Tag Archives: blogging

I’m Writing a Book on Security

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/04/im_writing_a_bo.html

I’m writing a book on security in the highly connected Internet-of-Things World. Tentative title:

Click Here to Kill Everybody
Peril and Promise in a Hyper-Connected World

There are two underlying metaphors in the book. The first is what I have called the World-Sized Web, which is that combination of mobile, cloud, persistence, personalization, agents, cyber-physical systems, and the Internet of Things. The second is what I’m calling the “war of all against all,” which is the recognition that security policy is a series of “wars” between various interests, and that any policy decision in any one of the wars affects all the others. I am not wedded to either metaphor at this point.

This is the current table of contents, with three of the chapters broken out into sub-chapters:

  • Introduction
  • The World-Sized Web
  • The Coming Threats
    • Privacy Threats
    • Availability and Integrity Threats
    • Threats from Software-Controlled Systems
    • Threats from Interconnected Systems
    • Threats from Automatic Algorithms
    • Threats from Autonomous Systems
    • Other Threats of New Technologies
    • Catastrophic Risk
    • Cyberwar
  • The Current Wars
    • The Copyright Wars
    • The US/EU Data Privacy Wars
    • The War for Control of the Internet
    • The War of Secrecy
  • The Coming Wars
    • The War for Your Data
    • The War Against Your Computers
    • The War for Your Embedded Computers
    • The Militarization of the Internet
    • The Powerful vs. the Powerless
    • The Rights of the Individual vs. the Rights of Society
  • The State of Security
  • Near-Term Solutions
  • Security for an Empowered World
  • Conclusion

That will change, of course. If the past is any guide, everything will change.

Questions: Am I missing any threats? Am I missing any wars?

Current schedule is for me to finish writing this book by the end of September, and have it published at the end of April 2017. I hope to have pre-publication copies available for sale at the RSA Conference next year. As with my previous book, Norton is the publisher.

So if you notice me blogging less this summer, this is why.

AWS Week in Review – April 11, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-april-11-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday

April 11

Tuesday

April 12

Wednesday

April 13

Thursday

April 14

Friday

April 15

Saturday

April 16

Sunday

April 17

New & Notable Open Source

  • cfn-include implements a Fn::Include for CloudFormation templates.
  • TumblessTemplates is a set of CloudFormation templates for quick setup of the Tumbless blogging platform.
  • s3git is Git for cloud storage.
  • s3_uploader is an S3 file uploader GUI written in Python.
  • SSH2EC2 lets you connect to EC2 instances via tags and metadata.
  • lambada is AWS Lambda for silly people.
  • aws-iam-proxy is a proxy that signs requests with IAM credentials.
  • hyperion is a Scala library and a set of abstractions for AWS Data Pipeline.
  • dynq is a DynamoDB query library.
  • cloud-custodian is a policy rules engine for AWS management.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – March 14, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-march-14-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday
March 14

We announced that the Developer Preview of AWS SDK for C++ is Now Available.
We celebrated Ten Years in the AWS Cloud.
We launched Amazon EMR 4.4.0 with Sqoop, HCatalog, Java 8, and More.
The AWS Compute Blog announced the Launch of AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway in the EU (Frankfurt) Region.
The Amazon Simple Email Service Blog annouced that Amazon SES Now Supports Custom Email From Domains.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Using Amazon SQS with Spring Boot and Spring JMS.
The AWS Partner Network Blog urged you to Take Advantage of AWS Self-Paced Labs.
The AWS Windows and .NET Developer Blog showed you how to Retrieve Request Metrics from the AWS SDK for .NET.
The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog announced the New Amazon-Busan Cloud Innovation and Technology Center.
We announced Lumberyard Beta 1.1 is Now Available.
Bometric shared AWS Security Best Practices: Network Security.
CloudCheckr listed 5 AWS Security Traps You Might be Missing.
Serverless Code announced that ServerlessConf is Here!
Cloud Academy launched 2 New AWS Courses – (Advanced Techniques for AWS Monitoring, Metrics and Logging and Advanced Deployment Techniques on AWS).
Cloudonaut reminded you to Avoid Sharing Key Pairs for EC2.
8KMiles talked about How Cloud Computing Can Address Healthcare Industry Challenges.
Evident discussed the CIS Foundations Benchmark for AWS Security.
Talkin’ Cloud shared 10 Facts About AWS as it Celebrates 10 Years.
The Next Platform reviewed Ten Years of AWS And a Status Check for HPC Clouds.
ZephyCloud is AWS-powered Wind Farm Design Software.

Tuesday
March 15

We announced the AWS Database Migration Service.
We announced that AWS CloudFormation Now Supports Amazon GameLift.
The AWS Partner Network Blog reminded everyone that Friends Don’t Let Friends Build Data Centers.
The Amazon GameDev Blog talked about Using Autoscaling to Control Costs While Delivering Great Player Experiences.
We updated the AWS SDK for JavaScript, the AWS SDK for Ruby, and the AWS SDK for Go.
Calorious talked about Uploading Images into Amazon S3.
Serverless Code showed you How to Use LXML in Lambda.
The Acquia Developer Center talked about Open-Sourcing Moonshot.
Concurrency Labs encouraged you to Hatch a Swarm of AWS IoT Things Using Locust, EC2 and Get Your IoT Application Ready for Prime Time.

Wednesday
March 16

We announced an S3 Lifecycle Management Update with Support for Multipart Upload and Delete Markers.
We announced that the EC2 Container Service is Now Available in the US West (Oregon) Region.
We announced that Amazon ElastiCache now supports the R3 node family in AWS China (Beijing) and AWS South America (Sao Paulo) Regions.
We announced that AWS IoT Now Integrates with Amazon Elasticsearch Service and CloudWatch.
We published the Puppet on the AWS Cloud: Quick Start Reference Deployment.
We announced that Amazon RDS Enhanced Monitoring is now available in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region.
I wrote about Additional Failover Control for Amazon Aurora (this feature was launched earlier in the year).
The AWS Security Blog showed you How to Set Up Uninterrupted, Federated User Access to AWS Using AD FS.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Migrating Your Databases Using AWS Database Migration Service.
We updated the AWS SDK for Java and the AWS CLI.
CloudWedge asked Cloud Computing: Cost Saver or Additional Expense?
Gathering Clouds reviewed New 2016 AWS Services: Certificate Manager, Lambda, Dev SecOps.

