based on the total time your devices are connected to AWS IoT. Priced at $0.08 per million minutes of connection (equivalent to $0.042 per device per year for 24/7 connectivity). Your devices can send keep-alive pings at 30 second to 20 minute intervals at no additional cost.

Messaging – Metered by the number of messages transmitted between your devices and AWS IoT. Pricing starts at $1 per million messages, with volume pricing falling as low as $0.70 per million. You may send and receive messages up to 128 kilobytes in size. Messages are metered in 5 kilobyte increments (up from 512 bytes previously). For example, an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two messages.

Rules Engine – Metered for each time a rule is triggered, and for the number of actions executed within a rule, with a minimum of one action per rule. Priced at $0.15 per million rules-triggered and $0.15 per million actions-executed. Rules that process a message in excess of 5 kilobytes are metered at the next multiple of the 5 kilobyte size. For example, a rule that processes an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two rules.

Device Shadow & Registry Updates – Metered on the number of operations to access or modify Device Shadow or Registry data, priced at $1.25 per million operations. Device Shadow and Registry operations are metered in 1 kilobyte increments of the Device Shadow or Registry record size. For example, an update to a 1.5 kilobyte Shadow record is metered as two operations.

The AWS Free Tier now offers a generous allocation of connection minutes, messages, triggered rules, rules actions, Shadow, and Registry usage, enough to operate a fleet of up to 50 devices. The new prices will take effect on January 1, 2018 with no effort on your part. At that time, the updated prices will be published on the AWS IoT Pricing page.

AWS IoT at re:Invent
We have an entire IoT track at this year’s AWS re:Invent. Here is a sampling:

We also have customer-led sessions from Philips, Panasonic, Enel, and Salesforce.

Jeff;

AWS Achieves FedRAMP JAB Moderate Provisional Authorization for 20 Services in the AWS US East/West Region

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-fedramp-jab-moderate-authorization-for-20-services-in-us-eastwest/

The AWS US East/West Region has received a Provisional Authority to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) at the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) Moderate baseline.

Though AWS has maintained an AWS US East/West Region Agency-ATO since early 2013, this announcement represents AWS’s carefully deliberated move to the JAB for the centralized maintenance of our P-ATO for 10 services already authorized. This also includes the addition of 10 new services to our FedRAMP program (see the complete list of services below). This doubles the number of FedRAMP Moderate services available to our customers to enable increased use of the cloud and support modernized IT missions. Our public sector customers now can leverage this FedRAMP P-ATO as a baseline for their own authorizations and look to the JAB for centralized Continuous Monitoring reporting and updates. In a significant enhancement for our partners that build their solutions on the AWS US East/West Region, they can now achieve FedRAMP JAB P-ATOs of their own for their Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings.

In line with FedRAMP security requirements, our independent FedRAMP assessment was completed in partnership with a FedRAMP accredited Third Party Assessment Organization (3PAO) on our technical, management, and operational security controls to validate that they meet or exceed FedRAMP’s Moderate baseline requirements. Effective immediately, you can begin leveraging this P-ATO for the following 20 services in the AWS US East/West Region:

  • Amazon Aurora (MySQL)*
  • Amazon CloudWatch Logs*
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Elastic Block Store
  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud
  • Amazon EMR*
  • Amazon Glacier*
  • Amazon Kinesis Streams*
  • Amazon RDS (MySQL, Oracle, Postgres*)
  • Amazon Redshift
  • Amazon Simple Notification Service*
  • Amazon Simple Queue Service*
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service
  • Amazon Simple Workflow Service*
  • Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
  • AWS CloudFormation*
  • AWS CloudTrail*
  • AWS Identity and Access Management
  • AWS Key Management Service
  • Elastic Load Balancing

* Services with first-time FedRAMP Moderate authorizations

We continue to work with the FedRAMP Project Management Office (PMO), other regulatory and compliance bodies, and our customers and partners to ensure that we are raising the bar on our customers’ security and compliance needs.

To learn more about how AWS helps customers meet their security and compliance requirements, see the AWS Compliance website. To learn about what other public sector customers are doing on AWS, see our Government, Education, and Nonprofits Case Studies and Customer Success Stories. To review the public posting of our FedRAMP authorizations, see the FedRAMP Marketplace.

