Tag Archives: CNC

Progressing from tech to leadership

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2018/02/on-leadership.html

I’ve been a technical person all my life. I started doing vulnerability research in the late 1990s – and even today, when I’m not fiddling with CNC-machined robots or making furniture, I’m probably clobbering together a fuzzer or writing a book about browser protocols and APIs. In other words, I’m a geek at heart.

My career is a different story. Over the past two decades and a change, I went from writing CGI scripts and setting up WAN routers for a chain of shopping malls, to doing pentests for institutional customers, to designing a series of network monitoring platforms and handling incident response for a big telco, to building and running the product security org for one of the largest companies in the world. It’s been an interesting ride – and now that I’m on the hook for the well-being of about 100 folks across more than a dozen subteams around the world, I’ve been thinking a bit about the lessons learned along the way.

Of course, I’m a bit hesitant to write such a post: sometimes, your efforts pan out not because of your approach, but despite it – and it’s possible to draw precisely the wrong conclusions from such anecdotes. Still, I’m very proud of the culture we’ve created and the caliber of folks working on our team. It happened through the work of quite a few talented tech leads and managers even before my time, but it did not happen by accident – so I figured that my observations may be useful for some, as long as they are taken with a grain of salt.

But first, let me start on a somewhat somber note: what nobody tells you is that one’s level on the leadership ladder tends to be inversely correlated with several measures of happiness. The reason is fairly simple: as you get more senior, a growing number of people will come to you expecting you to solve increasingly fuzzy and challenging problems – and you will no longer be patted on the back for doing so. This should not scare you away from such opportunities, but it definitely calls for a particular mindset: your motivation must come from within. Look beyond the fight-of-the-day; find satisfaction in seeing how far your teams have come over the years.

With that out of the way, here’s a collection of notes, loosely organized into three major themes.

The curse of a techie leader

Perhaps the most interesting observation I have is that for a person coming from a technical background, building a healthy team is first and foremost about the subtle art of letting go.

There is a natural urge to stay involved in any project you’ve started or helped improve; after all, it’s your baby: you’re familiar with all the nuts and bolts, and nobody else can do this job as well as you. But as your sphere of influence grows, this becomes a choke point: there are only so many things you could be doing at once. Just as importantly, the project-hoarding behavior robs more junior folks of the ability to take on new responsibilities and bring their own ideas to life. In other words, when done properly, delegation is not just about freeing up your plate; it’s also about empowerment and about signalling trust.

Of course, when you hand your project over to somebody else, the new owner will initially be slower and more clumsy than you; but if you pick the new leads wisely, give them the right tools and the right incentives, and don’t make them deathly afraid of messing up, they will soon excel at their new jobs – and be grateful for the opportunity.

A related affliction of many accomplished techies is the conviction that they know the answers to every question even tangentially related to their domain of expertise; that belief is coupled with a burning desire to have the last word in every debate. When practiced in moderation, this behavior is fine among peers – but for a leader, one of the most important skills to learn is knowing when to keep your mouth shut: people learn a lot better by experimenting and making small mistakes than by being schooled by their boss, and they often try to read into your passing remarks. Don’t run an authoritarian camp focused on total risk aversion or perfectly efficient resource management; just set reasonable boundaries and exit conditions for experiments so that they don’t spiral out of control – and be amazed by the results every now and then.

Death by planning

When nothing is on fire, it’s easy to get preoccupied with maintaining the status quo. If your current headcount or budget request lists all the same projects as last year’s, or if you ever find yourself ending an argument by deferring to a policy or a process document, it’s probably a sign that you’re getting complacent. In security, complacency usually ends in tears – and when it doesn’t, it leads to burnout or boredom.

In my experience, your goal should be to develop a cadre of managers or tech leads capable of coming up with clever ideas, prioritizing them among themselves, and seeing them to completion without your day-to-day involvement. In your spare time, make it your mission to challenge them to stay ahead of the curve. Ask your vendor security lead how they’d streamline their work if they had a 40% jump in the number of vendors but no extra headcount; ask your product security folks what’s the second line of defense or containment should your primary defenses fail. Help them get good ideas off the ground; set some mental success and failure criteria to be able to cut your losses if something does not pan out.

Of course, malfunctions happen even in the best-run teams; to spot trouble early on, instead of overzealous project tracking, I found it useful to encourage folks to run a data-driven org. I’d usually ask them to imagine that a brand new VP shows up in our office and, as his first order of business, asks “why do you have so many people here and how do I know they are doing the right things?”. Not everything in security can be quantified, but hard data can validate many of your assumptions – and will alert you to unseen issues early on.

When focusing on data, it’s important not to treat pie charts and spreadsheets as an art unto itself; if you run a security review process for your company, your CSAT scores are going to reach 100% if you just rubberstamp every launch request within ten minutes of receiving it. Make sure you’re asking the right questions; instead of “how satisfied are you with our process”, try “is your product better as a consequence of talking to us?”

Whenever things are not progressing as expected, it is a natural instinct to fall back to micromanagement, but it seldom truly cures the ill. It’s probable that your team disagrees with your vision or its feasibility – and that you’re either not listening to their feedback, or they don’t think you’d care. It’s good to assume that most of your employees are as smart or smarter than you; barking your orders at them more loudly or more frequently does not lead anyplace good. It’s good to listen to them and either present new facts or work with them on a plan you can all get behind.

In some circumstances, all that’s needed is honesty about the business trade-offs, so that your team feels like your “partner in crime”, not a victim of circumstance. For example, we’d tell our folks that by not falling behind on basic, unglamorous work, we earn the trust of our VPs and SVPs – and that this translates into the independence and the resources we need to pursue more ambitious ideas without being told what to do; it’s how we game the system, so to speak. Oh: leading by example is a pretty powerful tool at your disposal, too.

The human factor

I’ve come to appreciate that hiring decent folks who can get along with others is far more important than trying to recruit conference-circuit superstars. In fact, hiring superstars is a decidedly hit-and-miss affair: while certainly not a rule, there is a proportion of folks who put the maintenance of their celebrity status ahead of job responsibilities or the well-being of their peers.

For teams, one of the most powerful demotivators is a sense of unfairness and disempowerment. This is where tech-originating leaders can shine, because their teams usually feel that their bosses understand and can evaluate the merits of the work. But it also means you need to be decisive and actually solve problems for them, rather than just letting them vent. You will need to make unpopular decisions every now and then; in such cases, I think it’s important to move quickly, rather than prolonging the uncertainty – but it’s also important to sincerely listen to concerns, explain your reasoning, and be frank about the risks and trade-offs.