Thursday
March 17

We announced the new Marketplace Metering Service for 3rd Party Sellers.
We announced Amazon VPC Endpoints for Amazon S3 in South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul).
We announced AWS CloudTrail Support for Kinesis Firehose.
The AWS Big Data Blog showed you How to Analyze a Time Series in Real Time with AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis and Amazon DynamoDB Streams.
The AWS Enterprise Blog showed you How to Create a Cloud Center of Excellence in your Enterprise, and then talked about Staffing Your Enterprise’s Cloud Center of Excellence.
The AWS Mobile Development Blog showed you How to Analyze Device-Generated Data with AWS IoT and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.
Stelligent initiated a series on Serverless Delivery.
CloudHealth Academy talked about Modeling RDS Reservations.
N2W Software talked about How to Pre-Warm Your EBS Volumes on AWS.
ParkMyCloud explained How to Save Money on AWS With ParkMyCloud.

Friday
March 18

The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog told you how AWS GovCloud (US) Helps ASD Cut Costs by 50% While Dramatically Improving Security.
The Amazon GameDev Blog discussed Code Archeology: Crafting Lumberyard.
Calorious talked about Importing JSON into DynamoDB.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Graceful Shutdown Using AWS AutoScaling Groups and Terraform.

Saturday
March 19

DZone Cloud Zone wants to honor some Trailblazing Women in the Cloud.

Sunday
March 20

 Cloudability talked about How Atlassian Nailed the Reserved Instance Buying Process.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Serverless Delivery Architectures.
Gorillastack explained Why the Cloud is THE Key Technology Enabler for Digital Transformation.

New & Notable Open Source

Tumbless is a blogging platform based only on S3 and your browser.
aws-amicleaner cleans up old, unused AMIs and related snapshots.
alexa-aws-administration helps you to do various administration tasks in your AWS account using an Amazon Echo.
aws-s3-zipper takes an S3 bucket folder and zips it for streaming.
aws-lambda-helper is a collection of helper methods for Lambda.
CloudSeed lets you describe a list of AWS stack components, then configure and build a custom stack.
aws-ses-sns-dashboard is a Go-based dashboard with SES and SNS notifications.
snowplow-scala-analytics-sdk is a Scala SDK for working with Snowplow-enriched events in Spark using Lambda.
StackFormation is a lightweight CloudFormation stack manager.
aws-keychain-util is a command-line utility to manage AWS credentials in the OS X keychain.

New SlideShare Presentations

Account Separation and Mandatory Access Control on AWS.
Crypto Options in AWS.
Security Day IAM Recommended Practices.
What’s Nearly New.

New Customer Success Stories

AdiMap measures online advertising spend, app financials, and salary data. Using AWS, AdiMap builds predictive financial models without spending millions on compute resources and hardware, providing scalable financial intelligence and reducing time to market for new products.
Change.org is the world’s largest and fastest growing social change platform, with more than 125 million users in 196 countries starting campaigns and mobilizing support for local causes and global issues. The organization runs its website and business intelligence cluster on AWS, and runs its continuous integration and testing on Solano CI from APN member Solano Labs.
Flatiron Health has been able to reach 230 cancer clinics and 2,200 clinicians across the United States with a solution that captures and organizes oncology data, helping to support cancer treatments. Flatiron moved its solution to AWS to improve speed to market and to minimize the time and expense that the startup company needs to devote to its IT infrastructure.
Global Red specializes in lifecycle marketing, including strategy, data, analytics, and execution across all digital channels. By re-architecting and migrating its data platform and related applications to AWS, Global Red reduced the time to onboard new customers for its advertising trading desk and marketing automation platforms by 50 percent.
GMobi primarily sells its products and services to Original Design Manufacturers and Original Equipment Manufacturers in emerging markets. By running its “over the air” firmware updates, mobile billing, and advertising software development kits in an AWS infrastructure, GMobi has grown to support 120 million users while maintaining more than 99.9 percent availability
Time Inc.’s new chief technology officer joined the renowned media organization in early 2014, and promised big changes. With AWS, Time Inc. can leverage security features and functionality that mirror the benefits of cloud computing, including rich tools, best-in-class industry standards and protocols and lower costs.
Seaco Global is one of the world’s largest shipping companies. By using AWS to run SAP applications, it also reduced the time needed to complete monthly business processes to just one day, down from four days in the past.

New YouTube Videos

AWS Database Migration Service.
Introduction to Amazon WorkSpaces.
AWS Pop-up Loft.
Save the Date – AWS re:Invent 2016.

Upcoming Events

March 22nd – Live Event (Seattle, Washington) – AWS Big Data Meetup – Intro to SparkR.
March 22nd – Live Broadcast – VoiceOps: Commanding and Controlling Your AWS environments using Amazon Echo and Lambda.
March 23rd – Live Event (Atlanta, Georgia) – AWS Key Management Service & AWS Storage Services for a Hybrid Cloud (Atlanta AWS Community).
April 6th – Live Event (Boston, Massachusetts) AWS at Bio-IT World.
April 18th & 19th – Live Event (Chicago, Illinois) – AWS Summit – Chicago.
April 20th – Live Event (Melbourne, Australia) – Inaugural Melbourne Serverless Meetup.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – AWS Partner Summit.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – Inaugural Sydney Serverless Meetup.
ParkMyCloud 2016 AWS Cost-Reduction Roadshow.
AWS Loft – San Francisco.
AWS Loft – New York.
AWS Loft – Tel Aviv.
AWS Zombie Microservices Roadshow.
AWS Public Sector Events.
AWS Global Summit Series.

Help Wanted

AWS Careers.

