Tag Archives: EC2 Container Service

How I built a data warehouse using Amazon Redshift and AWS services in record time

Post Syndicated from Stephen Borg original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/how-i-built-a-data-warehouse-using-amazon-redshift-and-aws-services-in-record-time/

This is a customer post by Stephen Borg, the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

Cerberus Technologies, in their own words: Cerberus is a company founded in 2017 by a team of visionary iGaming veterans. Our mission is simple – to offer the best tech solutions through a data-driven and a customer-first approach, delivering innovative solutions that go against traditional forms of working and process. This mission is based on the solid foundations of reliability, flexibility and security, and we intend to fundamentally change the way iGaming and other industries interact with technology.

Over the years, I have developed and created a number of data warehouses from scratch. Recently, I built a data warehouse for the iGaming industry single-handedly. To do it, I used the power and flexibility of Amazon Redshift and the wider AWS data management ecosystem. In this post, I explain how I was able to build a robust and scalable data warehouse without the large team of experts typically needed.

In two of my recent projects, I ran into challenges when scaling our data warehouse using on-premises infrastructure. Data was growing at many tens of gigabytes per day, and query performance was suffering. Scaling required major capital investment for hardware and software licenses, and also significant operational costs for maintenance and technical staff to keep it running and performing well. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get the resources needed to scale the infrastructure with data growth, and these projects were abandoned. Thanks to cloud data warehousing, the bottleneck of infrastructure resources, capital expense, and operational costs have been significantly reduced or have totally gone away. There is no more excuse for allowing obstacles of the past to delay delivering timely insights to decision makers, no matter how much data you have.

With Amazon Redshift and AWS, I delivered a cloud data warehouse to the business very quickly, and with a small team: me. I didn’t have to order hardware or software, and I no longer needed to install, configure, tune, or keep up with patches and version updates. Instead, I easily set up a robust data processing pipeline and we were quickly ingesting and analyzing data. Now, my data warehouse team can be extremely lean, and focus more time on bringing in new data and delivering insights. In this post, I show you the AWS services and the architecture that I used.

Handling data feeds

I have several different data sources that provide everything needed to run the business. The data includes activity from our iGaming platform, social media posts, clickstream data, marketing and campaign performance, and customer support engagements.

To handle the diversity of data feeds, I developed abstract integration applications using Docker that run on Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) and feed data to Amazon Kinesis Data Streams. These data streams can be used for real time analytics. In my system, each record in Kinesis is preprocessed by an AWS Lambda function to cleanse and aggregate information. My system then routes it to be stored where I need on Amazon S3 by Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose. Suppose that you used an on-premises architecture to accomplish the same task. A team of data engineers would be required to maintain and monitor a Kafka cluster, develop applications to stream data, and maintain a Hadoop cluster and the infrastructure underneath it for data storage. With my stream processing architecture, there are no servers to manage, no disk drives to replace, and no service monitoring to write.

Setting up a Kinesis stream can be done with a few clicks, and the same for Kinesis Firehose. Firehose can be configured to automatically consume data from a Kinesis Data Stream, and then write compressed data every N minutes to Amazon S3. When I want to process a Kinesis data stream, it’s very easy to set up a Lambda function to be executed on each message received. I can just set a trigger from the AWS Lambda Management Console, as shown following.

I also monitor the duration of function execution using Amazon CloudWatch and AWS X-Ray.

Regardless of the format I receive the data from our partners, I can send it to Kinesis as JSON data using my own formatters. After Firehose writes this to Amazon S3, I have everything in nearly the same structure I received but compressed, encrypted, and optimized for reading.

This data is automatically crawled by AWS Glue and placed into the AWS Glue Data Catalog. This means that I can immediately query the data directly on S3 using Amazon Athena or through Amazon Redshift Spectrum. Previously, I used Amazon EMR and an Amazon RDS–based metastore in Apache Hive for catalog management. Now I can avoid the complexity of maintaining Hive Metastore catalogs. Glue takes care of high availability and the operations side so that I know that end users can always be productive.

