Tag Archives: Cooper

HackSpace magazine 7: Internet of Everything

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-7-internet-of-everything/

We’re usually averse to buzzwords at HackSpace magazine, but not this month: in issue 7, we’re taking a deep dive into the Internet of Things.HackSpace magazine issue 7 cover

Internet of Things (IoT)

To many people, IoT is a shady term used by companies to sell you something you already own, but this time with WiFi; to us, it’s a way to make our builds smarter, more useful, and more connected. In HackSpace magazine #7, you can join us on a tour of the boards that power IoT projects, marvel at the ways in which other makers are using IoT, and get started with your first IoT project!

Awesome projects

DIY retro computing: this issue, we’re taking our collective hat off to Spencer Owen. He stuck his home-brew computer on Tindie thinking he might make a bit of beer money — now he’s paying the mortgage with his making skills and inviting others to build modules for his machine. And if that tickles your fancy, why not take a crack at our Z80 tutorial? Get out your breadboard, assemble your jumper wires, and prepare to build a real-life computer!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Shameless patriotism: combine Lego, Arduino, and the car of choice for 1960 gold bullion thieves, and you’ve got yourself a groovy weekend project. We proudly present to you one man’s epic quest to add LED lights (controllable via a smartphone!) to his daughter’s LEGO Mini Cooper.

Makerspaces

Patriotism intensifies: for the last 200-odd years, the Black Country has been a hotbed of making. Urban Hax, based in Walsall, is the latest makerspace to show off its riches in the coveted Space of the Month pages. Every space has its own way of doing things, but not every space has a portrait of Rob Halford on the wall. All hail!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Diversity: advice on diversity often boils down to ‘Be nice to people’, which might feel more vague than actionable. This is where we come in to help: it is truly worth making the effort to give people of all backgrounds access to your makerspace, so we take a look at why it’s nice to be nice, and at the ways in which one makerspace has put niceness into practice — with great results.

And there’s more!

We also show you how to easily calculate the size and radius of laser-cut gears, use a bank of LEDs to etch PCBs in your own mini factory, and use chemistry to mess with your lunch menu.

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Helen Steer inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

All this plus much, much more waits for you in HackSpace magazine issue 7!

Get your copy of HackSpace magazine

If you like the sound of that, you can find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

And if you can’t get to the shops, fear not: you can subscribe from £4 an issue from our online shop. And if you’d rather try before you buy, you can always download the free PDF. Happy reading, and happy making!

The post HackSpace magazine 7: Internet of Everything appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Prices Rise as Catch Decreases

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/04/friday_squid_bl_621.html

In Japan:

Last year’s haul sank 15% to 53,000 tons, according to the JF Zengyoren national federation of fishing cooperatives. The squid catch has fallen by half in just two years. The previous low was plumbed in 2016.

Lighter catches have been blamed on changing sea temperatures, which impedes the spawning and growth of the squid. Critics have also pointed to overfishing by North Korean and Chinese fishing boats.

Wholesale prices of flying squid have climbed as a result. Last year’s average price per kilogram came to 564 yen, a roughly 80% increase from two years earlier, according to JF Zengyoren.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Eating Firefly Squid

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/04/friday_squid_bl_620.html

In Tokama, Japan, you can watch the firefly squid catch and eat them in various ways:

“It’s great to eat hotaruika around when the seasons change, which is when people tend to get sick,” said Ryoji Tanaka, an executive at the Toyama prefectural federation of fishing cooperatives. “In addition to popular cooking methods, such as boiling them in salted water, you can also add them to pasta or pizza.”

Now there is a new addition: eating hotaruika raw as sashimi. However, due to reports that parasites have been found in their internal organs, the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry recommends eating the squid after its internal organs have been removed, or after it has been frozen for at least four days at minus 30 C or lower.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Welcome Billy – Senior Systems Administrator

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/welcome-billy-senior-systems-administrator/

The data center keeps growing, with well over 500 Petabytes of data under management we needed more systems administrators to help us keep track of all the systems as our operation expands. Our latest systems administrator is Billy! Let’s learn a bit more about him shall we?

