Tag Archives: cbs

Inside the MPAA, Netflix & Amazon Global Anti-Piracy Alliance

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/inside-the-mpaa-netflix-amazon-global-anti-piracy-alliance-170918/

The idea of collaboration in the anti-piracy arena isn’t new but an announcement this summer heralded what is destined to become the largest project the entertainment industry has ever seen.

The Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE) is a coalition of 30 companies that reads like a who’s who of the global entertainment market. In alphabetical order its members are:

Amazon, AMC Networks, BBC Worldwide, Bell Canada and Bell Media, Canal+ Group, CBS Corporation, Constantin Film, Foxtel, Grupo Globo, HBO, Hulu, Lionsgate, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Millennium Media, NBCUniversal, Netflix, Paramount Pictures, SF Studios, Sky, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Star India, Studio Babelsberg, STX Entertainment, Telemundo, Televisa, Twentieth Century Fox, Univision Communications Inc., Village Roadshow, The Walt Disney Company, and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

The aim of the project is clear. Instead of each company considering its anti-piracy operations as a distinct island, ACE will bring them all together while presenting a united front to decision and lawmakers. At the core of the Alliance will be the MPAA.

“ACE, with its broad coalition of creators from around the world, is designed, specifically, to leverage the best possible resources to reduce piracy,”
outgoing MPAA chief Chris Dodd said in June.

“For decades, the MPAA has been the gold standard for antipiracy enforcement. We are proud to provide the MPAA’s worldwide antipiracy resources and the deep expertise of our antipiracy unit to support ACE and all its initiatives.”

Since then, ACE and its members have been silent on the project. Today, however, TorrentFreak can pull back the curtain, revealing how the agreement between the companies will play out, who will be in control, and how much the scheme will cost.

Power structure: Founding Members & Executive Committee Members

Netflix, Inc., Amazon Studios LLC, Paramount Pictures Corporation, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Inc., Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, Universal City Studios LLC, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., and Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, are the ‘Founding Members’ (Governing Board) of ACE.

These companies are granted full voting rights on ACE business, including the approval of initiatives and public policy, anti-piracy strategy, budget-related matters, plus approval of legal action. Not least, they’ll have the power to admit or expel ACE members.

All actions taken by the Governing Board (never to exceed nine members) need to be approved by consensus, with each Founding Member able to vote for or against decisions. Members are also allowed to abstain but one persistent objection will be enough to stop any matter being approved.

The second tier – ‘Executive Committee Members’ – is comprised of all the other companies in the ACE project (as listed above, minus the Governing Board). These companies will not be allowed to vote on ACE initiatives but can present ideas and strategies. They’ll also be allowed to suggest targets for law enforcement action while utilizing the MPAA’s anti-piracy resources.

Rights of all members

While all members of ACE can utilize the alliance’s resources, none are barred from simultaneously ‘going it alone’ on separate anti-piracy initiatives. None of these strategies and actions need approval from the Founding Members, provided they’re carried out in a company’s own name and at its own expense.

Information obtained by TorrentFreak indicates that the MPAA also reserves the right to carry out anti-piracy actions in its own name or on behalf of its member studios. The pattern here is different, since the MPAA’s global anti-piracy resources are the same resources being made available to the ACE alliance and for which members have paid to share.

Expansion of ACE

While ACE membership is already broad, the alliance is prepared to take on additional members, providing certain criteria are met. Crucially, any prospective additions must be owners or producers of movies and/or TV shows. The Governing Board will then vet applicants to ensure that they meet the criteria for acceptance as a new Executive Committee Members.

ACE Operations

The nine Governing Board members will meet at least four times a year, with each nominating a senior executive to serve as its representative. The MPAA’s General Counsel will take up the position of non-voting member of the Governing Board and will chair its meetings.

Matters to be discussed include formulating and developing the alliance’s ‘Global Anti-Piracy Action Plan’ and approving and developing the budget. ACE will also form an Anti-Piracy Working Group, which is scheduled to meet at least once a month.

On a daily basis, the MPAA and its staff will attend to the business of the ACE alliance. The MPAA will carry out its own work too but when presenting to outside third parties, it will clearly state which “hat” it is currently wearing.

Much deliberation has taken place over who should be the official spokesperson for ACE. Documents obtained by TF suggest that the MPAA planned to hire a consulting firm to find a person for the role, seeking a professional with international experience who had never been previously been connected with the MPAA.

They appear to have settled on Zoe Thorogood, who previously worked for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Money, money, money

Of course, the ACE program isn’t going to fund itself, so all members are required to contribute to the operation. The MPAA has opened a dedicated bank account under its control specifically for the purpose, with members contributing depending on status.

Founding/Governing Board Members will be required to commit $5m each annually. However, none of the studios that are MPAA members will have to hand over any cash, since they already fund the MPAA, whose anti-piracy resources ACE is built.