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.
Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – March 14, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-march-14-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday
March 14

We announced that the Developer Preview of AWS SDK for C++ is Now Available.
We celebrated Ten Years in the AWS Cloud.
We launched Amazon EMR 4.4.0 with Sqoop, HCatalog, Java 8, and More.
The AWS Compute Blog announced the Launch of AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway in the EU (Frankfurt) Region.
The Amazon Simple Email Service Blog annouced that Amazon SES Now Supports Custom Email From Domains.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Using Amazon SQS with Spring Boot and Spring JMS.
The AWS Partner Network Blog urged you to Take Advantage of AWS Self-Paced Labs.
The AWS Windows and .NET Developer Blog showed you how to Retrieve Request Metrics from the AWS SDK for .NET.
The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog announced the New Amazon-Busan Cloud Innovation and Technology Center.
We announced Lumberyard Beta 1.1 is Now Available.
Bometric shared AWS Security Best Practices: Network Security.
CloudCheckr listed 5 AWS Security Traps You Might be Missing.
Serverless Code announced that ServerlessConf is Here!
Cloud Academy launched 2 New AWS Courses – (Advanced Techniques for AWS Monitoring, Metrics and Logging and Advanced Deployment Techniques on AWS).
Cloudonaut reminded you to Avoid Sharing Key Pairs for EC2.
8KMiles talked about How Cloud Computing Can Address Healthcare Industry Challenges.
Evident discussed the CIS Foundations Benchmark for AWS Security.
Talkin’ Cloud shared 10 Facts About AWS as it Celebrates 10 Years.
The Next Platform reviewed Ten Years of AWS And a Status Check for HPC Clouds.
ZephyCloud is AWS-powered Wind Farm Design Software.

Tuesday
March 15

We announced the AWS Database Migration Service.
We announced that AWS CloudFormation Now Supports Amazon GameLift.
The AWS Partner Network Blog reminded everyone that Friends Don’t Let Friends Build Data Centers.
The Amazon GameDev Blog talked about Using Autoscaling to Control Costs While Delivering Great Player Experiences.
We updated the AWS SDK for JavaScript, the AWS SDK for Ruby, and the AWS SDK for Go.
Calorious talked about Uploading Images into Amazon S3.
Serverless Code showed you How to Use LXML in Lambda.
The Acquia Developer Center talked about Open-Sourcing Moonshot.
Concurrency Labs encouraged you to Hatch a Swarm of AWS IoT Things Using Locust, EC2 and Get Your IoT Application Ready for Prime Time.

Wednesday
March 16

We announced an S3 Lifecycle Management Update with Support for Multipart Upload and Delete Markers.
We announced that the EC2 Container Service is Now Available in the US West (Oregon) Region.
We announced that Amazon ElastiCache now supports the R3 node family in AWS China (Beijing) and AWS South America (Sao Paulo) Regions.
We announced that AWS IoT Now Integrates with Amazon Elasticsearch Service and CloudWatch.
We published the Puppet on the AWS Cloud: Quick Start Reference Deployment.
We announced that Amazon RDS Enhanced Monitoring is now available in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region.
I wrote about Additional Failover Control for Amazon Aurora (this feature was launched earlier in the year).
The AWS Security Blog showed you How to Set Up Uninterrupted, Federated User Access to AWS Using AD FS.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Migrating Your Databases Using AWS Database Migration Service.
We updated the AWS SDK for Java and the AWS CLI.
CloudWedge asked Cloud Computing: Cost Saver or Additional Expense?
Gathering Clouds reviewed New 2016 AWS Services: Certificate Manager, Lambda, Dev SecOps.

Thursday
March 17

We announced the new Marketplace Metering Service for 3rd Party Sellers.
We announced Amazon VPC Endpoints for Amazon S3 in South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul).
We announced AWS CloudTrail Support for Kinesis Firehose.
The AWS Big Data Blog showed you How to Analyze a Time Series in Real Time with AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis and Amazon DynamoDB Streams.
The AWS Enterprise Blog showed you How to Create a Cloud Center of Excellence in your Enterprise, and then talked about Staffing Your Enterprise’s Cloud Center of Excellence.
The AWS Mobile Development Blog showed you How to Analyze Device-Generated Data with AWS IoT and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.
Stelligent initiated a series on Serverless Delivery.
CloudHealth Academy talked about Modeling RDS Reservations.
N2W Software talked about How to Pre-Warm Your EBS Volumes on AWS.
ParkMyCloud explained How to Save Money on AWS With ParkMyCloud.

Friday
March 18

The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog told you how AWS GovCloud (US) Helps ASD Cut Costs by 50% While Dramatically Improving Security.
The Amazon GameDev Blog discussed Code Archeology: Crafting Lumberyard.
Calorious talked about Importing JSON into DynamoDB.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Graceful Shutdown Using AWS AutoScaling Groups and Terraform.

Saturday
March 19

DZone Cloud Zone wants to honor some Trailblazing Women in the Cloud.

Sunday
March 20

 Cloudability talked about How Atlassian Nailed the Reserved Instance Buying Process.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Serverless Delivery Architectures.
Gorillastack explained Why the Cloud is THE Key Technology Enabler for Digital Transformation.

New & Notable Open Source

Tumbless is a blogging platform based only on S3 and your browser.
aws-amicleaner cleans up old, unused AMIs and related snapshots.
alexa-aws-administration helps you to do various administration tasks in your AWS account using an Amazon Echo.
aws-s3-zipper takes an S3 bucket folder and zips it for streaming.
aws-lambda-helper is a collection of helper methods for Lambda.
CloudSeed lets you describe a list of AWS stack components, then configure and build a custom stack.
aws-ses-sns-dashboard is a Go-based dashboard with SES and SNS notifications.
snowplow-scala-analytics-sdk is a Scala SDK for working with Snowplow-enriched events in Spark using Lambda.
StackFormation is a lightweight CloudFormation stack manager.
aws-keychain-util is a command-line utility to manage AWS credentials in the OS X keychain.

New SlideShare Presentations

Account Separation and Mandatory Access Control on AWS.
Crypto Options in AWS.
Security Day IAM Recommended Practices.
What’s Nearly New.