What is your Backblaze Title?
Sr. Systems Administrator

Where are you originally from?
Boston, MA

What attracted you to Backblaze?
I’ve read the hard drive articles that were published and was excited to be a part of the company that took the time to do that kind of analysis and share it with the world.

What do you expect to learn while being at Backblaze?
I expect that I’ll learn about the problems that arise from a larger scale operation and how to solve them. I’m very curious to find out what they are.

Where else have you worked?
I’ve worked for the MIT Math Dept, Google, a social network owned by AOL called Bebo, Evernote, a contractor recommendation site owned by The Home Depot called RedBeacon, and a few others that weren’t as interesting.

Where did you go to school?
I started college at The Cooper Union, discovered that Electrical Engineering wasn’t my thing, then graduated from the Computer Science program at Northeastern.

What’s your dream job?
Is couch potato a job? I like to solve puzzles and play with toys, which is why I really enjoy being a sysadmin. My dream job is to do pretty much what I do now, but not have to participate in on-call.

Favorite place you’ve traveled?
We did a 2 week tour through Europe on our honeymoon. I’d go back to any place there.

Favorite hobby?
Reading and listening to music. I spent a stupid amount of money on a stereo, so I make sure it gets plenty of use. I spent much less money on my library card, but I try to utilize it quite a bit as well.

Of what achievement are you most proud?
I designed a built a set of shelves for the closet in my kids’ room. Built with hand tools. The only electricity I used was the lights to see what I was doing.

Star Trek or Star Wars?
Star Trek: The Next Generation

Coke or Pepsi?
Coke!

Favorite food?
Pesto. Usually on angel hair, but it also works well on bread, or steak, or a spoon.

Why do you like certain things?
I like things that are a little outside the norm, like musical covers and mashups, or things that look like 1 thing but are really something else. Secret compartments are also fun.

Anything else you’d like you’d like to tell us?
I’m full of anecdotes and lines from songs and movies and tv shows.

Pesto is delicious! Welcome to the systems administrator team Billy, we’ll keep the fridge stocked with Coke for you!

The post Welcome Billy – Senior Systems Administrator appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Article from a Former Chinese PLA General on Cyber Sovereignty

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/01/article_from_a_.html

Interesting article by Major General Hao Yeli, Chinese People’s Liberation Army (ret.), a senior advisor at the China International Institute for Strategic Society, Vice President of China Institute for Innovation and Development Strategy, and the Chair of the Guanchao Cyber Forum.

Against the background of globalization and the internet era, the emerging cyber sovereignty concept calls for breaking through the limitations of physical space and avoiding misunderstandings based on perceptions of binary opposition. Reinforcing a cyberspace community with a common destiny, it reconciles the tension between exclusivity and transferability, leading to a comprehensive perspective. China insists on its cyber sovereignty, meanwhile, it transfers segments of its cyber sovereignty reasonably. China rightly attaches importance to its national security, meanwhile, it promotes international cooperation and open development.

China has never been opposed to multi-party governance when appropriate, but rejects the denial of government’s proper role and responsibilities with respect to major issues. The multilateral and multiparty models are complementary rather than exclusive. Governments and multi-stakeholders can play different leading roles at the different levels of cyberspace.

In the internet era, the law of the jungle should give way to solidarity and shared responsibilities. Restricted connections should give way to openness and sharing. Intolerance should be replaced by understanding. And unilateral values should yield to respect for differences while recognizing the importance of diversity.