“Each Governing Board Member will contribute annual dues in an amount equal to $5 million USD. Payment of dues shall be made bi-annually in equal shares, payable at
the beginning of each six (6) month period,” the ACE agreement reads.

“The contribution of MPAA personnel, assets and resources…will constitute and be considered as full payment of each MPAA Member Studio’s Governing Board dues.”

That leaves just Netflix and Amazon paying the full amount of $5m in cash each.

From each company’s contribution, $1m will be paid into legal trust accounts allocated to each Governing Board member. If ACE-agreed litigation and legal expenses exceed that amount for the year, members will be required to top up their accounts to cover their share of the costs.

For the remaining 21 companies on the Executive Committee, annual dues are $200,000 each, to be paid in one installment at the start of the financial year – $4.2m all in. Of all dues paid by all members from both tiers, half will be used to boost anti-piracy resources, over and above what the MPAA will spend on the same during 2017.

“Fifty percent (50%) of all dues received from Global Alliance Members other than
the MPAA Member Studios…shall, as agreed by the Governing Board, be used (a) to increase the resources spent on online antipiracy over and above….the amount of MPAA’s 2017 Content Protection Department budget for online antipiracy initiatives/operations,” an internal ACE document reads.

Intellectual property

As the project moves forward, the Alliance expects to gain certain knowledge and experience. On the back of that, the MPAA hopes to grow its intellectual property portfolio.

“Absent written agreement providing otherwise, any and all data, intellectual property, copyrights, trademarks, or know-how owned and/or contributed to the Global Alliance by MPAA, or developed or created by the MPAA or the Global Alliance during the Term of this Charter, shall remain and/or become the exclusive property of the MPAA,” the ACE agreement reads.

That being said, all Governing Board Members will also be granted “perpetual, irrevocable, non-exclusive licenses” to use the same under certain rules, even in the event they leave the ACE initiative.

Terms and extensions

Any member may withdraw from the Alliance at any point, but there will be no refunds. Additionally, any financial commitment previously made to litigation will have to be honored by the member.

The ACE agreement has an initial term of two years but Governing Board Members will meet not less than three months before it is due to expire to vote on any extension.

To be continued……

With the internal structure of ACE now revealed, all that remains is to discover the contents of the initiative’s ‘Global Anti-Piracy Action Plan’. To date, that document has proven elusive but with an operation of such magnitude, future leaks are a distinct possibility.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Popcorn Time Devs Help Streaming Aggregator Reelgood to ‘Fix Piracy’

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/popcorn-time-devs-help-streaming-aggregator-reelgood-to-fix-piracy-170812/

During the fall of 2015, the MPAA shut down one of the most prominent pirate streaming services, Popcorn Time fork PopcornTime.io.

While the service was found to be clearly infringing, many of the developers didn’t set out to break the law. Most of all, they wanted to provide the public with easy access to their favorite movies and TV-shows.

Fast forward nearly two years and several of these Popcorn Time developers are still on the same quest. The main difference is that they now operate on the safe side of the law.

The startup they’re working with is called Reelgood, which can be best described as a streaming service aggregator. The San-Francisco based company, founded by ex-Facebook employee David Sanderson, recently raised $3.5 million and has opened its doors to the public.

The goal of Reelgood is similar to Popcorn Time in the way that it aims to be the go-to tool for people to access their entertainment. Instead of using pirate sources, however, Reelgood stitches together content from various legal platforms, both paid and free.

Reelgood

TorrentFreak spoke to former Popcorn Time developer Luigi Poole, who’s leading the charge on the development of Reelgood’s web app. He stresses that the increasing fragmentation of streaming services, which drives some people to pirate sites, is one of the problems Reelgood hopes to fix.

“There’s a misconception that torrenting is done by bad people who don’t want to pay for content. I’d say, in the vast majority of cases, torrenting is a symptom of the massive fragmentation that’s been given as the only legal option to the consumer,” Poole says.

While people have many reasons to pirate, some stick to unauthorized services because it’s simply too cumbersome to dig through all the legal options. Pirate sites have a single interface to all popular movies and TV-shows and legal platforms don’t.

“The modern TV/movie ecosystem is made up of an increasing number of different services. This makes finding content like changing channels, only more complicated. Is that movie you’re about to buy or rent on a service you already pay for? Right now there’s no way to do this other than a cumbersome search using each service’s individual search. Time to go digging,” Poole says.

“We believe this is the main reason people torrent — it’s just easier, given that the legal options presented to us are essentially a ‘go fetch’ treasure hunt,” he adds.

Flipping that channel on an old school television often beats the online streaming experience. That is, for those who want more than Netflix alone.

