Tag Archives: AWS Server Migration Service

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Jenny Hang original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-september-aws-online-tech-talks/

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

AWS Tech Talks

Join us this September to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

 

Compute:

September 23, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Your Hybrid Cloud Architecture with AWS – Learn about the extensive range of services AWS offers to help you build a hybrid cloud architecture best suited for your use case.

September 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTSelf-Hosted WordPress: It’s Easier Than You Think – Learn how you can easily build a fault-tolerant WordPress site using Amazon Lightsail.

October 3, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTLower Costs by Right Sizing Your Instance with Amazon EC2 T3 General Purpose Burstable Instances – Get an overview of T3 instances, understand what workloads are ideal for them, and understand how the T3 credit system works so that you can lower your EC2 instance costs today.

 

Containers:

September 26, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDevelop a Web App Using Amazon ECS and AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Learn how to build your first app using CDK and AWS container services.

 

Data Lakes & Analytics:

September 26, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Provisioning Amazon MSK Clusters and Using Popular Apache Kafka-Compatible Tooling – Learn best practices on running Apache Kafka production workloads at a lower cost on Amazon MSK.

 

Databases:

September 25, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTWhat’s New in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) – Learn what’s new in Amazon DocumentDB, a fully managed MongoDB compatible database service designed from the ground up to be fast, scalable, and highly available.

October 3, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Enterprise-Class Security, High-Availability, and Scalability with Amazon ElastiCache – Learn about new enterprise-friendly Amazon ElastiCache enhancements like customer managed key and online scaling up or down to make your critical workloads more secure, scalable and available.

 

DevOps:

October 1, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT – CI/CD for Containers: A Way Forward for Your DevOps Pipeline – Learn how to build CI/CD pipelines using AWS services to get the most out of the agility afforded by containers.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid:

September 24, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PT Virtual Workshop: How to Monitor and Manage Your AWS Costs – Learn how to visualize and manage your AWS cost and usage in this virtual hands-on workshop.

October 2, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT – Accelerate Cloud Adoption and Reduce Operational Risk with AWS Managed Services – Learn how AMS accelerates your migration to AWS, reduces your operating costs, improves security and compliance, and enables you to focus on your differentiating business priorities.

 

IoT:

September 25, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTComplex Monitoring for Industrial with AWS IoT Data Services – Learn how to solve your complex event monitoring challenges with AWS IoT Data Services.

 

Machine Learning:

September 23, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTTraining Machine Learning Models Faster – Learn how to train machine learning models quickly and with a single click using Amazon SageMaker.

September 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing Containers for Deep Learning Workflows – Learn how containers can help address challenges in deploying deep learning environments.

October 3, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PTVirtual Workshop: Getting Hands-On with Machine Learning and Ready to Race in the AWS DeepRacer League – Join DeClercq Wentzel, Senior Product Manager for AWS DeepRacer, for a presentation on the basics of machine learning and how to build a reinforcement learning model that you can use to join the AWS DeepRacer League.

 

AWS Marketplace:

September 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTAdvancing Software Procurement in a Containerized World – Learn how to deploy applications faster with third-party container products.

 

Migration:

September 24, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTApplication Migrations Using AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) – Learn how to use AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) for automating application migration and scheduling continuous replication, from your on-premises data centers or Microsoft Azure to AWS.

 

Networking & Content Delivery:

September 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuilding Highly Available and Performant Applications using AWS Global Accelerator – Learn how to build highly available and performant architectures for your applications with AWS Global Accelerator, now with source IP preservation.

September 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTAWS Office Hours: Amazon CloudFront – Just getting started with Amazon CloudFront and [email protected]? Get answers directly from our experts during AWS Office Hours.

 

Robotics:

October 1, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTRobots and STEM: AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate Unite! – Come join members of the AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate teams as we provide an overview of our education initiatives and walk you through the newly launched RoboMaker Badge.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance:

October 1, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Running Active Directory on AWS – Learn how to deploy Active Directory on AWS and start migrating your windows workloads.

 

Serverless:

October 2, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EventBridge – Learn how to optimize event-driven applications, and use rules and policies to route, transform, and control access to these events that react to data from SaaS apps.

 

Storage:

September 24, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTOptimize Your Amazon S3 Data Lake with S3 Storage Classes and Management Tools – Learn how to use the Amazon S3 Storage Classes and management tools to better manage your data lake at scale and to optimize storage costs and resources.