Yet Another FBI Proposal for Insecure Communications

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/01/yet_another_fbi.html

Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein has given talks where he proposes that tech companies decrease their communications and device security for the benefit of the FBI. In a recent talk, his idea is that tech companies just save a copy of the plaintext:

Law enforcement can also partner with private industry to address a problem we call “Going Dark.” Technology increasingly frustrates traditional law enforcement efforts to collect evidence needed to protect public safety and solve crime. For example, many instant-messaging services now encrypt messages by default. The prevent the police from reading those messages, even if an impartial judge approves their interception.

The problem is especially critical because electronic evidence is necessary for both the investigation of a cyber incident and the prosecution of the perpetrator. If we cannot access data even with lawful process, we are unable to do our job. Our ability to secure systems and prosecute criminals depends on our ability to gather evidence.

I encourage you to carefully consider your company’s interests and how you can work cooperatively with us. Although encryption can help secure your data, it may also prevent law enforcement agencies from protecting your data.

Encryption serves a valuable purpose. It is a foundational element of data security and essential to safeguarding data against cyber-attacks. It is critical to the growth and flourishing of the digital economy, and we support it. I support strong and responsible encryption.

I simply maintain that companies should retain the capability to provide the government unencrypted copies of communications and data stored on devices, when a court orders them to do so.

Responsible encryption is effective secure encryption, coupled with access capabilities. We know encryption can include safeguards. For example, there are systems that include central management of security keys and operating system updates; scanning of content, like your e-mails, for advertising purposes; simulcast of messages to multiple destinations at once; and key recovery when a user forgets the password to decrypt a laptop. No one calls any of those functions a “backdoor.” In fact, those very capabilities are marketed and sought out.

I do not believe that the government should mandate a specific means of ensuring access. The government does not need to micromanage the engineering.

The question is whether to require a particular goal: When a court issues a search warrant or wiretap order to collect evidence of crime, the company should be able to help. The government does not need to hold the key.

Rosenstein is right that many services like Gmail naturally keep plaintext in the cloud. This is something we pointed out in our 2016 paper: “Don’t Panic.” But forcing companies to build an alternate means to access the plaintext that the user can’t control is an enormous vulnerability.

Remote Hack of a Boeing 757

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/12/remote_hack_of_.html

Last month, the DHS announced that it was able to remotely hack a Boeing 757:

“We got the airplane on Sept. 19, 2016. Two days later, I was successful in accomplishing a remote, non-cooperative, penetration,” said Robert Hickey, aviation program manager within the Cyber Security Division of the DHS Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate.

“[Which] means I didn’t have anybody touching the airplane, I didn’t have an insider threat. I stood off using typical stuff that could get through security and we were able to establish a presence on the systems of the aircraft.” Hickey said the details of the hack and the work his team are doing are classified, but said they accessed the aircraft’s systems through radio frequency communications, adding that, based on the RF configuration of most aircraft, “you can come to grips pretty quickly where we went” on the aircraft.

Amazon SES Now Supports DMARC Validation and Reporting for Incoming Email

Post Syndicated from Nic Webb original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/ses/amazon-ses-now-supports-dmarc-validation-and-reporting-for-incoming-email/

Amazon SES now adds DMARC verdicts to incoming emails, and publishes aggregate DMARC reports to domain owners. These two new features will help combat email spoofing and phishing, making the email ecosystem a safer and more secure place.

What is DMARC?

DMARC stands for Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance. The DMARC standard was designed to prevent malicious actors from sending messages that appear to be from legitimate senders. Domain owners can tell email receivers how to handle unauthenticated messages that appear to be from their domains. The DMARC standard also specifies certain reports that email senders and receivers send to each other. The cooperative nature of this reporting process helps improve the email authentication infrastructure.

How does Amazon SES Implement DMARC?

When you receive an email message through Amazon SES, the headers of that message will include a DMARC policy verdict alongside the DKIM and SPF verdicts (both of which are already present). This additional information helps you verify the authenticity of all email messages you receive.

Messages you receive through Amazon SES will contain one of the following DMARC verdicts:

  • PASS – The message passed DMARC authentication.
  • FAIL – The message failed DMARC authentication.
  • GRAY – The sending domain does not have a DMARC policy.
  • PROCESSING_FAILED – An issue occurred that prevented Amazon SES from providing a DMARC verdict.