Working with Amazon Athena and Amazon Redshift for analysis

I found Amazon Athena extremely useful out of the box for ad hoc analysis. Our engineers (me) use Athena to understand new datasets that we receive and to understand what transformations will be needed for long-term query efficiency.

For our data analysts and data scientists, we’ve selected Amazon Redshift. Amazon Redshift has proven to be the right tool for us over and over again. It easily processes 20+ million transactions per day, regardless of the footprint of the tables and the type of analytics required by the business. Latency is low and query performance expectations have been more than met. We use Redshift Spectrum for long-term data retention, which enables me to extend the analytic power of Amazon Redshift beyond local data to anything stored in S3, and without requiring me to load any data. Redshift Spectrum gives me the freedom to store data where I want, in the format I want, and have it available for processing when I need it.

To load data directly into Amazon Redshift, I use AWS Data Pipeline to orchestrate data workflows. I create Amazon EMR clusters on an intra-day basis, which I can easily adjust to run more or less frequently as needed throughout the day. EMR clusters are used together with Amazon RDS, Apache Spark 2.0, and S3 storage. The data pipeline application loads ETL configurations from Spring RESTful services hosted on AWS Elastic Beanstalk. The application then loads data from S3 into memory, aggregates and cleans the data, and then writes the final version of the data to Amazon Redshift. This data is then ready to use for analysis. Spark on EMR also helps with recommendations and personalization use cases for various business users, and I find this easy to set up and deliver what users want. Finally, business users use Amazon QuickSight for self-service BI to slice, dice, and visualize the data depending on their requirements.

Each AWS service in this architecture plays its part in saving precious time that’s crucial for delivery and getting different departments in the business on board. I found the services easy to set up and use, and all have proven to be highly reliable for our use as our production environments. When the architecture was in place, scaling out was either completely handled by the service, or a matter of a simple API call, and crucially doesn’t require me to change one line of code. Increasing shards for Kinesis can be done in a minute by editing a stream. Increasing capacity for Lambda functions can be accomplished by editing the megabytes allocated for processing, and concurrency is handled automatically. EMR cluster capacity can easily be increased by changing the master and slave node types in Data Pipeline, or by using Auto Scaling. Lastly, RDS and Amazon Redshift can be easily upgraded without any major tasks to be performed by our team (again, me).

In the end, using AWS services including Kinesis, Lambda, Data Pipeline, and Amazon Redshift allows me to keep my team lean and highly productive. I eliminated the cost and delays of capital infrastructure, as well as the late night and weekend calls for support. I can now give maximum value to the business while keeping operational costs down. My team pushed out an agile and highly responsive data warehouse solution in record time and we can handle changing business requirements rapidly, and quickly adapt to new data and new user requests.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Deploy a Data Warehouse Quickly with Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and Tableau Server and Top 8 Best Practices for High-Performance ETL Processing Using Amazon Redshift.


About the Author

Stephen Borg is the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies. He has a background in platform software engineering, and first became involved in data warehousing using the typical RDBMS, SQL, ETL, and BI tools. He quickly became passionate about providing insight to help others optimize the business and add personalization to products. He is now the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

 

 

 

AWS Architecture Monthly for Kindle

Post Syndicated from Jamey Tisdale original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/aws-architecture-monthly-for-kindle/

We recently launched AWS Architecture Monthly, a new subscription service on Kindle that will push a selection of the best content around cloud architecture from AWS, with a few pointers to other content you might also enjoy.

From building a simple website to crafting an AI-based chat bot, the choices of technologies and the best practices in how to apply them are constantly evolving. Our goal is to supply you each month with a broad selection of the best new tech content from AWS — from deep-dive tutorials to industry-trend articles.