Whenever you see a clash of personalities on your team, you probably need to respond swiftly and decisively; being right should not justify being a bully. If you don’t react to repeated scuffles, your best people will probably start looking for other opportunities: it’s draining to put up with constant pie fights, no matter if the pies are thrown straight at you or if you just need to duck one every now and then.

More broadly, personality differences seem to be a much better predictor of conflict than any technical aspects underpinning a debate. As a boss, you need to identify such differences early on and come up with creative solutions. Sometimes, all you need is taking some badly-delivered but valid feedback and having a conversation with the other person, asking some questions that can help them reach the same conclusions without feeling that their worldview is under attack. Other times, the only path forward is making sure that some folks simply don’t run into each for a while.

Finally, dealing with low performers is a notoriously hard but important part of the game. Especially within large companies, there is always the temptation to just let it slide: sideline a struggling person and wait for them to either get over their issues or leave. But this sends an awful message to the rest of the team; for better or worse, fairness is important to most. Simply firing the low performers is seldom the best solution, though; successful recovery cases are what sets great managers apart from the average ones.

Oh, one more thought: people in leadership roles have their allegiance divided between the company and the people who depend on them. The obligation to the company is more formal, but the impact you have on your team is longer-lasting and more intimate. When the obligations to the employer and to your team collide in some way, make sure you can make the right call; it might be one of the the most consequential decisions you’ll ever make.

[$] An overview of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/741301/rss

The Cloud
Native Computing Foundation
(CNCF) held its conference,
KubeCon + CloudNativeCon,
in December 2017. There were 4000 attendees at this gathering in Austin, Texas,
more than
all the previous KubeCons before, which shows the rapid growth of the
community building around the tool that was announced by Google in
2014. Large corporations are also taking a larger part in the
community, with major players in the industry joining the CNCF, which is a project of the Linux
Foundation. The CNCF now features three of the largest cloud
hosting businesses (Amazon, Google, and Microsoft), but also emerging
companies from Asia like Baidu and Alibaba.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 25

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/08/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-25/

Welcome to TimeShift

This week, a few of us from Grafana Labs, along with 4,000 of our closest friends, headed down to chilly Austin, TX for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017. We got to see a number of great talks and were thrilled to see Grafana make appearances in some of the presentations. We were also a sponsor of the conference and handed out a ton of swag (we overnighted some of our custom Grafana scarves, which came in handy for Thursday’s snow).

We also announced Grafana Labs has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a Silver member! We’re excited to share our expertise in time series data visualization and open source software with the CNCF community.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Grafana Labs Joins the CNCF: Grafana Labs has officially joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). We look forward to working with the CNCF community to democratize metrics and help unify traditionally disparate information.

Automating Web Performance Regression Alerts: Peter and his team needed a faster and easier way to find web performance regressions at the Wikimedia Foundation. Grafana 4’s alerting features were exactly what they needed. This post covers their journey on setting up alerts for both RUM and synthetic testing and shares the alerts they’ve set up on their dashboards.

How To Install Grafana on Ubuntu 17.10: As you probably guessed from the title, this article walks you through installing and configuring Grafana in the latest version of Ubuntu (or earlier releases). It also covers installing plugins using the Grafana CLI tool.

Prometheus: Starting the Server with Alertmanager, cAdvisor and Grafana: Learn how to monitor Docker from scratch using cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana in this detailed, step-by-step walkthrough.

Monitoring Java EE Servers with Prometheus and Payara: In this screencast, Adam uses firehose; a Java EE 7+ metrics gateway for Prometheus, to convert the JSON output into Prometheus statistics and visualizes the data in Grafana.

Monitoring Spark Streaming with InfluxDB and Grafana: This article focuses on how to monitor Apache Spark Streaming applications with InfluxDB and Grafana at scale.


GrafanaCon EU, March 1-2, 2018

We are currently reaching out to everyone who submitted a talk to GrafanaCon and will soon publish the final schedule at grafanacon.org.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Lots of plugin updates and a new OpenNMS Helm App plugin to announce! To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

OpenNMS Helm App – The new OpenNMS Helm App plugin replaces the old OpenNMS data source. Helm allows users to create flexible dashboards using both fault management (FM) and performance management (PM) data from OpenNMS® Horizon™ and/or OpenNMS® Meridian™. The old data source is now deprecated.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP Data Source – This data source plugin (that uses PNP4Nagios to access RRD files) received a small, but important update that fixes template query parsing.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Vonage Status Panel – The latest version of the Status Panel comes with a number of small fixes and changes. Below are a few of the enhancements:

  • Threshold settings – removed Show Always option, and replaced it with 2 options:
    • Display Alias – Select when to show the metric alias.
    • Display Value – Select when to show the metric value.
  • Text format configuration (bold / italic) for warning / critical / disabled states.
  • Option to change the corner radius of the panel. Now you can change the panel’s shape to have rounded corners.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Plugin – This plugin received a small update, so be sure to install version 1.0.4.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – The Carpet Plot Panel received a fix for IE 11, and also added the ability to choose custom colors.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Docker Meetup @ Tuenti | Madrid, Spain – Dec 12, 2017: Javier Provecho: Intro to Metrics with Swarm, Prometheus and Grafana

Learn how to gain visibility in real time for your micro services. We’ll cover how to deploy a Prometheus server with persistence and Grafana, how to enable metrics endpoints for various service types (docker daemon, traefik proxy and postgres) and how to scrape, visualize and set up alarms based on those metrics.

RSVP

Grafana Lyon Meetup n ° 2 | Lyon, France – Dec 14, 2017: This meetup will cover some of the latest innovations in Grafana and discussion about automation. Also, free beer and chips, so – of course you’re going!

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

We were thrilled to see our dashboards bigger than life at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon this week. Thanks for snapping a photo and sharing!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Hard to believe this is the 25th issue of Timeshift! I have a blast writing these roundups, but Let me know what you think. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/16/staying-busy-between-code-pushes/

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes.