October 2, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTThe Great Migration to Cloud Storage: Choosing the Right Storage Solution for Your Workload – Learn more about AWS storage services and identify which service is the right fit for your business.

 

 

Learn about hourly-replication in Server Migration Service and the ability to migrate large data volumes

Post Syndicated from Martin Yip original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/learn-about-hourly-replication-in-server-migration-service-and-the-ability-to-migrate-large-data-volumes/

This post courtesy of Shane Baldacchino, AWS Solutions Architect

AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) is an agentless service that makes it easier and faster for you to migrate thousands of on-premises workloads to AWS. AWS SMS allows you to automate, schedule, and track incremental replications of live server volumes, making it easier for you to coordinate large-scale server migrations.

In my previous blog posts, we introduced how you can use AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) to migrate a popular commercial off the shelf software, WordPress into AWS.

For details and a walkthrough on how setup the AWS Server Migration Service, please see the following blog posts for Hyper-V and VMware hypervisors which will guide you through the high level process.

In this article we are going to step it up a few notches and look past common the migration of off-the-shelf software and provide you a pattern on how you can use AWS SMS and some of the recently launched features to migrate a more complicated environment, especially compression and resiliency for replication jobs and the support for data volumes greater than 4TB.

This post covers a migration of a complex internally developed eCommerce system comprising of a polyglot architecture. It is made up a Windows Microsoft IIS presentation tier, Tomcat application tier, and Microsoft SQL Server database tier. All workloads run on-premises as virtual machines in a VMware vCenter 5.5 and ESX 5.5 environment.

This theoretical customer environment has various business and infrastructure requirements.

Application downtime: During any migration activities, the application cannot be offline for more than 2 hours
Licensing: The customer has renewed their Microsoft SQL Server license for an additional 3 years and holds License Mobility with Software Assurance option for Microsoft SQL Server and therefore wants to take advantage of AWS BYOL licensing for Microsoft SQL server and Microsoft Windows Server.
Large data volumes: The Microsoft SQL Server database engine (.mdf, .ldf and .ndf files) consumes 11TB of storage

Walkthrough

Key elements of this migration process are identical to the process outlined in my previous blog posts and for more information on this process, please see the following blog posts Hyper-V and VMware hypervisors, but a high level you will need to.

• Establish your AWS environment.
• Download the SMS Connector from the AWS Management Console.
• Configure AWS SMS and Hypervisor permissions.
• Install and configure the SMS Connector appliance.
• Import your virtual machine inventory and create a replication jobs
• Launch your Amazon EC2 instances and associated NACL’s, Security Groups and AWS Elastic Load Balancers
• Change your DNS records to resolve the custom application to an AWS Elastic Load Balancer.

Before you start, ensure that your source systems OS and vCenter version are supported by AWS. For more information, see the Server Migration Service FAQ.

Planning the Migration

Once you have downloaded and configured the AWS SMS connector with your given Hypervisor you can get started in creating replication jobs.

The artifacts derived from our replication jobs with AWS SMS will be AMI’s (Amazon Machine Images) and as such we do not need to replicate each server individually and that is because we have a three-tier architecture that has commonality between servers with multiple Application and Web servers performing the same function, and as such we can leverage a common AMI and create three replication jobs.

1. Microsoft SQL Server – Database Tier
2. Ubuntu Server – Application Tier
3. IIS Web server – Webserver Tier

Performing the Replication

After validating that the SMS Connector is in a “HEALTHY” state, import your server catalog from your Hypervisor to AWS SMS. This process can take up to a minute.

Select the three servers (Microsoft SQL Server, Ubuntu Server, IIS Web server) to migrate and choose Create replication job. AWS SMS now supports creating replications jobs with frequencies as short as 1 hour, and as such to ensure our business RTO (Recovery Time Objective) of 2 hours is met we will create our replication jobs with a frequency of 1 hour. This will minimize the risk of any delta updates during the cutover windows not completing.

Given the businesses existing licensing investment in Microsoft SQL Server, they will leverage these the BYOL (Bring Your Own License) offering when creating the Microsoft SQL Server replication job.

The AWS SMS console guides you through the process. The time that the initial replication task takes to complete is dependent on available bandwidth and the size of your virtual machines.

After the initial seed replication, network bandwidth requirement is minimized as AWS SMS replicates only incremental changes occurring on the VM.

