Tag Archives: Dependencies

UI Testing at Scale with AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Stas Neyman original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/ui-testing-at-scale-with-aws-lambda/

This is a guest blog post by Wes Couch and Kurt Waechter from the Blackboard Internal Product Development team about their experience using AWS Lambda.

One year ago, one of our UI test suites took hours to run. Last month, it took 16 minutes. Today, it takes 39 seconds. Here’s how we did it.

The backstory:

Blackboard is a global leader in delivering robust and innovative education software and services to clients in higher education, government, K12, and corporate training. We have a large product development team working across the globe in at least 10 different time zones, with an internal tools team providing support for quality and workflows. We have been using Selenium Webdriver to perform automated cross-browser UI testing since 2007. Because we are now practicing continuous delivery, the automated UI testing challenge has grown due to the faster release schedule. On top of that, every commit made to each branch triggers an execution of our automated UI test suite. If you have ever implemented an automated UI testing infrastructure, you know that it can be very challenging to scale and maintain. Although there are services that are useful for testing different browser/OS combinations, they don’t meet our scale needs.

It used to take three hours to synchronously run our functional UI suite, which revealed the obvious need for parallel execution. Previously, we used Mesos to orchestrate a Selenium Grid Docker container for each test run. This way, we were able to run eight concurrent threads for test execution, which took an average of 16 minutes. Although this setup is fine for a single workflow, the cracks started to show when we reached the scale required for Blackboard’s mature product lines. Going beyond eight concurrent sessions on a single container introduced performance problems that impact the reliability of tests (for example, issues in Webdriver or the browser popping up frequently). We tried Mesos and considered Kubernetes for Selenium Grid orchestration, but the answer to scaling a Selenium Grid was to think smaller, not larger. This led to our breakthrough with AWS Lambda.

The solution:

We started using AWS Lambda for UI testing because it doesn’t require costly infrastructure or countless man hours to maintain. The steps we outline in this blog post took one work day, from inception to implementation. By simply packaging the UI test suite into a Lambda function, we can execute these tests in parallel on a massive scale. We use a custom JUnit test runner that invokes the Lambda function with a request to run each test from the suite. The runner then aggregates the results returned from each Lambda test execution.

Selenium is the industry standard for testing UI at scale. Although there are other options to achieve the same thing in Lambda, we chose this mature suite of tools. Selenium is backed by Google, Firefox, and others to help the industry drive their browsers with code. This makes Lambda and Selenium a compelling stack for achieving UI testing at scale.

Making Chrome Run in Lambda

Currently, Chrome for Linux will not run in Lambda due to an absent mount point. By rebuilding Chrome with a slight modification, as Marco Lüthy originally demonstrated, you can run it inside Lambda anyway! It took about two hours to build the current master branch of Chromium to build on a c4.4xlarge. Unfortunately, the current version of ChromeDriver, 2.33, does not support any version of Chrome above 62, so we’ll be using Marco’s modified version of version 60 for the near future.

Required System Libraries

The Lambda runtime environment comes with a subset of common shared libraries. This means we need to include some extra libraries to get Chrome and ChromeDriver to work. Anything that exists in the java resources folder during compile time is included in the base directory of the compiled jar file. When this jar file is deployed to Lambda, it is placed in the /var/task/ directory. This allows us to simply place the libraries in the java resources folder under a folder named lib/ so they are right where they need to be when the Lambda function is invoked.

To get these libraries, create an EC2 instance and choose the Amazon Linux AMI.

Next, use ssh to connect to the server. After you connect to the new instance, search for the libraries to find their locations.

sudo find / -name libgconf-2.so.4
sudo find / -name libORBit-2.so.0

Now that you have the locations of the libraries, copy these files from the EC2 instance and place them in the java resources folder under lib/.

Packaging the Tests

To deploy the test suite to Lambda, we used a simple Gradle tool called ShadowJar, which is similar to the Maven Shade Plugin. It packages the libraries and dependencies inside the jar that is built. Usually test dependencies and sources aren’t included in a jar, but for this instance we want to include them. To include the test dependencies, add this section to the build.gradle file.

shadowJar {
   from sourceSets.test.output
   configurations = [project.configurations.testRuntime]
}

Deploying the Test Suite

Now that our tests are packaged with the dependencies in a jar, we need to get them into a running Lambda function. We use  simple SAM  templates to upload the packaged jar into S3, and then deploy it to Lambda with our settings.

{
   "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",
   "Transform": "AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31",
   "Resources": {
       "LambdaTestHandler": {
           "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
           "Properties": {
               "CodeUri": "./build/libs/your-test-jar-all.jar",
               "Runtime": "java8",
               "Handler": "com.example.LambdaTestHandler::handleRequest",
               "Role": "<YourLambdaRoleArn>",
               "Timeout": 300,
               "MemorySize": 1536
           }
       }
   }
}

We use the maximum timeout available to ensure our tests have plenty of time to run. We also use the maximum memory size because this ensures our Lambda function can support Chrome and other resources required to run a UI test.

Specifying the handler is important because this class executes the desired test. The test handler should be able to receive a test class and method. With this information it will then execute the test and respond with the results.

public LambdaTestResult handleRequest(TestRequest testRequest, Context context) {
   LoggerContainer.LOGGER = new Logger(context.getLogger());
  
   BlockJUnit4ClassRunner runner = getRunnerForSingleTest(testRequest);
  
   Result result = new JUnitCore().run(runner);

   return new LambdaTestResult(result);
}

Creating a Lambda-Compatible ChromeDriver

We provide developers with an easily accessible ChromeDriver for local test writing and debugging. When we are running tests on AWS, we have configured ChromeDriver to run them in Lambda.

To configure ChromeDriver, we first need to tell ChromeDriver where to find the Chrome binary. Because we know that ChromeDriver is going to be unzipped into the root task directory, we should point the ChromeDriver configuration at that location.

The settings for getting ChromeDriver running are mostly related to Chrome, which must have its working directories pointed at the tmp/ folder.

Start with the default DesiredCapabilities for ChromeDriver, and then add the following settings to enable your ChromeDriver to start in Lambda.

public ChromeDriver createLambdaChromeDriver() {
   ChromeOptions options = new ChromeOptions();

   // Set the location of the chrome binary from the resources folder
   options.setBinary("/var/task/chrome");

   // Include these settings to allow Chrome to run in Lambda
   options.addArguments("--disable-gpu");
   options.addArguments("--headless");
   options.addArguments("--window-size=1366,768");
   options.addArguments("--single-process");
   options.addArguments("--no-sandbox");
   options.addArguments("--user-data-dir=/tmp/user-data");
   options.addArguments("--data-path=/tmp/data-path");
   options.addArguments("--homedir=/tmp");
   options.addArguments("--disk-cache-dir=/tmp/cache-dir");
  
   DesiredCapabilities desiredCapabilities = DesiredCapabilities.chrome();
   desiredCapabilities.setCapability(ChromeOptions.CAPABILITY, options);
  
   return new ChromeDriver(desiredCapabilities);
}

Executing Tests in Parallel

You can approach parallel test execution in Lambda in many different ways. Your approach depends on the structure and design of your test suite. For our solution, we implemented a custom test runner that uses reflection and JUnit libraries to create a list of test cases we want run. When we have the list, we create a TestRequest object to pass into the Lambda function that we have deployed. In this TestRequest, we place the class name, test method, and the test run identifier. When the Lambda function receives this TestRequest, our LambdaTestHandler generates and runs the JUnit test. After the test is complete, the test result is sent to the test runner. The test runner compiles a result after all of the tests are complete. By executing the same Lambda function multiple times with different test requests, we can effectively run the entire test suite in parallel.

To get screenshots and other test data, we pipe those files during test execution to an S3 bucket under the test run identifier prefix. When the tests are complete, we link the files to each test execution in the report generated from the test run. This lets us easily investigate test executions.

Pro Tip: Dynamically Loading Binaries

AWS Lambda has a limit of 250 MB of uncompressed space for packaged Lambda functions. Because we have libraries and other dependencies to our test suite, we hit this limit when we tried to upload a function that contained Chrome and ChromeDriver (~140 MB). This test suite was not originally intended to be used with Lambda. Otherwise, we would have scrutinized some of the included libraries. To get around this limit, we used the Lambda functions temporary directory, which allows up to 500 MB of space at runtime. Downloading these binaries at runtime moves some of that space requirement into the temporary directory. This allows more room for libraries and dependencies. You can do this by grabbing Chrome and ChromeDriver from an S3 bucket and marking them as executable using built-in Java libraries. If you take this route, be sure to point to the new location for these executables in order to create a ChromeDriver.

private static void downloadS3ObjectToExecutableFile(String key) throws IOException {
   File file = new File("/tmp/" + key);

   GetObjectRequest request = new GetObjectRequest("s3-bucket-name", key);

   FileUtils.copyInputStreamToFile(s3client.getObject(request).getObjectContent(), file);
   file.setExecutable(true);
}

Lambda-Selenium Project Source

We have compiled an open source example that you can grab from the Blackboard Github repository. Grab the code and try it out!

https://blackboard.github.io/lambda-selenium/

Conclusion

One year ago, one of our UI test suites took hours to run. Last month, it took 16 minutes. Today, it takes 39 seconds. Thanks to AWS Lambda, we can reduce our build times and perform automated UI testing at scale!

How to Enable Caching for AWS CodeBuild

Post Syndicated from Karthik Thirugnanasambandam original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/how-to-enable-caching-for-aws-codebuild/

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed build service. There are no servers to provision and scale, or software to install, configure, and operate. You just specify the location of your source code, choose your build settings, and CodeBuild runs build scripts for compiling, testing, and packaging your code.

A typical application build process includes phases like preparing the environment, updating the configuration, downloading dependencies, running unit tests, and finally, packaging the built artifact.

Downloading dependencies is a critical phase in the build process. These dependent files can range in size from a few KBs to multiple MBs. Because most of the dependent files do not change frequently between builds, you can noticeably reduce your build time by caching dependencies.

In this post, I will show you how to enable caching for AWS CodeBuild.

Requirements

  • Create an Amazon S3 bucket for storing cache archives (You can use existing s3 bucket as well).
  • Create a GitHub account (if you don’t have one).

Create a sample build project:

1. Open the AWS CodeBuild console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/codebuild/.

2. If a welcome page is displayed, choose Get started.

If a welcome page is not displayed, on the navigation pane, choose Build projects, and then choose Create project.

3. On the Configure your project page, for Project name, type a name for this build project. Build project names must be unique across each AWS account.

4. In Source: What to build, for Source provider, choose GitHub.

5. In Environment: How to build, for Environment image, select Use an image managed by AWS CodeBuild.

  • For Operating system, choose Ubuntu.
  • For Runtime, choose Java.
  • For Version,  choose aws/codebuild/java:openjdk-8.
  • For Build specification, select Insert build commands.

Note: The build specification file (buildspec.yml) can be configured in two ways. You can package it along with your source root directory, or you can override it by using a project environment configuration. In this example, I will use the override option and will use the console editor to specify the build specification.

6. Under Build commands, click Switch to editor to enter the build specification.

Copy the following text.

version: 0.2

phases:
  build:
    commands:
      - mvn install
      
cache:
  paths:
    - '/root/.m2/**/*'

Note: The cache section in the build specification instructs AWS CodeBuild about the paths to be cached. Like the artifacts section, the cache paths are relative to $CODEBUILD_SRC_DIR and specify the directories to be cached. In this example, Maven stores the downloaded dependencies to the /root/.m2/ folder, but other tools use different folders. For example, pip uses the /root/.cache/pip folder, and Gradle uses the /root/.gradle/caches folder. You might need to configure the cache paths based on your language platform.

7. In Artifacts: Where to put the artifacts from this build project:

  • For Type, choose No artifacts.

8. In Cache:

  • For Type, choose Amazon S3.
  • For Bucket, choose your S3 bucket.
  • For Path prefix, type cache/archives/

9. In Service role, the Create a service role in your account option will display a default role name.  You can accept the default name or type your own.

If you already have an AWS CodeBuild service role, choose Choose an existing service role from your account.

10. Choose Continue.

11. On the Review page, to run a build, choose Save and build.

Review build and cache behavior:

Let us review our first build for the project.

In the first run, where no cache exists, overall build time would look something like below (notice the time for DOWNLOAD_SOURCE, BUILD and POST_BUILD):

If you check the build logs, you will see log entries for dependency downloads. The dependencies are downloaded directly from configured external repositories. At the end of the log, you will see an entry for the cache uploaded to your S3 bucket.

Let’s review the S3 bucket for the cached archive. You’ll see the cache from our first successful build is uploaded to the configured S3 path.

Let’s try another build with the same CodeBuild project. This time the build should pick up the dependencies from the cache.

In the second run, there was a cache hit (cache was generated from the first run):

You’ll notice a few things:

  1. DOWNLOAD_SOURCE took slightly longer. Because, in addition to the source code, this time the build also downloaded the cache from user’s s3 bucket.
  2. BUILD time was faster. As the dependencies didn’t need to get downloaded, but were reused from cache.
  3. POST_BUILD took slightly longer, but was relatively the same.

Overall, build duration was improved with cache.

Best practices for cache

  • By default, the cache archive is encrypted on the server side with the customer’s artifact KMS key.
  • You can expire the cache by manually removing the cache archive from S3. Alternatively, you can expire the cache by using an S3 lifecycle policy.
  • You can override cache behavior by updating the project. You can use the AWS CodeBuild the AWS CodeBuild console, AWS CLI, or AWS SDKs to update the project. You can also invalidate cache setting by using the new InvalidateProjectCache API. This API forces a new InvalidationKey to be generated, ensuring that future builds receive an empty cache. This API does not remove the existing cache, because this could cause inconsistencies with builds currently in flight.
  • The cache can be enabled for any folders in the build environment, but we recommend you only cache dependencies/files that will not change frequently between builds. Also, to avoid unexpected application behavior, don’t cache configuration and sensitive information.

Conclusion

In this blog post, I showed you how to enable and configure cache setting for AWS CodeBuild. As you see, this can save considerable build time. It also improves resiliency by avoiding external network connections to an artifact repository.

I hope you found this post useful. Feel free to leave your feedback or suggestions in the comments.

Access Resources in a VPC from AWS CodeBuild Builds

Post Syndicated from John Pignata original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/access-resources-in-a-vpc-from-aws-codebuild-builds/

John Pignata, Startup Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

In this blog post we’re going to discuss a new AWS CodeBuild feature that is available starting today. CodeBuild builds can now access resources in a VPC directly without these resources being exposed to the public internet. These resources include Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) databases, Amazon ElastiCache clusters, internal services running on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), and Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), or any service endpoints that are only reachable from within a specific VPC.

CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. As part of the build process, developers often require access to resources that should be isolated from the public Internet. Now CodeBuild builds can be optionally configured to have VPC connectivity and access these resources directly.