New Customer Success Stories

AdiMap measures online advertising spend, app financials, and salary data. Using AWS, AdiMap builds predictive financial models without spending millions on compute resources and hardware, providing scalable financial intelligence and reducing time to market for new products.
Change.org is the world’s largest and fastest growing social change platform, with more than 125 million users in 196 countries starting campaigns and mobilizing support for local causes and global issues. The organization runs its website and business intelligence cluster on AWS, and runs its continuous integration and testing on Solano CI from APN member Solano Labs.
Flatiron Health has been able to reach 230 cancer clinics and 2,200 clinicians across the United States with a solution that captures and organizes oncology data, helping to support cancer treatments. Flatiron moved its solution to AWS to improve speed to market and to minimize the time and expense that the startup company needs to devote to its IT infrastructure.
Global Red specializes in lifecycle marketing, including strategy, data, analytics, and execution across all digital channels. By re-architecting and migrating its data platform and related applications to AWS, Global Red reduced the time to onboard new customers for its advertising trading desk and marketing automation platforms by 50 percent.
GMobi primarily sells its products and services to Original Design Manufacturers and Original Equipment Manufacturers in emerging markets. By running its “over the air” firmware updates, mobile billing, and advertising software development kits in an AWS infrastructure, GMobi has grown to support 120 million users while maintaining more than 99.9 percent availability
Time Inc.’s new chief technology officer joined the renowned media organization in early 2014, and promised big changes. With AWS, Time Inc. can leverage security features and functionality that mirror the benefits of cloud computing, including rich tools, best-in-class industry standards and protocols and lower costs.
Seaco Global is one of the world’s largest shipping companies. By using AWS to run SAP applications, it also reduced the time needed to complete monthly business processes to just one day, down from four days in the past.

New YouTube Videos

AWS Database Migration Service.
Introduction to Amazon WorkSpaces.
AWS Pop-up Loft.
Save the Date – AWS re:Invent 2016.

Upcoming Events

March 22nd – Live Event (Seattle, Washington) – AWS Big Data Meetup – Intro to SparkR.
March 22nd – Live Broadcast – VoiceOps: Commanding and Controlling Your AWS environments using Amazon Echo and Lambda.
March 23rd – Live Event (Atlanta, Georgia) – AWS Key Management Service & AWS Storage Services for a Hybrid Cloud (Atlanta AWS Community).
April 6th – Live Event (Boston, Massachusetts) AWS at Bio-IT World.
April 18th & 19th – Live Event (Chicago, Illinois) – AWS Summit – Chicago.
April 20th – Live Event (Melbourne, Australia) – Inaugural Melbourne Serverless Meetup.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – AWS Partner Summit.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – Inaugural Sydney Serverless Meetup.
ParkMyCloud 2016 AWS Cost-Reduction Roadshow.
AWS Loft – San Francisco.
AWS Loft – New York.
AWS Loft – Tel Aviv.
AWS Zombie Microservices Roadshow.
AWS Public Sector Events.
AWS Global Summit Series.

Help Wanted

AWS Careers.

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.
Jeff;

Conservancy’s Year In Review 2015

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2015/12/18/conservancy-yir.html

If you’ve noticed my blog a little silent the past few weeks, I’ve been
spending my blogging time in December writing blogs on Conservancy’s site
for Conservancy’s 2015:
Year in Review series
.

So far, these are the ones that were posted:

Karen Sandler Speaks about IRS Charity Issues
Bradley M. Kuhn Speaks About Future of Copyleft
Bradley and Karen Speak at FOSDEM 2015
Conservancy Wins DMCA Exception for Smart TVs

Generally speaking, if you want to keep up with my work, you probably
should subscribe not only to my blog but also to Conservancy’s. I tend to
crosspost the more personal pieces, but if something is purely a
Conservancy matter and doesn’t relate to usual things I write about here, I
don’t crosspost.

No, You Won’t See Me on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Google Plus, Google Hangouts, nor Skype

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2011/11/24/google-plus.html

Most folks outside of technology fields and the software freedom
movement can’t grok why I’m not on Facebook. Facebook’s marketing has
reached most of the USA’s non-technical Internet users. On the upside,
Facebook gave the masses access to something akin to blogging. But, as
with most technology controlled by for-profit companies, Facebook is
proprietary software. Facebook, as a software application, is written
in a mix of server-side software that no one besides Facebook
employees can study, modify and share. On the client-side, Facebook is
an obfuscated, proprietary software Javascript application, which is
distributed to the user’s browser when they access facebook.com. Thus,
in my view, using Facebook is no different than installing a proprietary
binary program on my GNU/Linux desktop.

Most of the press critical of Facebook has focused on privacy, data
mining of users’ data on behalf of advertisers, and other types of data
autonomy concerns. Such concerns remain incredibly important too.
Nevertheless, since the advent of the software freedom community’s
concerns about network services a few years ago, I’ve maintained this
simple principle, that I still find correct: While I can agree that
merely liberating all software for an online application is not a
sufficient condition to treat the online users well, the
liberation of the software is certainly a necessary condition
for the freedom of the users. Releasing freely all code for the online
application the first step for freedom, autonomy, and privacy of the
users. Therefore, I certainly don’t give in myself to running
proprietary software on my
FaiF desktops. I simply
refuse to use Facebook.

Meanwhile, when Google Plus was announced, I didn’t see any fundamental
difference from Facebook. Of course, there are differences on the
subtle edges: for example, I do expect that Google will respect data
portability more than Facebook. However, I expect data mining for
advertisers’ behalf will be roughly the same, although Google will
likely be more subtle with advertising tie-in than Facebook, and thus
users will not notice it as much.

But, since I’m firstly a software freedom activist, on the primary
issue of my concern, there is absolutely no difference between Facebook
and Google Plus. Google Plus’ software is a mix of server-side
trade-secret software that only Google employees can study, share, and
modify, and a client-side proprietary Javascript application downloaded
into the users’ browsers when they access the website.

Yet, in a matter of just a few months, much of the online conversation
in the software freedom community has moved to Google Plus, and I’ve
heard very few people lament this situation. It’s not that I believe
we’ll succeed against proprietary software tomorrow, and I understand
fully that (unlike me) most people in the software freedom community
have important reasons to interact regularly with those outside of our
community. It’s not that I chastise software freedom developers and
activist for maintaining a minimal presence on these services to
interact with those who aren’t committed to our cause.

My actual complaint here is that Google Plus is becoming the default
location for discussion of software freedom issues. I’ve noticed
because I’ve recently discovered that I’ve missed a lot of community
conversations that are only occurring on Google Plus. (I’ve similarly
noticed that many of my Free Software contacts spam me to join Linkedin,
so I assume something similar is occurring there as well.)

What’s more, I’ve received more pressure than ever before to sign up
for not only Google Plus, but for Twitter, Linkedin, Google Hangout, Skype and other
socially-oriented online communication services. Indeed, just in the
last ten days, I’ve had three different software freedom development
projects and/or organizations request that I sign up for a proprietary
online communication service merely to attend a meeting or conference
call. (Update on 2013-02-16: I still get such requests on a monthly basis.) Of course, I refused, but I’ve not felt peer pressure this strong
since I was a teenager.