And the problem isn’t going away anytime soon. As we reported earlier this week, there’s a trend towards more fragmentation, instead of less. Disney is pulling some of its most popular content from the US Netflix in 2019, keeping piracy relevant.

“The untold story is that consumers are throwing up their hands with all this fragmentation, and turning to torrenting not because it’s free, but because it’s intuitive and easy,” Poole says.

“Reelgood fixes this problem by acting as a pirate site interface for every legal option, sort of like a TV guide to anything streaming, also giving you notifications anytime something is new, letting you track when certain content becomes available, and not only telling you where it’s available but taking you straight there with one click to play.”

Reelgood can be seen as a defragmentation tool, creating a uniform interface for all the legal platforms people have access to. In addition to paid services such as Netflix and HBO, it also lists free content from Fox, CBS, Crackle, and many other providers.

TorrentFreak took it for a spin and it indeed works as advertised. Simply add your streaming service accounts and all will be bundled into an elegant and uniform interface that allows you to watch and track everything with a single click.

The service is still limited to US libraries but there are already plans to expand it to other countries, which is promising. While it may not eradicate piracy anytime soon, it does a good job of trying to organize the increasingly complex streaming landscape.

Unfortunately, it’s still not cheap to use more than a handful of paid services, but that’s a problem even Reelgood can’t fix. Not even with help from seven former Popcorn Time developers.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Create Multiple Builds from the Same Source Using Different AWS CodeBuild Build Specification Files

Post Syndicated from Prakash Palanisamy original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/create-multiple-builds-from-the-same-source-using-different-aws-codebuild-build-specification-files/

In June 2017, AWS CodeBuild announced you can now specify an alternate build specification file name or location in an AWS CodeBuild project.

In this post, I’ll show you how to use different build specification files in the same repository to create different builds. You’ll find the source code for this post in our GitHub repo.

Requirements

The AWS CLI must be installed and configured.

Solution Overview

I have created a C program (cbsamplelib.c) that will be used to create a shared library and another utility program (cbsampleutil.c) to use that library. I’ll use a Makefile to compile these files.

I need to put this sample application in RPM and DEB packages so end users can easily deploy them. I have created a build specification file for RPM. It will use make to compile this code and the RPM specification file (cbsample.rpmspec) configured in the build specification to create the RPM package. Similarly, I have created a build specification file for DEB. It will create the DEB package based on the control specification file (cbsample.control) configured in this build specification.

RPM Build Project:

The following build specification file (buildspec-rpm.yml) uses build specification version 0.2. As described in the documentation, this version has different syntax for environment variables. This build specification includes multiple phases:

  • As part of the install phase, the required packages is installed using yum.
  • During the pre_build phase, the required directories are created and the required files, including the RPM build specification file, are copied to the appropriate location.
  • During the build phase, the code is compiled, and then the RPM package is created based on the RPM specification.

As defined in the artifact section, the RPM file will be uploaded as a build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using cb-centos-project.json as a reference, create the input JSON file for the CLI command. This project uses an AWS CodeCommit repository named codebuild-multispec and a file named buildspec-rpm.yml as the build specification file. To create the RPM package, we need to specify a custom image name. I’m using the latest CentOS 7 image available in the Docker Hub. I’m using a role named CodeBuildServiceRole. It contains permissions similar to those defined in CodeBuildServiceRole.json. (You need to change the resource fields in the policy, as appropriate.)

{
    "name": "rpm-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "centos:7",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "RPM Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

After the cli-input-json file is ready, execute the following command to create the build project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-centos-project.json

{
    "project": {
        "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole", 
        "tags": [
            {
                "value": "RPM Demo Build", 
                "key": "Name"
            }
        ], 
        "artifacts": {
            "namespaceType": "NONE", 
            "packaging": "NONE", 
            "type": "S3", 
            "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository", 
            "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "lastModified": 1500559811.13, 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "created": 1500559811.13, 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:project/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source."
    }
}

When the project is created, run the following command to start the build. After the build has started, get the build ID. You can use the build ID to get the status of the build.

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1: 012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    }
}

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "ids": [
        "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    ]
}