With your free subscription, you can look forward to fresh content delivered directly to your Kindledevice or Kindle app including:
– Technical whitepapers
– Reference architectures
– New solutions and implementation guides
– Training and certification opportunities
– Industry trends

The January issue is now live. This month includes:
– AWS Architecture Blog: Glenn Gore’s Take on re:Invent 2017 (Chief Architect for AWS)
– AWS Reference Architectures: Java Microservices Deployed on EC2 Container Service; Node.js Microservices Deployed on EC2 Container Service
– AWS Training & Certification: AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate
– Sample Code: aws-serverless-express
– Technical Whitepaper: Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda – Overview and Best Practices

At this time, Architecture Monthly annual subscriptions are only available in the France (new), US, UK, and Germany. As more countries become available, we’ll update you here on the blog. For Amazon.com countries not listed above, we are offering single-issue downloads — also accessible from our landing page. The content is the same as in the subscription but requires individual-issue downloads.

FAQ
I have to submit my credit card information for a free subscription?
While you do have to submit your card information at this time (as you would for a free book in the Kindle store), it won’t be charged. This will remain a free, annual subscription and includes all 10 issues for the year.

Why isn’t the subscription available everywhere?
As new countries get added to Kindle Newsstand, we’ll ensure we add them for Architecture Monthly. This month we added France but anticipate it will take some time for the new service to move into additional markets.

What countries are included in the Amazon.com list where the issues can be downloaded?
Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Gibraltar, Guernsey, India, Ireland, Isle of Man, Japan, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, San Marino, Spain, Switzerland, Vatican City

Access Resources in a VPC from AWS CodeBuild Builds

Post Syndicated from John Pignata original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/access-resources-in-a-vpc-from-aws-codebuild-builds/

John Pignata, Startup Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

In this blog post we’re going to discuss a new AWS CodeBuild feature that is available starting today. CodeBuild builds can now access resources in a VPC directly without these resources being exposed to the public internet. These resources include Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) databases, Amazon ElastiCache clusters, internal services running on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), and Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), or any service endpoints that are only reachable from within a specific VPC.

CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. As part of the build process, developers often require access to resources that should be isolated from the public Internet. Now CodeBuild builds can be optionally configured to have VPC connectivity and access these resources directly.

Accessing Resources in a VPC

You can configure builds to have access to a VPC when you create a CodeBuild project or you can update an existing CodeBuild project with VPC configuration attributes. Here’s how it looks in the console:

 

To configure VPC connectivity: select a VPC, one or more subnets within that VPC, and one or more VPC security groups that CodeBuild should apply when attaching to your VPC. Once configured, commands running as part of your build will be able to access resources in your VPC without transiting across the public Internet.

Use Cases

The availability of VPC connectivity from CodeBuild builds unlocks many potential uses. For example, you can:

  • Run integration tests from your build against data in an Amazon RDS instance that’s isolated on a private subnet.
  • Query data in an ElastiCache cluster directly from tests.
  • Interact with internal web services hosted on Amazon EC2, Amazon ECS, or services that use internal Elastic Load Balancing.
  • Retrieve dependencies from self-hosted, internal artifact repositories such as PyPI for Python, Maven for Java, npm for Node.js, and so on.
  • Access objects in an Amazon S3 bucket configured to allow access only through a VPC endpoint.
  • Query external web services that require fixed IP addresses through the Elastic IP address of the NAT gateway associated with your subnet(s).

… and more! Your builds can now access any resource that’s hosted in your VPC without any compromise on network isolation.

Internet Connectivity

CodeBuild requires access to resources on the public Internet to successfully execute builds. At a minimum, it must be able to reach your source repository system (such as AWS CodeCommit, GitHub, Bitbucket), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) to deliver build artifacts, and Amazon CloudWatch Logs to stream logs from the build process. The interface attached to your VPC will not be assigned a public IP address so to enable Internet access from your builds, you will need to set up a managed NAT Gateway or NAT instance for the subnets you configure. You must also ensure your security groups allow outbound access to these services.

IP Address Space

Each running build will be assigned an IP address from one of the subnets in your VPC that you designate for CodeBuild to use. As CodeBuild scales to meet your build volume, ensure that you select subnets with enough address space to accommodate your expected number of concurrent builds.