Indeed, the advent of proprietary social networking software adds a new
challenge to those of us who want to stand firm and resist proprietary
software. As adoption of services like Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus,
Skype, Linkedin and Google Hangouts increases, those of us who resist using proprietary
software will come under ever-increasing peer pressure. Disturbingly,
I’ve found that peer pressure comes not only from folks outside
our community, but also from those who have, for
years, otherwise been supporters of the software freedom
movement.

When I point out that I use only Free Software, some respond that
Skype, Facebook, and Google Plus are convenient and do things that can’t
be done easily with Free Software currently. I don’t argue that point.
It’s easy to resist Microsoft Windows, or Internet Explorer, or any
other proprietary software that is substandard and works poorly. But
proprietary software developers aren’t necessarily stupid, nor
untalented. In fact, proprietary software developers are highly paid to
write easy-to-use, beautiful and enticing software (cross-reference
Apple, BTW). The challenge the software freedom community faces is not
merely to provide alternatives to the worst proprietary software, but to
also replace the most enticing proprietary software available. Yet, if
FaiF Software developers settle into being users of that enticing
proprietary software, the key inspiration for development
disappears.

The best motivator to write great new software is to solve a problem
that’s not yet solved. To inspire ourselves as FaiF Software
developers, we can’t complacently settle into use of proprietary
software applications as part of our daily workflow. That’s why you
won’t find me on Google Plus, Google Hangout, Facebook, Skype, Linkedin, Twitter or
any other proprietary software network service. You can phone with me
with SIP, you can read my blog and identi.ca feed, and chat with me on
IRC and XMPP, and those are the only places that I’ll be until there’s
Free Software replacements for those other services. I sometimes kid
myself into believing that I’m leading by example, but sadly few in the
software freedom community seem to be following.

Last Four FaiF Episodes

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2011/11/11/more-faif.html

Those of you that follow my blog have probably wondered we’re I’ve
been. Quite frankly, there is just so much work going on at Conservancy
that I have almost had no time to do anything but Conservancy work, eat
and sleep. My output on this blog and
on identi.ca surely shows that.

The one thing that I’ve kept up with
is the oggcast, Free as in
Freedom
that I co-host
with Karen Sandler, and which is
produced by Dan Lynch.

Since I last made a blog post here, Karen, Dan and I released four
oggcasts. I’ll discuss them here in reverse chronological order:

In Episode 0x1C, which was released today, we published Karen’s
interview with Adam Dingle
of Yorba. IMO (which is undoubtedly
biased), this episode is an important one since it relates to the
issues of non-profit organizations in our community who waiting in the
501(c)(3) application queue. This is a detailed and specific follow-up
to the issues that Karen and I discussed
on FaiF’s Episode
0x13
.

In Episode 0x1B, Karen and I discuss in some detail about the work that
we’ve been up to. Both Karen and I are full-time Executive Directors,
and the amount of work that job takes always seems insurmountable.
Although, after we recorded the episode, I somewhat embarrassingly
remembered
the Bush/Kerry
debate where George W. Bush kept saying his job as president is hard
work
. It’s certainly annoying when a chief executive goes on
and on about how hard his job is, so I apologize if I did a little too
much of that in Episode 0x1B.

In Episode 0x1A,
Karen and I discussed in detail Steve Jobs’ death and the various news
coverage about it. The subject is a bit old news now that I write this,
but I’m glad we did that episode, since it gave me an opportunity to say
everything I wanted to stay about Steve Jobs’ life and death.

In Episode 0x19, we
played Karen’s interview
with Jos Poortvliet,
discussed the identi.ca upgrade, and Karen discussed GNOME 3.2.

My plan is to at least keep the FaiF oggcast going, and I’m
even bugging
Fontana that he and I should start an oggcast too
. Beyond that, I
can’t necessarily commit to any other activities outside of that (and my
job at Conservancy and volunteer duties at FSF). BTW, I recently
attended a few conferences (both LinxCon Europe and the Summer of Code
Mentor Summit). At both of them, multiple folks asked me why I haven’t
been blogging more. I appreciate people’s interest in what I’m writing,
but at the moment, my day-job at Conservancy and volunteer work at FSF
has had to take absolute priority.

Based on the ebb and flow (yes, that’s the first time I’ve actually
used that phrase on my ebb.org blog 🙂 of the Free Software community
that I’ve gotten used to over the last decade and a half, I usually find
that things slow down in mid-December until mid-January. Since
Conservancy’s work is based on the needs of its Free Software projects,
I’ll likely be able to return a “normal” 50 hour work week
(instead of the 60-70 I’ve been doing lately) in December. Thus, I’ll
probably try to write some queued blog posts then to slowly push out
over the few months that follow.

Finally, I want to mention
that Conservancy
has an donation appeal
up on its website. I hope you’ll give
generously to support Conservancy’s work. On that, I’ll just briefly
mention my “hard work” again, to assure you
that donors to
Conservancy
definitely get their money’s worth when I’m on the job.
Since I’m on the topic of that, I also thank everyone who
has donated to FSF
and Conservancy over the
years. I’ve been fortunate to have worked full-time at both
organizations, and I appreciate the community that has supported all
that work over the years.

Conservancy Activity Summary, 2010-10-01 to 2010-12-31

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2011/01/02/conservancy-1.html

[ Crossposted
from Conservancy’s
blog
. ]

I had hoped to blog more regularly about my work at Conservancy, and
hopefully I’ll do better in the coming year. But now seems a good time
to summarize what has happened with Conservancy since I started my
full-time volunteer stint as Executive Director from 2010-10-01 until
2010-12-31.

New Members

We excitedly announced in the last few months two new Conservancy
member
projects, PyPy
and Git.
Thinking of PyPy connects me back to my roots in Computer Science: in
graduate school, I focused on research about programming language
infrastructure and, in particular, virtual machines and language
runtimes. PyPy is a project that connects Conservancy to lots of
exciting programming language research work of that nature, and I’m glad
they’ve joined.