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc
{
    "buildsNotFound": [], 
    "builds": [
        {
            "buildComplete": true, 
            "phases": [
                {
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "endTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "phaseType": "SUBMITTED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560156.761
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PROVISIONING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 24, 
                    "startTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "endTime": 1500560182.066
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "DOWNLOAD_SOURCE", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 15, 
                    "startTime": 1500560182.066, 
                    "endTime": 1500560197.906
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "INSTALL", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 19, 
                    "startTime": 1500560197.906, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.515
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PRE_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.515, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.662
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.662, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.995
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "POST_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.995, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.074
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "UPLOAD_ARTIFACTS", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.074, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.542
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "FINALIZING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 4, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.542, 
                    "endTime": 1500560223.128
                }, 
                {
                    "phaseType": "COMPLETED", 
                    "startTime": 1500560223.128
                }
            ], 
            "logs": {
                "groupName": "/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
                "deepLink": "https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudwatch/home?region=eu-west-1#logEvent:group=/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo;stream=57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
                "streamName": "57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
            }, 
            "artifacts": {
                "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
            }, 
            "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
            "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
            "initiator": "prakash", 
            "buildStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
            "environment": {
                "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
                "privilegedMode": false, 
                "image": "centos:7", 
                "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
                "environmentVariables": []
            }, 
            "source": {
                "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
                "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
                "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
            }, 
            "currentPhase": "COMPLETED", 
            "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
            "endTime": 1500560223.128, 
            "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
            "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
        }
    ]
}

DEB Build Project:

In this project, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-deb.yml. Like the RPM build project, this specification includes multiple phases. Here I use a Debian control file to create the package in DEB format. After a successful build, the DEB package will be uploaded as build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - apt-get install gcc make -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - cp -f cbsample.control ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN/control
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Building the application"
      - make
      - cp libcbsamplelib.so ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - cp cbsamplelib.h ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - cp cbsampleutil ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - chmod +x ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin/cbsampleutil
      - dpkg-deb --build ./cbsample-$build_version

artifacts:
  files:
    - cbsample-*.deb

Here we use cb-ubuntu-project.json as a reference to create the CLI input JSON file. This project uses the same AWS CodeCommit repository (codebuild-multispec) but a different buildspec file in the same repository (buildspec-deb.yml). We use the default CodeBuild image to create the DEB package. We use the same IAM role (CodeBuildServiceRole).

{
    "name": "deb-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build DEB from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-deb.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "aws/codebuild/ubuntu-base:14.04",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "Debian Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

Using the CLI input JSON file, create the project, start the build, and check the status of the project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-ubuntu-project.json

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-DEB-Demo:e535c4b0-7067-4fbe-8060-9bb9de203789

After successful completion of the RPM and DEB builds, check the S3 bucket configured in the artifacts section for the build packages. Build projects will create a directory in the name of the build project and copy the artifacts inside it.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-DEB-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:37:22       5420 cbsample-0.1.deb

Override Buildspec During Build Start:

It’s also possible to override the build specification file of an existing project when starting a build. If we want to create the libs RPM package instead of the whole RPM, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-libs-rpm.yml. This build specification file is similar to the earlier RPM build. The only difference is that it uses a different RPM specification file to create libs RPM.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-libs-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample-libs.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample-libs.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample-libs*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using the same RPM build project that we created earlier, start a new build and set the value of the `–buildspec-override` parameter to buildspec-libs-rpm.yml .

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --buildspec-override buildspec-libs-rpm.yml
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-libs-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500562366.239, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567"
    }
}

After the build is completed successfully, check to see if the package appears in the artifact S3 bucket under the CodeBuild-RPM-Demo build project folder.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm
2017-07-20 16:53:54       5320 cbsample-libs-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

Conclusion

In this post, I have shown you how multiple buildspec files in the same source repository can be used to run multiple AWS CodeBuild build projects. I have also shown you how to provide a different buildspec file when starting the build.

For more information about AWS CodeBuild, see the AWS CodeBuild documentation. You can get started with AWS CodeBuild by using this step by step guide.


About the author

Prakash Palanisamy is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps or Alexa, he will be solving problems in Project Euler. He also enjoys watching educational documentaries.

Pirates Cost Australia’s Ten Network “Hundreds of Millions of Dollars”

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/pirates-cost-australias-ten-network-hundreds-of-millions-of-dollars-170616/

In 2016, Australia’s Ten Network posted losses of AUS$157 million. This April, the broadcaster showed signs of continuing distress when it posted a half-year loss of AUS$232 million.

In a statement to the stock exchange, Ten said it was trying to secure new terms for a AUS$200 million debt financing guarantee. According to ABC, the company had lost more than 60% of its value in the preceding 12 months and almost 98% over the previous five years.

More bad news arrived this week when Ten’s board decided to put the company into voluntary administration after failing to secure a guarantee for a AUS$250 million loan that could’ve kept the ship afloat into the new year. As moves get underway to secure the company’s future, fingers of blame are being raised.

According to Village Roadshow co-chief executive Graham Burke, Internet pirates cost Ten “hundreds of millions of dollars” in advertising revenue due to their tendency to obtain movies and TV shows from the web rather than via legitimate means.

Burke told The Australian (paywall) that movies supplied to Ten by 21st Century Fox (including The Revenant and The Peanuts Movie which were both leaked) had received lower broadcast ratings due to people viewing them online in advance.