If the DMARC verdict is FAIL, Amazon SES will also provide information about the sending domain’s DMARC settings. In this situation, you will see one of the following verdicts:

  • NONE – The owner of the sending domain requests that no specific action be taken on messages that fail DMARC authentication.
  • QUARANTINE – The owner of the sending domain requests that messages that fail DMARC authentication be treated by receivers as suspicious.
  • REJECT – The owner of the sending domain requests that messages that fail DMARC authentication be rejected.

In addition to publishing the DMARC verdict on each incoming message, Amazon SES now sends DMARC aggregate reports to domain owners. These reports help domain owners identify systemic authentication failures, and avoid potential domain spoofing attacks.

Note: Domain owners only receive aggregate information about emails that do not pass DMARC authentication. These reports, known as RUA reports, only include information about the IP addresses that send unauthenticated emails to you. These reports do not include information about legitimate email senders.

How do I configure DMARC?

As is the case with SPF and DKIM, domain owners must publish their DMARC policies as DNS records for their domains. For more information about setting up DMARC, see Complying with DMARC Using Amazon SES in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

DMARC reporting is now available in the following AWS Regions: US West (Oregon), US East (N. Virginia), and EU (Ireland). You can find more information about the dmarcVerdict and dmarcPolicy objects in the Amazon SES Developer Guide. The Developer Guide also includes a sample Lambda function that you can use to bounce incoming emails that fail DMARC authentication.

The Science of Interrogation

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/10/the_science_of_.html

Fascinating article about two psychologists who are studying interrogation techniques.

Now, two British researchers are quietly revolutionising the study and practice of interrogation. Earlier this year, in a meeting room at the University of Liverpool, I watched a video of the Diola interview alongside Laurence Alison, the university’s chair of forensic psychology, and Emily Alison, a professional counsellor. My permission to view the tape was negotiated with the counter-terrorist police, who are understandably wary of allowing outsiders access to such material. Details of the interview have been changed to protect the identity of the officers involved, though the quotes are verbatim.

The Alisons, husband and wife, have done something no scholars of interrogation have been able to do before. Working in close cooperation with the police, who allowed them access to more than 1,000 hours of tapes, they have observed and analysed hundreds of real-world interviews with terrorists suspected of serious crimes. No researcher in the world has ever laid hands on such a haul of data before. Based on this research, they have constructed the world’s first empirically grounded and comprehensive model of interrogation tactics.

The Alisons’ findings are changing the way law enforcement and security agencies approach the delicate and vital task of gathering human intelligence. “I get very little, if any, pushback from practitioners when I present the Alisons’ work,” said Kleinman, who now teaches interrogation tactics to military and police officers. “Even those who don’t have a clue about the scientific method, it just resonates with them.” The Alisons have done more than strengthen the hand of advocates of non-coercive interviewing: they have provided an unprecedentedly authoritative account of what works and what does not, rooted in a profound understanding of human relations. That they have been able to do so is testament to a joint preoccupation with police interviews that stretches back more than 20 years.

Purism and KDE to Work Together on World’s First Truly Free Smartphone

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/733720/rss

Purism and KDE are working
together
to adapt Plasma Mobile to Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone.
The shared vision of freedom, openness and personal control for end users has brought KDE and Purism together in a common venture. Both organisations agree that cooperating will help bring a truly free and open source smartphone to the market. KDE and Purism will work together to make this happen.

Purism and KDE to work together on free smartphone

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/733720/rss

Purism and KDE are working
together
to adapt Plasma Mobile to Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone.
The shared vision of freedom, openness and personal control for end users has brought KDE and Purism together in a common venture. Both organisations agree that cooperating will help bring a truly free and open source smartphone to the market. KDE and Purism will work together to make this happen.