Service Role Permissions

CodeBuild requires new permissions in order to manage network interfaces on your VPCs. If you create a service role for your new projects, these permissions will be included in that role’s policy automatically. For existing service roles, you can edit the policy document to include the additional actions. For the full policy document to apply to your service role, see Advanced Setup in the CodeBuild documentation.

For more information, see VPC Support in the CodeBuild documentation. We hope you find the ability to access internal resources on a VPC useful in your build processes! If you have any questions or feedback, feel free to reach out to us through the AWS CodeBuild forum or leave a comment!

Updated AWS SOC Reports Are Now Available with 19 Additional Services in Scope

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/updated-aws-soc-reports-are-now-available-with-19-additional-services-in-scope/

AICPA SOC logo

Newly updated reports are available for AWS System and Organization Control Report 1 (SOC 1), formerly called AWS Service Organization Control Report 1, and AWS SOC 2: Security, Availability, & Confidentiality Report. You can download both reports for free and on demand in the AWS Management Console through AWS Artifact. The updated AWS SOC 3: Security, Availability, & Confidentiality Report also was just released. All three reports cover April 1, 2017, through September 30, 2017.

With the addition of the following 19 services, AWS now supports 51 SOC-compliant AWS services and is committed to increasing the number:

  • Amazon API Gateway
  • Amazon Cloud Directory
  • Amazon CloudFront
  • Amazon Cognito
  • Amazon Connect
  • AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory
  • Amazon EC2 Container Registry
  • Amazon EC2 Container Service
  • Amazon EC2 Systems Manager
  • Amazon Inspector
  • AWS IoT Platform
  • Amazon Kinesis Streams
  • AWS Lambda
  • AWS [email protected]
  • AWS Managed Services
  • Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration
  • AWS Shield
  • AWS Step Functions
  • AWS WAF

With this release, we also are introducing a separate spreadsheet, eliminating the need to extract the information from multiple PDFs.

If you are not yet an AWS customer, contact AWS Compliance to access the SOC Reports.

– Chad

AWS Hot Startups – September 2017

Post Syndicated from Tina Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-september-2017/

As consumers continue to demand faster, simpler, and more on-the-go services, FinTech companies are responding with ever more innovative solutions to fit everyone’s needs and to improve customer experience. This month, we are excited to feature the following startups—all of whom are disrupting traditional financial services in unique ways:

  • Acorns – allowing customers to invest spare change automatically.
  • Bondlinc – improving the bond trading experience for clients, financial institutions, and private banks.
  • Lenda – reimagining homeownership with a secure and streamlined online service.

Acorns (Irvine, CA)

Driven by the belief that anyone can grow wealth, Acorns is relentlessly pursuing ways to help make that happen. Currently the fastest-growing micro-investing app in the U.S., Acorns takes mere minutes to get started and is currently helping over 2.2 million people grow their wealth. And unlike other FinTech apps, Acorns is focused on helping America’s middle class – namely the 182 million citizens who make less than $100,000 per year – and looking after their financial best interests.

Acorns is able to help their customers effortlessly invest their money, little by little, by offering ETF portfolios put together by Dr. Harry Markowitz, a Nobel Laureate in economic sciences. They also offer a range of services, including “Round-Ups,” whereby customers can automatically invest spare change from every day purchases, and “Recurring Investments,” through which customers can set up automatic transfers of just $5 per week into their portfolio. Additionally, Found Money, Acorns’ earning platform, can help anyone spend smarter as the company connects customers to brands like Lyft, Airbnb, and Skillshare, who then automatically invest in customers’ Acorns account.

The Acorns platform runs entirely on AWS, allowing them to deliver a secure and scalable cloud-based experience. By utilizing AWS, Acorns is able to offer an exceptional customer experience and fulfill its core mission. Acorns uses Terraform to manage services such as Amazon EC2 Container Service, Amazon CloudFront, and Amazon S3. They also use Amazon RDS and Amazon Redshift for data storage, and Amazon Glacier to manage document retention.