“Piracy is a much bigger channel and an illicit economy than the three main commercial networks combined,” Burke told the publication.

“Movies from Fox arrive with several million people having seen them through piracy. If it wasn’t for piracy, the ratings would be stronger and the product would not be arriving clapped out.”

But leaked or not, content doesn’t come cheap. As part of efforts to remain afloat, Ten Network recently tried to re-negotiate content supply deals with Fox and CBS. Together they reportedly cost the broadcaster more than AUS$900 million over the previous six years.

Despite this massive price tag and numerous other problems engulfing the troubled company, Burke suggests it is pirates that are to blame for Ten’s demise.

“A large part of Ten’s expenditure is on movies and they are being seen by millions of people ­illegitimately on websites supported by rogue ­advertising for drugs, prostitution and even legitimate advertising. The cumulative effect of all the ­pirated product out there has brought down Ten,” Burke said.

While piracy has certainly been blamed for a lot of things over the years, it is extremely rare for a senior industry figure to link it so closely with the potential demise of a major broadcaster.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Global Entertainment Giants Form Massive Anti-Piracy Coalition

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/global-entertainment-giants-form-massive-anti-piracy-coalition-170613/

It’s not unusual for companies within the same area of business to collaborate in order to combat piracy. The studios and labels that form the MPAA and RIAA, for example, have doing just that for decades.

Today, however, an unprecedented number of global content creators and distribution platforms have announced the formation of a brand new coalition to collaboratively fight Internet piracy on a global scale.

The Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE) is a coalition of 30 companies that reads like a who’s who of the global entertainment market. In alphabetical order the members are:

Amazon, AMC Networks, BBC Worldwide, Bell Canada and Bell Media, Canal+ Group, CBS Corporation, Constantin Film, Foxtel, Grupo Globo, HBO, Hulu, Lionsgate, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Millennium Media, NBCUniversal, Netflix, Paramount Pictures, SF Studios, Sky, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Star India, Studio Babelsberg, STX Entertainment, Telemundo, Televisa, Twentieth Century Fox, Univision Communications Inc., Village Roadshow, The Walt Disney Company, and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

In a joint announcement today, ACE notes that there are now more than 480 services available for consumers to watch films and TV programs online. However, despite that abundance of content, piracy continues to pose a threat to creators and the economy.

“Films and television shows can often be found on pirate sites within days – and in many cases hours – of release,” ACE said in a statement.

“Last year, there were an estimated 5.4 billion downloads of pirated wide release films and primetime television and VOD shows using peer-to-peer protocols worldwide. There were also an estimated 21.4 billion total visits to streaming piracy sites worldwide across both desktops and mobile devices in 2016.”

Rather than the somewhat fragmented anti-piracy approach currently employed by ACE members separately, the coalition will present a united front of all major content creators and distributors, with a mission to cooperate and expand in order to minimize the threat.

At the center of the alliance appears to be the MPAA. ACE reports that the anti-piracy resources of the Hollywood group will be used “in concert” with the existing anti-piracy departments of the member companies.

Unprecedented scale aside, ACE’s modus operandi will be a familiar one.

The coalition says it will work closely with law enforcement to shut down pirate sites and services, file civil litigation, and forge new relationships with other content protection groups. It will also strive to reach voluntary anti-piracy agreements with other interested parties across the Internet.

MPAA chief Chris Dodd, whose group will play a major role in ACE, welcomed the birth of the alliance.

“ACE, with its broad coalition of creators from around the world, is designed, specifically, to leverage the best possible resources to reduce piracy,” Dodd said.

“For decades, the MPAA has been the gold standard for antipiracy enforcement. We are proud to provide the MPAA’s worldwide antipiracy resources and the deep expertise of our antipiracy unit to support ACE and all its initiatives.”

The traditionally non-aggressive BBC described ACE as “hugely important” in the fight against “theft and illegal distribution”, with Netflix noting that even its creative strategies for dealing with piracy are in need of assistance.

“While we’re focused on providing a great consumer experience that ultimately discourages piracy, there are still bad players around the world trying to profit off the hard work of others,” said Netflix General Counsel, David Hyman.

“By joining ACE, we will work together, share knowledge, and leverage the group’s combined anti-piracy resources to address the global online piracy problem.”

It’s likely that the creation of ACE will go down as a landmark moment in the fight against piracy. Never before has such a broad coalition promised to pool resources on such a grand and global scale. That being said, with great diversity comes the potential for greatly diverging opinions, so only time will tell if this coalition can really hold together.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Фалшиви новини: две употреби на понятието

Post Syndicated from nellyo original https://nellyo.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/fakenews/

Фалшивите новини не са новост, но в последната година интензивно се говори за fake news u post-truth.