A Hardware Privacy Monitor for iPhones

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/09/a_hardware_priv.html

Andrew “bunnie” Huang and Edward Snowden have designed a hardware device that attaches to an iPhone and monitors it for malicious surveillance activities, even in instances where the phone’s operating system has been compromised. They call it an Introspection Engine, and their use model is a journalist who is concerned about government surveillance:

Our introspection engine is designed with the following goals in mind:

  1. Completely open source and user-inspectable (“You don’t have to trust us”)
  2. Introspection operations are performed by an execution domain completely separated from the phone”s CPU (“don’t rely on those with impaired judgment to fairly judge their state”)

  3. Proper operation of introspection system can be field-verified (guard against “evil maid” attacks and hardware failures)

  4. Difficult to trigger a false positive (users ignore or disable security alerts when there are too many positives)

  5. Difficult to induce a false negative, even with signed firmware updates (“don’t trust the system vendor” — state-level adversaries with full cooperation of system vendors should not be able to craft signed firmware updates that spoof or bypass the introspection engine)

  6. As much as possible, the introspection system should be passive and difficult to detect by the phone’s operating system (prevent black-listing/targeting of users based on introspection engine signatures)

  7. Simple, intuitive user interface requiring no specialized knowledge to interpret or operate (avoid user error leading to false negatives; “journalists shouldn’t have to be cryptographers to be safe”)

  8. Final solution should be usable on a daily basis, with minimal impact on workflow (avoid forcing field reporters into the choice between their personal security and being an effective journalist)

This looks like fantastic work, and they have a working prototype.

Of course, this does nothing to stop all the legitimate surveillance that happens over a cell phone: location tracking, records of who you talk to, and so on.

BoingBoing post.

Australia Considering New Law Weakening Encryption

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/07/australia_consi.html

News from Australia:

Under the law, internet companies would have the same obligations telephone companies do to help law enforcement agencies, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said. Law enforcement agencies would need warrants to access the communications.

“We’ve got a real problem in that the law enforcement agencies are increasingly unable to find out what terrorists and drug traffickers and pedophile rings are up to because of the very high levels of encryption,” Turnbull told reporters.

“Where we can compel it, we will, but we will need the cooperation from the tech companies,” he added.

Never mind that the law 1) would not achieve the desired results because all the smart “terrorists and drug traffickers and pedophile rings” will simply use a third-party encryption app, and 2) would make everyone else in Australia less secure. But that’s all ground I’ve covered before.

I found this bit amusing:

Asked whether the laws of mathematics behind encryption would trump any new legislation, Mr Turnbull said: “The laws of Australia prevail in Australia, I can assure you of that.

“The laws of mathematics are very commendable but the only law that applies in Australia is the law of Australia.”

Next Turnbull is going to try to legislate that pi = 3.2.

Another article. BoingBoing post.

EDITED TO ADD: More commentary.

The Dangers of Secret Law

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/the_dangers_of_.html

Last week, the Department of Justice released 18 new FISC opinions related to Section 702 as part of an EFF FOIA lawsuit. (Of course, they don’t mention EFF or the lawsuit. They make it sound as if it was their idea.)

There’s probably a lot in these opinions. In one Kafkaesque ruling, a defendant was denied access to the previous court rulings that were used by the court to decide against it:

…in 2014, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) rejected a service provider’s request to obtain other FISC opinions that government attorneys had cited and relied on in court filings seeking to compel the provider’s cooperation.

[…]

The provider’s request came up amid legal briefing by both it and the DOJ concerning its challenge to a 702 order. After the DOJ cited two earlier FISC opinions that were not public at the time — one from 2014 and another from 2008­ — the provider asked the court for access to those rulings.

The provider argued that without being able to review the previous FISC rulings, it could not fully understand the court’s earlier decisions, much less effectively respond to DOJ’s argument. The provider also argued that because attorneys with Top Secret security clearances represented it, they could review the rulings without posing a risk to national security.