Maintaining a regular cadence of pushing out releases, adding new features, implementing bug fixes and staying on top of support requests is important for any software to thrive; but especially important for open source software due to its rapid pace. It’s easy to lose yourself in code and forget that events are happening all the time – in every corner of the world, where we can learn, share knowledge, and meet like-minded individuals to build better software, together. There are so many amazing events we’d like to participate in, but there simply isn’t enough time (or budget) to fit them all in. Here’s what we’ve been up to recently; between code pushes.

Recent Events

Øredev Conference | Malmö, Sweden: Øredev is one of the biggest developer conferences in Scandinavia, and Grafana Labs jumped at the chance to be a part of it. In early November, Grafana Labs Principal Developer, Carl Bergquist, gave a great talk on “Monitoring for Everyone”, which discussed the concepts of monitoring and why everyone should care, different ways to monitor your systems, extending your monitoring to containers and microservices, and finally what to monitor and alert on. Watch the video of his talk below.

InfluxDays | San Francisco, CA: Dan Cech, our Director of Platform Services, spoke at InfluxDays in San Francisco on Nov 14, and Grafana Labs sponsored the event. InfluxDB is a popular data source for Grafana, so we wanted to connect to the InfluxDB community and show them how to get the most out of their data. Dan discussed building dashboards, choosing the best panels for your data, setting up alerting in Grafana and a few sneak peeks of the upcoming Grafana 5.0. The video of his talk is forthcoming, but Dan has made his presentation available.

PromCon | Munich, Germany: PromCon is the Prometheus-focused event of the year. In August, Carl Bergquist, had the opportunity to speak at PromCon and take a deep dive into Grafana and Prometheus. Many attendees at PromCon were already familiar with Grafana, since it’s the default dashboard tool for Prometheus, but Carl had a trove of tricks and optimizations to share. He also went over some major changes and what we’re currently working on.

CNCF Meetup | New York, NY: Grafana Co-founder and CEO, Raj Dutt, particpated in a panel discussion with the folks of Packet and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The discussion focused on the success stories, failures, rationales and in-the-trenches challenges when running cloud native in private or non “public cloud” datacenters (bare metal, colocation, private clouds, special hardware or networking setups, compliance and security-focused deployments).

Percona Live | Dublin: Daniel Lee traveled to Dublin, Ireland this fall to present at the database conference Percona Live. There he showed the new native MySQL support, along with a number of upcoming features in Grafana 5.0. His presentation is available to download.

Big Monitoring Meetup | St. Petersburg, Russian Federation: Alexander Zobnin, our developer located in Russia, is the primary maintainer of our popular Zabbix plugin. He attended the Big Monitoring Meetup to discuss monitoring, Grafana dashboards and democratizing metrics.

Why observability matters – now and in the future | Webinar: Our own Carl Bergquist and Neil Gehani, Director of Product at Weaveworks, to discover best practices on how to get started with monitoring both your application and infrastructure. Start capturing metrics that matter, aggregate and visualize them in a useful way that allows for identifying bottlenecks and proactively preventing incidents. View Carl’s presentation.

Upcoming Events

We’re going to maintain this momentum with a number of upcoming events, and hope you can join us.

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more.

Buy Tickets

How to Use Open Source Projects for Performance Monitoring | Webinar
Nov. 29, 1pm EST:
Check out how you can use popular open source projects, for performance monitoring of your Infrastructure, Application, and Cloud faster, easier, and to scale. In this webinar, Daniel Lee from Grafana Labs, and Chris Churilo from InfluxData, will provide you with step by step instruction from download & configure, to collecting metrics and building dashboards and alerts.

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and the CFP is now open. There is no need to register; all are welcome. If you’re interested in speaking at FOSDEM, submit your talk now!

GrafanaCon EU

Last, but certainly not least, the next GrafanaCon is right around the corner. GrafanaCon EU (to be held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, March 1-2. 2018),is a two-day event with talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding ecosystem. In addition to the latest features and functionality of Grafana, you can expect to see and hear from members of the monitoring community like Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch Kubernetes, and more. Head to grafanacon.org to see the latest speakers confirmed. We have speakers from Automattic, Bloomberg, CERN, Fastly, Tinder and more!

Conclusion

The Grafana Labs team is spread across the globe. Having a “post-geographic” company structure give us the opportunity to take part in events wherever they may be held in the world. As our team continues to grow, we hope to take part in even more events, and hope you can find the time to join us.

Under the Hood: Task Networking for Amazon ECS

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/under-the-hood-task-networking-for-amazon-ecs/

This post courtsey of ECS Sr. Software Dev Engineer Anirudh Aithal.

Today, AWS announced Task Networking for Amazon ECS, which enables elastic network interfaces to be attached to containers.

In this post, I take a closer look at how this new container-native “awsvpc” network mode is implemented using container networking interface plugins on ECS managed instances (referred to as container instances).

This post is a deep dive into how task networking works with Amazon ECS. If you want to learn more about how you can start using task networking for your containerized applications, see Introducing Cloud Native Networking for Amazon ECS Containers. Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts the Container Networking Interface (CNI) project, which consists of a specification and libraries for writing plugins to configure network interfaces in Linux containers. For more about cloud native computing in AWS, see Adrian Cockcroft’s post on Cloud Native Computing.

Container instance setup

Before I discuss the details of enabling task networking on container instances, look at how a typical instance looks in ECS.

The diagram above shows a typical container instance. The ECS agent, which itself is running as a container, is responsible for:

  • Registering the EC2 instance with the ECS backend
  • Ensuring that task state changes communicated to it by the ECS backend are enacted on the container instance
  • Interacting with the Docker daemon to create, start, stop, and monitor
  • Relaying container state and task state transitions to the ECS backend

Because the ECS agent is just acting as the supervisor for containers under its management, it offloads the problem of setting up networking for containers to either the Docker daemon (for containers configured with one of Docker’s default networking modes) or a set of CNI plugins (for containers in task with networking mode set to awsvpc).

In either case, network stacks of containers are configured via network namespaces. As per the ip-netns(8) manual, “A network namespace is logically another copy of the network stack, with its own routes, firewall rules, and network devices.” The network namespace construct makes the partitioning of network stack between processes and containers running on a host possible.

Network namespaces and CNI plugins

CNI plugins are executable files that comply with the CNI specification and configure the network connectivity of containers. The CNI project defines a specification for the plugins and provides a library for interacting with plugins, thus providing a consistent, reliable, and simple interface with which to interact with the plugins.