– Chris Gile, Senior Manager, AWS Public Sector Risk and Compliance

Cross-Account Integration with Amazon SNS

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/cross-account-integration-with-amazon-sns/

Contributed by Zak Islam, Senior Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

 

Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) is a fully managed AWS service that makes it easy to decouple your application components and fan-out messages. SNS provides topics (similar to topics in message brokers such as RabbitMQ or ActiveMQ) that you can use to create 1:1, 1:N, or N:N producer/consumer design patterns. For more information about how to send messages from SNS to Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda, or HTTP(S) endpoints in the same account, see Sending Amazon SNS Messages to Amazon SQS Queues.

SNS can be used to send messages within a single account or to resources in different accounts to create administrative isolation. This enables administrators to grant only the minimum level of permissions required to process a workload (for example, limiting the scope of your application account to only send messages and to deny deletes). This approach is commonly known as the “principle of least privilege.” If you are interested, read more about AWS’s multi-account security strategy.

This is great from a security perspective, but why would you want to share messages between accounts? It may sound scary, but it’s a common practice to isolate application components (such as producer and consumer) to operate using different AWS accounts to lock down privileges in case credentials are exposed. In this post, I go slightly deeper and explore how to set up your SNS topic so that it can route messages to SQS queues that are owned by a separate AWS account.

Potential use cases

First, look at a common order processing design pattern:

This is a simple architecture. A web server submits an order directly to an SNS topic, which then fans out messages to two SQS queues. One SQS queue is used to track all incoming orders for audits (such as anti-entropy, comparing the data of all replicas and updating each replica to the newest version). The other is used to pass the request to the order processing systems.

Imagine now that a few years have passed, and your downstream processes no longer scale, so you are kicking around the idea of a re-architecture project. To thoroughly test your system, you need a way to replay your production messages in your development system. Sure, you can build a system to replicate and replay orders from your production environment in your development environment. Wouldn’t it be easier to subscribe your development queues to the production SNS topic so you can test your new system in real time? That’s exactly what you can do here.

Here’s another use case. As your business grows, you recognize the need for more metrics from your order processing pipeline. The analytics team at your company has built a metrics aggregation service and ingests data via a central SQS queue. Their architecture is as follows:

Again, it’s a fairly simple architecture. All data is ingested via SQS queues (master_ingest_queue, in this case). You subscribe the master_ingest_queue, running under the analytics team’s AWS account, to the topic that is in the order management team’s account.

Making it work

Now that you’ve seen a few scenarios, let’s dig into the details. There are a couple of ways to link an SQS queue to an SNS topic (subscribe a queue to a topic):

  1. The queue owner can create a subscription to the topic.
  2. The topic owner can subscribe a queue in another account to the topic.

Queue owner subscription

What happens when the queue owner subscribes to a topic? In this case, assume that the topic owner has given permission to the subscriber’s account to call the Subscribe API action using the topic ARN (Amazon Resource Name). For the examples below, also assume the following:

  •  Topic_Owner is the identifier for the account that owns the topic MainTopic
  • Queue_Owner is the identifier for the account that owns the queue subscribed to the main topic

To enable the subscriber to subscribe to a topic, the topic owner must add the sns:Subscribe and topic ARN to the topic policy via the AWS Management Console, as follows:

{
  "Version":"2012-10-17",
  "Id":"MyTopicSubscribePolicy",
  "Statement":[{
      "Sid":"Allow-other-account-to-subscribe-to-topic",
      "Effect":"Allow",
      "Principal":{
        "AWS":"Topic_Owner"
      },
      "Action":"sns:Subscribe",
      "Resource":"arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:Queue_Owner:MainTopic"
    }
  ]
}

After this has been set up, the subscriber (using account Queue_Owner) can call Subscribe to link the queue to the topic. After the queue has been successfully subscribed, SNS starts to publish notifications. In this case, neither the topic owner nor the subscriber have had to process any kind of confirmation message.

Topic owner subscription

The second way to subscribe an SQS queue to an SNS topic is to have the Topic_Owner account initiate the subscription for the queue from account Queue_Owner. In this case, SNS first sends a confirmation message to the queue. To confirm the subscription, a user who can read messages from the queue must visit the URL specified in the SubscribeURL value in the message. Until the subscription is confirmed, no notifications published to the topic are sent to the queue. To confirm a subscription, you can use the SQS console or the ReceiveMessage API action.