Американската FCC (Федерална комисия за комуникациите)  е получила над 40 жалби относно фалшиви новини за периода от октомври 2016 до април 2017. Това съобщава журналистът Джонатан Ритърс, който ги е изискал  по законодателството за достъп (FOIA) и ги анализира в своя публикация.

Авторите на жалби обявяват  за фалшиви новини  “всичко  – от Breitbart  и туитите на Доналд Тръмп  до коментарите  на CNN”.  Половината от жалбите обявяват за фалшиви новини новините на CNN (“Communist News Network”) – фалшиви  разкази, популяризирани от леви фашистки психопати  – и просто истории, които не се харесват на Тръмп.

Ето интересното за използването на термина фалшиви новини: Тръмп и неговите привърженици се опитват да се оттласнат от първоначалното значение  измислена история, пропаганда и да  насочат обратно негативната обществена оценка към критиката на властта. Цитирана е жалба, в която се съдържа оплакване от  атакуването на Тръмп и нацията чрез

наводняването на медиите  с фалшиви новини, подвеждащи истории и едностранчиви предубедени интервюта и говорители,  най-осезаемо при CNN, MSNBC, ABC, CBS, NBC и PBS,  New York Times и Washington Post.

Фалшиви новини  са например лъжи, използвани  в масови обществени кампании (често по напълно проверими теми като бюджетни разходи и приходи, изказвания  на папата и пр.),  непотвърдени слухове и заблуждаващи твърдения – и не,  не са фалшиви новини критичните към властта материали и разобличаването на лъжите – лъжи толкова по-дръзки, колкото са по-проверими, например колко граждани са присъствали при встъпването в длъжност на Тръмп в сравнение с Обама 2009.

 

Фалшивите новини  – съответно медиите на фалшивите новини и платформите на разпространениемогат да имат решаваща роля  в голямата картина, гражданите на САЩ и Обединеното кралство знаят най-добре.

Оттам и твърденията, че  концепцията за фалшивите новини служела  на загубилите да обяснят поражението си. Всъщност концепцията за фалшивите новини  служи на всекиго: просто победителите, освен другото, са успели да се организират  ефективно срещу медиите на фалшивите новини.

Filed under: Digital, Media Law

Ed Sheeran Tells Musician Fan He’ll “Sort Out” Facebook Copyright Ban

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/ed-sheeran-tells-musician-fan-hell-sort-out-facebook-copyright-ban-170310/

For millions of people around the globe, Facebook is the platform of choice for keeping in contact with family and friends. For artists and other creators, it’s a great way of raising a profile and reaching out more personally to fans.

With two crowd-sourced albums under her belt, UK-based full-time busker Charlotte Campbell is regularly in touch with the public through performances on the London Underground. She also uses Facebook to keep up with fans, but a few days ago her entire experience came to an abrupt halt after she was banned from the platform.

Charlotte’s crime was to post a 15-second snippet of her cover of Ed Sheeran’s song Castle On The Hill, together with a link to the full track on her YouTube channel.

“I love Ed Sheeran’s music and always cover his songs for my busking repertoire,” Charlotte informs TorrentFreak. “I find them easy to learn because I play them on repeat at home so I know all the lyrics by heart.”

However, the musician’s tribute would land her in hot water after being flagged as copyright infringement by Sheeran’s record label Atlantic/Warner. Charlotte was informed that she’d been banned from her own Facebook page for the next three days. If she did it again, she’d be banned forever, Facebook warned.

“I had no prior warning or previous offences to my knowledge. Doesn’t sound like much but for an independent musician making my living from music, Facebook is my primary promotional tool and I’m already struggling to get heard, it was quite deflating,” Charlotte adds.

Charlotte says that it’s taken her months of daily work on Facebook and YouTube to get her videos seen by a regular 10,000 people, so the three-day ban felt like a lifetime to her.

“I’m heartbroken, it’s just so frustrating. I’m a tiny artist, I’m tiny, she says.

But while Charlotte’s reach is currently pretty modest by Sheeran’s standards, something magical happened yesterday afternoon. It could raise the singer’s profile in a way she could never have predicted.

After Charlotte was banned from Facebook, some of her fans took to Ed Sheeran fansites to complain that after paying tribute to the star, Charlotte’s reward was to lose her voice online. Amazingly, word reached Sheeran himself, who dropped in on Charlotte’s Facebook page to give his support.

“Just seen your video, [the ban] definitely has nothing to do with me. I bloody love seeing people cover my songs. One of the best things I get out of this job is seeing other people find enjoyment too,” Sheeran wrote.

“I asked what’s gone on and apparently it’s a bot that Warner have that works on some weird algorithm (I have no idea what that means) but it’s just bad luck that it was your video,” he explained.

While popping by to offer support is great, Sheeran went a step further, promising to sort out the problem with those concerned.