Acorns is hiring! Be sure to check out their careers page if you are interested.

Bondlinc (Singapore)

Eng Keong, Founder and CEO of Bondlinc, has long wanted to standardize, improve, and automate the traditional workflows that revolve around bond trading. As a former trader at BNP Paribas and Jefferies & Company, E.K. – as Keong is known – had personally seen how manual processes led to information bottlenecks in over-the-counter practices. This drove him, along with future Bondlinc CTO Vincent Caldeira, to start a new service that maximizes efficiency, information distribution, and accessibility for both clients and bankers in the bond market.

Currently, bond trading requires banks to spend a significant amount of resources retrieving data from expensive and restricted institutional sources, performing suitability checks, and attaching required documentation before presenting all relevant information to clients – usually by email. Bankers are often overwhelmed by these time-consuming tasks, which means clients don’t always get proper access to time-sensitive bond information and pricing. Bondlinc bridges this gap between banks and clients by providing a variety of solutions, including easy access to basic bond information and analytics, updates of new issues and relevant news, consolidated management of your portfolio, and a chat function between banker and client. By making the bond market much more accessible to clients, Bondlinc is taking private banking to the next level, while improving efficiency of the banks as well.

As a startup running on AWS since inception, Bondlinc has built and operated its SaaS product by leveraging Amazon EC2, Amazon S3, Elastic Load Balancing, and Amazon RDS across multiple Availability Zones to provide its customers (namely, financial institutions) a highly available and seamlessly scalable product distribution platform. Bondlinc also makes extensive use of Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon SNS to meet the stringent operational monitoring, auditing, compliance, and governance requirements of its customers. Bondlinc is currently experimenting with Amazon Lex to build a conversational interface into its mobile application via a chat-bot that provides trading assistance services.

To see how Bondlinc works, request a demo at Bondlinc.com.

Lenda (San Francisco, CA)

Lenda is a digital mortgage company founded by seasoned FinTech entrepreneur Jason van den Brand. Jason wanted to create a smarter, simpler, and more streamlined system for people to either get a mortgage or refinance their homes. With Lenda, customers can find out if they are pre-approved for loans, and receive accurate, real-time mortgage rate quotes from industry-experienced home loan advisors. Lenda’s advisors support customers through the loan process by providing financial advice and guidance for a seamless experience.

Lenda’s innovative platform allows borrowers to complete their home loans online from start to finish. Through a savvy combination of being a direct lender with proprietary technology, Lenda has simplified the mortgage application process to save customers time and money. With an interactive dashboard, customers know exactly where they are in the mortgage process and can manage all of their documents in one place. The company recently received its Series A funding of $5.25 million, and van den Brand shared that most of the capital investment will be used to improve Lenda’s technology and fulfill the company’s mission, which is to reimagine homeownership, starting with home loans.

AWS allows Lenda to scale its business while providing a secure, easy-to-use system for a faster home loan approval process. Currently, Lenda uses Amazon S3, Amazon EC2, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Redshift, and Amazon WorkSpaces.

Visit Lenda.com to find out more.

Thanks for reading and see you in October for another round of hot startups!

-Tina

Creating a Cost-Efficient Amazon ECS Cluster for Scheduled Tasks

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/creating-a-cost-efficient-amazon-ecs-cluster-for-scheduled-tasks/

Madhuri Peri
Sr. DevOps Consultant

When you use Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), depending on the logging levels on the RDS instances and the volume of transactions, you could generate a lot of log data. To ensure that everything is running smoothly, many customers search for log error patterns using different log aggregation and visualization systems, such as Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Splunk, or other tool of their choice. A module needs to periodically retrieve the RDS logs using the SDK, and then send them to Amazon S3. From there, you can stream them to your log aggregation tool.

One option is writing an AWS Lambda function to retrieve the log files. However, because of the time that this function needs to execute, depending on the volume of log files retrieved and transferred, it is possible that Lambda could time out on many instances.  Another approach is launching an Amazon EC2 instance that runs this job periodically. However, this would require you to run an EC2 instance continuously, not an optimal use of time or money.