What’s next?

In this post, I covered a few simple use cases but the principles can be extended to complex systems as well. As you architect new systems and refactor existing ones, think about where you can leverage queues (SQS) and topics (SNS) to build a loosely coupled system that can be quickly and easily extended to meet your business need.

For step by step instructions, see Sending Amazon SNS messages to an Amazon SQS queue in a different account. You can also visit the following resources to get started working with message queues and topics:

New – SES Dedicated IP Pools

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-ses-dedicated-ip-pools/

Today we released Dedicated IP Pools for Amazon Simple Email Service (SES). With dedicated IP pools, you can specify which dedicated IP addresses to use for sending different types of email. Dedicated IP pools let you use your SES for different tasks. For instance, you can send transactional emails from one set of IPs and you can send marketing emails from another set of IPs.

If you’re not familiar with Amazon SES these concepts may not make much sense. We haven’t had the chance to cover SES on this blog since 2016, which is a shame, so I want to take a few steps back and talk about the service as a whole and some of the enhancements the team has made over the past year. If you just want the details on this new feature I strongly recommend reading the Amazon Simple Email Service Blog.

What is SES?

So, what is SES? If you’re a customer of Amazon.com you know that we send a lot of emails. Bought something? You get an email. Order shipped? You get an email. Over time, as both email volumes and types increased Amazon.com needed to build an email platform that was flexible, scalable, reliable, and cost-effective. SES is the result of years of Amazon’s own work in dealing with email and maximizing deliverability.

In short: SES gives you the ability to send and receive many types of email with the monitoring and tools to ensure high deliverability.

Sending an email is easy; one simple API call:

import boto3
ses = boto3.client('ses')
ses.send_email(
    Source='[email protected]',
    Destination={'ToAddresses': ['[email protected]']},
    Message={
        'Subject': {'Data': 'Hello, World!'},
        'Body': {'Text': {'Data': 'Hello, World!'}}
    }
)

Receiving and reacting to emails is easy too. You can set up rulesets that forward received emails to Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), or AWS Lambda – you could even trigger a Amazon Lex bot through Lambda to communicate with your customers over email. SES is a powerful tool for building applications. The image below shows just a fraction of the capabilities:

Deliverability 101

Deliverability is the percentage of your emails that arrive in your recipients’ inboxes. Maintaining deliverability is a shared responsibility between AWS and the customer. AWS takes the fight against spam very seriously and works hard to make sure services aren’t abused. To learn more about deliverability I recommend the deliverability docs. For now, understand that deliverability is an important aspect of email campaigns and SES has many tools that enable a customer to manage their deliverability.

Dedicated IPs and Dedicated IP pools

When you’re starting out with SES your emails are sent through a shared IP. That IP is responsible for sending mail on behalf of many customers and AWS works to maintain appropriate volume and deliverability on each of those IPs. However, when you reach a sufficient volume shared IPs may not be the right solution.

By creating a dedicated IP you’re able to fully control the reputations of those IPs. This makes it vastly easier to troubleshoot any deliverability or reputation issues. It’s also useful for many email certification programs which require a dedicated IP as a commitment to maintaining your email reputation. Using the shared IPs of the Amazon SES service is still the right move for many customers but if you have sustained daily sending volume greater than hundreds of thousands of emails per day you might want to consider a dedicated IP. One caveat to be aware of: if you’re not sending a sufficient volume of email with a consistent pattern a dedicated IP can actually hurt your reputation. Dedicated IPs are $24.95 per address per month at the time of this writing – but you can find out more at the pricing page.

Before you can use a Dedicated IP you need to “warm” it. You do this by gradually increasing the volume of emails you send through a new address. Each IP needs time to build a positive reputation. In March of this year SES released the ability to automatically warm your IPs over the course of 45 days. This feature is on by default for all new dedicated IPs.

Customers who send high volumes of email will typically have multiple dedicated IPs. Today the SES team released dedicated IP pools to make managing those IPs easier. Now when you send email you can specify a configuration set which will route your email to an IP in a pool based on the pool’s association with that configuration set.

One of the other major benefits of this feature is that it allows customers who previously split their email sending across several AWS accounts (to manage their reputation for different types of email) to consolidate into a single account.

You can read the documentation and blog for more info.