The court disagreed in several respects. It found that the court’s rules and Section 702 prohibited the documents release. It also rejected the provider’s claim that the Constitution’s Due Process Clause entitled it to the documents.

This kind of government secrecy is toxic to democracy. National security is important, but we will not survive if we become a country of secret court orders based on secret interpretations of secret law.

Surveillance Intermediaries

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/surveillance_in_2.html

Interesting law-journal article: “Surveillance Intermediaries,” by Alan Z. Rozenshtein.

Abstract:Apple’s 2016 fight against a court order commanding it to help the FBI unlock the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino terrorists exemplifies how central the question of regulating government surveillance has become in American politics and law. But scholarly attempts to answer this question have suffered from a serious omission: scholars have ignored how government surveillance is checked by “surveillance intermediaries,” the companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook that dominate digital communications and data storage, and on whose cooperation government surveillance relies. This Article fills this gap in the scholarly literature, providing the first comprehensive analysis of how surveillance intermediaries constrain the surveillance executive. In so doing, it enhances our conceptual understanding of, and thus our ability to improve, the institutional design of government surveillance.

Surveillance intermediaries have the financial and ideological incentives to resist government requests for user data. Their techniques of resistance are: proceduralism and litigiousness that reject voluntary cooperation in favor of minimal compliance and aggressive litigation; technological unilateralism that designs products and services to make surveillance harder; and policy mobilization that rallies legislative and public opinion to limit surveillance. Surveillance intermediaries also enhance the “surveillance separation of powers”; they make the surveillance executive more subject to inter-branch constraints from Congress and the courts, and to intra-branch constraints from foreign-relations and economics agencies as well as the surveillance executive’s own surveillance-limiting components.

The normative implications of this descriptive account are important and cross-cutting. Surveillance intermediaries can both improve and worsen the “surveillance frontier”: the set of tradeoffs ­ between public safety, privacy, and economic growth ­ from which we choose surveillance policy. And while intermediaries enhance surveillance self-government when they mobilize public opinion and strengthen the surveillance separation of powers, they undermine it when their unilateral technological changes prevent the government from exercising its lawful surveillance authorities.

MariaDB 10.2 GA released with several advanced features

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2017/05/mariadb-102-ga-released-with-several.html

MariaDB 10.2.6 GA is now released. It’s a release where we have concentrated on adding new advanced features to MariaDB

The most noteworthy ones are:

  • Windows Functions gives you the ability to do advanced calculation over a sliding window.
  • Common table expressions allows you to do more complex SQL statements without having to do explicit temporary tables.
  • We finally have a DEFAULT clause that can take expressions and also CHECK CONSTRAINT.
  • Multiple triggers for the same event. This is important for anyone trying to use tools, like pt-online-schema-change, which requires multiple triggers for the same table.
  • A new storage engine, MyRocks, that gives you high compression of your data without sacrificing speed. It has been developed in cooperation with Facebook and MariaDB to allow you to handle more data with less resources.
  • flashback, a feature that can rollback instances/databases/tables to an old snapshot. The version in MariaDB 10.2 is DML only. In MariaDB 10.3 we will also allow rollback over DML (like DROP TABLE).
  • Compression of events in the binary log.
  • JSON functions added. In 10.2.7 we will also add support for CREATE TABLE … (a JSON).

A few smaller but still noteworthy new features:

  • Connection setup was made faster by moving creation of THD to a new thread. This, in addition with better thread caching, can give a connection speedup for up to 85 % in some cases.
  • Table cache can automatically partition itself as needed to reduce the contention.
  • NO PAD collations, which means that end space are significant in comparisons.
  • InnoDB is now the default storage engine. Until MariaDB 10.1, MariaDB used the XtraDB storage engine as default. XtraDB in 10.2 is not up to date with the latest features of InnoDB and cannot be used. The main reason for this change is that most of the important features of XtraDB are nowadays implemented in InnoDB . As the MariaDB team is doing a lot more InnoDB development than ever before, we can’t anymore manage updating two almost identical engines. The InnoDB version in MariaDB contains the best features of MySQL InnoDB and XtraDB and a lot more. As the InnoDB on disk format is identical to XtraDB’s this will not cause any problems when upgrading to MariaDB 10.2
  • The old GPL client library is gone; now MariaDB Server comes with the LGPL Connector/C client library.