You specify the container or its network namespace and invoke the plugin with the ADD command to add network interfaces to a container, and then the DEL command to tear them down. For example, the reference bridge plugin adds all containers on the same host into a bridge that resides in the host network namespace.

This plugin model fits in nicely with the ECS agent’s “minimal intrusion in the container lifecycle” model, as the agent doesn’t need to concern itself with the details of the network setup for containers. It’s also an extensible model, which allows the agent to switch to a different set of plugins if the need arises in future. Finally, the ECS agent doesn’t need to monitor the liveliness of these plugins as they are only invoked when required.

Invoking CNI plugins from the ECS agent

When ECS attaches an elastic network interface to the instance and sends the message to the agent to provision the elastic network interface for containers in a task, the elastic network interface (as with any network device) shows up in the global default network namespace of the host. The ECS agent invokes a chain of CNI plugins to ensure that the elastic network interface is configured appropriately in the container’s network namespace. You can review these plugins in the amazon-ecs-cni-plugins GitHub repo.

The first plugin invoked in this chain is the ecs-eni plugin, which ensures that the elastic network interface is attached to container’s network namespace and configured with the VPC-allocated IP addresses and the default route to use the subnet gateway. The container also needs to make HTTP requests to the credentials endpoint (hosted by the ECS agent) for getting IAM role credentials. This is handled by the ecs-bridge and ecs-ipam plugins, which are invoked next. The CNI library provides mechanisms to interpret the results from the execution of these plugins, which results in an efficient error handling in the agent. The following diagram illustrates the different steps in this process:

To avoid the race condition between configuring the network stack and commands being invoked in application containers, the ECS agent creates an additional “pause” container for each task before starting the containers in the task definition. It then sets up the network namespace of the pause container by executing the previously mentioned CNI plugins. It also starts the rest of the containers in the task so that they share their network stack of the pause container. This means that all containers in a task are addressable by the IP addresses of the elastic network interface, and they can communicate with each other over the localhost interface.

In this example setup, you have two containers in a task behind an elastic network interface. The following commands show that they have a similar view of the network stack and can talk to each other over the localhost interface.

List the last three containers running on the host (you launched a task with two containers and the ECS agent launched the additional container to configure the network namespace):

$ docker ps -n 3 --format "{{.ID}}\t{{.Names}}\t{{.Command}}\t{{.Status}}"
7d7b7fbc30b9	ecs-front-envoy-5-envoy-sds-ecs-ce8bd9eca6dd81a8d101	"/bin/sh -c '/usr/..."	Up 3 days
dfdcb2acfc91	ecs-front-envoy-5-front-envoy-faeae686adf9c1d91000	"/bin/sh -c '/usr/..."	Up 3 days
f731f6dbb81c	ecs-front-envoy-5-internalecspause-a8e6e19e909fa9c9e901	"./pause"	Up 3 days

List interfaces for these containers and make sure that they are the same:

$ for id in `docker ps -n 3 -q`; do pid=`docker inspect $id -f '{{.State.Pid}}'`; echo container $id; sudo nsenter -t $pid -n ip link show; done
container 7d7b7fbc30b9
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

container dfdcb2acfc91
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

container f731f6dbb81c
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

Conclusion

All of this work means that you can use the new awsvpc networking mode and benefit from native networking support for your containers. You can learn more about using awsvpc mode in Introducing Cloud Native Networking for Amazon ECS Containers or the ECS documentation.

I appreciate your feedback in the comments section. You can also reach me on GitHub in either the ECS CNI Plugins or the ECS Agent repositories.

Weekend distractions: a perfectly good dining table

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2017/11/weekend-distractions-perfectly-good.html

I’ve been a DIYer all my adult life. Some of my non-software projects still revolve around computers, especially when they deal with CNC machining or electronics. But I’ve been also dabbling in woodworking for quite a while. I have not put that much effort into documenting my projects (say, cutting boards) – but I figured it’s time to change that. It may inspire some folks to give a new hobby a try – or help them overcome a problem or two.

So, without further ado, here’s the build log for a dining table I put together over the past two weekends or so. I think I turned out pretty nice:

Have fun!

Manufacturing Astro Pi case replicas

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/astro-pi-case-guest-post/

Tim Rowledge produces and sells wonderful replicas of the cases which our Astro Pis live in aboard the International Space Station. Here is the story of how he came to do this. Over to you, Tim!

When the Astro Pi case was first revealed a couple of years ago, the collective outpouring of ‘Squee!’ it elicited may have been heard on board the ISS itself. People wanted to buy it or build it at home, and someone wanted to know whether it would blend. (There’s always one.)

The complete Astro Pi

The Sense HAT and its Pi tucked snugly in the original Astro Pi flight case — gorgeous, isn’t it?

Replicating the Astro Pi case

Some months later the STL files for printing your own Astro Pi case were released, and people jumped at the chance to use them. Soon reports appeared saying you had to make quite a few attempts before getting a good print — normal for any complex 3D-printing project. A fellow member of my local makerspace successfully made a couple of cases, but it took a lot of time, filament, and post-print finishing work. And of course, a plastic Astro Pi case simply doesn’t look or feel like the original made of machined aluminium — or ‘aluminum’, as they tend to say over here in North America.

Batch of tops of Astro Pi case replicas by Tim Rowledge

A batch of tops designed by Tim

I wanted to build an Astro Pi case which would more closely match the original. Fortunately, someone else at my makerspace happens to have some serious CNC machining equipment at his small manufacturing company. Therefore, I focused on creating a case design that could be produced with his three-axis device. This meant simplifying some parts to avoid expensive, slow, complex multi-fixture work. It took us a while, but we ended up with a design we can efficiently make using his machine.

Lasered Astro Pi case replica by Tim Rowledge

Tim’s first lasered case

And the resulting case looks really, really like the original — in fact, upon receiving one of the final prototypes, Eben commented:

“I have to say, at first glance they look spectacular: unless you hold them side by side with the originals, it’s hard to pinpoint what’s changed. I’m looking forward to seeing one built up and then seeing them in the wild.”

Inside the Astro Pi case

Making just the bare case is nice, but there are other parts required to recreate a complete Astro Pi unit. Thus I got my local electronics company to design a small HAT to provide much the same support the mezzanine board offers: an RTC and nice, clean connections to the six buttons. We also added well-labelled, grouped pads for all the other GPIO lines, along with space for an ADC. If you’re making your own Astro Pi replica, you might like the Switchboard.