Accessing Resources in a VPC

You can configure builds to have access to a VPC when you create a CodeBuild project or you can update an existing CodeBuild project with VPC configuration attributes. Here’s how it looks in the console:

 

To configure VPC connectivity: select a VPC, one or more subnets within that VPC, and one or more VPC security groups that CodeBuild should apply when attaching to your VPC. Once configured, commands running as part of your build will be able to access resources in your VPC without transiting across the public Internet.

Use Cases

The availability of VPC connectivity from CodeBuild builds unlocks many potential uses. For example, you can:

  • Run integration tests from your build against data in an Amazon RDS instance that’s isolated on a private subnet.
  • Query data in an ElastiCache cluster directly from tests.
  • Interact with internal web services hosted on Amazon EC2, Amazon ECS, or services that use internal Elastic Load Balancing.
  • Retrieve dependencies from self-hosted, internal artifact repositories such as PyPI for Python, Maven for Java, npm for Node.js, and so on.
  • Access objects in an Amazon S3 bucket configured to allow access only through a VPC endpoint.
  • Query external web services that require fixed IP addresses through the Elastic IP address of the NAT gateway associated with your subnet(s).

… and more! Your builds can now access any resource that’s hosted in your VPC without any compromise on network isolation.

Internet Connectivity

CodeBuild requires access to resources on the public Internet to successfully execute builds. At a minimum, it must be able to reach your source repository system (such as AWS CodeCommit, GitHub, Bitbucket), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) to deliver build artifacts, and Amazon CloudWatch Logs to stream logs from the build process. The interface attached to your VPC will not be assigned a public IP address so to enable Internet access from your builds, you will need to set up a managed NAT Gateway or NAT instance for the subnets you configure. You must also ensure your security groups allow outbound access to these services.

IP Address Space

Each running build will be assigned an IP address from one of the subnets in your VPC that you designate for CodeBuild to use. As CodeBuild scales to meet your build volume, ensure that you select subnets with enough address space to accommodate your expected number of concurrent builds.

Service Role Permissions

CodeBuild requires new permissions in order to manage network interfaces on your VPCs. If you create a service role for your new projects, these permissions will be included in that role’s policy automatically. For existing service roles, you can edit the policy document to include the additional actions. For the full policy document to apply to your service role, see Advanced Setup in the CodeBuild documentation.

For more information, see VPC Support in the CodeBuild documentation. We hope you find the ability to access internal resources on a VPC useful in your build processes! If you have any questions or feedback, feel free to reach out to us through the AWS CodeBuild forum or leave a comment!

Event-Driven Computing with Amazon SNS and AWS Compute, Storage, Database, and Networking Services

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/event-driven-computing-with-amazon-sns-compute-storage-database-and-networking-services/

Contributed by Otavio Ferreira, Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

Like other developers around the world, you may be tackling increasingly complex business problems. A key success factor, in that case, is the ability to break down a large project scope into smaller, more manageable components. A service-oriented architecture guides you toward designing systems as a collection of loosely coupled, independently scaled, and highly reusable services. Microservices take this even further. To improve performance and scalability, they promote fine-grained interfaces and lightweight protocols.

However, the communication among isolated microservices can be challenging. Services are often deployed onto independent servers and don’t share any compute or storage resources. Also, you should avoid hard dependencies among microservices, to preserve maintainability and reusability.

If you apply the pub/sub design pattern, you can effortlessly decouple and independently scale out your microservices and serverless architectures. A pub/sub messaging service, such as Amazon SNS, promotes event-driven computing that statically decouples event publishers from subscribers, while dynamically allowing for the exchange of messages between them. An event-driven architecture also introduces the responsiveness needed to deal with complex problems, which are often unpredictable and asynchronous.

What is event-driven computing?

Given the context of microservices, event-driven computing is a model in which subscriber services automatically perform work in response to events triggered by publisher services. This paradigm can be applied to automate workflows while decoupling the services that collectively and independently work to fulfil these workflows. Amazon SNS is an event-driven computing hub, in the AWS Cloud, that has native integration with several AWS publisher and subscriber services.

Which AWS services publish events to SNS natively?

Several AWS services have been integrated as SNS publishers and, therefore, can natively trigger event-driven computing for a variety of use cases. In this post, I specifically cover AWS compute, storage, database, and networking services, as depicted below.

Compute services

  • Auto Scaling: Helps you ensure that you have the correct number of Amazon EC2 instances available to handle the load for your application. You can configure Auto Scaling lifecycle hooks to trigger events, as Auto Scaling resizes your EC2 cluster.As an example, you may want to warm up the local cache store on newly launched EC2 instances, and also download log files from other EC2 instances that are about to be terminated. To make this happen, set an SNS topic as your Auto Scaling group’s notification target, then subscribe two Lambda functions to this SNS topic. The first function is responsible for handling scale-out events (to warm up cache upon provisioning), whereas the second is in charge of handling scale-in events (to download logs upon termination).

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk: An easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and web services developed in a number of programming languages. You can configure event notifications for your Elastic Beanstalk environment so that notable events can be automatically published to an SNS topic, then pushed to topic subscribers.As an example, you may use this event-driven architecture to coordinate your continuous integration pipeline (such as Jenkins CI). That way, whenever an environment is created, Elastic Beanstalk publishes this event to an SNS topic, which triggers a subscribing Lambda function, which then kicks off a CI job against your newly created Elastic Beanstalk environment.

  • Elastic Load Balancing: Automatically distributes incoming application traffic across Amazon EC2 instances, containers, or other resources identified by IP addresses.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on Elastic Load Balancing metrics, to automate the handling of events derived from Classic Load Balancers. As an example, you may leverage this event-driven design to automate latency profiling in an Amazon ECS cluster behind a Classic Load Balancer. In this example, whenever your ECS cluster breaches your load balancer latency threshold, an event is posted by CloudWatch to an SNS topic, which then triggers a subscribing Lambda function. This function runs a task on your ECS cluster to trigger a latency profiling tool, hosted on the cluster itself. This can enhance your latency troubleshooting exercise by making it timely.

Storage services

  • Amazon S3: Object storage built to store and retrieve any amount of data.You can enable S3 event notifications, and automatically get them posted to SNS topics, to automate a variety of workflows. For instance, imagine that you have an S3 bucket to store incoming resumes from candidates, and a fleet of EC2 instances to encode these resumes from their original format (such as Word or text) into a portable format (such as PDF).In this example, whenever new files are uploaded to your input bucket, S3 publishes these events to an SNS topic, which in turn pushes these messages into subscribing SQS queues. Then, encoding workers running on EC2 instances poll these messages from the SQS queues; retrieve the original files from the input S3 bucket; encode them into PDF; and finally store them in an output S3 bucket.

  • Amazon EFS: Provides simple and scalable file storage, for use with Amazon EC2 instances, in the AWS Cloud.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on EFS metrics, to automate the management of your EFS systems. For example, consider a highly parallelized genomics analysis application that runs against an EFS system. By default, this file system is instantiated on the “General Purpose” performance mode. Although this performance mode allows for lower latency, it might eventually impose a scaling bottleneck. Therefore, you may leverage an event-driven design to handle it automatically.Basically, as soon as the EFS metric “Percent I/O Limit” breaches 95%, CloudWatch could post this event to an SNS topic, which in turn would push this message into a subscribing Lambda function. This function automatically creates a new file system, this time on the “Max I/O” performance mode, then switches the genomics analysis application to this new file system. As a result, your application starts experiencing higher I/O throughput rates.

  • Amazon Glacier: A secure, durable, and low-cost cloud storage service for data archiving and long-term backup.You can set a notification configuration on an Amazon Glacier vault so that when a job completes, a message is published to an SNS topic. Retrieving an archive from Amazon Glacier is a two-step asynchronous operation, in which you first initiate a job, and then download the output after the job completes. Therefore, SNS helps you eliminate polling your Amazon Glacier vault to check whether your job has been completed, or not. As usual, you may subscribe SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints to your SNS topic, to be notified when your Amazon Glacier job is done.

  • AWS Snowball: A petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses secure appliances to transfer large amounts of data.You can leverage Snowball notifications to automate workflows related to importing data into and exporting data from AWS. More specifically, whenever your Snowball job status changes, Snowball can publish this event to an SNS topic, which in turn can broadcast the event to all its subscribers.As an example, imagine a Geographic Information System (GIS) that distributes high-resolution satellite images to users via Web browser. In this example, the GIS vendor could capture up to 80 TB of satellite images; create a Snowball job to import these files from an on-premises system to an S3 bucket; and provide an SNS topic ARN to be notified upon job status changes in Snowball. After Snowball changes the job status from “Importing” to “Completed”, Snowball publishes this event to the specified SNS topic, which delivers this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally creates a CloudFront web distribution for the target S3 bucket, to serve the images to end users.

Database services

  • Amazon RDS: Makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.RDS leverages SNS to broadcast notifications when RDS events occur. As usual, these notifications can be delivered via any protocol supported by SNS, including SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints.As an example, imagine that you own a social network website that has experienced organic growth, and needs to scale its compute and database resources on demand. In this case, you could provide an SNS topic to listen to RDS DB instance events. When the “Low Storage” event is published to the topic, SNS pushes this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which in turn leverages the RDS API to increase the storage capacity allocated to your DB instance. The provisioning itself takes place within the specified DB maintenance window.

  • Amazon ElastiCache: A web service that makes it easy to deploy, operate, and scale an in-memory data store or cache in the cloud.ElastiCache can publish messages using Amazon SNS when significant events happen on your cache cluster. This feature can be used to refresh the list of servers on client machines connected to individual cache node endpoints of a cache cluster. For instance, an ecommerce website fetches product details from a cache cluster, with the goal of offloading a relational database and speeding up page load times. Ideally, you want to make sure that each web server always has an updated list of cache servers to which to connect.To automate this node discovery process, you can get your ElastiCache cluster to publish events to an SNS topic. Thus, when ElastiCache event “AddCacheNodeComplete” is published, your topic then pushes this event to all subscribing HTTP endpoints that serve your ecommerce website, so that these HTTP servers can update their list of cache nodes.

  • Amazon Redshift: A fully managed data warehouse that makes it simple to analyze data using standard SQL and BI (Business Intelligence) tools.Amazon Redshift uses SNS to broadcast relevant events so that data warehouse workflows can be automated. As an example, imagine a news website that sends clickstream data to a Kinesis Firehose stream, which then loads the data into Amazon Redshift, so that popular news and reading preferences might be surfaced on a BI tool. At some point though, this Amazon Redshift cluster might need to be resized, and the cluster enters a ready-only mode. Hence, this Amazon Redshift event is published to an SNS topic, which delivers this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally deletes the corresponding Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, so that clickstream data uploads can be put on hold.At a later point, after Amazon Redshift publishes the event that the maintenance window has been closed, SNS notifies a subscribing Lambda function accordingly, so that this function can re-create the Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, and resume clickstream data uploads to Amazon Redshift.

  • AWS DMS: Helps you migrate databases to AWS quickly and securely. The source database remains fully operational during the migration, minimizing downtime to applications that rely on the database.DMS also uses SNS to provide notifications when DMS events occur, which can automate database migration workflows. As an example, you might create data replication tasks to migrate an on-premises MS SQL database, composed of multiple tables, to MySQL. Thus, if replication tasks fail due to incompatible data encoding in the source tables, these events can be published to an SNS topic, which can push these messages into a subscribing SQS queue. Then, encoders running on EC2 can poll these messages from the SQS queue, encode the source tables into a compatible character set, and restart the corresponding replication tasks in DMS. This is an event-driven approach to a self-healing database migration process.

Networking services

  • Amazon Route 53: A highly available and scalable cloud-based DNS (Domain Name System). Route 53 health checks monitor the health and performance of your web applications, web servers, and other resources.You can set CloudWatch alarms and get automated Amazon SNS notifications when the status of your Route 53 health check changes. As an example, imagine an online payment gateway that reports the health of its platform to merchants worldwide, via a status page. This page is hosted on EC2 and fetches platform health data from DynamoDB. In this case, you could configure a CloudWatch alarm for your Route 53 health check, so that when the alarm threshold is breached, and the payment gateway is no longer considered healthy, then CloudWatch publishes this event to an SNS topic, which pushes this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally updates the DynamoDB table that populates the status page. This event-driven approach avoids any kind of manual update to the status page visited by merchants.

  • AWS Direct Connect (AWS DX): Makes it easy to establish a dedicated network connection from your premises to AWS, which can reduce your network costs, increase bandwidth throughput, and provide a more consistent network experience than Internet-based connections.You can monitor physical DX connections using CloudWatch alarms, and send SNS messages when alarms change their status. As an example, when a DX connection state shifts to 0 (zero), indicating that the connection is down, this event can be published to an SNS topic, which can fan out this message to impacted servers through HTTP endpoints, so that they might reroute their traffic through a different connection instead. This is an event-driven approach to connectivity resilience.

More event-driven computing on AWS

In addition to SNS, event-driven computing is also addressed by Amazon CloudWatch Events, which delivers a near real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources. With CloudWatch Events, you can route each event type to one or more targets, including:

Many AWS services publish events to CloudWatch. As an example, you can get CloudWatch Events to capture events on your ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) jobs running on AWS Glue and push failed ones to an SQS queue, so that you can retry them later.

Conclusion

Amazon SNS is a pub/sub messaging service that can be used as an event-driven computing hub to AWS customers worldwide. By capturing events natively triggered by AWS services, such as EC2, S3 and RDS, you can automate and optimize all kinds of workflows, namely scaling, testing, encoding, profiling, broadcasting, discovery, failover, and much more. Business use cases presented in this post ranged from recruiting websites, to scientific research, geographic systems, social networks, retail websites, and news portals.

Start now by visiting Amazon SNS in the AWS Management Console, or by trying the AWS 10-Minute Tutorial, Send Fan-out Event Notifications with Amazon SNS and Amazon SQS.

 

Building a Multi-region Serverless Application with Amazon API Gateway and AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Stefano Buliani original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-a-multi-region-serverless-application-with-amazon-api-gateway-and-aws-lambda/

This post written by: Magnus Bjorkman – Solutions Architect

Many customers are looking to run their services at global scale, deploying their backend to multiple regions. In this post, we describe how to deploy a Serverless API into multiple regions and how to leverage Amazon Route 53 to route the traffic between regions. We use latency-based routing and health checks to achieve an active-active setup that can fail over between regions in case of an issue. We leverage the new regional API endpoint feature in Amazon API Gateway to make this a seamless process for the API client making the requests. This post does not cover the replication of your data, which is another aspect to consider when deploying applications across regions.

Solution overview

Currently, the default API endpoint type in API Gateway is the edge-optimized API endpoint, which enables clients to access an API through an Amazon CloudFront distribution. This typically improves connection time for geographically diverse clients. By default, a custom domain name is globally unique and the edge-optimized API endpoint would invoke a Lambda function in a single region in the case of Lambda integration. You can’t use this type of endpoint with a Route 53 active-active setup and fail-over.