For its part, Git rounds out a group of three DVCS projects that are
now Conservancy members; Conservancy is now the home of Darcs, Git, and
Mercurial. Amusingly, when I reminded the Git developers when they
applied that their “competition” were members, the Git
developers told me that they were inspired to apply because these other
DVCS’ had been happy in Conservancy. That’s a reminder that the
software freedom community remains a place where projects — even
that might seem on the surface as competitors — seek to get along
and work together whenever possible. I’m glad Conservancy now hosts all
these projects together.

Meanwhile, I remain in active discussions with five projects that have
been offered membership in Conservancy. As I always tell new projects,
joining Conservancy is a big step for a project, so it often takes time
for communities to discuss the details of Conservancy’s Fiscal
Sponsorship Agreement. It may be some time before these five projects
join, and perhaps they’ll ultimately decide not to join. However, I’ll
continue to help them make the right decision for their project, even if
joining a different fiscal sponsor (or not joining one at all) is the
ultimately right choice.

Also, about once every two weeks, another inquiry about joining
Conservancy comes in. We won’t be able to accept all the projects that
are interested, but hopefully many can become members of
Conservancy.

Annual Filings

In the late fall, I finished up Conservancy’s 2010 filings. Annual
filings for a non-profit can be an administrative rat-hole at times, but
the level of transparency they create for an organization makes them worth
it.
Conservancy’s FY
2009 Federal Form 990

and FY
2009 New York CHAR-500
are up
on Conservancy’s filing
page
. I always make the filings available on our own website; I wish
other non-profits would do this. It’s so annoying to have to go to a
third-party source to grab these documents. (Although New York State, to
its credit, makes all
the NY
NPO filings available on its website
.)

Conservancy filed a Form 990-EZ in FY 2009. If you take a look, I’d
encourage you to direct the most attention to Part III (which is on the
top of page 2) to see most of Conservancy’s program activities between
2008-03-01 to 2009-02-28.

In FY 2010, Conservancy will move from the New York State requirement
of “limited financial review” to “full audit“
(see page 4 of the CHAR-500 for the level requirements). Conservancy
had so little funds in FY 2007 that it wasn’t required to file a Form 990 at all.
Now, just three years later, there is enough revenue to warrant a full
audit. However, I’ve already begun preparing myself for all the
administrative work that will entail.

Project Growth and Funding

Those increases in revenue are related to growth in many of
Conservancy’s projects. 2010 marked the beginning of the first
full-time funding of a developer by Conservancy. Specifically, since
June, Matt
Mackall has been funded through directed donations to Conservancy to
work full-time on Mercurial
.
Matt blogs once a month (under
topic of Mercurial Fellowship Update)
about his work,
but, more directly,
the hundreds
of changesets that Matt’s committed really show
the advantages of
funding projects through Conservancy.

Conservancy is also collecting donations and managing funding for
various part-time development initiatives by many developers.
Developers of jQuery, Sugar Labs, and Twisted have all recently received
regular development funding through Conservancy. An important part of
my job is making sure these developers receive funding and report the
work clearly and fully to the community of donors (and the general
public) that fund this work.

But, as usual with Conservancy, it’s handling of the “many little
things” for projects that make a big difference and sometimes
takes the most time. In late 2010, Conservancy handled funding for Code
Sprints and conferences for
the Mercurial, Darcs,
and jQuery. In addition, jQuery
held a conference in
Boston in October
, for which Conservancy handled all the financial
details. I was fortunate to be able to attend the conference and meet
many of the jQuery developers in person for the first time. Wine also
held their annual conference in November 2010, and Conservancy handled
the venue details and reimbursements to many of travelers to the
conference.

Also, as always, Conservancy project contributors regularly attend
other conferences related to their projects. At least a few times a
month, Conservancy reimburses developers for travel to speak and attend
important conferences related to their projects.

Google Summer of Code

Since its inception, Google’s Summer of Code (SoC) program has been one
of the most important philanthropy programs for Open Source and Free
Software projects. In 2010, eight Conservancy projects (and 5% of the
entire SoC program) participated in SoC. The SoC program funds college
students for the summer to contribute to the projects, and an
experienced contributor to project mentors each student. A $500 stipend
is paid to the non-profit organization of the project for each project
contributor who mentors a student.

Furthermore, there’s an annual conference, in October, of all the
mentors, with travel funded by Google. This is a really valuable
conference, since it’s one of the few places where very disparate Free
Software projects that usually wouldn’t interact can meet up in one
place. I attended this year’s Soc Mentor Summit and hope to attend
again next year.

I’m really going to be urging all Conservancy’s projects to take
advantage of the SoC program in 2011. The level of funding given out by
Google for this program is higher than any other open-application
funding program for
FLOSS.
While Google’s selfish motives are clear (the program presumably helps
them recruit young programmers to hire), the benefit to Free Software
community of the program can nevertheless not be ignored.

GPL Enforcement

GPL Enforcement,
primarily for our BusyBox member
project, remains an active focus of Conservancy. Work regarding the
lawsuit continues. It’s been more than a year since Conservancy filed a
lawsuit against fourteen defendants who manufacture embedded devices
that included BusyBox without source nor an offer for source. Some of
those have come into compliance with the GPL and settled, but a number
remain and are out of compliance; our litigation efforts continue.
Usually, our lawyers encourage us not to comment on ongoing litigation,
but we did put up
a news
item in August when the Court granted Conservancy a default judgment
against one of the defendants, Westinghouse
.

Meanwhile, in the coming year, Conservancy hopes to expand efforts to
enforce the GPL. New violation reports on BusyBox arrive almost daily
that need attention.

More Frequent Blogging

As noted at the start of this post, my hope is to update Conservancy’s
blog more regularly with information about our activities.

This blog post was covered on
LWN
and
on lxnews.org.

Microsoft Patent Aggression Continues Against Free Software

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2009/07/17/microsoft-patent-aggression.html

I think this news
item from yesterday
mostly speaks for itself, but I could not let the
incident go by without blogging briefly about it.

There has been so much talk in the last two weeks that Microsoft has
changed with regard to its patent policy toward Free Software. We fool
ourselves if we trust any of the window-dressing that Microsoft has put
forward to convince us that we can trust them in this regard. Indeed, I
spoke extensively about this in my interview on the Linux
Outlaws show
this week.