New – AWS SAM Local (Beta) – Build and Test Serverless Applications Locally

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-sam-local-beta-build-and-test-serverless-applications-locally/

Today we’re releasing a beta of a new tool, SAM Local, that makes it easy to build and test your serverless applications locally. In this post we’ll use SAM local to build, debug, and deploy a quick application that allows us to vote on tabs or spaces by curling an endpoint. AWS introduced Serverless Application Model (SAM) last year to make it easier for developers to deploy serverless applications. If you’re not already familiar with SAM my colleague Orr wrote a great post on how to use SAM that you can read in about 5 minutes. At it’s core, SAM is a powerful open source specification built on AWS CloudFormation that makes it easy to keep your serverless infrastructure as code – and they have the cutest mascot.

SAM Local takes all the good parts of SAM and brings them to your local machine.

There are a couple of ways to install SAM Local but the easiest is through NPM. A quick npm install -g aws-sam-local should get us going but if you want the latest version you can always install straight from the source: go get github.com/awslabs/aws-sam-local (this will create a binary named aws-sam-local, not sam).

I like to vote on things so let’s write a quick SAM application to vote on Spaces versus Tabs. We’ll use a very simple, but powerful, architecture of API Gateway fronting a Lambda function and we’ll store our results in DynamoDB. In the end a user should be able to curl our API curl https://SOMEURL/ -d '{"vote": "spaces"}' and get back the number of votes.

Let’s start by writing a simple SAM template.yaml:

AWSTemplateFormatVersion : '2010-09-09'
Transform: AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31
Resources:
  VotesTable:
    Type: "AWS::Serverless::SimpleTable"
  VoteSpacesTabs:
    Type: "AWS::Serverless::Function"
    Properties:
      Runtime: python3.6
      Handler: lambda_function.lambda_handler
      Policies: AmazonDynamoDBFullAccess
      Environment:
        Variables:
          TABLE_NAME: !Ref VotesTable
      Events:
        Vote:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /
            Method: post

So we create a [dynamo_i] table that we expose to our Lambda function through an environment variable called TABLE_NAME.

To test that this template is valid I’ll go ahead and call sam validate to make sure I haven’t fat-fingered anything. It returns Valid! so let’s go ahead and get to work on our Lambda function.

import os
import os
import json
import boto3
votes_table = boto3.resource('dynamodb').Table(os.getenv('TABLE_NAME'))

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    print(event)
    if event['httpMethod'] == 'GET':
        resp = votes_table.scan()
        return {'body': json.dumps({item['id']: int(item['votes']) for item in resp['Items']})}
    elif event['httpMethod'] == 'POST':
        try:
            body = json.loads(event['body'])
        except:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'malformed json input'}
        if 'vote' not in body:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'missing vote in request body'}
        if body['vote'] not in ['spaces', 'tabs']:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'vote value must be "spaces" or "tabs"'}

        resp = votes_table.update_item(
            Key={'id': body['vote']},
            UpdateExpression='ADD votes :incr',
            ExpressionAttributeValues={':incr': 1},
            ReturnValues='ALL_NEW'
        )
        return {'body': "{} now has {} votes".format(body['vote'], resp['Attributes']['votes'])}

So let’s test this locally. I’ll need to create a real DynamoDB database to talk to and I’ll need to provide the name of that database through the enviornment variable TABLE_NAME. I could do that with an env.json file or I can just pass it on the command line. First, I can call:
$ echo '{"httpMethod": "POST", "body": "{\"vote\": \"spaces\"}"}' |\
TABLE_NAME="vote-spaces-tabs" sam local invoke "VoteSpacesTabs"

to test the Lambda – it returns the number of votes for spaces so theoritically everything is working. Typing all of that out is a pain so I could generate a sample event with sam local generate-event api and pass that in to the local invocation. Far easier than all of that is just running our API locally. Let’s do that: sam local start-api. Now I can curl my local endpoints to test everything out.
I’ll run the command: $ curl -d '{"vote": "tabs"}' http://127.0.0.1:3000/ and it returns: “tabs now has 12 votes”. Now, of course I did not write this function perfectly on my first try. I edited and saved several times. One of the benefits of hot-reloading is that as I change the function I don’t have to do any additional work to test the new function. This makes iterative development vastly easier.