The new regional API endpoint in API Gateway moves the API endpoint into the region and the custom domain name is unique per region. This makes it possible to run a full copy of an API in each region and then use Route 53 to use an active-active setup and failover. The following diagram shows how you do this:

Active/active multi region architecture

  • Deploy your Rest API stack, consisting of API Gateway and Lambda, in two regions, such as us-east-1 and us-west-2.
  • Choose the regional API endpoint type for your API.
  • Create a custom domain name and choose the regional API endpoint type for that one as well. In both regions, you are configuring the custom domain name to be the same, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com
  • Use the host name of the custom domain names from each region, for example, xxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com and xxxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com, to configure record sets in Route 53 for your client-facing domain name, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com

The above solution provides an active-active setup for your API across the two regions, but you are not doing failover yet. For that to work, set up a health check in Route 53:

Route 53 Health Check

A Route 53 health check must have an endpoint to call to check the health of a service. You could do a simple ping of your actual Rest API methods, but instead provide a specific method on your Rest API that does a deep ping. That is, it is a Lambda function that checks the status of all the dependencies.

In the case of the Hello World API, you don’t have any other dependencies. In a real-world scenario, you could check on dependencies as databases, other APIs, and external dependencies. Route 53 health checks themselves cannot use your custom domain name endpoint’s DNS address, so you are going to directly call the API endpoints via their region unique endpoint’s DNS address.

Walkthrough

The following sections describe how to set up this solution. You can find the complete solution at the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo. Clone or download the repository locally to be able to do the setup as described.

Prerequisites

You need the following resources to set up the solution described in this post:

  • AWS CLI
  • An S3 bucket in each region in which to deploy the solution, which can be used by the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM). You can use the following CloudFormation templates to create buckets in us-east-1 and us-west-2:
    • us-east-1:
    • us-west-2:
  • A hosted zone registered in Amazon Route 53. This is used for defining the domain name of your API endpoint, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com. You can use a third-party domain name registrar and then configure the DNS in Amazon Route 53, or you can purchase a domain directly from Amazon Route 53.

Deploy API with health checks in two regions

Start by creating a small “Hello World” Lambda function that sends back a message in the region in which it has been deployed.


"""Return message."""
import logging

logging.basicConfig()
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    """Lambda handler for getting the hello world message."""

    region = context.invoked_function_arn.split(':')[3]

    logger.info("message: " + "Hello from " + region)
    
    return {
		"message": "Hello from " + region
    }

Also create a Lambda function for doing a health check that returns a value based on another environment variable (either “ok” or “fail”) to allow for ease of testing:


"""Return health."""
import logging
import os

logging.basicConfig()
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    """Lambda handler for getting the health."""

    logger.info("status: " + os.environ['STATUS'])
    
    return {
		"status": os.environ['STATUS']
    }

Deploy both of these using an AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) template. SAM is a CloudFormation extension that is optimized for serverless, and provides a standard way to create a complete serverless application. You can find the full helloworld-sam.yaml template in the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

A few things to highlight:

  • You are using inline Swagger to define your API so you can substitute the current region in the x-amazon-apigateway-integration section.
  • Most of the Swagger template covers CORS to allow you to test this from a browser.
  • You are also using substitution to populate the environment variable used by the “Hello World” method with the region into which it is being deployed.

The Swagger allows you to use the same SAM template in both regions.

You can only use SAM from the AWS CLI, so do the following from the command prompt. First, deploy the SAM template in us-east-1 with the following commands, replacing “<your bucket in us-east-1>” with a bucket in your account:


> cd helloworld-api
> aws cloudformation package --template-file helloworld-sam.yaml --output-template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --s3-bucket <your bucket in us-east-1> --region us-east-1
> aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --stack-name multiregionhelloworld --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-east-1

Second, do the same in us-west-2:


> aws cloudformation package --template-file helloworld-sam.yaml --output-template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --s3-bucket <your bucket in us-west-2> --region us-west-2
> aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --stack-name multiregionhelloworld --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-west-2

The API was created with the default endpoint type of Edge Optimized. Switch it to Regional. In the Amazon API Gateway console, select the API that you just created and choose the wheel-icon to edit it.

API Gateway edit API settings

In the edit screen, select the Regional endpoint type and save the API. Do the same in both regions.

Grab the URL for the API in the console by navigating to the method in the prod stage.

API Gateway endpoint link

You can now test this with curl:


> curl https://2wkt1cxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/prod/helloworld
{"message": "Hello from us-west-2"}

Write down the domain name for the URL in each region (for example, 2wkt1cxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com), as you need that later when you deploy the Route 53 setup.

Create the custom domain name

Next, create an Amazon API Gateway custom domain name endpoint. As part of using this feature, you must have a hosted zone and domain available to use in Route 53 as well as an SSL certificate that you use with your specific domain name.

You can create the SSL certificate by using AWS Certificate Manager. In the ACM console, choose Get started (if you have no existing certificates) or Request a certificate. Fill out the form with the domain name to use for the custom domain name endpoint, which is the same across the two regions:

Amazon Certificate Manager request new certificate

Go through the remaining steps and validate the certificate for each region before moving on.

You are now ready to create the endpoints. In the Amazon API Gateway console, choose Custom Domain Names, Create Custom Domain Name.

API Gateway create custom domain name

A few things to highlight:

  • The domain name is the same as what you requested earlier through ACM.
  • The endpoint configuration should be regional.
  • Select the ACM Certificate that you created earlier.
  • You need to create a base path mapping that connects back to your earlier API Gateway endpoint. Set the base path to v1 so you can version your API, and then select the API and the prod stage.

Choose Save. You should see your newly created custom domain name:

API Gateway custom domain setup

Note the value for Target Domain Name as you need that for the next step. Do this for both regions.

Deploy Route 53 setup

Use the global Route 53 service to provide DNS lookup for the Rest API, distributing the traffic in an active-active setup based on latency. You can find the full CloudFormation template in the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

The template sets up health checks, for example, for us-east-1:


HealthcheckRegion1:
  Type: "AWS::Route53::HealthCheck"
  Properties:
    HealthCheckConfig:
      Port: "443"
      Type: "HTTPS_STR_MATCH"
      SearchString: "ok"
      ResourcePath: "/prod/healthcheck"
      FullyQualifiedDomainName: !Ref Region1HealthEndpoint
      RequestInterval: "30"
      FailureThreshold: "2"

Use the health check when you set up the record set and the latency routing, for example, for us-east-1:


Region1EndpointRecord:
  Type: AWS::Route53::RecordSet
  Properties:
    Region: us-east-1
    HealthCheckId: !Ref HealthcheckRegion1
    SetIdentifier: "endpoint-region1"
    HostedZoneId: !Ref HostedZoneId
    Name: !Ref MultiregionEndpoint
    Type: CNAME
    TTL: 60
    ResourceRecords:
      - !Ref Region1Endpoint

You can create the stack by using the following link, copying in the domain names from the previous section, your existing hosted zone name, and the main domain name that is created (for example, hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com):

The following screenshot shows what the parameters might look like:
Serverless multi region Route 53 health check

Specifically, the domain names that you collected earlier would map according to following:

  • The domain names from the API Gateway “prod”-stage go into Region1HealthEndpoint and Region2HealthEndpoint.
  • The domain names from the custom domain name’s target domain name goes into Region1Endpoint and Region2Endpoint.

Using the Rest API from server-side applications

You are now ready to use your setup. First, demonstrate the use of the API from server-side clients. You can demonstrate this by using curl from the command line:


> curl https://hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com/v1/helloworld/
{"message": "Hello from us-east-1"}

Testing failover of Rest API in browser

Here’s how you can use this from the browser and test the failover. Find all of the files for this test in the browser-client folder of the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

Use this html file:


<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8"/>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge"/>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"/>
    <title>Multi-Region Client</title>
</head>
<body>
<div>
   <h1>Test Client</h1>

    <p id="client_result">

    </p>

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script src="settings.js"></script>
    <script src="client.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

The html file uses this JavaScript file to repeatedly call the API and print the history of messages:


var messageHistory = "";

(function call_service() {

   $.ajax({
      url: helloworldMultiregionendpoint+'v1/helloworld/',
      dataType: "json",
      cache: false,
      success: function(data) {
         messageHistory+="<p>"+data['message']+"</p>";
         $('#client_result').html(messageHistory);
      },
      complete: function() {
         // Schedule the next request when the current one's complete
         setTimeout(call_service, 10000);
      },
      error: function(xhr, status, error) {
         $('#client_result').html('ERROR: '+status);
      }
   });

})();

Also, make sure to update the settings in settings.js to match with the API Gateway endpoints for the DNS-proxy and the multi-regional endpoint for the Hello World API: var helloworldMultiregionendpoint = "https://hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com/";

You can now open the HTML file in the browser (you can do this directly from the file system) and you should see something like the following screenshot:

Serverless multi region browser test

You can test failover by changing the environment variable in your health check Lambda function. In the Lambda console, select your health check function and scroll down to the Environment variables section. For the STATUS key, modify the value to fail.

Lambda update environment variable

You should see the region switch in the test client:

Serverless multi region broker test switchover

During an emulated failure like this, the browser might take some additional time to switch over due to connection keep-alive functionality. If you are using a browser like Chrome, you can kill all the connections to see a more immediate fail-over: chrome://net-internals/#sockets

Summary

You have implemented a simple way to do multi-regional serverless applications that fail over seamlessly between regions, either being accessed from the browser or from other applications/services. You achieved this by using the capabilities of Amazon Route 53 to do latency based routing and health checks for fail-over. You unlocked the use of these features in a serverless application by leveraging the new regional endpoint feature of Amazon API Gateway.

The setup was fully scripted using CloudFormation, the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), and the AWS CLI, and it can be integrated into deployment tools to push the code across the regions to make sure it is available in all the needed regions. For more information about cross-region deployments, see Building a Cross-Region/Cross-Account Code Deployment Solution on AWS on the AWS DevOps blog.

I Still Prefer Eclipse Over IntelliJ IDEA

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/still-prefer-eclipse-intellij-idea/

Over the years I’ve observed an inevitable shift from Eclipse to IntelliJ IDEA. Last year they were almost equal in usage, and I have the feeling things are swaying even more towards IDEA.

IDEA is like the iPhone of IDEs – its users tell you that “you will feel how much better it is once you get used to it”, “are you STILL using Eclipse??”, “IDEA is so much better, I thought everyone has switched”, etc.

I’ve been using mostly Eclipse for the past 12 years, but in some cases I did use IDEA – when I was writing Scala, when I was writing Android, and most recently – when Eclipse failed to be ready for the Java 9 release, so after half a day of trying to get it working, I just switched to IDEA until Eclipse finally gets a working Java 9 version (with Maven and the rest of the stuff).

But I will get back to Eclipse again, soon. And I still prefer it. Not just because of all the key combinations I’ve internalized (you can reuse those in IDEA), but because there are still things I find worse in IDEA. Of course, IDEA has so much more cool features like code improvement suggestions and actually working plugins for everything. But at least some of the problems I see have to do with the more basic development workflow and experience. And you can’t compensate for those with sugarcoating. So here they are:

  • Projects are not automatically built (by default), so you can end up with compilation errors that you don’t see until you open a non-compiling file or run a build. And turning the autobild on makes my machine crawl. I know I need an upgrade, but that’s not the point – not having “build on change” was a huge surprise to me the first time I tried IDEA. I recently complained about that on twitter and it turns out “it’s a feature”. The rationale seems to be that if you use refactoring, that shouldn’t happen. Well, there are dozens of cases when it does happen. Refactoring by adding a method parameter, by changing the type of a parameter, by removing a parameter (where the IDE can’t infer which parameter is removed based on the types), by changing return types. Also, a change in maven/gradle dependencies may introduces compilation issues that you don’t get to see. This is not a reasonable default at all, and I think the performance issues are the only reason it’s still the default. I think this makes the experience much worse.
  • You can have only one project per screen. Maybe there are those small companies with greenfield projects where you only need one. But I’ve never been in a situation, where you don’t at least occasionally need a separate project. Be it an “experiments” one, a “tools” one, or whatever. And no, multi-module maven projects (which IDEA handles well) are not sufficient. So each time you need to step out of your main project, you launch another screen. Apart from the bad usability, it’s double the memory, double the fun.
  • Speaking of memory, It seems to be taking more memory than Eclipse. I don’t have representative benchmarks of that, and I know that my 8 GB RAM home machine is way to small for development nowadays, but still.
  • It feels less responsive and clunky. There is some minor delay that I can’t define well, but “I feel it”. I read somewhere that they were excessively repainting the screen elements, so that might be the explanation. Eclipse feels smoother (I know that’s not a proper argument, but I can’t be more precise)
  • Due to some extra cleverness, I have “unused methods” and “never assigned fields” all around the project. It uses spring, so these methods and fields are controller methods and autowired fields. Maybe some spring plugin would take care of that, but spring is not the only framework that uses reflection. Even getters and setters on POJOs get the unused warnings. What’s the problem with those warnings? That warnings are devalued. They don’t mean anything now. There isn’t a “yellow” indicator on the class either, so you don’t actually see the amount of warnings you have. Eclipse displays warnings better, and the false positives are much less.
  • The call hierarchy is slightly worse. But since that’s the most important IDE feature for me (alongside refactoring), it matters. It doesn’t give you the call hierarchy of default constructors that are not explicitly defined. Also, from what I’ve seen IDEA users don’t often use the call hierarchy feature. “Find usage” I think predates the call hierarchy, and is also much more visible through the UI, so some of the IDEA users don’t even know what a call hierarchy is. And repeatedly do “find usage”. That’s only partly the IDE’s fault.
  • No search in the output console. Come one, why I do I have an IDE, where I have to copy the output and paste it in a text editor in order to search. Now, to clarify, the console does have search. But when I run my (spring-boot) application, it outputs stuff in a panel at the bottom that is not the console and doesn’t have search.
  • CTRL+arrows by default jumps over whole words, and not camel cased words. This is configurable, but is yet another odd default. You almost always want to be able to traverse your variables word by word (in camel case), rather than skipping over the whole variable (method/class) name.
  • A few years ago when I used it for Scala, the project never actually compiled. But I guess that’s more Scala’s fault than of the IDE

Apart from the first two, the rest are not major issues, I agree. But they add up. Ultimately, it’s a matter of personal choice whether you can turn a blind eye to these issues. But I’m getting back to Eclipse again. At some point I will propose improvements in the IntelliJ IDEA backlog and will check it again in a few years, I guess.

The post I Still Prefer Eclipse Over IntelliJ IDEA appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

piwheels: making “pip install” fast

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/piwheels/

TL;DR pip install numpy used to take ages, and now it’s super fast thanks to piwheels.

