Tag Archives: brewing

This Raspberry Pi–powered setup improves home brewing

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/this-raspberry-pi-powered-setup-improves-home-brewing/

We spied New Orleans–based Raspberry Pi–powered home brewing analysis and were interested in how this project could help other at-home brewers perfect their craft.

Raspberry Pi in a case with fan, neatly tucked away on a shelf in the Danger Shed

When you’re making beer, you want the yeast to eat up the sugars and leave alcohol behind. To check whether this is happening, you need to be able to track changes in gravity, known as ‘gravity curves’. You also have to do yeast cell counts, and you need to be able to tell when your beer has finished fermenting.

“We wanted a way to skip the paper and pencil and instead input the data directly into the software. Enter the Raspberry Pi!”

Patrick Murphy

Patrick Murphy and co. created a piece of software called Aleproof which allows you to monitor all of this stuff remotely. But before rolling it out, they needed somewhere to test that it works. Enter the ‘Danger Shed’, where they ran Aleproof on Raspberry Pi.

The Danger Shed benefits from a fancy light-changing fan for the Raspberry Pi

A Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ spins their Python-based program on Raspberry Pi OS and shares its intel via a mounted monitor.

Here’s what Patrick had to say about what they’re up to in the Danger Shed and why they needed a Raspberry Pi:

The project uses PyCharm to run the Python-based script on the Raspberry Pi OS

“I am the founder and owner of Arithmech, a small software company that develops Python applications for brewers. Myself and a few buddies (all of us former Army combat medics) started our own brewing project called Danger Shed Ales & Mead to brew and test out the software on real-world data. We brew in the shed and record data on paper as we go, then enter the data into our software at a later time.”

Look how neat and out of the way our tiny computer is

“We wanted a way to skip the paper and pencil and instead input the data directly into the software. Enter the Raspberry Pi! The shed is small, hot, has leaks, and is generally a hostile place for a full-size desktop computer. Raspberry Pi solves our problem in multiple ways: it’s small, portable, durable (in a case), and easily cooled. But on top of that, we are able to run the code using PyCharm, enter data throughout the brewing process, and fix bugs all from the shed!”

The Raspberry Pi in its case inc. fan

“The Raspberry Pi made it easy for us to set up our software and run it as a stand-alone brewing software station.”

Productivity may have slowed when Patrick, Philip, and John remembered you can play Minecraft on the Raspberry Pi

The post This Raspberry Pi–powered setup improves home brewing appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

[$] Changes in Prometheus 2.0

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/744721/rss

2017 was a big year for the Prometheus project, as it published
its 2.0 release in November
. The new release ships numerous
bug fixes, new features, and, notably, a new storage engine that brings major
performance improvements. This comes at the cost of incompatible changes to
the storage and configuration-file formats. An overview of
Prometheus and its new release was presented to the Kubernetes community in a talk
held during KubeCon
+ CloudNativeCon
. This article covers what changed in this new release
and what is brewing next in the Prometheus community; it is a companion to
this article, which provided a general
introduction to monitoring with Prometheus.

Gladys Project: a Raspberry Pi home assistant

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/gladys-project-home-assistant/

If, like me, you’re a pretty poor time-keeper with the uncanny ability to never get up when your alarm goes off and yet still somehow make it to work just in time — a little dishevelled, brushing your teeth in the office bathroom — then you too need Gladys.

Raspberry Pi home assistant

Over the last year, we’ve seen off-the-shelf home assistants make their way onto the Raspberry Pi. With the likes of Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, it’s becoming ever easier to tell the air around you to “Turn off the bathroom light” or “Resume my audiobook”, and it happens without you lifting a finger. It’s quite wonderful. And alongside these big names are several home-brew variants, such as Jarvis and Jasper, which were developed to run on a Pi in order to perform home automation tasks.

So do we need another such service? Sure! And here’s why…

A Romantic Mode with your Home Assistant Gladys !

A simple romantic mode in Gladys ! See https://gladysproject.com for more informations about the project 🙂 Devices used : – A 5$ Xiaomi Switch Button – A Raspberry Pi 3 with Gladys on it – Connected lights ( Works with Philips Hue, Milight lamp, etc..

Gladys Project

According to the Gladys creators’ website, Gladys Project is ‘an open-source program which runs on your Raspberry Pi. It communicates with all your devices and checks your calendar to help you in your everyday life’.

Gladys does the basic day-to-day life maintenance tasks that I need handled in order to exist without my mum there to remind me to wake up in time for work. And, as you can see from the video above, it also plays some mean George Michael.

A screenshot of a mobile phone showing the Gladys app - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys can help run your day from start to finish, taking into consideration road conditions and travel time to ensure you’re never late, regardless of external influences. It takes you 30 minutes to get ready and another 30 minutes to drive to work for 9.00? OK, but today there’s a queue on the motorway, and now your drive time is looking to be closer to an hour. Thankfully, Gladys has woken you up a half hour earlier, so you’re still on time. Isn’t that nice of her? And while you’re showering and mourning those precious stolen minutes of sleep, she’s opening the blinds and brewing coffee for you. Thanks, mum!

A screenshot of the Gladys hub on the Raspberry Pi - Gladys Project home assistant

Set the parameters of your home(s) using the dedicated hub.