The electronics supply industry just loves to offer *some* of what you need, so that one supplier never has everything: we had to obtain the required stand-offs, screws, spacers, and JST wires from assorted other sources. Jeff at my nearby Industrial Paint & Plastics took on the laser engraving of our cases, leaving out copyrighted logos etcetera.

Lasering the top of an Astro Pi case replica by Tim Rowledge

Lasering the top of a case

Get your own Astro Pi case

Should you like to buy one of our Astro Pi case kits, pop over to www.astropicase.com, and we’ll get it on its way to you pronto. If you’re an institutional or corporate customer, the fully built option might make more sense for you — ordering the Pi and other components, and having a staff member assemble it all, may well be more work than is sensible.

Astro Pi case replica Tim Rowledge

Tim’s first full Astro Pi case replica, complete with shiny APEM buttons

To put the kit together yourself, all you need to do is add a Pi, Sense HAT, Camera Module, and RTC battery, and choose your buttons. An illustrated manual explains the process step by step. Our version of the Astro Pi case uses the same APEM buttons as the units in orbit, and whilst they are expensive, just clicking them is a source of great joy. It comes in a nice travel case too.

Tim Rowledge holding up a PCB

This is Tim. Thanks, Tim!

Take part in Astro Pi

If having an Astro Pi replica is not enough for you, this is your chance: the 2017-18 Astro Pi challenge is open! Do you know a teenager who might be keen to design a experiment to run on the Astro Pis in space? Are you one yourself? You have until 29 October to send us your Mission Space Lab entry and become part of the next generation of space scientists? Head over to the Astro Pi website to find out more.

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Spooktacular Halloween Haunted Portrait

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/spooktacular-halloween-haunted-portrait/

October has come at last, and with it, the joy of Halloween is now upon us. So while I spend the next 30 days quoting Hocus Pocus at every opportunity, here’s Adafruit’s latest spooky build … the spooktacular Haunted Portrait.

Adafruit Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

Haunted Portraits

If you’ve visited a haunted house such as Disney’s Haunted Mansion, or walked the halls of Hogwarts at Universal Studios, you will have seen a ‘moving portrait’. Whether it’s the classic ‘did that painting just blink?’ approach, or occupants moving in and out of frame, they’re an effective piece of spooky decoration – and now you can make your own!

Adafruit’s AdaBox

John Park, maker extraordinaire, recently posted a live make video where he used the contents of the Raspberry Pi-themed AdaBox 005 to create a blinking portrait.

AdaBox 005 Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

The Adabox is Adafruit’s own maker subscription service where plucky makers receive a mystery parcel containing exciting tech and inspirational builds. Their more recent delivery, the AdaBox 005, contains a Raspberry Pi Zero, their own Joy Bonnet, a case, and peripherals, including Pimoroni’s no-solder Hammer Headers.

AdaBox 005 Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

While you can purchase the AdaBoxes as one-off buys, subscribers get extra goodies. With AdaBox 005, they received bonus content including Raspberry Pi swag in the form of stickers, and a copy of The MagPi Magazine.

AdaBox 005 Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

The contents of AdaBox 005 allows makers to build their own Raspberry Pi Zero tiny gaming machine. But the ever-working minds of the Adafruit team didn’t want to settle there, so they decided to create more tutorials based on the box’s contents, such as John Park’s Haunted Portrait.

Bringing a portrait to life

Alongside the AdaBox 005 content, all of which can be purchased from Adafruit directly, you’ll need a flat-screen monitor and a fancy frame. The former could be an old TV or computer screen while the latter, unless you happen to have an ornate frame that perfectly fits your monitor, can be made from cardboard, CNC-cut wood or gold-painted macaroni and tape … probably.

Adafruit Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

You’ll need to attach headers to your Raspberry Pi Zero. For those of you who fear the soldering iron, the Hammer Headers can be hammered into place without the need for melty hot metal. If you’d like to give soldering a go, you can follow Laura’s Getting Started With Soldering tutorial video.

Adafruit Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait Hammer Header

In his tutorial, John goes on to explain how to set up the Joy Bonnet (if you wish to use it as an added controller), set your Raspberry Pi to display in portrait mode, and manipulate an image in Photoshop or GIMP to create the blinking effect.

Adafruit Raspberry Pi Haunted Portrait

Blinking eyes are just the start of the possibilities for this project. This is your moment to show off your image manipulation skills! Why not have the entire head flash to show the skull within? Or have an ethereal image appear in the background of an otherwise unexceptional painting of a bowl of fruit?

In the final stages of the tutorial, John explains how to set an image slideshow running on the Pi, and how to complete the look with the aforementioned ornate frame. He also goes into detail about the importance of using a matte effect screen or transparent gels to give a more realistic ‘painted’ feel.

You’ll find everything you need to make your own haunted portrait here, including a link to John’s entire live stream.

Get spooky!

We’re going to make this for Pi Towers. In fact, I’m wondering whether I could create an entire gallery of portraits specifically for our reception area and see how long it takes people to notice …

… though I possibly shouldn’t have given my idea away on this rather public blog post.

If you make the Haunted Portrait, or any other Halloween-themed Pi build, make sure you share it with us via social media, or in the comments below.

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Vinyl Shelf Finder

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/vinyl-shelf-finder/

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a person in possession of a large record collection must be in want of a good shelving system. Valentin Galea has solved this problem by developing the Vinyl Shelf Finder. In this build, a web-based app directs a pan-and-tilt laser to point out your record of choice among your collection.

Vinyl Shelf Finder demo by Valentin Galea

Ta-dah!

Collector’s issues

People love to collect stuff. Stamps; soap bars; Troll dolls; belly button fluff (no, really); if you can think of a tangible item, someone out there in the world is collecting it. Of course, every collector needs to solve two issues — which system to use for cataloguing and sorting their collection, and how to best retrieve items from it. This is where Valentin’s Vinyl Shelf Finder comes in. He says:

My vinyl collection is pretty modest — about 500 records in one vertical shelf and a couple of boxes. This is enough to get cumbersome when I’m searching for specific stuff, so I came up with the idea of a automated laser pointer finder.