The Python Package Index (PyPI) is a package repository for Python modules. Members of the Python community publish software and libraries in it as an easy method of distribution. If you’ve ever used pip install, PyPI is the service that hosts the software you installed. You may have noticed that some installations can take a long time on the Raspberry Pi. That usually happens when modules have been implemented in C and require compilation.

XKCD comic of two people sword-fighting on office chairs while their code is compiling

No more slacking off! pip install numpy takes just a few seconds now \o/

Wheels for Python packages

A general solution to this problem exists: Python wheels are a standard for distributing pre-built versions of packages, saving users from having to build from source. However, when C code is compiled, it’s compiled for a particular architecture, so package maintainers usually publish wheels for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows, macOS, and Linux. Although Raspberry Pi runs Linux, its architecture is ARM, so Linux wheels are not compatible.

A comic of snakes biting their own tails to roll down a sand dune like wheels

What Python wheels are not

Pip works by browsing PyPI for a wheel matching the user’s architecture — and if it doesn’t find one, it falls back to the source distribution (usually a tarball or zip of the source code). Then the user has to build it themselves, which can take a long time, or may require certain dependencies. And if pip can’t find a source distribution, the installation fails.

Developing piwheels

In order to solve this problem, I decided to build wheels of every package on PyPI. I wrote some tooling for automating the process and used a postgres database to monitor the status of builds and log the output. Using a Pi 3 in my living room, I attempted to build wheels of the latest version of all 100 000 packages on PyPI and to host them on a web server on the Pi. This took a total of ten days, and my proof-of-concept seemed to show that it generally worked and was likely to be useful! You could install packages directly from the server, and installations were really fast.

A Raspberry Pi 3 sitting atop a Pi 2 on cloth

This Pi 3 was the piwheels beta server, sitting atop my SSH gateway Pi 2 at home

I proceeded to plan for version 2, which would attempt to build every version of every package — about 750 000 versions in total. I estimated this would take 75 days for one Pi, but I intended to scale it up to use multiple Pis. Our web hosts Mythic Beasts provide dedicated Pi 3 hosting, so I fired up 20 of them to share the load. With some help from Dave Jones, who created an efficient queuing system for the builders, we were able make this run like clockwork. In under two weeks, it was complete! Read ALL about the first build run drama on my blog.

A list of the mythic beasts cloud Pis

ALL the cloud Pis

Improving piwheels

We analysed the failures, made some tweaks, installed some key dependencies, and ran the build again to raise our success rate from 76% to 83%. We also rebuilt packages for Python 3.5 (the new default in Raspbian Stretch). The wheels we build are tagged ‘armv7l’, but because our Raspbian image is compatible with all Pi models, they’re really ARMv6, so they’re compatible with Pi 3, Pi 2, Pi 1 and Pi Zero. This means the ‘armv6l’-tagged wheels we provide are really just the ARMv7 wheels renamed.

The piwheels monitor interface created by Dave Jones

The wonderful piwheels monitor interface created by Dave

Now, you might be thinking “Why didn’t you just cross-compile?” I really wanted to have full compatibility, and building natively on Pis seemed to be the best way to achieve that. I had easy access to the Pis, and it really didn’t take all that long. Plus, you know, I wanted to eat my own dog food.

You might also be thinking “Why don’t you just apt install python3-numpy?” It’s true that some Python packages are distributed via the Raspbian/Debian archives too. However, if you’re in a virtual environment, or you need a more recent version than the one packaged for Debian, you need pip.

How it works

Now that the piwheels package repository is running as a service, hosted on a Pi 3 in the Mythic Beasts data centre in London. The pip package in Raspbian Stretch is configured to use piwheels as an additional index, so it falls back to PyPI if we’re missing a package. Just run sudo apt upgrade to get the configuration change. You’ll find that pip installs are much faster now! If you want to use piwheels on Raspbian Jessie, that’s possible too — find the instructions in our FAQs. And now, every time you pip install something, your files come from a web server running on a Raspberry Pi (that capable little machine)!

Try it for yourself in a virtual environment:

sudo apt install virtualenv python3-virtualenv -y
virtualenv -p /usr/bin/python3 testpip
source testpip/bin/activate
pip install numpy

This takes about 20 minutes on a Pi 3, 2.5 hours on a Pi 1, or just a few seconds on either if you use piwheels.

If you’re interested to see the details, try pip install numpy -v for verbose output. You’ll see that pip discovers two indexes to search:

2 location(s) to search for versions of numpy:
  * https://pypi.python.org/simple/numpy/
  * https://www.piwheels.hostedpi.com/simple/numpy/

Then it searches both indexes for available files. From this list of files, it determines the latest version available. Next it looks for a Python version and architecture match, and then opts for a wheel over a source distribution. If a new package or version is released, piwheels will automatically pick it up and add it to the build queue.

A flowchart of how piwheels works

How piwheels works

For the users unfamiliar with virtual environments I should mention that doing this isn’t a requirement — just an easy way of testing installations in a sandbox. Most pip usage will require sudo pip3 install {package}, which installs at a system level.

If you come across any issues with any packages from piwheels, please let us know in a GitHub issue.

Taking piwheels further

We currently provide over 670 000 wheels for more than 96 000 packages, all compiled natively on Raspberry Pi hardware. Moreover, we’ll keep building new packages as they are released.

Note that, at present, we have built wheels for Python 3.4 and 3.5 — we’re planning to add support for Python 3.6 and 2.7. The fact that piwheels is currently missing Python 2 wheels does not affect users: until we rebuild for Python 2, PyPI will be used as normal, it’ll just take longer than installing a Python 3 package for which we have a wheel. But remember, Python 2 end-of-life is less than three years away!

Many thanks to Dave Jones for his contributions to the project, and to Mythic Beasts for providing the excellent hosted Pi service.

Screenshot of the mythic beasts Raspberry Pi 3 server service website

Related/unrelated, check out my poster from the PyCon UK poster session:

A poster about Python and Raspberry Pi

Click to download the PDF!

The post piwheels: making “pip install” fast appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Grafana 4.6 Released

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/10/26/grafana-4.6-released/

Release Highlights

The Grafana 4.6 release contains some exciting and much anticipated new additions:

This is a big release so check out the other features and fixes in the Changelog section below.

Annotations

Annotations provide a way to mark points on the graph with rich events. You can now add annotation events and regions right from the graph panel! Just hold CTRL/CMD + click or drag region to open the Add Annotation view. The
Annotations documentation is updated to include details on this new exciting feature.

Cloudwatch

Cloudwatch now supports alerting. You can now setup alert rules for any Cloudwatch metric!

Postgres

Grafana v4.6 now ships with a built-in datasource plugin for PostgreSQL. Have logs or metric data in Postgres? You can now visualize that data and
define alert rules on it like any of our other data sources.

Prometheus

New enhancements include support for instant queries (for a single point in time instead of a time range) and improvements to query editor in the form of autocomplete for label names and label values.

This makes exploring and filtering Prometheus data much easier.

Changelog

Here are just a few highlights from the Changelog.

New Features

  • Annotations: Add support for creating annotations from graph panel #8197
  • GCS: Adds support for Google Cloud Storage #8370 thx @chuhlomin
  • Prometheus: Adds /metrics endpoint for exposing Grafana metrics. #9187
  • Jaeger: Add support for open tracing using jaeger in Grafana. #9213
  • Unit types: New date & time unit types added, useful in singlestat to show dates & times. #3678, #6710, #2764
  • Prometheus: Add support for instant queries #5765, thx @mtanda
  • Cloudwatch: Add support for alerting using the cloudwatch datasource #8050, thx @mtanda
  • Pagerduty: Include triggering series in pagerduty notification #8479, thx @rickymoorhouse
  • Prometheus: Align $__interval with the step parameters. #9226, thx @alin-amana
  • Prometheus: Autocomplete for label name and label value #9208, thx @mtanda
  • Postgres: New Postgres data source #9209, thx @svenklemm
  • Datasources: Make datasource HTTP requests verify TLS by default. closes #9371, #5334, #8812, thx @mattbostock

Minor

  • SMTP: Make it possible to set specific HELO for smtp client. #9319
  • Alerting: Add diff and percent diff as series reducers #9386, thx @shanhuhai5739
  • Slack: Allow images to be uploaded to slack when Token is present #7175, thx @xginn8
  • Table: Add support for displaying the timestamp with milliseconds #9429, thx @s1061123
  • Hipchat: Add metrics, message and image to hipchat notifications #9110, thx @eloo
  • Kafka: Add support for sending alert notifications to kafka #7104, thx @utkarshcmu

Tech

  • Webpack: Changed from systemjs to webpack (see readme or building from source guide for new build instructions). Systemjs is still used to load plugins but now plugins can only import a limited set of dependencies. See PLUGIN_DEV.md for more details on how this can effect some plugins.

Download

Head to the v4.6 download page for download links & instructions.

Thanks

A big thanks to all the Grafana users who contribute by submitting PRs, bug reports, helping out on our community site and providing feedback!

Things Go Better With Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/things-go-better-with-step-functions/

I often give presentations on Amazon’s culture of innovation, and start out with a slide that features a revealing quote from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos:

I love to sit down with our customers and to learn how we have empowered their creativity and to pursue their dreams. Earlier this year I chatted with Patrick from The Coca-Cola Company in order to learn how they used AWS Step Functions and other AWS services to support the Coke.com Vending Pass program. This program includes drink rewards earned by purchasing products at vending machines equipped to support mobile payments using the Coca-Cola Vending Pass. Participants swipe their NFC-enabled phones to complete an Apple Pay or Android Pay purchase, identifying themselves to the vending machine and earning credit towards future free vending purchases in the process

After the swipe, a combination of SNS topics and AWS Lambda functions initiated a pair of calls to some existing backend code to count the vending points and update the participant’s record. Unfortunately, the backend code was slow to react and had some timing dependencies, leading to missing updates that had the potential to confuse Vending Pass participants. The initial solution to this issue was very simple: modify the Lambda code to include a 90 second delay between the two calls. This solved the problem, but ate up process time for no good reason (billing for the use of Lambda functions is based on the duration of the request, in 100 ms intervals).

In order to make their solution more cost-effective, the team turned to AWS Step Functions, building a very simple state machine. As I wrote in an earlier blog post, Step Functions coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices at scale, using visual workflows that are easy to build.

Coke built a very simple state machine to simplify their business logic and reduce their costs. Yours can be equally simple, or they can make use of other Step Function features such as sequential and parallel execution and the ability to make decisions and choose alternate states. The Coke state machine looks like this:

The FirstState and the SecondState states (Task states) call the appropriate Lambda functions while Step Functions implements the 90 second delay (a Wait state). This modification simplified their logic and reduced their costs. Here’s how it all fits together:

 

What’s Next
This initial success led them to take a closer look at serverless computing and to consider using it for other projects. Patrick told me that they have already seen a boost in productivity and developer happiness. Developers no longer need to wait for servers to be provisioned, and can now (as Jeff says) unleash their creativity and pursue their dreams. They expect to use Step Functions to improve the scalability, functionality, and reliability of their applications, going far beyond the initial use for the Coca-Cola Vending Pass. For example, Coke has built a serverless solution for publishing nutrition information to their food service partners using Lambda, Step Functions, and API Gateway.

Patrick and his team are now experimenting with machine learning and artificial intelligence. They built a prototype application to analyze a stream of photos from Instagram and extract trends in tastes and flavors. The application (built as a quick, one-day prototype) made use of Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon API Gateway, and Amazon Rekognition and was, in Patrick’s words, a “big win and an enabler.”

In order to build serverless applications even more quickly, the development team has created an internal CI/CD reference architecture that builds on the Serverless Application Framework. The architecture includes a guided tour of Serverless and some boilerplate code to access internal services and assets. Patrick told me that this model allows them to easily scale promising projects from “a guy with a computer” to an entire development team.

Patrick will be on stage at AWS re:Invent next to my colleague Tim Bray. To meet them in person, be sure to attend SRV306 – State Machines in the Wild! How Customers Use AWS Step Functions.

Jeff;

Yuki Chan – Automated Penetration Testing Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/10/yuki-chan-automated-penetration-testing-tool/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Yuki Chan – Automated Penetration Testing Tool

Yuki Chan is an Automated Penetration Testing Tool that carries out a whole range of standard security auditing tasks automatically. It’s highly recommended to use this tool within Kali Linux OS as it already contains all the dependencies.

This tool is only designed for Linux OS so if you are not using Linux OS it won’t be much use, but if you have Android Smartphone or Tablet you can run this tool via Termux or GNURoot Debian.

Read the rest of Yuki Chan – Automated Penetration Testing Tool now! Only available at Darknet.

[$] Fedora’s Boltron preview

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/732316/rss

In many ways, distributions shackle their users to particular versions of
tools, libraries, and frameworks. Distributions do not do that to be
cruel, of course, but to try to ensure a
consistent and well-functioning experience across all of the software
they ship. But users have often chafed at these restrictions, especially
for the fast-moving environments surrounding various web frameworks and their
dependencies.
Fedora has been making an effort to make it easier for a single system to
support these kinds of environments with its Modularity
initiative
. In late July, Fedora announced a
preview release of the server side of the Modularity equation, Boltron, which is a
version of the distribution that supports the initiative.

How to Configure an LDAPS Endpoint for Simple AD

Post Syndicated from Cameron Worrell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-configure-an-ldaps-endpoint-for-simple-ad/

Simple AD, which is powered by Samba  4, supports basic Active Directory (AD) authentication features such as users, groups, and the ability to join domains. Simple AD also includes an integrated Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server. LDAP is a standard application protocol for the access and management of directory information. You can use the BIND operation from Simple AD to authenticate LDAP client sessions. This makes LDAP a common choice for centralized authentication and authorization for services such as Secure Shell (SSH), client-based virtual private networks (VPNs), and many other applications. Authentication, the process of confirming the identity of a principal, typically involves the transmission of highly sensitive information such as user names and passwords. To protect this information in transit over untrusted networks, companies often require encryption as part of their information security strategy.

In this blog post, we show you how to configure an LDAPS (LDAP over SSL/TLS) encrypted endpoint for Simple AD so that you can extend Simple AD over untrusted networks. Our solution uses Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) to send decrypted LDAP traffic to HAProxy running on Amazon EC2, which then sends the traffic to Simple AD. ELB offers integrated certificate management, SSL/TLS termination, and the ability to use a scalable EC2 backend to process decrypted traffic. ELB also tightly integrates with Amazon Route 53, enabling you to use a custom domain for the LDAPS endpoint. The solution needs the intermediate HAProxy layer because ELB can direct traffic only to EC2 instances. To simplify testing and deployment, we have provided an AWS CloudFormation template to provision the ELB and HAProxy layers.

This post assumes that you have an understanding of concepts such as Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) and its components, including subnets, routing, Internet and network address translation (NAT) gateways, DNS, and security groups. You should also be familiar with launching EC2 instances and logging in to them with SSH. If needed, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview and prerequisites in the next section before proceeding with the deployment.