Detecting your return home at the end of the day, Gladys runs your pre-set evening routine. Then, once you place your phone on an NFC tag to indicate bedtime, she turns off the lights and, if your nighttime preferences dictate it, starts the whale music playlist, sending you into a deep, stressless slumber.

A screenshot of Etcher showing the install process of the Gladys image - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys comes as a pre-built Raspbian image, ready to be cloned to an SD card.

Gladys is free to download from the Gladys Project website and is compatible with smart devices such as Philips Hue lightbulbs, WeMo Insight Switches, and the ever tricky to control without the official app Sonos speakers!

Automate and chill

Which tasks and devices in your home do you control with a home assistant? Do you love sensor-controlled lighting which helps you save on electricity? How about working your way through an audiobook as you do your housework, requesting a pause every time you turn on the vacuum cleaner?

Share your experiences with us in the comments below, and if you’ve built a home assistant for Raspberry Pi, or use an existing setup to run your household, share that too.

And, as ever, if you want to keep up to date with Raspberry Pi projects from across the globe, be sure to follow us on social media, sign up to our weekly newsletter, the Raspberry Pi Weekly, and check out The MagPi, the official magazine of the Raspberry Pi community, available in stores or as a free PDF download.

The post Gladys Project: a Raspberry Pi home assistant appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Join Us for AWS Security Week November 6–9 in New York City

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/join-us-for-aws-security-week-november-6-9-in-new-york-city/

Want to learn how to securely deploy applications and services in the AWS Cloud? Join us in New York City at the AWS Pop-up Loft for AWS Security Week, November 6–9. At this free technical event, you will learn security concepts and strategies from AWS security professionals in sessions, demos, and labs.

Here is a sampling of the security offerings during the week:

  • Become a Cloud Security Ninja
  • Data Protection in Transit and at Rest
  • Soup to Nuts: Identity Federation for AWS
  • Brewing an Effective Cloud Security Strategy

Learn more about the available sessions and register!

– Craig

A homebrew Pi kit for home brewing

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/homebrew-beer-brewing-pi/

While the rest of us are forced to leave the house to obtain a tasty brew, beer master Christoper Aedo has incorporated a Raspberry Pi into his home brewing system for ultimate ‘sit-back-and-relax’ homebrew home brew.

homebrew home brew Raspberry Pi

KEG! KEG! KEG! KEG!

I drink and I know things

Having brewed his own beer for several years, Christopher was no novice in the pursuit of creating the perfect pint*. He was already brewing 10 gallons at a time when he decided to go all electric with a Raspberry Pi. Inspiration struck when he stumbled upon the StrangeBrew Elsinore Java server, and he went to work planning the best setup for the job:

Before I could talk myself out of the project, I decided to start buying parts. My basic design was a Hot Liquor Tank (HLT) and boil kettle with 5500W heating elements in them, plus a mash tun with a false bottom. I would use a pump to recirculate the mash through a 50 foot stainless coil in the HLT (a “heat exchanger recirculating mash system”, known as HERMS). I would need a second pump to circulate the water in the HLT, and to help with transferring water to the mash tun. All of the electrical components would be controlled with a Raspberry Pi.

Homebrew hardware setup

First, he set up the electrical side of his homebrew system using The Electric Brewing Company‘s walkthrough, swapping out the 12V solid-state relays for ones that manage the 3V needed by the Pi. Aedo then implemented the temperature sensors and controls of these relays. He used Hilitchi DS18B20 Waterproof Temperature Sensors connected to a 1-Wire bus and learned how to manage the relays in this tutorial.

Christopher wanted to be able to move his system around his property. Therefore, he squeezed all the electrical components of the build into a waterproof project box. For cooling purposes, he integrated copper shims and heat sinks.

homebrew home brew raspberry pi

Among the wires, wires, and more wires sits a Raspberry Pi, bottom left.

A brew-tiful build

With the hardware sorted, he took on the project’s software next. Although he had been inspired by it, Christopher decided to move away from the StrangeBrew Elsinore project in favour of the Python-based CraftBeerPi by active repo maintainer Manuel Fritsch.

homebrew home brew raspberry pi

The CraftBeerPi dashboard

This package allowed him to configure his chosen GPIO pins and set up the appropriate sensors. In fact, the setup process was so easy that Christoper also implemented a secondhand fridge as a fermentation chamber.

Duff Beer for me, Duff Beer for you…

In his recently released article on opensource.com, Aedo goes into far more detail. So if you want to create your own brewing kit, it offers all the info you need to get going.

Christoper attributes a lot of his build to the Hosehead, Electric Brewery, and CraftBeerPi projects. Using their resources and those of StrangeBrew Elsinore, any home brewer can control at least part of their system via a Raspberry Pi. Moreover, they can also keep track of their brewery stock levels via the wonderfully named Kegerface display.

We love seeing projects like this that take inspiration from others and build on them. We also love beer.

How about you? Have you created any sort of beer brewing system, from scratch or with the help of an existing project? Then make sure to share it with us in the comments below.

Duff man homebrew

 

*Did you know the British pint is larger than the American pint?

The post A homebrew Pi kit for home brewing appeared first on Raspberry Pi.