There are a lot of other new features, performance enhancements and variables in MariaDB 10.2 for you to explore!

I am happy to see that a lot of the new features have come from the MariadB community! (Note to myself; This list doesn’t include all contributors to MariadB 10.2, needs to be update.)

Thanks a lot to everyone that has contributed to MariaDB!

The Internet of Microphones

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/46952.html

So the CIA has tools to snoop on you via your TV and your Echo is testifying in a murder case and yet people are still buying connected devices with microphones in and why are they doing that the world is on fire surely this is terrible?

You’re right that the world is terrible, but this isn’t really a contributing factor to it. There’s a few reasons why. The first is that there’s really not any indication that the CIA and MI5 ever turned this into an actual deployable exploit. The development reports[1] describe a project that still didn’t know what would happen to their exploit over firmware updates and a “fake off” mode that left a lit LED which wouldn’t be there if the TV were actually off, so there’s a potential for failed updates and people noticing that there’s something wrong. It’s certainly possible that development continued and it was turned into a polished and usable exploit, but it really just comes across as a bunch of nerds wanting to show off a neat demo.

But let’s say it did get to the stage of being deployable – there’s still not a great deal to worry about. No remote infection mechanism is described, so they’d need to do it locally. If someone is in a position to reflash your TV without you noticing, they’re also in a position to, uh, just leave an internet connected microphone of their own. So how would they infect you remotely? TVs don’t actually consume a huge amount of untrusted content from arbitrary sources[2], so that’s much harder than it sounds and probably not worth it because:

YOU ARE CARRYING AN INTERNET CONNECTED MICROPHONE THAT CONSUMES VAST QUANTITIES OF UNTRUSTED CONTENT FROM ARBITRARY SOURCES

Seriously your phone is like eleven billion times easier to infect than your TV is and you carry it everywhere. If the CIA want to spy on you, they’ll do it via your phone. If you’re paranoid enough to take the battery out of your phone before certain conversations, don’t have those conversations in front of a TV with a microphone in it. But, uh, it’s actually worse than that.

These days audio hardware usually consists of a very generic codec containing a bunch of digital→analogue converters, some analogue→digital converters and a bunch of io pins that can basically be wired up in arbitrary ways. Hardcoding the roles of these pins makes board layout more annoying and some people want more inputs than outputs and some people vice versa, so it’s not uncommon for it to be possible to reconfigure an input as an output or vice versa. From software.

Anyone who’s ever plugged a microphone into a speaker jack probably knows where I’m going with this. An attacker can “turn off” your TV, reconfigure the internal speaker output as an input and listen to you on your “microphoneless” TV. Have a nice day, and stop telling people that putting glue in their laptop microphone is any use unless you’re telling them to disconnect the internal speakers as well.

If you’re in a situation where you have to worry about an intelligence agency monitoring you, your TV is the least of your concerns – any device with speakers is just as bad. So what about Alexa? The summary here is, again, it’s probably easier and more practical to just break your phone – it’s probably near you whenever you’re using an Echo anyway, and they also get to record you the rest of the time. The Echo platform is very restricted in terms of where it gets data[3], so it’d be incredibly hard to compromise without Amazon’s cooperation. Amazon’s not going to give their cooperation unless someone turns up with a warrant, and then we’re back to you already being screwed enough that you should have got rid of all your electronics way earlier in this process. There are reasons to be worried about always listening devices, but intelligence agencies monitoring you shouldn’t generally be one of them.

tl;dr: The CIA probably isn’t listening to you through your TV, and if they are then you’re almost certainly going to have a bad time anyway.