What we see in this agreement between the Melco Group and Microsoft is
another little above-water piece of the same patent aggression iceberg
that Microsoft has placed in our community’s way. They continue to shake
down companies that distribute GNU/Linux systems for patent royalties. As
I’ve written about before, it’s
difficult to judge if these are GPLv2-compliant, but they are almost
certainly not GPLv3-compliant
. If there were ever a moment for the
community to scramble to GPLv3, this would be it, if for no other reason
to defend ourselves against the looming aggression.

In the meantime, we’d be foolish to trust any sort of promises
Microsoft has to make about their patents. Would they really make a
reliable promise that would prevent their ongoing campaign of patent
aggression against Free Software?

Update: In related news, I was also glad to read FSF’s new statement on the issue, which includes some of the same comments I made on Linux Outlaws Episode 102.

Having fun with bzr

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/bizarre-fun.html

#nocomments y

So I wanted to hack proper channel mapping query support into libsndfile, something I have had
on my TODO list for years. The first step was to find the source code
repository for it
. That was easy. Alas the VCS used is bzr. There are some
very vocal folks on the Internet who claim that the bzr user interface is
stupendously easy to use in contrast to git which apparantly is the very
definition of complexity. And if it is stated on the Internet it must be true.
I think I mastered git quite well, so yeah, checking out the sources with bzr
can’t be that difficult for my limited brain capacity.

So let’s do what Erik suggests for checking out the sources:

$ bzr get http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Calling this I get a nice percentage counter that starts at 0% and ends at, … uh, 0%. That gives me a real feeling of progress. It takes a while, and then I get an error:

bzr: ERROR: Not a branch: “http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/”.

Now that’s a useful error message. They even include an all-caps word! I guess that error message is right — it’s not a branch, it is a repository. Or is it not?

So what do we do about this? Maybe get is not actually the right verb. Let’s try to play around a bit. Let’s use the verb I use to get sources with in git:

$ bzr clone http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Hmm, this results in exactly same 0% to 0% progress counter, and the same useless error message.

Now I remember that bzr is actually more inspired by Subversion’s UI than by git’s, so let’s try it the SVN way.

$ bzr checkout http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Hmm, and of course, I get exactly the same results again. A counter that counts from 0% to 0% and the same useless error message.

Ok, maybe that error is bzr’s standard reply? Let’s check this out:

$ bzr waldo http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/
bzr: ERROR: unknown command “waldo”

Apparently not. bzr actually knows more than one error message.

Ok, I admit doing this by trial-and-error is a rather lame approach. RTFM! So let’s try this.

$ man bzr-get
No manual entry for bzr-get

Ouch. No man page? How awesome. Ah, wait, maybe they have only a single unreadable mega man page for everything. Let’s try this:

$ man bzr

Wow, this actually worked. Seems to list all commands. Now let’s look for the help on bzr get:

/bzr get
Pattern not found (press RETURN)

Hmm, no documentation for their most important command? That’s weird! Ok, let’s try it again with our git vocabulary:

/bzr clone
Pattern not found (press RETURN)

Ok, this not funny anymore. Apparently the verbs are listed in alphabetical order.
So let’s browse to the letter g as in get. However it doesn’t
exist. There’s bzr export, and then the next entry is bzr
help (Oh, irony!) — but no get in-between.

Ok, enough of this shit. Maybe the message wants to tell us that the repo
actually doesn’t exist (even though it confusingly calls it a “branch”). Let’s
go back to the original page at Erik’s site and read things again. Aha, the
“main archive archive can be found at (yes, the directory looks empty, but
it isn’t): http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/“.
Hmm, indeed — that URL looks very empty when it is accessed. How weird though
that in bzr a repo is an empty directory!

And at this point I gave up and downloaded the tarball to make my patches
against. I have still not managed to check out the sources from the repo.
Somehow I get the feeling the actual repo really isn’t available anymore under that address.

So why am I blogging about this? Not so much to start another flamefest, to
nourish the fanboys, nor because it is so much fun to bash other people’s work or
simply to piss people off. It’s more for two reasons:

Firstly, simply to make
the point that folks can claim a thousand times that git’s UI sucks and bzr’s
UI is awesome. It’s simply not true. From what I experienced it is not the
tiniest bit better. The error messages useless, the documentation incomplete,
the interfaces surprising and exactly as redundant as git’s. The only
effective difference I noticed is that it takes a bit longer to show those
error messages with bzr — the Python tax. To summarize this more positively: git excels as much as bzr does. Both’ documentation, their error messages and their user interface are the best in their class. And they have all the best chances for future improvement.

And the second reason of course is that I’d still like to know what the correct way to get the sources is. But for that I should probably ask Erik himself.

Having fun with bzr

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/bizarre-fun.html

#nocomments y

So I wanted to hack proper channel mapping query support into libsndfile, something I have had
on my TODO list for years. The first step was to find the source code
repository for it
. That was easy. Alas the VCS used is bzr. There are some
very vocal folks on the Internet who claim that the bzr user interface is
stupendously easy to use in contrast to git which apparantly is the very
definition of complexity. And if it is stated on the Internet it must be true.
I think I mastered git quite well, so yeah, checking out the sources with bzr
can’t be that difficult for my limited brain capacity.

So let’s do what Erik suggests for checking out the sources:

$ bzr get http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Calling this I get a nice percentage counter that starts at 0% and ends at, … uh, 0%. That gives me a real feeling of progress. It takes a while, and then I get an error:

bzr: ERROR: Not a branch: "http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/".

Now that’s a useful error message. They even include an all-caps word! I guess that error message is right — it’s not a branch, it is a repository. Or is it not?

So what do we do about this? Maybe get is not actually the right verb. Let’s try to play around a bit. Let’s use the verb I use to get sources with in git:

$ bzr clone http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Hmm, this results in exactly same 0% to 0% progress counter, and the same useless error message.

Now I remember that bzr is actually more inspired by Subversion’s UI than by git’s, so let’s try it the SVN way.

$ bzr checkout http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/

Hmm, and of course, I get exactly the same results again. A counter that counts from 0% to 0% and the same useless error message.

Ok, maybe that error is bzr’s standard reply? Let’s check this out:

$ bzr waldo http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/
bzr: ERROR: unknown command "waldo"

Apparently not. bzr actually knows more than one error message.

Ok, I admit doing this by trial-and-error is a rather lame approach. RTFM! So let’s try this.