The Vinyl Shelf Finder

Valentin keeps an online record of his vinyl collection using Discogs. He entered each LP’s shelf position into the record, and wrote a Node.js app to access the Discogs database. The mobile app has a GUI from which he chooses records based on their name and cover image. To build the hardware, he mounted a Pimoroni Pan-Tilt HAT on a Raspberry Pi, and affixed a laser pointer to the HAT. When he selects a record in the app, the pan-and-tilt laser moves to point out the LP’s location.

Valentin Galea on Twitter

my latest hobby prj: #vinyl finder – with lazers and #raspberrypi #iot and #nodejs – https://t.co/IGGzQDgUFI https://t.co/7YBE3svGyE

Not only does the app help Valentin find records – he has also set it up to collect listening statistics using the Last.fm API. He plans to add more sophisticated statistics, and is looking into how to automate the entry of the shelf positions into his database.

If you’re interested in the Vinyl Shelf Finder, head over to Valentin’s GitHub to learn more, and to find out about updates he is making to this work in progress.

GUI of Valentin Galea's Vinyl Shelf Finder app

 

Vinyl + Pi

We’ve previously blogged about Mike Smith’s kaleidoscopic Recordshelf build — maybe he and Valentin could team up to create the ultimate, beautiful, practical vinyl-shelving system!

If you listen to lots of LP records and would like to learn about digitising them, check out this Pi-powered project from Mozilla HQ. If, on the other hand, you have a vinyl player you never use, why not make amazing art with it by hacking it into a CNC Wood Burner?

Are you a collector of things common or unusual? Could Raspberry Pi technology help make your collection better? Share your ideas with us in the comments!

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The CNC Wood Burner turning heads (and wood, obviously)

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/cnc-wood-burner/

Why stick to conventional laser cutters or CNC machines for creating images on wood, when you can build a device to do the job that is a beautiful piece of art in itself? Mechanical and Computer Science student and Imgur user Tucker Shannon has created a wonderful-looking CNC Wood Burner using a Raspberry Pi and stepper motors. His project has a great vinyl-turntable-like design.

Raspberry Pi CNC Wood Burner

Tucker’s somewhat hypnotic build burns images into wood using a Raspberry Pi and stepper motors
GIF c/o Tucker Shannon

A CNC Wood Burner?

Sure! Why not? Tucker had already put the knowledge he acquired while studying at Oregon State University to good use by catching a bike thief in action with the help of a Raspberry Pi. Thus it’s obvious he has the skills he needed to incorporate our little computer into a project. Moreover, his Skittles portrait of Bill Nye is evidence of his artistic flare, so it’s not surprising that he wanted to make something a little different, and pretty, using code.

Tucker Shannon

“Bill Nye, the Skittles Guy”
Image c/o Tucker Shannon

With an idea in mind and sketches drawn, Tucker first considered using an old record player as the base of his build. Having a rotating deck and arm already in place would have made building his project easier. However, he reports on Imgur:

I thought about that! I couldn’t find any at local thrift shops though. Apparently, they’ve become pretty popular…

We can’t disagree with him. Since his search was unsuccessful, Tucker ended up creating the CNC Wood Burner from scratch.

Raspberry Pi CNC Wood Burner

Concept designs
Image c/o Tucker Shannon

Taking into consideration the lumps and bumps of the wood he would be using as a ‘canvas’, Tucker decided to incorporate a pivot to allow the arm to move smoothly over the rough surface.

The code for the make is currently in ‘spaghetti form’, though Tucker is set to release it, as well as full instructions for the build, in the near future.

The build

Tucker laser-cut the pieces for the wood burner’s box and gear out of birch and pine wood. As the motors require 12v power, the standard Raspberry Pi supply wasn’t going to be enough. Therefore, Tucker scavenged for old computer parts , and ended up rescuing a PSU (power supply unit). He then fitted the PSU and the Raspberry Pi within the box.

Raspberry Pi CNC Wood Burner

The cannibalised PSU, stepper motor controller, and Raspberry Pi fit nicely into Tucker’s handmade pine box.
Image c/o Tucker Shannon

Next, he got to work building runners for the stepper motor controlling the position of the ‘pen thing’ that would scorch the image into the wood.

Raspberry Pi CNC Wood Burner

Initial tests on paper help to align the pen
Image c/o Tucker Shannon

After a few test runs using paper, the CNC Wood Burner was good to go!

The results

Tucker has used his CNC Wood Burner to create some wonderful pieces of art. The few examples he’s shared on Imgur have impressed us with their precision. We’re looking forward to seeing what else he is going to make with it!

Raspberry Pi CNC Wood Burner

The build burns wonderfully clean-lined images into wood
Image c/o Tucker Shannon

Your turn

Image replication using Raspberry Pis and stepper motors isn’t a new thing – though doing it using a wood-burning device may be! We’ve seen some great builds in which makers set up motors and a marker pen to create massive works of art. Are you one of those makers? Or have you been planning a build similar to Tucker’s project, possibly with a new twist?

Share your project with us below, whether it is complete or still merely sketches in a notebook. We’d love to see what you’re getting up to!

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[$] Connecting Kubernetes services with linkerd

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/719282/rss

When a monolithic application is divided up into microservices, one new
problem that must be solved is how to connect all those microservices
to provide the old application’s functionality.

Linkerd, which is now officially a Cloud-Native Computing Foundation project, is a transparent proxy which
solves this problem by
sitting between those microservices and routing their requests.
Two separate
CNC/KubeCon
events — a talk by Oliver Gould briefly joined by
Oliver Beattie, and a salon hosted by Gould — provided a view of linkerd
and what it can offer.

…or, how I learned not to be a jerk in 20 short years

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2017/02/or-how-i-learned-not-to-be-jerk-in-20.html

People who are accomplished in one field of expertise tend to believe that they can bring unique insights to just about any other debate.
I am as guilty as anyone: at one time or another, I aired my thoughts on anything from
CNC manufacturing, to
electronics, to
emergency preparedness, to
politics.
Today, I’m about to commit the same sin – but instead of pretending to speak from a position of authority, I wanted to share a more personal tale.



The author, circa 1995. The era of hand-crank computers and punch cards.

Back in my school days, I was that one really tall and skinny kid in the class. It wasn’t trying to stay this way; I preferred computer games to sports, and my grandma’s Polish cooking was heavy on potatoes, butter, chicken, dumplings, cream, and cheese. But that did not matter: I could eat what I wanted, as often as I wanted, and I still stayed in shape. This made me look down on chubby kids; if my reckless ways had little or no effect on my body, it followed that they had to be exceptionally lazy and must have lacked even the most basic form of self-control.