“I’ve had a word, and i’ll get it sorted. Sorry again. Keep doing what you do, tis ace,” he said.

That Sheeran took the time to get involved in this issue came as a big but welcome surprise to Charlotte.

“I’m not sure I’ve really processed it, to be honest, I still feel like I’m dreaming!” she tells TF.

“I felt so relieved that it wasn’t Ed Sheeran who had personally rejected my cover! And it really restored my faith in humanity and in Ed himself.”

While it’s commendable that Sheeran got involved, people shouldn’t be too surprised. The artist is on record saying that copyright infringement helped shoot him to stardom, so a cover version won’t be of any concern to him.

“Illegal file sharing was what made me. It was students in England going to university, sharing my songs with each other,” he recently told CBS.

Of course, it’s disappointing that Charlotte has had to suffer at the hands of Warner’s cruel copyright bots. Ironically, though, this whole episode is now set to raise her profile, hopefully by a lot.

“I really had no idea that Ed would see my video about this so I couldn’t have dreamed that anything would come of it. Now I guess I hope that I’ll be on Ed Sheeran’s radar and next time he’s looking for a support act I’ll pop into his mind. Or at the least he’ll pop by my busking spot one day and join me for a duet!” Charlotte concludes.

If the rumors are correct, Sheeran may well be headlining the Glastonbury Festival this summer and that Pyramid Stage is awfully big for just one person. We know someone who’s probably free that day…..

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

‘Star Trek’ Fan Film Settles Copyright Battle with Movie Studios

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/movie-studios-settle-copyright-battle-with-star-trek-fan-film-170123/

klingonLast year Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios launched a legal battle against the makers of a Star Trek inspired fan film, accusing them of copyright infringement.

The case, which revolved around the well-received short film Star Trek: Prelude to Axanar and the planned follow-up feature film Axanar, put the future of the crowdfunded project at risk.

In the original complaint, the rightsholders claimed ownership over various Star Trek related settings, characters, species, clothing, colors, shapes, words, short phrases and even the Klingon language.

In a pre-trial order earlier this month the court decided that the fan-film is not entitled to a fair use defense. In addition, it found that there is an objective substantial similarity between the fan-film and the original Star Trek works.

This meant that Axanar was about to head into trial with a significant disadvantage, but in the end it didn’t come to that. Instead, both parties agreed to a settlement while asking the court to dismissed the case.

“Paramount Pictures Corporation, CBS Studios Inc., Axanar Productions, Inc. and Alec Peters are pleased to announce that the litigation regarding Axanar’s film Prelude to Axanar and its proposed film Axanar has been resolved,” reads a joint statement, published by HWR.

With a settlement, the Axanar team avoids having to pay a high amount in damages if they had lost. However, it also means that the planned film for which it raised over a million dollars through crowdfunding, will look substantially different.

Although most of the settlement terms remain confidential, it is clear that the film’s length will be significantly shorter. Instead of a planned 100-minute feature, Axanar will be reduced to two fifteen minute segments.

“Terms of the settlement agreement include an agreement to allow Axanar Productions to continue showing Prelude to Axanar commercial-free on YouTube and to allow Axanar Productions to produce the Axanar feature film as two fifteen-minute segments that can be distributed on YouTube,” Axanar announced.

While the films are allowed to appear on YouTube, they can’t be monetized through ads. Also, several copyrighted elements will be removed from the original script to satisfy the movie studios. One of the hot irons was the use of Klingon language, but it’s unclear whether that is still permitted.

Many fans who backed the project financially are disappointed with the outcome, but in comments on social media the filmmakers are clear that they really had no other viable option.

commentsaxan

“And your solution is? Maybe you haven’t been following the multi-million $ lawsuit that we have been going through the past 13 months,” Axanar commented after someone suggested they had caved-in to the movie studios’ restrictive demands.

In response to the lawsuit, Paramount and CBS issued a set of fan film guidelines last summer, hoping to avoid similar legal battles in the future. While this comes too late for director Alec Peter and his crew, they are glad that their project can continue in an edited form.

“Axanar Productions was created by lifelong Star Trek fans to celebrate their love for Star Trek. Alec Peters and the Axanar team look forward to continuing to share the Axanar story and are happy to work within the Guidelines for Fan Films for future projects.”

“Live Long and Prosper,” the Axanar team concludes.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

‘Klingon Language’ Copyright Battle Ends, For Now

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/klingon-language-copyright-battle-ends-for-now-170113/

klingonLast year Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios filed a lawsuit against the makers of a Star Trek inspired fan film, accusing them of copyright infringement.

The case, which centers around the well-received short film Star Trek: Prelude to Axanar and the planned follow-up feature film Axanar, goes to trial later this month.

In the original complaint the rightsholders claimed ownership over various Star Trek related settings, characters, species, clothing, colors, shapes, words, short phrases and even the Klingon language.