Note: This solution is intended for use by clients requiring an LDAPS endpoint only. If your requirements extend beyond this, you should consider accessing the Simple AD servers directly or by using AWS Directory Service for Microsoft AD.

Solution overview

The following diagram and description illustrates and explains the Simple AD LDAPS environment. The CloudFormation template creates the items designated by the bracket (internal ELB load balancer and two HAProxy nodes configured in an Auto Scaling group).

Diagram of the the Simple AD LDAPS environment

Here is how the solution works, as shown in the preceding numbered diagram:

  1. The LDAP client sends an LDAPS request to ELB on TCP port 636.
  2. ELB terminates the SSL/TLS session and decrypts the traffic using a certificate. ELB sends the decrypted LDAP traffic to the EC2 instances running HAProxy on TCP port 389.
  3. The HAProxy servers forward the LDAP request to the Simple AD servers listening on TCP port 389 in a fixed Auto Scaling group configuration.
  4. The Simple AD servers send an LDAP response through the HAProxy layer to ELB. ELB encrypts the response and sends it to the client.

Note: Amazon VPC prevents a third party from intercepting traffic within the VPC. Because of this, the VPC protects the decrypted traffic between ELB and HAProxy and between HAProxy and Simple AD. The ELB encryption provides an additional layer of security for client connections and protects traffic coming from hosts outside the VPC.

Prerequisites

  1. Our approach requires an Amazon VPC with two public and two private subnets. The previous diagram illustrates the environment’s VPC requirements. If you do not yet have these components in place, follow these guidelines for setting up a sample environment:
    1. Identify a region that supports Simple AD, ELB, and NAT gateways. The NAT gateways are used with an Internet gateway to allow the HAProxy instances to access the internet to perform their required configuration. You also need to identify the two Availability Zones in that region for use by Simple AD. You will supply these Availability Zones as parameters to the CloudFormation template later in this process.
    2. Create or choose an Amazon VPC in the region you chose. In order to use Route 53 to resolve the LDAPS endpoint, make sure you enable DNS support within your VPC. Create an Internet gateway and attach it to the VPC, which will be used by the NAT gateways to access the internet.
    3. Create a route table with a default route to the Internet gateway. Create two NAT gateways, one per Availability Zone in your public subnets to provide additional resiliency across the Availability Zones. Together, the routing table, the NAT gateways, and the Internet gateway enable the HAProxy instances to access the internet.
    4. Create two private routing tables, one per Availability Zone. Create two private subnets, one per Availability Zone. The dual routing tables and subnets allow for a higher level of redundancy. Add each subnet to the routing table in the same Availability Zone. Add a default route in each routing table to the NAT gateway in the same Availability Zone. The Simple AD servers use subnets that you create.
    5. The LDAP service requires a DNS domain that resolves within your VPC and from your LDAP clients. If you do not have an existing DNS domain, follow the steps to create a private hosted zone and associate it with your VPC. To avoid encryption protocol errors, you must ensure that the DNS domain name is consistent across your Route 53 zone and in the SSL/TLS certificate (see Step 2 in the “Solution deployment” section).
  2. Make sure you have completed the Simple AD Prerequisites.
  3. We will use a self-signed certificate for ELB to perform SSL/TLS decryption. You can use a certificate issued by your preferred certificate authority or a certificate issued by AWS Certificate Manager (ACM).
    Note: To prevent unauthorized connections directly to your Simple AD servers, you can modify the Simple AD security group on port 389 to block traffic from locations outside of the Simple AD VPC. You can find the security group in the EC2 console by creating a search filter for your Simple AD directory ID. It is also important to allow the Simple AD servers to communicate with each other as shown on Simple AD Prerequisites.

Solution deployment

This solution includes five main parts:

  1. Create a Simple AD directory.
  2. Create a certificate.
  3. Create the ELB and HAProxy layers by using the supplied CloudFormation template.
  4. Create a Route 53 record.
  5. Test LDAPS access using an Amazon Linux client.

1. Create a Simple AD directory

With the prerequisites completed, you will create a Simple AD directory in your private VPC subnets:

  1. In the Directory Service console navigation pane, choose Directories and then choose Set up directory.
  2. Choose Simple AD.
    Screenshot of choosing "Simple AD"
  3. Provide the following information:
    • Directory DNS – The fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the directory, such as corp.example.com. You will use the FQDN as part of the testing procedure.
    • NetBIOS name – The short name for the directory, such as CORP.
    • Administrator password – The password for the directory administrator. The directory creation process creates an administrator account with the user name Administrator and this password. Do not lose this password because it is nonrecoverable. You also need this password for testing LDAPS access in a later step.
    • Description – An optional description for the directory.
    • Directory Size – The size of the directory.
      Screenshot of the directory details to provide
  4. Provide the following information in the VPC Details section, and then choose Next Step:
    • VPC – Specify the VPC in which to install the directory.
    • Subnets – Choose two private subnets for the directory servers. The two subnets must be in different Availability Zones. Make a note of the VPC and subnet IDs for use as CloudFormation input parameters. In the following example, the Availability Zones are us-east-1a and us-east-1c.
      Screenshot of the VPC details to provide
  5. Review the directory information and make any necessary changes. When the information is correct, choose Create Simple AD.

It takes several minutes to create the directory. From the AWS Directory Service console , refresh the screen periodically and wait until the directory Status value changes to Active before continuing. Choose your Simple AD directory and note the two IP addresses in the DNS address section. You will enter them when you run the CloudFormation template later.

Note: Full administration of your Simple AD implementation is out of scope for this blog post. See the documentation to add users, groups, or instances to your directory. Also see the previous blog post, How to Manage Identities in Simple AD Directories.

2. Create a certificate

In the previous step, you created the Simple AD directory. Next, you will generate a self-signed SSL/TLS certificate using OpenSSL. You will use the certificate with ELB to secure the LDAPS endpoint. OpenSSL is a standard, open source library that supports a wide range of cryptographic functions, including the creation and signing of x509 certificates. You then import the certificate into ACM that is integrated with ELB.

  1. You must have a system with OpenSSL installed to complete this step. If you do not have OpenSSL, you can install it on Amazon Linux by running the command, sudo yum install openssl. If you do not have access to an Amazon Linux instance you can create one with SSH access enabled to proceed with this step. Run the command, openssl version, at the command line to see if you already have OpenSSL installed.
    [[email protected] ~]$ openssl version
    OpenSSL 1.0.1k-fips 8 Jan 2015

  2. Create a private key using the command, openssl genrsa command.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl genrsa 2048 > privatekey.pem
    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ......................................................................................................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)

  3. Generate a certificate signing request (CSR) using the openssl req command. Provide the requested information for each field. The Common Name is the FQDN for your LDAPS endpoint (for example, ldap.corp.example.com). The Common Name must use the domain name you will later register in Route 53. You will encounter certificate errors if the names do not match.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl req -new -key privatekey.pem -out server.csr
    You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated into your certificate request.

  4. Use the openssl x509 command to sign the certificate. The following example uses the private key from the previous step (privatekey.pem) and the signing request (server.csr) to create a public certificate named server.crt that is valid for 365 days. This certificate must be updated within 365 days to avoid disruption of LDAPS functionality.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl x509 -req -sha256 -days 365 -in server.csr -signkey privatekey.pem -out server.crt
    Signature ok
    subject=/C=XX/L=Default City/O=Default Company Ltd/CN=ldap.corp.example.com
    Getting Private key

  5. You should see three files: privatekey.pem, server.crt, and server.csr.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ ls
    privatekey.pem server.crt server.csr

    Restrict access to the private key.

    [[email protected] tmp]$ chmod 600 privatekey.pem

    Keep the private key and public certificate for later use. You can discard the signing request because you are using a self-signed certificate and not using a Certificate Authority. Always store the private key in a secure location and avoid adding it to your source code.

  6. In the ACM console, choose Import a certificate.
  7. Using your favorite Linux text editor, paste the contents of your server.crt file in the Certificate body box.
  8. Using your favorite Linux text editor, paste the contents of your privatekey.pem file in the Certificate private key box. For a self-signed certificate, you can leave the Certificate chain box blank.
  9. Choose Review and import. Confirm the information and choose Import.

3. Create the ELB and HAProxy layers by using the supplied CloudFormation template

Now that you have created your Simple AD directory and SSL/TLS certificate, you are ready to use the CloudFormation template to create the ELB and HAProxy layers.

  1. Load the supplied CloudFormation template to deploy an internal ELB and two HAProxy EC2 instances into a fixed Auto Scaling group. After you load the template, provide the following input parameters. Note: You can find the parameters relating to your Simple AD from the directory details page by choosing your Simple AD in the Directory Service console.
Input parameter Input parameter description
HAProxyInstanceSize The EC2 instance size for HAProxy servers. The default size is t2.micro and can scale up for large Simple AD environments.
MyKeyPair The SSH key pair for EC2 instances. If you do not have an existing key pair, you must create one.
VPCId The target VPC for this solution. Must be in the VPC where you deployed Simple AD and is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SubnetId1 The Simple AD primary subnet. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SubnetId2 The Simple AD secondary subnet. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
MyTrustedNetwork Trusted network Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) to allow connections to the LDAPS endpoint. For example, use the VPC CIDR to allow clients in the VPC to connect.
SimpleADPriIP The primary Simple AD Server IP. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SimpleADSecIP The secondary Simple AD Server IP. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
LDAPSCertificateARN The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) for the SSL certificate. This information is available in the ACM console.
  1. Enter the input parameters and choose Next.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details and choose Create. The stack will be created in approximately 5 minutes.

4. Create a Route 53 record

The next step is to create a Route 53 record in your private hosted zone so that clients can resolve your LDAPS endpoint.

  1. If you do not have an existing DNS domain for use with LDAP, create a private hosted zone and associate it with your VPC. The hosted zone name should be consistent with your Simple AD (for example, corp.example.com).
  2. When the CloudFormation stack is in CREATE_COMPLETE status, locate the value of the LDAPSURL on the Outputs tab of the stack. Copy this value for use in the next step.
  3. On the Route 53 console, choose Hosted Zones and then choose the zone you used for the Common Name box for your self-signed certificate. Choose Create Record Set and enter the following information:
    1. Name – The label of the record (such as ldap).
    2. Type – Leave as A – IPv4 address.
    3. Alias – Choose Yes.
    4. Alias Target – Paste the value of the LDAPSURL on the Outputs tab of the stack.
  4. Leave the defaults for Routing Policy and Evaluate Target Health, and choose Create.
    Screenshot of finishing the creation of the Route 53 record

5. Test LDAPS access using an Amazon Linux client

At this point, you have configured your LDAPS endpoint and now you can test it from an Amazon Linux client.

  1. Create an Amazon Linux instance with SSH access enabled to test the solution. Launch the instance into one of the public subnets in your VPC. Make sure the IP assigned to the instance is in the trusted IP range you specified in the CloudFormation parameter MyTrustedNetwork in Step 3.b.
  2. SSH into the instance and complete the following steps to verify access.
    1. Install the openldap-clients package and any required dependencies:
      sudo yum install -y openldap-clients.
    2. Add the server.crt file to the /etc/openldap/certs/ directory so that the LDAPS client will trust your SSL/TLS certificate. You can copy the file using Secure Copy (SCP) or create it using a text editor.
    3. Edit the /etc/openldap/ldap.conf file and define the environment variables BASE, URI, and TLS_CACERT.
      • The value for BASE should match the configuration of the Simple AD directory name.
      • The value for URI should match your DNS alias.
      • The value for TLS_CACERT is the path to your public certificate.

Here is an example of the contents of the file.

BASE dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com
URI ldaps://ldap.corp.example.com
TLS_CACERT /etc/openldap/certs/server.crt

To test the solution, query the directory through the LDAPS endpoint, as shown in the following command. Replace corp.example.com with your domain name and use the Administrator password that you configured with the Simple AD directory

$ ldapsearch -D "[email protected]corp.example.com" -W sAMAccountName=Administrator

You should see a response similar to the following response, which provides the directory information in LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF) for the administrator distinguished name (DN) from your Simple AD LDAP server.

# extended LDIF
#
# LDAPv3
# base <dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com> (default) with scope subtree
# filter: sAMAccountName=Administrator
# requesting: ALL
#

# Administrator, Users, corp.example.com
dn: CN=Administrator,CN=Users,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com
objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: user
description: Built-in account for administering the computer/domain
instanceType: 4
whenCreated: 20170721123204.0Z
uSNCreated: 3223
name: Administrator
objectGUID:: l3h0HIiKO0a/ShL4yVK/vw==
userAccountControl: 512
…

You can now use the LDAPS endpoint for directory operations and authentication within your environment. If you would like to learn more about how to interact with your LDAPS endpoint within a Linux environment, here are a few resources to get started:

Troubleshooting

If you receive an error such as the following error when issuing the ldapsearch command, there are a few things you can do to help identify issues.

ldap_sasl_bind(SIMPLE): Can't contact LDAP server (-1)
  • You might be able to obtain additional error details by adding the -d1 debug flag to the ldapsearch command in the previous section.
    $ ldapsearch -D "[email protected]" -W sAMAccountName=Administrator –d1

  • Verify that the parameters in ldap.conf match your configured LDAPS URI endpoint and that all parameters can be resolved by DNS. You can use the following dig command, substituting your configured endpoint DNS name.
    $ dig ldap.corp.example.com

  • Confirm that the client instance from which you are connecting is in the CIDR range of the CloudFormation parameter, MyTrustedNetwork.
  • Confirm that the path to your public SSL/TLS certificate configured in ldap.conf as TLS_CAERT is correct. You configured this in Step 5.b.3. You can check your SSL/TLS connection with the command, substituting your configured endpoint DNS name for the string after –connect.
    $ echo -n | openssl s_client -connect ldap.corp.example.com:636

  • Verify that your HAProxy instances have the status InService in the EC2 console: Choose Load Balancers under Load Balancing in the navigation pane, highlight your LDAPS load balancer, and then choose the Instances

Conclusion

You can use ELB and HAProxy to provide an LDAPS endpoint for Simple AD and transport sensitive authentication information over untrusted networks. You can explore using LDAPS to authenticate SSH users or integrate with other software solutions that support LDAP authentication. This solution’s CloudFormation template is available on GitHub.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the Directory Service forum.

– Cameron and Jeff

Bassi: Dev v Ops

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/730630/rss

Emmanuele Bassi writes about the
mismatch
between the traditional distribution packaging model and what
the world seems to actually want. “The more I think about it, the less I understand how that ever worked in the first place. It is not a mystery, though, why it’s a dying model.

When I say that ‘nobody develops applications like the Linux distributions
encourages and prefers’ I’m not kidding around: Windows, macOS, iOS,
Electron, and Android application developers are heavily based on the
concept of a core set of OS services; a parallel installable blocks of
system dependencies shipped and retired by the OS vendor; and a bundling
system that allows application developers to provide their own
dependencies, and control them.”