$ man bzr-get
No manual entry for bzr-get

Ouch. No man page? How awesome. Ah, wait, maybe they have only a single unreadable mega man page for everything. Let’s try this:

$ man bzr

Wow, this actually worked. Seems to list all commands. Now let’s look for the help on bzr get:

/bzr get
Pattern not found  (press RETURN)

Hmm, no documentation for their most important command? That’s weird! Ok, let’s try it again with our git vocabulary:

/bzr clone
Pattern not found  (press RETURN)

Ok, this not funny anymore. Apparently the verbs are listed in alphabetical order.
So let’s browse to the letter g as in get. However it doesn’t
exist. There’s bzr export, and then the next entry is bzr
help
(Oh, irony!) — but no get in-between.

Ok, enough of this shit. Maybe the message wants to tell us that the repo
actually doesn’t exist (even though it confusingly calls it a “branch”). Let’s
go back to the original page at Erik’s site and read things again. Aha, the
main archive archive can be found at (yes, the directory looks empty, but
it isn’t): http://www.mega-nerd.com/Bzr/libsndfile-pub/“.

Hmm, indeed — that URL looks very empty when it is accessed. How weird though
that in bzr a repo is an empty directory!

And at this point I gave up and downloaded the tarball to make my patches
against. I have still not managed to check out the sources from the repo.
Somehow I get the feeling the actual repo really isn’t available anymore under that address.

So why am I blogging about this? Not so much to start another flamefest, to
nourish the fanboys, nor because it is so much fun to bash other people’s work or
simply to piss people off. It’s more for two reasons:

Firstly, simply to make
the point that folks can claim a thousand times that git’s UI sucks and bzr’s
UI is awesome. It’s simply not true. From what I experienced it is not the
tiniest bit better. The error messages useless, the documentation incomplete,
the interfaces surprising and exactly as redundant as git’s. The only
effective difference I noticed is that it takes a bit longer to show those
error messages with bzr — the Python tax. To summarize this more positively: git excels as much as bzr does. Both’ documentation, their error messages and their user interface are the best in their class. And they have all the best chances for future improvement.

And the second reason of course is that I’d still like to know what the correct way to get the sources is. But for that I should probably ask Erik himself.

podjango: A Minimalist Django Application for Podcast Publishing

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2008/11/20/podjango.html

I had yet to mention in my blog that I now co-host
a podcast at SFLC.
I found myself, as we launched the podcast last week, in a classic hacker
situation of having one project demand the need to write code for a
tangentially related project.

Specifically, we needed a way to easily publish show notes and
otherwise make available the podcast on the website and in RSS feeds.
Fortunately, we already had a few applications we’d written using Django. I looked briefly at django podcast, but
the interface was a bit complicated, and I didn’t like its (over)use of
templates to do most of the RSS feeding.

The small blogging application we’d hacked up for this blog was so
close to what we needed, that I simply decided to fork it and make it into
a small podcast publisher. It worked out well, and I’ve now launched a Free Software
project called podjango
under the AGPLv3.

Most of the existing code will be quite obvious to any Django hacker.
The only interesting thing to note is that I made some serious effort for
the RSS
feeds. First, I heavily fleshed out the
minimal example for an iTunesFeed generator in the Django
documentation
. It’s currently a bit specific to this podcast, but should be
easily abstracted. I did a good amount of research on the needed fields
for the iTunes
RSS
and Media RSS
and what should be in them. (Those feedforall.com tutorials appear to be
the best I could find on this.)

Second, I did about six hours of work to build what I called SFLC’s ominbus RSS feed.
The most effort went into building an RSS feed that includes disparate
Django application components, but this
thread on query set manipulation from django-users
referenced from Michael
Angela’s blog
was very helpful. I was glad, actually, that the
ultimate solution centered around complicated features of Python. Being
an old-school Perl hacker, I love when the solution is obvious once you
learn a feature of the language that you didn’t know before. (Is that the
definition of programming language snobbery? 😉

It also turns out that Fabian
Scherschel (aka fabsh)
had started working on on a Django podcast
application too, and he’s going to merge in his efforts with podjango. I
preemptively apologize publicly, BTW, that I didn’t reach out to the
django-podcast guys before starting a new project. However, I’m sure
fabsh and I both would be happy to cooperate with them if they want to try
to merge the codebases (although I don’t want to use a non-Free software
platform like Google Code to host any project I work on ;). Anyway, I
really think RSS feeds should be implemented using generators in Python
code rather than in templates, though, and I think the user interface
should be abstracted away from as many details for the DTD fields as
possible. Thus, it may turn out that we and django-podcast have
incompatible design goals.

Anyway, I hope the code we’ve released is useful, and I’m glad for
Fabian to take over as project lead. I need to move onto other projects,
and hope that others will be interested in generalizing and improving the
code under Fab’s leadership. I’m happy to help it along.

Like Twitter, but with Freedom Inside

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2008/07/03/microblog-freedom-inside.html

A company called Control
Yourself
, led
by Evan
Prodromou
(who serves with me and many others on
the FSF-endorsed
Freedom for Network Services Committee
) yesterday launched a site
called
identi.ca. It’s a microblogging
service similar to Twitter, but it is designed to respect the rights
and freedoms of its users.

I’m personally excited because the software for the system, Laconica, is under the license that I
originally drafted back in 2002, the Affero GPL (which was updated
as part of the GPLv3 process
, and is now available as AGPLv3).
This marks the first time I’ve seen a company release its product under
a network service freedom-defending license from the start.

His launch comes at an interesting time. Twitter has had no
Jabber-based updates for more than a month, and Identica allows updates
via Jabber. Thus, in a way, it’s more fully featured than Twitter is
right now!

IQ Light Mania

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-light-mania.html

As promised here’s a gallery of
better quality photos of a mobile made from mexican style IQ lights.

IQ Light Mobile

All these lights have been fabricated using this stencil and this material.

I hope this gallery shows a little bit how fascinating these lamps are and explain why I am so obsessed of them that I cannot stop blogging about them.

IQ Light Mania

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-light-mania.html

As promised here’s a gallery of
better quality photos of a mobile made from mexican style IQ lights.

IQ Light Mobile

All these lights have been fabricated using this stencil and this material.

I hope this gallery shows a little bit how fascinating these lamps are and explain why I am so obsessed of them that I cannot stop blogging about them.