Let’s say we don’t want to deal with accessing a real DynamoDB database over the network though. What are our options? Well we can download DynamoDB Local and launch it with java -Djava.library.path=./DynamoDBLocal_lib -jar DynamoDBLocal.jar -sharedDb. Then we can have our Lambda function use the AWS_SAM_LOCAL environment variable to make some decisions about how to behave. Let’s modify our function a bit:

import os
import json
import boto3
if os.getenv("AWS_SAM_LOCAL"):
    votes_table = boto3.resource(
        'dynamodb',
        endpoint_url="http://docker.for.mac.localhost:8000/"
    ).Table("spaces-tabs-votes")
else:
    votes_table = boto3.resource('dynamodb').Table(os.getenv('TABLE_NAME'))

Now we’re using a local endpoint to connect to our local database which makes working without wifi a little easier.

SAM local even supports interactive debugging! In Java and Node.js I can just pass the -d flag and a port to immediately enable the debugger. For Python I could use a library like import epdb; epdb.serve() and connect that way. Then we can call sam local invoke -d 8080 "VoteSpacesTabs" and our function will pause execution waiting for you to step through with the debugger.

Alright, I think we’ve got everything working so let’s deploy this!

First I’ll call the sam package command which is just an alias for aws cloudformation package and then I’ll use the result of that command to sam deploy.

$ sam package --template-file template.yaml --s3-bucket MYAWESOMEBUCKET --output-template-file package.yaml
Uploading to 144e47a4a08f8338faae894afe7563c3  90570 / 90570.0  (100.00%)
Successfully packaged artifacts and wrote output template to file package.yaml.
Execute the following command to deploy the packaged template
aws cloudformation deploy --template-file package.yaml --stack-name 
$ sam deploy --template-file package.yaml --stack-name VoteForSpaces --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM
Waiting for changeset to be created..
Waiting for stack create/update to complete
Successfully created/updated stack - VoteForSpaces

Which brings us to our API:
.

I’m going to hop over into the production stage and add some rate limiting in case you guys start voting a lot – but otherwise we’ve taken our local work and deployed it to the cloud without much effort at all. I always enjoy it when things work on the first deploy!

You can vote now and watch the results live! http://spaces-or-tabs.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/

We hope that SAM Local makes it easier for you to test, debug, and deploy your serverless apps. We have a CONTRIBUTING.md guide and we welcome pull requests. Please tweet at us to let us know what cool things you build. You can see our What’s New post here and the documentation is live here.

Randall

Open and Click Tracking Have Arrived

Post Syndicated from Brent Meyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/ses/open-and-click-tracking-have-arrived/

We’re pleased to announce the addition of open and click tracking metrics to Amazon SES. These metrics will help you measure the effectiveness of the email campaigns you send using Amazon SES.

We’re also adding the ability to publish email sending metrics to Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) using event publishing. This feature gives you greater control over the sending notifications you receive through Amazon SNS.

What’s new in this release?

When you send an email using Amazon SES, we now collect metrics related to opens and clicks. Opens, in this sense, refers to the number of users who successfully received your email and opened it in their email clients; clicks refers to the number of users who received an email and clicked one or more links in it.

Additionally, you can now use event publishing to push email sending notifications—including open and click notifications—using Amazon SNS. Previously, you could send account-level notifications through Amazon SNS. These notifications were pretty limited: you could only receive notifications about bounces, complaints, and deliveries, and you would receive notifications about all of these events across your entire Amazon SES account. Now you can use event publishing to send notifications about deliveries, opens, clicks, bounces, and complaints. Furthermore, you can set up event publishing so that you only receive notifications about emails sent using the configuration sets you specify in those emails.

Why should I use open and click tracking?

Whether you are sending marketing emails, transactional emails, or notifications, you need to know how effective your communications are. The email sending metrics feature of Amazon SES gives you data about entire email response funnel—the total number of emails that were sent, bounced, viewed, and clicked. You can then transform those insights into action.

For example, the open and click tracking feature can help you identify the customers who are most interested in receiving the messages you send. By narrowing down your list of recipients and focusing on your most engaged customers, you can save money (by sending fewer messages), improve the response rates of your marketing campaigns (by targeting only the customers who are most interested in what you have to say), and protect your sender reputation (by reducing the number of bounces and complaints against your sending domain).

How do I enable open and click tracking?