[1] Which I have obviously not read
[2] I look forward to the first person demonstrating code execution through malformed MPEG over terrestrial broadcast TV
[3] You’d need a vulnerability in its compressed audio codecs, and you’d need to convince the target to install a skill that played content from your servers

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The Internet of Microphones

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original http://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/46952.html

So the CIA has tools to snoop on you via your TV and your Echo is testifying in a murder case and yet people are still buying connected devices with microphones in and why are they doing that the world is on fire surely this is terrible?

You’re right that the world is terrible, but this isn’t really a contributing factor to it. There’s a few reasons why. The first is that there’s really not any indication that the CIA and MI5 ever turned this into an actual deployable exploit. The development reports[1] describe a project that still didn’t know what would happen to their exploit over firmware updates and a “fake off” mode that left a lit LED which wouldn’t be there if the TV were actually off, so there’s a potential for failed updates and people noticing that there’s something wrong. It’s certainly possible that development continued and it was turned into a polished and usable exploit, but it really just comes across as a bunch of nerds wanting to show off a neat demo.

But let’s say it did get to the stage of being deployable – there’s still not a great deal to worry about. No remote infection mechanism is described, so they’d need to do it locally. If someone is in a position to reflash your TV without you noticing, they’re also in a position to, uh, just leave an internet connected microphone of their own. So how would they infect you remotely? TVs don’t actually consume a huge amount of untrusted content from arbitrary sources[2], so that’s much harder than it sounds and probably not worth it because:

YOU ARE CARRYING AN INTERNET CONNECTED MICROPHONE THAT CONSUMES VAST QUANTITIES OF UNTRUSTED CONTENT FROM ARBITRARY SOURCES

Seriously your phone is like eleven billion times easier to infect than your TV is and you carry it everywhere. If the CIA want to spy on you, they’ll do it via your phone. If you’re paranoid enough to take the battery out of your phone before certain conversations, don’t have those conversations in front of a TV with a microphone in it. But, uh, it’s actually worse than that.

These days audio hardware usually consists of a very generic codec containing a bunch of digital→analogue converters, some analogue→digital converters and a bunch of io pins that can basically be wired up in arbitrary ways. Hardcoding the roles of these pins makes board layout more annoying and some people want more inputs than outputs and some people vice versa, so it’s not uncommon for it to be possible to reconfigure an input as an output or vice versa. From software.

Anyone who’s ever plugged a microphone into a speaker jack probably knows where I’m going with this. An attacker can “turn off” your TV, reconfigure the internal speaker output as an input and listen to you on your “microphoneless” TV. Have a nice day, and stop telling people that putting glue in their laptop microphone is any use unless you’re telling them to disconnect the internal speakers as well.

If you’re in a situation where you have to worry about an intelligence agency monitoring you, your TV is the least of your concerns – any device with speakers is just as bad. So what about Alexa? The summary here is, again, it’s probably easier and more practical to just break your phone – it’s probably near you whenever you’re using an Echo anyway, and they also get to record you the rest of the time. The Echo platform is very restricted in terms of where it gets data[3], so it’d be incredibly hard to compromise without Amazon’s cooperation. Amazon’s not going to give their cooperation unless someone turns up with a warrant, and then we’re back to you already being screwed enough that you should have got rid of all your electronics way earlier in this process. There are reasons to be worried about always listening devices, but intelligence agencies monitoring you shouldn’t generally be one of them.

tl;dr: The CIA probably isn’t listening to you through your TV, and if they are then you’re almost certainly going to have a bad time anyway.

[1] Which I have obviously not read
[2] I look forward to the first person demonstrating code execution through malformed MPEG over terrestrial broadcast TV
[3] You’d need a vulnerability in its compressed audio codecs, and you’d need to convince the target to install a skill that played content from your servers

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