As I entered adulthood, my habits remained the same. I felt healthy and stayed reasonably active, walking to and from work every other day and hiking with friends whenever I could. But my looks started to change:



The author at a really exciting BlackHat party in 2002.

I figured it’s just a part of growing up. But somewhere around my twentieth birthday, I stepped on a bathroom scale and typed the result into an online calculator. I was surprised to find out that my BMI was about 24 – pretty darn close to overweight.

“Pssh, you know how inaccurate these things are!”, I exclaimed while searching online to debunk that whole BMI thing. I mean, sure, I had some belly fat – maybe a pizza or two too far – but nothing that wouldn’t go away in time. Besides, I was doing fine, so what would be the point of submitting to the society’s idea of the “right” weight?

It certainly helped that I was having a blast at work. I made a name for myself in the industry, published a fair amount of cool research, authored a book, settled down, bought a house, had a kid. It wasn’t until the age of 26 that I strayed into a doctor’s office for a routine checkup. When the nurse asked me about my weight, I blurted out “oh, 175 pounds, give or take”. She gave me a funny look and asked me to step on the scale.

Turns out it was quite a bit more than 175 pounds. With a BMI of 27.1, I was now firmly into the “overweight” territory. Yeah yeah, the BMI metric was a complete hoax – but why did my passport photos look less flattering than before?



A random mugshot from 2007. Some people are just born big-boned, I think.

Well, damn. I knew what had to happen: from now on, I was going to start eating healthier foods. I traded Cheetos for nuts, KFC for sushi rolls, greasy burgers for tortilla wraps, milk smoothies for Jamba Juice, fries for bruschettas, regular sodas for diet. I’d even throw in a side of lettuce every now and then. It was bound to make a difference. I just wasn’t gonna be one of the losers who check their weight every day and agonize over every calorie on their plate. (Weren’t calories a scam, anyway? I think I read that on that cool BMI conspiracy site.)

By the time I turned 32, my body mass index hit 29. At that point, it wasn’t just a matter of looking chubby. I could do the math: at that rate, I’d be in a real pickle in a decade or two – complete with a ~50% chance of developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease. This wouldn’t just make me miserable, but also mess up the lives of my spouse and kids.



Presenting at Google TGIF in 2013. It must’ve been the unflattering light.

I wanted to get this over with right away, so I decided to push myself hard. I started biking to work, quite a strenuous ride. It felt good, but did not help: I would simply eat more to compensate and ended up gaining a few extra pounds. I tried starving myself. That worked, sure – only to be followed by an even faster rebound. Ultimately, I had to face the reality: I had a problem and I needed a long-term solution. There was no one weird trick to outsmart the calorie-counting crowd, no overnight cure.

I started looking for real answers. My world came crumbling down; I realized that a “healthy” burrito from Chipotle packed four times as many calories as a greasy burger from McDonald’s. That a loaded fruit smoothie from Jamba Juice was roughly equal to two hot dogs with a side of mashed potatoes to boot. That a glass of apple juice fared worse than a can of Sprite, and that bruschetta wasn’t far from deep-fried butter on a stick. It didn’t matter if it was sugar or fat, bacon or kale. Familiar favorites were not better or worse than the rest. Losing weight boiled down to portion control – and sticking to it for the rest of my life.

It was a slow and humbling journey that spanned almost a year. I ended up losing around 70 lbs along the way. What shocked me is that it wasn’t a painful experience; what held me back for years was just my own smugness, plus the folksy wisdom gleaned from the covers of glossy magazines.



Author with a tractor, 2017.

I’m not sure there is a moral to this story. I guess one lesson is: don’t be a judgmental jerk. Sometimes, the simple things – the ones you think you have all figured out – prove to be a lot more complicated than they seem.

World of Light – an interactive feedback map

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/world-of-light-an-interactive-feedback-map/

Using a self-written API, Joshua Krosenbrink gifted the new Usabilla office with the World of Light, a 426 RGB LED-powered map of the world.

World of Light

The API pushes user location information to a Raspberry Pi, animating the LEDs in real time to respond to website feedback as and when it’s received by the company.

World of Light

Nice LED wall I built with 426 RGB LEDs and a Raspberry Pi with WIFI. Renders live user feedback that comes in from all over the world by pulling data from the public API. A ‘little’ present for in the new office.

Joshua spent a decent amount of time using a CNC machine to drill the 426 holes needed, while distributing 30 amps of power to produce the beautiful effect. 

World of Light Map

More photos of the build can be found at the project’s Hackaday page. While we figure out what we could use this map for at Pi Towers, why not tell us how you would use one in the comments below?

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Sisyphus: the kinetic art table

Post Syndicated from Courtney Lentz original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/sisyphus-kinetic-art-table/

Surely if he had been given the opportunity, Sisyphus would have engineered a way out of his eternal punishment of rolling a boulder up a hill. It’s just too bad for him that Raspberry Pi wasn’t around to help. While it’s a far cry from his arduous task, the Pi has been used to power Bruce Shapiro’s Sisyphus, a continuous and ever-changing kinetic art piece that creates unique design patterns in sand using a small metal ball.

the-sisyphus-table-1-730x548

Sisyphus is truly mesmerising. We learned this first-hand: at Maker Faire New York earlier this month, it captured the attention of not only the Raspberry Pi crew, but also thousands of attendees throughout the weekend. Sisyphus momentarily drowned out the noise and action of the Faire.

You can think of Sisyphus as a cross between an Etch A Sketch and Spirograph, except this is no toy.

Under the table is a two-motor robot (the “Sisbot”) that moves a magnet which draws a steel ball through the sand. The motors are controlled by a small Raspberry Pi computer which plays a set of path files, much like a music player plays an MP3 file.

Sisyphus

Bruce is using Kickstarter in the hope of transitioning Sisyphus from what’s currently a large art installation exhibited around the world into a beautiful piece to be enjoyed in the home, as both furniture and art.

annmarie thomas on Twitter

Sisyphus- Stunning art/furniture kickstarter (fully funded in <a day) by friend Bruce Shapiro. https://t.co/ijxHQ0fYb5

Bruce says:

Of all works I made, Sisyphus stood out – it was my first CNC machine to break out of the studio/shop. No longer tasked with cutting materials to be used in making sculptures, it was the sculpture itself. It was also unique in another way – I wanted to live with it in my home. I’ve spent the last three years perfecting a home version that’s beautiful, user-friendly, near-silent, and that will run for years.

