Tag Archives: datamining

How Political Campaigns Use Personal Data

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2019/04/how_political_c.html

Really interesting report from Tactical Tech.

Data-driven technologies are an inevitable feature of modern political campaigning. Some argue that they are a welcome addition to politics as normal and a necessary and modern approach to democratic processes; others say that they are corrosive and diminish trust in already flawed political systems. The use of these technologies in political campaigning is not going away; in fact, we can only expect their sophistication and prevalence to grow. For this reason, the techniques and methods need to be reviewed outside the dichotomy of ‘good’ or ‘bad’ and beyond the headlines of ‘disinformation campaigns’.

All the data-driven methods presented in this guide would not exist without the commercial digital marketing and advertising industry. From analysing behavioural data to A/B testing and from geotargeting to psychometric profiling, political parties are using the same techniques to sell political candidates to voters that companies use to sell shoes to consumers. The question is, is that appropriate? And what impact does it have not only on individual voters, who may or may not be persuad-ed, but on the political environment as a whole?

The practice of political strategists selling candidates as brands is not new. Vance Packard wrote about the ‘depth probing’ techniques of ‘political persuaders’ as early as 1957. In his book, ‘The Hidden Persuaders’, Packard described political strategies designed to sell candidates to voters ‘like toothpaste’, and how public relations directors at the time boasted that ‘scientific methods take the guesswork out of politics’.5 In this sense, what we have now is a logical progression of the digitisation of marketing techniques and political persuasion techniques.

Zeynep Tufekci on Facebook and Cambridge Analytica

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/03/zeynep_tufekci_.html

Zeynep Tufekci is particularly cogent about Facebook and Cambridge Analytica.

Several news outlets asked me to write about this issue. I didn’t, because 1) my book manuscript is due on Monday (finally!), and 2) I knew Zeynep would say what I would say, only better.

Extracting Secrets from Machine Learning Systems

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/03/extracting_secr.html

This is fascinating research about how the underlying training data for a machine-learning system can be inadvertently exposed. Basically, if a machine-learning system trains on a dataset that contains secret information, in some cases an attacker can query the system to extract that secret information. My guess is that there is a lot more research to be done here.

EDITED TO ADD (3/9): Some interesting links on the subject.

Tracking People Without GPS

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/12/tracking_people_5.html

Interesting research:

The trick in accurately tracking a person with this method is finding out what kind of activity they’re performing. Whether they’re walking, driving a car, or riding in a train or airplane, it’s pretty easy to figure out when you know what you’re looking for.

The sensors can determine how fast a person is traveling and what kind of movements they make. Moving at a slow pace in one direction indicates walking. Going a little bit quicker but turning at 90-degree angles means driving. Faster yet, we’re in train or airplane territory. Those are easy to figure out based on speed and air pressure.

After the app determines what you’re doing, it uses the information it collects from the sensors. The accelerometer relays your speed, the magnetometer tells your relation to true north, and the barometer offers up the air pressure around you and compares it to publicly available information. It checks in with The Weather Channel to compare air pressure data from the barometer to determine how far above sea level you are. Google Maps and data offered by the US Geological Survey Maps provide incredibly detailed elevation readings.

Once it has gathered all of this information and determined the mode of transportation you’re currently taking, it can then begin to narrow down where you are. For flights, four algorithms begin to estimate the target’s location and narrows down the possibilities until its error rate hits zero.

If you’re driving, it can be even easier. The app knows the time zone you’re in based on the information your phone has provided to it. It then accesses information from your barometer and magnetometer and compares it to information from publicly available maps and weather reports. After that, it keeps track of the turns you make. With each turn, the possible locations whittle down until it pinpoints exactly where you are.

To demonstrate how accurate it is, researchers did a test run in Philadelphia. It only took 12 turns before the app knew exactly where the car was.

This is a good example of how powerful synthesizing information from disparate data sources can be. We spend too much time worried about individual data collection systems, and not enough about analysis techniques of those systems.

Research paper.

Weekly roundup: Taking a breather

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/dev/2017/08/09/weekly-roundup-taking-a-breather/

Nothing too special about this week; it went a little slow, but that’s been nice after the mad panic I was in at the end of July.

  • cc: I’m getting the hang of Unity and forming an uneasy truce with C#. Mostly did refactoring of some existing actor code, trying to move all the reading of controls to a single place so the rest of it can be reused for non-players.

  • fox flux: I put some work into a new forest background, which is already just… hilariously better than the one from the original game. Complex textures like leaves are one of my serious weak points, but this is forcing me to do it anyway and I’m slowly learning.

  • blog: I finished that post on Pokémon datamining, which ended up extraordinarily long and slightly late.

  • veekun: Dug into some missing stuff regarding items.

  • art: Spent a day or two doodling.

Still behind by one blog post (oops), and slacked on veekun a bit, but I’ve still got momentum.

Roombas will Spy on You

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/07/roombas_will_sp.html

The company that sells the Roomba autonomous vacuum wants to sell the data about your home that it collects.

Some questions:

What happens if a Roomba user consents to the data collection and later sells his or her home — especially furnished — and now the buyers of the data have a map of a home that belongs to someone who didn’t consent, Mr. Gidari asked. How long is the data kept? If the house burns down, can the insurance company obtain the data and use it to identify possible causes? Can the police use it after a robbery?

EDITED TO ADD (6/29): Roomba is backtracking — for now.