In a pre-trial order earlier this month the court decided that the fan-film is not entitled to a fair use defense. In addition, it found that there is an objective substantial similarity between the fan-film and the original Star Trek works.

While no ruling was made on individual items such as the Klingon language, costumes, characters or species, as a whole the overall look and feel was found to be substantially similar.

This was disappointing for the makers of the fan film, but in a subsequent order this week there was also some good news. In particular for those who feared for the future of the Klingon language.

The court tentatively granted a motion (pdf) from the Axanar team to preclude evidence that is unoriginal, in the public domain or owned by third parties. This motion specifically included the Klingon language, which now can’t be brought up at trial.

The news is welcomed by the Language Creation Society (LCS), a non-profit that promotes the art and craft of language creation.

LCS openly protested Paramount’s copyright claim over the Klingon language in recent months. They also tried to get officially involved in the case by filing an amicus brief and reply, which both used fierce Klingon statements throughout.

The language is a tool for people to communicate and express ideas, something people should be allowed to do freely under U.S. law, LCS argued.

Klingon in court *7/8

klingon2

Paramount disagreed and the court decided that LCS was not allowed to file their motion because the issue was moot. Looking back, however, LCS believes that their efforts did make an impact.

“We used Klingon in our brief to show that Klingon is a living language that anyone should be able to use without Paramount’s permission,” LCS notes.

“It also serves a real purpose beyond this one case. IP law can be dry and technical. The use of Klingon — and humor — helped spread our point that languages are not copyrightable.”

The good news for Klingons and their fans is that, while Paramount still claims ownership, there are no additional roadblocks to use the language. And without an order stating that Paramount has exclusive rights over the language’s use, LCS and others will continue to spread it.

In fact, the legal battle actually helped it to grow and evolve. After several decades, the name Paramount now finally has a Klingon translation: pa’ra’mon.

“We have not sought, nor do we need, any permission from Paramount for our use of Klingon — not even when we have created a new Klingon name for Paramount itself: parapa’ra’mon,” LCS writes.

neversurrenderNever surrender! Success!”

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Court: Fan-Funded Star Trek Film is Not ‘Fair Use’

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/court-fan-funded-star-trek-film-is-not-fair-use-170105/

axanarLast year, Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios filed a lawsuit against the makers of a Star Trek inspired fan film, accusing them of copyright infringement.

The dispute centers around the well-received short film Star Trek: Prelude to Axanar and the planned follow-up feature film Axanar.

Among other things, the Star Trek rightsholders claim ownership over various Star Trek related settings, characters, species, clothing, colors, shapes, words, short phrases and even the Klingon language.

The case is now heading towards a trial, which means that the ultimate decision may sit in the hands of a jury. However, this week the court shared its opinion on some crucial issues, responding to motions for summary judgment submitted by both parties earlier.

The Axanar team, for example, informed the court that their films do not infringe Star Trek copyrights. One of the main reasons, according to the makers, is that it clearly falls under fair use. However, the court sees the situation differently.

After weighing the four crucial factors for determining fair use, District Court Judge Robert Klausner concludes that the fan-film is not entitled to a fair use defense.

In an order published this week he explains that even though the film will be distributed for free, it has a commercial nature because the makers profit in other ways. For example, through other job benefits that flow out of it.

Another crucial factor is the amount and substantiality of the infringing elements that appear in the film. Here, the court also concludes that Axanar went beyond fair use by including many details of the Star Trek canon which are important to Star Trek fans.

The other two factors, the nature of the original copyrighted work, and the effect on the market value of the Star Trek franchise, didn’t warrant a fair use qualification either.

“The Court thus finds that all four fair use factors weigh in favor of Plaintiffs. If the jury does not find subjective substantial similarity, Defendants did not infringe and fair use defense is moot,” the order reads.

“Rejection of Defendants’ fair use defense is consistent with copyright’s very purpose because derivatives are ‘an important economic incentive to the creation of originals’,” it adds.

Responding to the motion of the movie studios, the court separately concluded that there is an objective substantial similarity between the fan-film and the original Star Trek works.

While no ruling was made on individual items such as the Klingon language, costumes, characters or species, as a whole the overall “look and feel” was found to be similar.

That said, the court leaves a ruling on subjective substantial similarity up to the jury.

This means that one of the main questions during trial will be whether an ordinary, reasonable person would find the total concept and feel of the fan-film to be substantially similar to the original Star Trek works. This will to a large degree determine the outcome of the case.

While it’s still too early to draw any conclusions, the court’s opinion is a clear setback for the Axanar makers. With fair use out of the way, and a court that sees substantial similarity with the original works, their fate now lies in the hands of the jury.

The court’s full opinion on the motions for summary judgement is available here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.