Updates to GPIO Zero, the physical computing API

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/gpio-zero-update/

GPIO Zero v1.4 is out now! It comes with a set of new features, including a handy pinout command line tool. To start using this newest version of the API, update your Raspbian OS now:

sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade

Some of the things we’ve added will make it easier for you try your hand on different programming styles. In doing so you’ll build your coding skills, and will improve as a programmer. As a consequence, you’ll learn to write more complex code, which will enable you to take on advanced electronics builds. And on top of that, you can use the skills you’ll acquire in other computing projects.

GPIO Zero pinout tool

The new pinout tool

Developing GPIO Zero

Nearly two years ago, I started the GPIO Zero project as a simple wrapper around the low-level RPi.GPIO library. I wanted to create a simpler way to control GPIO-connected devices in Python, based on three years’ experience of training teachers, running workshops, and building projects. The idea grew over time, and the more we built for our Python library, the more sophisticated and powerful it became.

One of the great things about Python is that it’s a multi-paradigm programming language. You can write code in a number of different styles, according to your needs. You don’t have to write classes, but you can if you need them. There are functional programming tools available, but beginners get by without them. Importantly, the more advanced features of the language are not a barrier to entry.

Become a more advanced programmer

As a beginner to programming, you usually start by writing procedural programs, in which the flow moves from top to bottom. Then you’ll probably add loops and create your own functions. Your next step might be to start using libraries which introduce new patterns that operate in a different manner to what you’ve written before, for example threaded callbacks (event-driven programming). You might move on to object-oriented programming, extending the functionality of classes provided by other libraries, and starting to write your own classes. Occasionally, you may make use of tools created with functional programming techniques.

Five buttons in different colours

Take control of the buttons in your life

It’s much the same with GPIO Zero: you can start using it very easily, and we’ve made it simple to progress along the learning curve towards more advanced programming techniques. For example, if you want to make a push button control an LED, the easiest way to do this is via procedural programming using a while loop:

from gpiozero import LED, Button

led = LED(17)
button = Button(2)

while True:
    if button.is_pressed:
        led.on()
    else:
        led.off()

But another way to achieve the same thing is to use events:

from gpiozero import LED, Button
from signal import pause

led = LED(17)
button = Button(2)

button.when_pressed = led.on
button.when_released = led.off

pause()

You could even use a declarative approach, and set the LED’s behaviour in a single line:

from gpiozero import LED, Button
from signal import pause

led = LED(17)
button = Button(2)

led.source = button.values

pause()

You will find that using the procedural approach is a great start, but at some point you’ll hit a limit, and will have to try a different approach. The example above can be approach in several programming styles. However, if you’d like to control a wider range of devices or a more complex system, you need to carefully consider which style works best for what you want to achieve. Being able to choose the right programming style for a task is a skill in itself.

Source/values properties

So how does the led.source = button.values thing actually work?

Every GPIO Zero device has a .value property. For example, you can read a button’s state (True or False), and read or set an LED’s state (so led.value = True is the same as led.on()). Since LEDs and buttons operate with the same value set (True and False), you could say led.value = button.value. However, this only sets the LED to match the button once. If you wanted it to always match the button’s state, you’d have to use a while loop. To make things easier, we came up with a way of telling devices they’re connected: we added a .values property to all devices, and a .source to output devices. Now, a loop is no longer necessary, because this will do the job:

led.source = button.values

This is a simple approach to connecting devices using a declarative style of programming. In one single line, we declare that the LED should get its values from the button, i.e. when the button is pressed, the LED should be on. You can even mix the procedural with the declarative style: at one stage of the program, the LED could be set to match the button, while in the next stage it could just be blinking, and finally it might return back to its original state.

These additions are useful for connecting other devices as well. For example, a PWMLED (LED with variable brightness) has a value between 0 and 1, and so does a potentiometer connected via an ADC (analogue-digital converter) such as the MCP3008. The new GPIO Zero update allows you to say led.source = pot.values, and then twist the potentiometer to control the brightness of the LED.

But what if you want to do something more complex, like connect two devices with different value sets or combine multiple inputs?

We provide a set of device source tools, which allow you to process values as they flow from one device to another. They also let you send in artificial values such as random data, and you can even write your own functions to generate values to pass to a device’s source. For example, to control a motor’s speed with a potentiometer, you could use this code:

from gpiozero import Motor, MCP3008
from signal import pause

motor = Motor(20, 21)
pot = MCP3008()

motor.source = pot.values

pause()

This works, but it will only drive the motor forwards. If you wanted the potentiometer to drive it forwards and backwards, you’d use the scaled tool to scale its values to a range of -1 to 1:

from gpiozero import Motor, MCP3008
from gpiozero.tools import scaled
from signal import pause

motor = Motor(20, 21)
pot = MCP3008()

motor.source = scaled(pot.values, -1, 1)

pause()

And to separately control a robot’s left and right motor speeds with two potentiometers, you could do this:

from gpiozero import Robot, MCP3008
from signal import pause

robot = Robot(left=(2, 3), right=(4, 5))
left = MCP3008(0)
right = MCP3008(1)

robot.source = zip(left.values, right.values)

pause()

GPIO Zero and Blue Dot

Martin O’Hanlon created a Python library called Blue Dot which allows you to use your Android device to remotely control things on their Raspberry Pi. The API is very similar to GPIO Zero, and it even incorporates the value/values properties, which means you can hook it up to GPIO devices easily:

from bluedot import BlueDot
from gpiozero import LED
from signal import pause

bd = BlueDot()
led = LED(17)

led.source = bd.values

pause()

We even included a couple of Blue Dot examples in our recipes.

Make a series of binary logic gates using source/values

Read more in this source/values tutorial from The MagPi, and on the source/values documentation page.

Remote GPIO control

GPIO Zero supports multiple low-level GPIO libraries. We use RPi.GPIO by default, but you can choose to use RPIO or pigpio instead. The pigpio library supports remote connections, so you can run GPIO Zero on one Raspberry Pi to control the GPIO pins of another, or run code on a PC (running Windows, Mac, or Linux) to remotely control the pins of a Pi on the same network. You can even control two or more Pis at once!

If you’re using Raspbian on a Raspberry Pi (or a PC running our x86 Raspbian OS), you have everything you need to remotely control GPIO. If you’re on a PC running Windows, Mac, or Linux, you just need to install gpiozero and pigpio using pip. See our guide on configuring remote GPIO.

I road-tested the new pin_factory syntax at the Raspberry Jam @ Pi Towers

There are a number of different ways to use remote pins:

  • Set the default pin factory and remote IP address with environment variables:
$ GPIOZERO_PIN_FACTORY=pigpio PIGPIO_ADDR=192.168.1.2 python3 blink.py
  • Set the default pin factory in your script:
import gpiozero
from gpiozero import LED
from gpiozero.pins.pigpio import PiGPIOFactory

gpiozero.Device.pin_factory = PiGPIOFactory(host='192.168.1.2')

led = LED(17)
  • The pin_factory keyword argument allows you to use multiple Pis in the same script:
from gpiozero import LED
from gpiozero.pins.pigpio import PiGPIOFactory

factory2 = PiGPIOFactory(host='192.168.1.2')
factory3 = PiGPIOFactory(host='192.168.1.3')

local_hat = TrafficHat()
remote_hat2 = TrafficHat(pin_factory=factory2)
remote_hat3 = TrafficHat(pin_factory=factory3)

This is a really powerful feature! For more, read this remote GPIO tutorial in The MagPi, and check out the remote GPIO recipes in our documentation.

GPIO Zero on your PC

GPIO Zero doesn’t have any dependencies, so you can install it on your PC using pip. In addition to the API’s remote GPIO control, you can use its ‘mock’ pin factory on your PC. We originally created the mock pin feature for the GPIO Zero test suite, but we found that it’s really useful to be able to test GPIO Zero code works without running it on real hardware:

$ GPIOZERO_PIN_FACTORY=mock python3
>>> from gpiozero import LED
>>> led = LED(22)
>>> led.blink()
>>> led.value
True
>>> led.value
False

You can even tell pins to change state (e.g. to simulate a button being pressed) by accessing an object’s pin property:

>>> from gpiozero import LED
>>> led = LED(22)
>>> button = Button(23)
>>> led.source = button.values
>>> led.value
False
>>> button.pin.drive_low()
>>> led.value
True

You can also use the pinout command line tool if you set your pin factory to ‘mock’. It gives you a Pi 3 diagram by default, but you can supply a revision code to see information about other Pi models. For example, to use the pinout tool for the original 256MB Model B, just type pinout -r 2.

GPIO Zero documentation and resources

On the API’s website, we provide beginner recipes and advanced recipes, and we have added remote GPIO configuration including PC/Mac/Linux and Pi Zero OTG, and a section of GPIO recipes. There are also new sections on source/values, command-line tools, FAQs, Pi information and library development.

You’ll find plenty of cool projects using GPIO Zero in our learning resources. For example, you could check out the one that introduces physical computing with Python and get stuck in! We even provide a GPIO Zero cheat sheet you can download and print.

There are great GPIO Zero tutorials and projects in The MagPi magazine every month. Moreover, they also publish Simple Electronics with GPIO Zero, a book which collects a series of tutorials useful for building your knowledge of physical computing. And the best thing is, you can download it, and all magazine issues, for free!

Check out the API documentation and read more about what’s new in GPIO Zero on my blog. We have lots planned for the next release. Watch this space.

Get building!

The world of physical computing is at your fingertips! Are you feeling inspired?

If you’ve never tried your hand on physical computing, our Build a robot buggy learning resource is the perfect place to start! It’s your step-by-step guide for building a simple robot controlled with the help of GPIO Zero.

If you have a gee-whizz idea for an electronics project, do share it with us below. And if you’re currently working on a cool build and would like to show us how it’s going, pop a link to it in the comments.

The post Updates to GPIO Zero, the physical computing API appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

[$] Apache disallows the Facebook BSD+patent license

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/728178/rss

Software patents may not have brought about the free-software apocalypse
that some have feared over the years, but they remain a minefield for the
software industry as a whole. A small-scale example of this can be seen in
the recent decision by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) to move a
license with patent-related terms to its “Category-X”
list
of licenses that cannot be used by ASF projects. A number of
projects will be scrambling to replace software dependencies on a short
timeline, all because Facebook wanted to clarify its patent-licensing
terms.

Journey into Deep Learning with AWS

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/journey-into-deep-learning-with-aws/

If you are anything like me, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), and Deep Learning are completely fascinating and exciting topics. As AI, ML, and Deep Learning become more widely used, for me it means that the science fiction written by Dr. Issac Asimov, the robotics and medical advancements in Star Wars, and the technologies that enabled Captain Kirk and his Star Trek crew “to boldly go where no man has gone before” can become achievable realities.

 

Most people interested in the aforementioned topics are familiar with the AI and ML solutions enabled by Deep Learning, such as Convolutional Neural Networks for Image and Video Classification, Speech Recognition, Natural Language interfaces, and Recommendation Engines. However, it is not always an easy task setting up the infrastructure, environment, and tools to enable data scientists, machine learning practitioners, research scientists, and deep learning hobbyists/advocates to dive into these technologies. Most developers desire to go quickly from getting started with deep learning to training models and developing solutions using deep learning technologies.

For these reasons, I would like to share some resources that will help to quickly build deep learning solutions whether you are an experienced data scientist or a curious developer wanting to get started.

Deep Learning Resources

The Apache MXNet is Amazon’s deep learning framework of choice. With the power of Apache MXNet framework and NVIDIA GPU computing, you can launch your scalable deep learning projects and solutions easily on the AWS Cloud. As you get started on your MxNet deep learning quest, there are a variety of self-service tutorials and datasets available to you:

  • Launch an AWS Deep Learning AMI: This guide walks you through the steps to launch the AWS Deep Learning AMI with Ubuntu
  • MXNet – Create a computer vision application: This hands-on tutorial uses a pre-built notebook to walk you through using neural networks to build a computer vision application to identify handwritten digits
  • AWS Machine Learning Datasets: AWS hosts datasets for Machine Learning on the AWS Marketplace that you can access for free. These large datasets are available for anyone to analyze the data without requiring the data to be downloaded or stored.
  • Predict and Extract – Learn to use pre-trained models for predictions: This hands-on tutorial will walk you through how to use pre-trained model for predicting and feature extraction using the full Imagenet dataset.

 

AWS Deep Learning AMIs

AWS offers Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) for use on Amazon EC2 for quick deployment of an infrastructure needed to start your deep learning journey. The AWS Deep Learning AMIs are pre-configured with popular deep learning frameworks built using Amazon EC2 instances on Amazon Linux, and Ubuntu that can be launched for AI targeted solutions and models. The deep learning frameworks supported and pre-configured on the deep learning AMI are:

  • Apache MXNet
  • TensorFlow
  • Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit (CNTK)
  • Caffe
  • Caffe2
  • Theano
  • Torch
  • Keras

Additionally, the AWS Deep Learning AMIs install preconfigured libraries for Jupyter notebooks with Python 2.7/3.4, AWS SDK for Python, and other data science related python packages and dependencies. The AMIs also come with NVIDIA CUDA and NVIDIA CUDA Deep Neural Network (cuDNN) libraries preinstalled with all the supported deep learning frameworks and the Intel Math Kernel Library is installed for Apache MXNet framework. You can launch any of the Deep Learning AMIs by visiting the AWS Marketplace using the Try the Deep Learning AMIs link.

Summary

It is a great time to dive into Deep Learning. You can accelerate your work in deep learning by using the AWS Deep Learning AMIs running on the AWS cloud to get your deep learning environment running quickly or get started learning more about Deep Learning on AWS with MXNet using the AWS self-service resources.  Of course, you can learn even more information about Deep Learning, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence on AWS by reviewing the AWS Deep Learning page, the Amazon AI product page, and the AWS AI Blog.

May the Deep Learning Force be with you all.

Tara

Deploying Java Microservices on Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-java-microservices-on-amazon-ec2-container-service/

This post and accompanying code graciously contributed by:

Huy Huynh
Sr. Solutions Architect
Magnus Bjorkman
Solutions Architect

Java is a popular language used by many enterprises today. To simplify and accelerate Java application development, many companies are moving from a monolithic to microservices architecture. For some, it has become a strategic imperative. Containerization technology, such as Docker, lets enterprises build scalable, robust microservice architectures without major code rewrites.

In this post, I cover how to containerize a monolithic Java application to run on Docker. Then, I show how to deploy it on AWS using Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), a high-performance container management service. Finally, I show how to break the monolith into multiple services, all running in containers on Amazon ECS.

Application Architecture

For this example, I use the Spring Pet Clinic, a monolithic Java application for managing a veterinary practice. It is a simple REST API, which allows the client to manage and view Owners, Pets, Vets, and Visits.