Like most great Maker Faire projects, it’s centred around a wonderful community. The collaboration and access to tools in Shapiro’s local makerspace helped develop the final design seen today. While Shapiro’s original makerspace has since closed its doors, Shapiro and his fellow members opened up what is now Nordeast Makers. It’s where the production for Sisyphus will take place.

Sisyphus

The Kickstarter products come in three styles: an end table, and two different coffee tables. You might want to find another place to display your coffee table books, though, so as to keep Sisyphus’s designs visible…

kickstarter-products

This Kickstarter won’t be running forever, so be sure to pledge if you love the sound of the Sisyphus.

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FarmBot, the open-source CNC farming robot

Post Syndicated from Courtney Lentz original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/farmbot-open-source-cnc-farming-robot/

What do you imagine the future of farming to look like? The FarmBot team, located along the California coast in San Luis Obispo, is exploring just that. The team has set out to create humanity’s first open-source CNC farming machine to put the power of polycrop farming into the smallest of spaces.

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The FarmBot structure fixes directly on top of any standard raised planter box. You can think of it like a 3D printer, but instead of extruding plastic, the tool head deposits seeds, delivers water and rids the box of weeds, all by moving across a gantry. Powered by a Raspberry Pi 3, an Arduino Mega and a motor control shield, the FarmBot brings agricultural automation within the reach of the committed hobbyist.

FarmBot Electronics

FarmBot’s interchangeable tooling set is impressive and has been carefully designed so that you may print tools with any hobbyist-level 3D printer.

The universal tool mount features 12 electrical connections, three liquid/gas lines and magnetic coupling. Ready-to-print attachment tools include the seed injection mount, the water nozzle specially designed for efficient watering, and the weed suppression tool which detects and destroys weeds at the root. FarmBot has documented detailed technical specifications of the universal tool mount, to encourage community members to design additional custom mounts that are specific to their particular farming needs.

Check out the tech specs of the tooling attachments for further nerding out!

FarmBot’s drag-and-drop web-based platform allows you to design and build your planter box farm easily. No coding is required; in fact, it has an almost game-like interface. Once your design is complete, the sequence builder and scheduler will help to allocate appropriate care to each plant.

Web-App-on-Different-Devices

It’s evident from looking at the design structure, documentation, CAD files, and detailed BOM that the creators of the FarmBot took to heart the idea of open source. By selecting off-the-shelf products and tools, they ensured this system is as accessible as possible. I’m really happy to see the Raspberry Pi 3 at the heart of FarmBot and I can’t wait to see how this community grows.

If you’re someone who’s serious about getting a good crop return from your small space, and you’re as mesmerized by FarmBot as I am, there’s still time to place a pre-order to receive one of the first batches ready to ship in February!

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Hamsters all the way down

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hamsters-all-the-way-down/

This project from Neil Mendoza harnesses the raw power of hamsters.

Joji, hamster artist, has been equipped with a wheel that drives a Raspberry Pi-aided plotter. Whenever he uses his wheel, he is also powering…a hamster selfie. Recursive hamstering, if you will.

Hamster Powered Hamster Drawing Machine

The Hamster Powered Hamster Drawing Machine is the machine hamsters everywhere have been waiting for, finally bringing workout selfies to the animal kingdom. The hamster drawing is encoded in two large wooden cams. The cams were generated by creating a simulation of the drawing machine using openFrameworks and Box2D.

Neil says:

The hamster drawing is encoded in two large wooden cams. The cams were generated by creating a simulation of the drawing machine using openFrameworks and Box2D. They were then exported as vectors and CNC milled from plywood. To be able to have the drawing encoded on the inside, rather than the outside, edge of the cams, it was necessary for them not to have a central axis. This was achieved by milling two aluminium circles with a groove in each of them for a roller chain to sit in. The sandwiched chain then sits on three sprockets around the edges of the back part machine. The drawing arms were also milled from aluminium with pockets for laser cut acrylic inserts.

The hamster is displayed on a small LCD screen connected to a Raspberry Pi hidden behind the screen. The Raspberry Pi is running software written in openFrameworks that sends ASCII commands to an Applied Motion STM23IP-3EE stepper motor over ethernet to control its speed.

Your average hamster covers a distance of about five and a half miles every night. Joji, we salute your muscular, artistic little legs. And Neil – that’s genius. Thanks ever so much for sharing.

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Home-made CNC milling machine

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/home-made-cnc-milling-machine/

For the uninitiated, a CNC milling machine is basically the opposite of a 3D printer. With a 3D printer, you’re adding medium from a nozzle to a blank space to create an object. A CNC milling machine starts with a chunk of medium and removes parts of it to create an object, drilling out parts of the medium with great precision while moving its spindle on more than one axis.

CNC milling machines (the CNC means Computer Numeric Control) are really expensive.

Screengrab from eBay today

Screengrab from eBay today

So Colin May did what any thinking engineer would do to bring the price down. He built his own, using a Raspberry Pi for its brains.

CNC machine

Colin says:

My friend and I thought about building a CNC Machine for a while. But we didn’t want it to be just an ordinary CNC Machine. We wanted to make a very unique machine that could have very unique attributes. We set out to make a CNC Machine that could do different types of Machining. For example, routing, laser engraving, 3D printing, drag knife, etc. We took about a few months to design the basics of the machine. For example, what kind of linear motion we would have for each axis, what kind of material we would use for it, what kind of style to make it, etc. We chose our build area to be 24″ X 24″ X 7″. After those few months of finalizing everything, we took our first step into physically making the machine. Note: This is made for the average consumer, for home use, and for someone who doesn’t have the money to invest in a $1000 CNC router or 3D printer.

Colin’s machine is still a work in progress, but it’s showing great promise, and we’re very interested to see where he takes it next. Here’s some prototype output:

chillipepper logo

First test of the machine

test output

Second test

And here’s some video. (Turn the sound down if you’ve got a dentist phobia.)

Raspberry Pi CNC Machine Test Pt: 2

Uploaded by Colin may on 2016-04-24.

Colin is intending to add extra functionality: 3D print capability, and some other machine tools – to the setup. You can follow his build and replicate it over at Instructables. Thanks Colin – we’re looking forward to seeing more!

 

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