The progress updates from AWS SMS are automatically sent to AWS Migration Hub so that you can track tasks in progress.

AWS Migration Hub provides a single location to track the progress of application migrations across multiple AWS and partner solutions. In this post, we are using AWS SMS as a mechanism to migrate the virtual machines (VMs) and track them via AWS Migration Hub.

Migration Hub and AWS SMS are both free. You pay only for the cost of the individual migration tools that you use, and any resources being consumed on AWS

The dashboard reflects any status changes that occur in the linked services. You can see from the following image that two servers are complete whilst another is in progress.

Using Migration Hub, you can view the migration progress of all applications. This allows you to quickly get progress updates across all of your migrations, easily identify and troubleshoot any issues, and reduce the overall time and effort spent on your migration projects.

After validating that the SMS Connector

Testing Your Replicated Instances

Thirty hours after creating the replication jobs, notification was received via AWS SNS (Simple Notification Service) that all 3 replication jobs have completed. During the 30-hour replication window the customers ISP experienced downtime and sporadic flapping of the link, but this was negated by the network auto-recovery feature of SMS. It recovered and resumed replication without any intervention.

With the replication tasks being complete. The artifact created by AWS SMS is a custom AMI that you can use to deploy an EC2 instance. Follow the usual process to launch your EC2 instance, noting that you may need to replace any host-based firewalls with security groups and NACLs and any hardware based load balancers with Elastic Load Balancing to achieve fault tolerance, scalability, performance and security.

As this environment is a 3-tier architecture with commonality been tiers (Application and Presentation Tier) we can create during the EC2 Launch process an ASG (Auto Scaling Group) to ensure that deployed capacity matches user demand. The ASG will be based on the custom AMI’s generated by the replication jobs.

When you create an EC2 instance, ensure that you pick the most suitable EC2 instance type and size to match your performance and cost requirements.

While your new EC2 instances are a replica of your on-premises VM, you should always validate that applications are functioning. How you do this differs on an application-by-application basis. You can use a combination of approaches, such as editing a local host file and testing your application, SSH, RDP and Telnet.

For our Windows Presentation and database tier, I can RDP in to my systems and validate IIS 8.0 and other services are functioning correctly.

For our Ubuntu Application tier, we can SSH in to perform validation.

Post validation of each individual server we can now continue to test the application end to end. This is because our systems have been instantiated inside a VPC with no route back to our on-premises environment which allows us to test functionality without the risk of communication back to our production application.

After validation of systems it is now time to cut over, plan your runbook accordingly to ensure you either eliminate or minimize application disruption.

Cutting Over

As the replication window specified in AWS SMS replication jobs was 1 hour, there were hourly AMI’s created that provide delta updates since the initial seed replication was performed. The customer verified the stack by executing the previously created runbook using the latest AMIs, and verified the application behaved as expected.

After another round of testing, the customer decided to plan the cutover on the coming Saturday at midnight, by announcing a two-hour scheduled maintenance window. During the cutover window, the customer took the application offline, shutdown Microsoft SQL Server instance and performed an on-demand sync of all systems.

This generate a new versioned AMI that contained all on-premise data. The customer then executed the runbook on the new AMI’s. For the application and presentation tier these AMI’s were used in the ASG configuration. After application validation Amazon Route 53 was updated to resolve the application CNAME to the Application Load Balancer CNAME used to load balance traffic to the fleet of IIS servers.

Based on the TTL (Time To Live) of your Amazon Route 53 DNS zone file, end users slowly resolve the application to AWS, in this case within 300 seconds. Once this TTL period had elapsed the customer brought their application back online and exited their maintenance window, with time to spare.

After modifying the Amazon Route 53 Zone Apex, the physical topology now looks as follows with traffic being routed to AWS.

After validation of a successful migration the customer deleted their AWS Server Migration Service replication jobs and began planning to decommission their on-premises resources.

Summary

This is an example pattern on migrate a complex custom polyglot environment in to AWS using AWS migration services, specifically leveraging many of the new features of the AWS SMS service.

Many architectures can be extended to use many of the inherent benefits of AWS, with little effort. For example this article illustrated how AWS Migration Services can be used to migrate complex environments in to AWS and then use native AWS services such as Amazon CloudWatch metrics to drive Auto Scaling policies to ensure deployed capacity matches user demand whilst technologies such as Application Load Balancers can be used to achieve fault tolerance and scalability

Think big and get building!