It is a simple three-tier architecture:

  • Client
    You simulate this by using curl commands.
  • Web/app server
    This is the Java and Spring-based application that you run using the embedded Tomcat. As part of this post, you run this within Docker containers.
  • Database server
    This is the relational database for your application that stores information about owners, pets, vets, and visits. For this post, use MySQL RDS.

I decided to not put the database inside a container as containers were designed for applications and are transient in nature. The choice was made even easier because you have a fully managed database service available with Amazon RDS.

RDS manages the work involved in setting up a relational database, from provisioning the infrastructure capacity that you request to installing the database software. After your database is up and running, RDS automates common administrative tasks, such as performing backups and patching the software that powers your database. With optional Multi-AZ deployments, Amazon RDS also manages synchronous data replication across Availability Zones with automatic failover.

Walkthrough

You can find the code for the example covered in this post at amazon-ecs-java-microservices on GitHub.

Prerequisites

You need the following to walk through this solution:

  • An AWS account
  • An access key and secret key for a user in the account
  • The AWS CLI installed

Also, install the latest versions of the following:

  • Java
  • Maven
  • Python
  • Docker

Step 1: Move the existing Java Spring application to a container deployed using Amazon ECS

First, move the existing monolith application to a container and deploy it using Amazon ECS. This is a great first step before breaking the monolith apart because you still get some benefits before breaking apart the monolith:

  • An improved pipeline. The container also allows an engineering organization to create a standard pipeline for the application lifecycle.
  • No mutations to machines.

You can find the monolith example at 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic.

Container deployment overview

The following diagram is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The load balancer that distributes requests across all available ports and instances registered in the application’s target group using round-robin.
  • The target group that is updated by Amazon ECS to always have an up-to-date list of all the service containers in the cluster. This includes the port on which they are accessible.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the container for the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Each container has a single application process that is bound to port 8080 within its namespace. In reality, all the containers are exposed on a different, randomly assigned port on the host.

The architecture is containerized but still monolithic because each container has all the same features of the rest of the containers

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository for the application.
  • A service/task definition that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers, so that the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have automated setup with the 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic/ecs-cluster.cf AWS CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The Python script calls the CloudFormation template for the initial setup of the VPC, Amazon ECS cluster, and RDS instance. It then extracts the outputs from the template and uses those for API calls to create Amazon ECR repositories, tasks, services, Application Load Balancer, and target groups.

Environment variables and Spring properties binding

As part of the Python script, you pass in a number of environment variables to the container as part of the task/container definition:

'environment': [
{
'name': 'SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE',
'value': 'mysql'
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_URL',
'value': my_sql_options['dns_name']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_USERNAME',
'value': my_sql_options['username']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_PASSWORD',
'value': my_sql_options['password']
}
],

The preceding environment variables work in concert with the Spring property system. The value in the variable SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE, makes Spring use the MySQL version of the application property file. The other environment files override the following properties in that file:

  • spring.datasource.url
  • spring.datasource.username
  • spring.datasource.password

Optionally, you can also encrypt sensitive values by using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. Instead of handing in the password, you pass in a reference to the parameter and fetch the value as part of the container startup. For more information, see Managing Secrets for Amazon ECS Applications Using Parameter Store and IAM Roles for Tasks.

Spotify Docker Maven plugin

Use the Spotify Docker Maven plugin to create the image and push it directly to Amazon ECR. This allows you to do this as part of the regular Maven build. It also integrates the image generation as part of the overall build process. Use an explicit Dockerfile as input to the plugin.

FROM frolvlad/alpine-oraclejdk8:slim
VOLUME /tmp
ADD spring-petclinic-rest-1.7.jar app.jar
RUN sh -c 'touch /app.jar'
ENV JAVA_OPTS=""
ENTRYPOINT [ "sh", "-c", "java $JAVA_OPTS -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom -jar /app.jar" ]

The Python script discussed earlier uses the AWS CLI to authenticate you with AWS. The script places the token in the appropriate location so that the plugin can work directly against the Amazon ECR repository.

Test setup

You can test the setup by running the Python script:
python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:
curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

You can clean this up before going to the next section:
python setup.py -m cleanup -r <your region>

Step 2: Converting the monolith into microservices running on Amazon ECS

The second step is to convert the monolith into microservices. For a real application, you would likely not do this as one step, but re-architect an application piece by piece. You would continue to run your monolith but it would keep getting smaller for each piece that you are breaking apart.

By migrating microservices, you would get four benefits associated with microservices:

  • Isolation of crashes
    If one microservice in your application is crashing, then only that part of your application goes down. The rest of your application continues to work properly.
  • Isolation of security
    When microservice best practices are followed, the result is that if an attacker compromises one service, they only gain access to the resources of that service. They can’t horizontally access other resources from other services without breaking into those services as well.
  • Independent scaling
    When features are broken out into microservices, then the amount of infrastructure and number of instances of each microservice class can be scaled up and down independently.
  • Development velocity
    In a monolith, adding a new feature can potentially impact every other feature that the monolith contains. On the other hand, a proper microservice architecture has new code for a new feature going into a new service. You can be confident that any code you write won’t impact the existing code at all, unless you explicitly write a connection between two microservices.

Find the monolith example at 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices.
You break apart the Spring Pet Clinic application by creating a microservice for each REST API operation, as well as creating one for the system services.

Java code changes

Comparing the project structure between the monolith and the microservices version, you can see that each service is now its own separate build.
First, the monolith version:

You can clearly see how each API operation is its own subpackage under the org.springframework.samples.petclinic package, all part of the same monolithic application.
This changes as you break it apart in the microservices version:

Now, each API operation is its own separate build, which you can build independently and deploy. You have also duplicated some code across the different microservices, such as the classes under the model subpackage. This is intentional as you don’t want to introduce artificial dependencies among the microservices and allow these to evolve differently for each microservice.

Also, make the dependencies among the API operations more loosely coupled. In the monolithic version, the components are tightly coupled and use object-based invocation.

Here is an example of this from the OwnerController operation, where the class is directly calling PetRepository to get information about pets. PetRepository is the Repository class (Spring data access layer) to the Pet table in the RDS instance for the Pet API:

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Inject
    private PetRepository pets;
    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> visitList.addAll(pet.getVisits()));
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }
}

In the microservice version, call the Pet API operation and not PetRepository directly. Decouple the components by using interprocess communication; in this case, the Rest API. This provides for fault tolerance and disposability.

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Value("#{environment['SERVICE_ENDPOINT'] ?: 'localhost:8080'}")
    private String serviceEndpoint;

    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> {
            logger.info(getPetVisits(pet.getId()).toString());
            visitList.addAll(getPetVisits(pet.getId()));
        });
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }

    private List<Visit> getPetVisits(int petId){
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
        Pet pet = restTemplate.getForObject("http://"+serviceEndpoint+"/pet/"+petId, Pet.class);
        logger.info(pet.getVisits().toString());
        return pet.getVisits();
    }
}

You now have an additional method that calls the API. You are also handing in the service endpoint that should be called, so that you can easily inject dynamic endpoints based on the current deployment.

Container deployment overview

Here is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and the related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The Application Load Balancer that inspects the client request. Based on routing rules, it directs the request to an instance and port from the target group that matches the rule.
  • The Application Load Balancer that has a target group for each microservice. The target groups are used by the corresponding services to register available container instances. Each target group has a path, so when you call the path for a particular microservice, it is mapped to the correct target group. This allows you to use one Application Load Balancer to serve all the different microservices, accessed by the path. For example, https:///owner/* would be mapped and directed to the Owner microservice.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the containers for each microservice of the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Because you are running multiple containers on the same instances, use dynamic port mapping to avoid port clashing. By using dynamic port mapping, the container is allocated an anonymous port on the host to which the container port (8080) is mapped. The anonymous port is registered with the Application Load Balancer and target group so that traffic is routed correctly.

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon ECR repository for each microservice.
  • A service/task definition per microservice that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers. That way, the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have again automated setup with the 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices/ecs-cluster.cf CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The CloudFormation template remains the same as in the previous section. In the Python script, you are now building five different Java applications, one for each microservice (also includes a system application). There is a separate Maven POM file for each one. The resulting Docker image gets pushed to its own Amazon ECR repository, and is deployed separately using its own service/task definition. This is critical to get the benefits described earlier for microservices.

Here is an example of the POM file for the Owner microservice:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>org.springframework.samples</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-petclinic-rest</artifactId>
    <version>1.7</version>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>1.5.2.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>
    <properties>
        <!-- Generic properties -->
        <java.version>1.8</java.version>
        <docker.registry.host>${env.docker_registry_host}</docker.registry.host>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.inject</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.inject</artifactId>
            <version>1</version>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Spring and Spring Boot dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-rest</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-cache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Databases - Uses HSQL by default -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.hsqldb</groupId>
            <artifactId>hsqldb</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>mysql</groupId>
            <artifactId>mysql-connector-java</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- caching -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.cache</groupId>
            <artifactId>cache-api</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.ehcache</groupId>
            <artifactId>ehcache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <!-- end of webjars -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.spotify</groupId>
                <artifactId>docker-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>0.4.13</version>
                <configuration>
                    <imageName>${env.docker_registry_host}/${project.artifactId}</imageName>
                    <dockerDirectory>src/main/docker</dockerDirectory>
                    <useConfigFile>true</useConfigFile>
                    <registryUrl>${env.docker_registry_host}</registryUrl>
                    <!--dockerHost>https://${docker.registry.host}</dockerHost-->
                    <resources>
                        <resource>
                            <targetPath>/</targetPath>
                            <directory>${project.build.directory}</directory>
                            <include>${project.build.finalName}.jar</include>
                        </resource>
                    </resources>
                    <forceTags>false</forceTags>
                    <imageTags>
                        <imageTag>${project.version}</imageTag>
                    </imageTags>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Test setup

You can test this by running the Python script:

python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:

curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

Conclusion

Migrating a monolithic application to a containerized set of microservices can seem like a daunting task. Following the steps outlined in this post, you can begin to containerize monolithic Java apps, taking advantage of the container runtime environment, and beginning the process of re-architecting into microservices. On the whole, containerized microservices are faster to develop, easier to iterate on, and more cost effective to maintain and secure.

This post focused on the first steps of microservice migration. You can learn more about optimizing and scaling your microservices with components such as service discovery, blue/green deployment, circuit breakers, and configuration servers at http://aws.amazon.com/containers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

mkosi — A Tool for Generating OS Images

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/mkosi-a-tool-for-generating-os-images.html

Introducing mkosi

After blogging about
casync
I realized I never blogged about the
mkosi tool that combines nicely
with it. mkosi has been around for a while already, and its time to
make it a bit better known. mkosi stands for Make Operating System
Image
, and is a tool for precisely that: generating an OS tree or
image that can be booted.

Yes, there are many tools like mkosi, and a number of them are quite
well known and popular. But mkosi has a number of features that I
think make it interesting for a variety of use-cases that other tools
don’t cover that well.

What is mkosi?

What are those use-cases, and what does mkosi precisely set apart?
mkosi is definitely a tool with a focus on developer’s needs for
building OS images, for testing and debugging, but also for generating
production images with cryptographic protection. A typical use-case
would be to add a mkosi.default file to an existing project (for
example, one written in C or Python), and thus making it easy to
generate an OS image for it. mkosi will put together the image with
development headers and tools, compile your code in it, run your test
suite, then throw away the image again, and build a new one, this time
without development headers and tools, and install your build
artifacts in it. This final image is then “production-ready”, and only
contains your built program and the minimal set of packages you
configured otherwise. Such an image could then be deployed with
casync (or any other tool of course) to be delivered to your set of
servers, or IoT devices or whatever you are building.

mkosi is supposed to be legacy-free: the focus is clearly on
today’s technology, not yesteryear’s. Specifically this means that
we’ll generate GPT partition tables, not MBR/DOS ones. When you tell
mkosi to generate a bootable image for you, it will make it bootable
on EFI, not on legacy BIOS. The GPT images generated follow
specifications such as the Discoverable Partitions
Specification
,
so that /etc/fstab can remain unpopulated and tools such as
systemd-nspawn can automatically dissect the image and boot from
them.

So, let’s have a look on the specific images it can generate:

  1. Raw GPT disk image, with ext4 as root
  2. Raw GPT disk image, with btrfs as root
  3. Raw GPT disk image, with a read-only squashfs as root
  4. A plain directory on disk containing the OS tree directly (this is useful for creating generic container images)
  5. A btrfs subvolume on disk, similar to the plain directory
  6. A tarball of a plain directory

When any of the GPT choices above are selected, a couple of additional
options are available:

  1. A swap partition may be added in
  2. The system may be made bootable on EFI systems
  3. Separate partitions for /home and /srv may be added in
  4. The root, /home and /srv partitions may be optionally encrypted with LUKS
  5. The root partition may be protected using dm-verity, thus making offline attacks on the generated system hard
  6. If the image is made bootable, the dm-verity root hash is automatically added to the kernel command line, and the kernel together with its initial RAM disk and the kernel command line is optionally cryptographically signed for UEFI SecureBoot

Note that mkosi is distribution-agnostic. It currently can build
images based on the following Linux distributions:

  1. Fedora
  2. Debian
  3. Ubuntu
  4. ArchLinux
  5. openSUSE

Note though that not all distributions are supported at the same
feature level currently. Also, as mkosi is based on dnf
--installroot
, debootstrap, pacstrap and zypper, and those
packages are not packaged universally on all distributions, you might
not be able to build images for all those distributions on arbitrary
host distributions.

The GPT images are put together in a way that they aren’t just
compatible with UEFI systems, but also with VM and container managers
(that is, at least the smart ones, i.e. VM managers that know UEFI,
and container managers that grok GPT disk images) to a large
degree. In fact, the idea is that you can use mkosi to build a
single GPT image that may be used to:

  1. Boot on bare-metal boxes
  2. Boot in a VM
  3. Boot in a systemd-nspawn container
  4. Directly run a systemd service off, using systemd’s RootImage= unit file setting

Note that in all four cases the dm-verity data is automatically used
if available to ensure the image is not tampered with (yes, you read
that right, systemd-nspawn and systemd’s RootImage= setting
automatically do dm-verity these days if the image has it.)

Mode of Operation

The simplest usage of mkosi is by simply invoking it without
parameters (as root):

# mkosi

Without any configuration this will create a GPT disk image for you,
will call it image.raw and drop it in the current directory. The
distribution used will be the same one as your host runs.

Of course in most cases you want more control about how the image is
put together, i.e. select package sets, select the distribution, size
partitions and so on. Most of that you can actually specify on the
command line, but it is recommended to instead create a couple of
mkosi.$SOMETHING files and directories in some directory. Then,
simply change to that directory and run mkosi without any further
arguments. The tool will then look in the current working directory
for these files and directories and make use of them (similar to how
make looks for a Makefile…). Every single file/directory is
optional, but if they exist they are honored. Here’s a list of the
files/directories mkosi currently looks for:

  1. mkosi.default — This is the main configuration file, here you
    can configure what kind of image you want, which distribution, which
    packages and so on.