If you’ve set up Sending Metrics in the past, then you can easily add open and click tracking to your existing configuration sets. On the Configuration Sets page, choose the configuration set that contains your sending event destination; edit the event destination, check the boxes for Open and Click (as shown in the image below), and then choose Save.

How does open and click tracking work?

Amazon SES makes very minor changes to your emails in order to make open and click tracking work. At the bottom of each message, we insert a 1 pixel by 1 pixel transparent GIF image. Each email includes a unique link to this image file; when the image is opened, we can tell exactly which message was opened and by whom.

To track clicks, we set up a redirect for each link in the message. When a recipient clicks a link, they are sent to an Amazon SES server, and are immediately forwarded to the destination address. As with open tracking, each of these redirect links is unique, allowing us to easily determine which recipient clicked the link, when they clicked it, and the email from which they arrived at the link.

Can I disable click tracking?

You can disable click tracking by adding a special tag to the anchor tags in your HTML. For example, if you were linking to the AWS home page, a normal anchor link would look something like this:

<a href="https://aws.amazon.com/">Amazon Web Services</a>

To disable click tracking for that same link, you would modify to look like this:

<a ses:no-track href="https://aws.amazon.com/">Amazon Web Services</a>

Because the ses:no-track attribute is non-standard HTML, we automatically remove it from the version of the email that arrives in your recipients’ inboxes.

How do I use event publishing with Amazon SNS?

If you’ve set up event destinations in the past, then the process of setting up an Amazon SNS event destination will be very familiar. You can add an Amazon SNS destination to an existing configuration set, or create a new configuration set that uses Amazon SNS as its event destination. To learn more, see “Set Up an Amazon SNS Event Destination for Amazon SES Event Publishing” in our Developer Guide.

We’re excited about this release. Let us know what you think of these new features in the SES Forum, or in the comments for this post.

AWS HIPAA Eligibility Update (July 2017) – Eight Additional Services

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hipaa-eligibility-update-july-2017-eight-additional-services/

It is time for an update on our on-going effort to make AWS a great host for healthcare and life sciences applications. As you can see from our Health Customer Stories page, Philips, VergeHealth, and Cambia (to choose a few) trust AWS with Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personally Identifying Information (PII) as part of their efforts to comply with HIPAA and HITECH.

In May we announced that we added Amazon API Gateway, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Database Migration Service, and Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) to our list of HIPAA eligible services and discussed our how customers and partners are putting them to use.

Eight More Eligible Services
Today I am happy to share the news that we are adding another eight services to the list:

Amazon CloudFront can now be utilized to enhance the delivery and transfer of Protected Health Information data to applications on the Internet. By providing a completely secure and encryptable pathway, CloudFront can now be used as a part of applications that need to cache PHI. This includes applications for viewing lab results or imaging data, and those that transfer PHI from Healthcare Information Exchanges (HIEs).

AWS WAF can now be used to protect applications running on AWS which operate on PHI such as patient care portals, patient scheduling systems, and HIEs. Requests and responses containing encrypted PHI and PII can now pass through AWS WAF.

AWS Shield can now be used to protect web applications such as patient care portals and scheduling systems that operate on encrypted PHI from DDoS attacks.

Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration can now be used to accelerate the bulk transfer of large amounts of research, genetics, informatics, insurance, or payer/payment data containing PHI/PII information. Transfers can take place between a pair of AWS Regions or from an on-premises system and an AWS Region.

Amazon WorkSpaces can now be used by researchers, informaticists, hospital administrators and other users to analyze, visualize or process PHI/PII data using on-demand Windows virtual desktops.

AWS Directory Service can now be used to connect the authentication and authorization systems of organizations that use or process PHI/PII to their resources in the AWS Cloud. For example, healthcare providers operating hybrid cloud environments can now use AWS Directory Services to allow their users to easily transition between cloud and on-premises resources.

Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) can now be used to send notifications containing encrypted PHI/PII as part of patient care, payment processing, and mobile applications.

Amazon Cognito can now be used to authenticate users into mobile patient portal and payment processing applications that use PHI/PII identifiers for accounts.

Additional HIPAA Resources
Here are some additional resources that will help you to build applications that comply with HIPAA and HITECH:

Keep in Touch
In order to make use of any AWS service in any manner that involves PHI, you must first enter into an AWS Business Associate Addendum (BAA). You can contact us to start the process.

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