  2. mkosi.extra/ — If this directory exists, then mkosi will copy
    everything inside it into the images built. You can place arbitrary
    directory hierarchies in here, and they’ll be copied over whatever is
    already in the image, after it was put together by the distribution’s
    package manager. This is the best way to drop additional static files
    into the image, or override distribution-supplied ones.

  3. mkosi.build — This executable file is supposed to be a build
    script. When it exists, mkosi will build two images, one after the
    other in the mode already mentioned above: the first version is the
    build image, and may include various build-time dependencies such as
    a compiler or development headers. The build script is also copied
    into it, and then run inside it. The script should then build
    whatever shall be built and place the result in $DESTDIR (don’t
    worry, popular build tools such as Automake or Meson all honor
    $DESTDIR anyway, so there’s not much to do here explicitly). It may
    also run a test suite, or anything else you like. After the script
    finished, the build image is removed again, and a second image (the
    final image) is built. This time, no development packages are
    included, and the build script is not copied into the image again —
    however, the build artifacts from the first run (i.e. those placed in
    $DESTDIR) are copied into the image.

  4. mkosi.postinst — If this executable script exists, it is invoked
    inside the image (inside a systemd-nspawn invocation) and can
    adjust the image as it likes at a very late point in the image
    preparation. If mkosi.build exists, i.e. the dual-phased
    development build process used, then this script will be invoked
    twice: once inside the build image and once inside the final
    image. The first parameter passed to the script clarifies which phase
    it is run in.

  5. mkosi.nspawn — If this file exists, it should contain a
    container configuration file for systemd-nspawn (see
    systemd.nspawn(5)
    for details), which shall be shipped along with the final image and
    shall be included in the check-sum calculations (see below).

  6. mkosi.cache/ — If this directory exists, it is used as package
    cache directory for the builds. This directory is effectively bind
    mounted into the image at build time, in order to speed up building
    images. The package installers of the various distributions will
    place their package files here, so that subsequent runs can reuse
    them.

  7. mkosi.passphrase — If this file exists, it should contain a
    pass-phrase to use for the LUKS encryption (if that’s enabled for the
    image built). This file should not be readable to other users.

  8. mkosi.secure-boot.crt and mkosi.secure-boot.key should be an
    X.509 key pair to use for signing the kernel and initrd for UEFI
    SecureBoot, if that’s enabled.

How to use it

So, let’s come back to our most trivial example, without any of the
mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi

As mentioned, this will create a build file image.raw in the current
directory. How do we use it? Of course, we could dd it onto some USB
stick and boot it on a bare-metal device. However, it’s much simpler
to first run it in a container for testing:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And there you go: the image should boot up, and just work for you.

Now, let’s make things more interesting. Let’s still not use any of
the mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi -t raw_btrfs --bootable -o foobar.raw
# systemd-nspawn -bi foobar.raw

This is similar as the above, but we made three changes: it’s no
longer GPT + ext4, but GPT + btrfs. Moreover, the system is made
bootable on UEFI systems, and finally, the output is now called
foobar.raw.

Because this system is bootable on UEFI systems, we can run it in KVM:

qemu-kvm -m 512 -smp 2 -bios /usr/share/edk2/ovmf/OVMF_CODE.fd -drive format=raw,file=foobar.raw

This will look very similar to the systemd-nspawn invocation, except
that this uses full VM virtualization rather than container
virtualization. (Note that the way to run a UEFI qemu/kvm instance
appears to change all the time and is different on the various
distributions. It’s quite annoying, and I can’t really tell you what
the right qemu command line is to make this work on your system.)

Of course, it’s not all raw GPT disk images with mkosi. Let’s try
a plain directory image:

# mkosi -d fedora -t directory -o quux
# systemd-nspawn -bD quux

Of course, if you generate the image as plain directory you can’t boot
it on bare-metal just like that, nor run it in a VM.

A more complex command line is the following:

# mkosi -d fedora -t raw_squashfs --checksum --xz --package=openssh-clients --package=emacs

In this mode we explicitly pick Fedora as the distribution to use, ask
mkosi to generate a compressed GPT image with a root squashfs,
compress the result with xz, and generate a SHA256SUMS file with
the hashes of the generated artifacts. The package will contain the
SSH client as well as everybody’s favorite editor.

Now, let’s make use of the various mkosi.$SOMETHING files. Let’s
say we are working on some Automake-based project and want to make it
easy to generate a disk image off the development tree with the
version you are hacking on. Create a configuration file:

# cat > mkosi.default <<EOF
[Distribution]
Distribution=fedora
Release=24

[Output]
Format=raw_btrfs
Bootable=yes

[Packages]
# The packages to appear in both the build and the final image
Packages=openssh-clients httpd
# The packages to appear in the build image, but absent from the final image
BuildPackages=make gcc libcurl-devel
EOF

And let’s add a build script:

# cat > mkosi.build <<EOF
#!/bin/sh
./autogen.sh
./configure --prefix=/usr
make -j `nproc`
make install
EOF
# chmod +x mkosi.build

And with all that in place we can now build our project into a disk image, simply by typing:

# mkosi

Let’s try it out:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

Of course, if you do this you’ll notice that building an image like
this can be quite slow. And slow build times are actively hurtful to
your productivity as a developer. Hence let’s make things a bit
faster. First, let’s make use of a package cache shared between runs:

# mkdir mkosi.cache

Building images now should already be substantially faster (and
generate less network traffic) as the packages will now be downloaded
only once and reused. However, you’ll notice that unpacking all those
packages and the rest of the work is still quite slow. But mkosi can
help you with that. Simply use mkosi‘s incremental build feature. In
this mode mkosi will make a copy of the build and final images
immediately before dropping in your build sources or artifacts, so
that building an image becomes a lot quicker: instead of always
starting totally from scratch a build will now reuse everything it can
reuse from a previous run, and immediately begin with building your
sources rather than the build image to build your sources in. To
enable the incremental build feature use -i:

# mkosi -i

Note that if you use this option, the package list is not updated
anymore from your distribution’s servers, as the cached copy is made
after all packages are installed, and hence until you actually delete
the cached copy the distribution’s network servers aren’t contacted
again and no RPMs or DEBs are downloaded. This means the distribution
you use becomes “frozen in time” this way. (Which might be a bad
thing, but also a good thing, as it makes things kinda reproducible.)

Of course, if you run mkosi a couple of times you’ll notice that it
won’t overwrite the generated image when it already exists. You can
either delete the file yourself first (rm image.raw) or let mkosi
do it for you right before building a new image, with mkosi -f. You
can also tell mkosi to not only remove any such pre-existing images,
but also remove any cached copies of the incremental feature, by using
-f twice.

I wrote mkosi originally in order to test systemd, and quickly
generate a disk image of various distributions with the most current
systemd version from git, without all that affecting my host system. I
regularly use mkosi for that today, in incremental mode. The two
commands I use most in that context are:

# mkosi -if && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And sometimes:

# mkosi -iff && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

The latter I use only if I want to regenerate everything based on the
very newest set of RPMs provided by Fedora, instead of a cached
snapshot of it.

BTW, the mkosi files for systemd are included in the systemd git
tree:
mkosi.default
and
mkosi.build. This
way, any developer who wants to quickly test something with current
systemd git, or wants to prepare a patch based on it and test it can
check out the systemd repository and simply run mkosi in it and a
few minutes later he has a bootable image he can test in
systemd-nspawn or KVM. casync has similar files:
mkosi.default,
mkosi.build.

Random Interesting Features

  1. As mentioned already, mkosi will generate dm-verity enabled
    disk images if you ask for it. For that use the --verity switch on
    the command line or Verity= setting in mkosi.default. Of course,
    dm-verity implies that the root volume is read-only. In this mode
    the top-level dm-verity hash will be placed along-side the output
    disk image in a file named the same way, but with the .roothash
    suffix. If the image is to be created bootable, the root hash is also
    included on the kernel command line in the roothash= parameter,
    which current systemd versions can use to both find and activate the
    root partition in a dm-verity protected way. BTW: it’s a good idea
    to combine this dm-verity mode with the raw_squashfs image mode,
    to generate a genuinely protected, compressed image suitable for
    running in your IoT device.

  2. As indicated above, mkosi can automatically create a check-sum
    file SHA256SUMS for you (--checksum) covering all the files it
    outputs (which could be the image file itself, a matching .nspawn
    file using the mkosi.nspawn file mentioned above, as well as the
    .roothash file for the dm-verity root hash.) It can then
    optionally sign this with gpg (--sign). Note that systemd‘s
    machinectl pull-tar and machinectl pull-raw command can download
    these files and the SHA256SUMS file automatically and verify things
    on download. With other words: what mkosi outputs is perfectly
    ready for downloads using these two systemd commands.

  3. As mentioned, mkosi is big on supporting UEFI SecureBoot. To
    make use of that, place your X.509 key pair in two files
    mkosi.secureboot.crt and mkosi.secureboot.key, and set
    SecureBoot= or --secure-boot. If so, mkosi will sign the
    kernel/initrd/kernel command line combination during the build. Of
    course, if you use this mode, you should also use
    Verity=/--verity=, otherwise the setup makes only partial
    sense. Note that mkosi will not help you with actually enrolling
    the keys you use in your UEFI BIOS.

  4. mkosi has minimal support for GIT checkouts: when it recognizes
    it is run in a git checkout and you use the mkosi.build script
    stuff, the source tree will be copied into the build image, but will
    all files excluded by .gitignore removed.

  5. There’s support for encryption in place. Use --encrypt= or
    Encrypt=. Note that the UEFI ESP is never encrypted though, and the
    root partition only if explicitly requested. The /home and /srv
    partitions are unconditionally encrypted if that’s enabled.

  6. Images may be built with all documentation removed.

  7. The password for the root user and additional kernel command line
    arguments may be configured for the image to generate.

Minimum Requirements

Current mkosi requires Python 3.5, and has a number of dependencies,
listed in the
README. Most
notably you need a somewhat recent systemd version to make use of its
full feature set: systemd 233. Older versions are already packaged for
various distributions, but much of what I describe above is only
available in the most recent release mkosi 3.

The UEFI SecureBoot support requires sbsign which currently isn’t
available in Fedora, but there’s a
COPR
.

Future

It is my intention to continue turning mkosi into a tool suitable
for:

  1. Testing and debugging projects
  2. Building images for secure devices
  3. Building portable service images
  4. Building images for secure VMs and containers

One of the biggest goals I have for the future is to teach mkosi and
systemd/sd-boot native support for A/B IoT style partition
setups. The idea is that the combination of systemd, casync and
mkosi provides generic building blocks for building secure,
auto-updating devices in a generic way from, even though all pieces
may be used individually, too.

FAQ

  1. Why are you reinventing the wheel again? This is exactly like
    $SOMEOTHERPROJECT!
    — Well, to my knowledge there’s no tool that
    integrates this nicely with your project’s development tree, and can
    do dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot and all that stuff for you. So
    nope, I don’t think this exactly like $SOMEOTHERPROJECT, thank you
    very much.

  2. What about creating MBR/DOS partition images? — That’s really
    out of focus to me. This is an exercise in figuring out how generic
    OSes and devices in the future should be built and an attempt to
    commoditize OS image building. And no, the future doesn’t speak MBR,
    sorry. That said, I’d be quite interested in adding support for
    booting on Raspberry Pi, possibly using a hybrid approach, i.e. using
    a GPT disk label, but arranging things in a way that the Raspberry Pi
    boot protocol (which is built around DOS partition tables), can still
    work.

  3. Is this portable? — Well, depends what you mean by
    portable. No, this tool runs on Linux only, and as it uses
    systemd-nspawn during the build process it doesn’t run on
    non-systemd systems either. But then again, you should be able to
    create images for any architecture you like with it, but of course if
    you want the image bootable on bare-metal systems only systems doing
    UEFI are supported (but systemd-nspawn should still work fine on
    them).

  4. Where can I get this stuff? — Try
    GitHub. And some distributions
    carry packaged versions, but I think none of them the current v3
    yet.

  5. Is this a systemd project? — Yes, it’s hosted under the
    systemd GitHub umbrella. And yes,
    during run-time systemd-nspawn in a current version is required. But
    no, the code-bases are separate otherwise, already because systemd
    is a C project, and mkosi Python.

  6. Requiring systemd 233 is a pretty steep requirement, no?
    Yes, but the feature we need kind of matters (systemd-nspawn‘s
    --overlay= switch), and again, this isn’t supposed to be a tool for
    legacy systems.

  7. Can I run the resulting images in LXC or Docker? — Humm, I am
    not an LXC nor Docker guy. If you select directory or subvolume
    as image type, LXC should be able to boot the generated images just
    fine, but I didn’t try. Last time I looked, Docker doesn’t permit
    running proper init systems as PID 1 inside the container, as they
    define their own run-time without intention to emulate a proper
    system. Hence, no I don’t think it will work, at least not with an
    unpatched Docker version. That said, again, don’t ask me questions
    about Docker, it’s not precisely my area of expertise, and quite
    frankly I am not a fan. To my knowledge neither LXC nor Docker are
    able to run containers directly off GPT disk images, hence the
    various raw_xyz image types are definitely not compatible with
    either. That means if you want to generate a single raw disk image
    that can be booted unmodified both in a container and on bare-metal,
    then systemd-nspawn is the container manager to go for
    (specifically, its -i/--image= switch).

Should you care? Is this a tool for you?

Well, that’s up to you really.

If you hack on some complex project and need a quick way to compile
and run your project on a specific current Linux distribution, then
mkosi is an excellent way to do that. Simply drop the mkosi.default
and mkosi.build files in your git tree and everything will be
easy. (And of course, as indicated above: if the project you are
hacking on happens to be called systemd or casync be aware that
those files are already part of the git tree — you can just use them.)

If you hack on some embedded or IoT device, then mkosi is a great
choice too, as it will make it reasonably easy to generate secure
images that are protected against offline modification, by using
dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot.

If you are an administrator and need a nice way to build images for a
VM or systemd-nspawn container, or a portable service then mkosi
is an excellent choice too.

If you care about legacy computers, old distributions, non-systemd
init systems, old VM managers, Docker, … then no, mkosi is not for
you, but there are plenty of well-established alternatives around that
cover that nicely.

And never forget: mkosi is an Open Source project. We are happy to
accept your patches and other contributions.

Oh, and one unrelated last thing: don’t forget to submit your talk
proposal

and/or buy a ticket for
All Systems Go! 2017 in Berlin — the
conference where things like systemd, casync and mkosi are
discussed, along with a variety of other Linux userspace projects used
for building systems.