Using the new Amazon CloudWatch integration with Amazon EC2 Container Service, you can trigger this job to run in a container on an existing Amazon ECS cluster. Additionally, this would allow you to improve costs by running containers on a fleet of Spot Instances.

In this post, I will show you how to use the new scheduled tasks (cron) feature in Amazon ECS and launch tasks using CloudWatch events, while leveraging Spot Fleet to maximize availability and cost optimization for containerized workloads.

Architecture

The following diagram shows how the various components described schedule a task that retrieves log files from Amazon RDS database instances, and deposits the logs into an S3 bucket.

Amazon ECS cluster container instances are using Spot Fleet, which is a perfect match for the workload that needs to run when it can. This improves cluster costs.

The task definition defines which Docker image to retrieve from the Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository and run on the Amazon ECS cluster.

The container image has Python code functions to make AWS API calls using boto3. It iterates over the RDS database instances, retrieves the logs, and deposits them in the S3 bucket. Many customers choose these logs to be delivered to their centralized log-store. CloudWatch Events defines the schedule for when the container task has to be launched.

Walkthrough

To provide the basic framework, we have built an AWS CloudFormation template that creates the following resources:

  • Amazon ECR repository for storing the Docker image to be used in the task definition
  • S3 bucket that holds the transferred logs
  • Task definition, with image name and S3 bucket as environment variables provided via input parameter
  • CloudWatch Events rule
  • Amazon ECS cluster
  • Amazon ECS container instances using Spot Fleet
  • IAM roles required for the container instance profiles

Before you begin

Ensure that Git, Docker, and the AWS CLI are installed on your computer.

In your AWS account, instantiate one Amazon Aurora instance using the console. For more information, see Creating an Amazon Aurora DB Cluster.

Implementation Steps

  1. Clone the code from GitHub that performs RDS API calls to retrieve the log files.
    git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks.git
  2. Build and tag the image.
    cd aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks/container-code/src && ls

    Dockerfile		rdslogsshipper.py	requirements.txt

    docker build -t rdslogsshipper .

    Sending build context to Docker daemon 9.728 kB
    Step 1 : FROM python:3
     ---> 41397f4f2887
    Step 2 : WORKDIR /usr/src/app
     ---> Using cache
     ---> 59299c020e7e
    Step 3 : COPY requirements.txt ./
     ---> 8c017e931c3b
    Removing intermediate container df09e1bed9f2
    Step 4 : COPY rdslogsshipper.py /usr/src/app
     ---> 099a49ca4325
    Removing intermediate container 1b1da24a6699
    Step 5 : RUN pip install --no-cache-dir -r requirements.txt
     ---> Running in 3ed98b30901d
    Collecting boto3 (from -r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading boto3-1.4.6-py2.py3-none-any.whl (128kB)
    Collecting botocore (from -r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading botocore-1.6.7-py2.py3-none-any.whl (3.6MB)
    Collecting s3transfer<0.2.0,>=0.1.10 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading s3transfer-0.1.10-py2.py3-none-any.whl (54kB)
    Collecting jmespath<1.0.0,>=0.7.1 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading jmespath-0.9.3-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Collecting python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading python_dateutil-2.6.1-py2.py3-none-any.whl (194kB)
    Collecting docutils>=0.10 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading docutils-0.14-py3-none-any.whl (543kB)
    Collecting six>=1.5 (from python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1->botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading six-1.10.0-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Installing collected packages: six, python-dateutil, docutils, jmespath, botocore, s3transfer, boto3
    Successfully installed boto3-1.4.6 botocore-1.6.7 docutils-0.14 jmespath-0.9.3 python-dateutil-2.6.1 s3transfer-0.1.10 six-1.10.0
     ---> f892d3cb7383
    Removing intermediate container 3ed98b30901d
    Step 6 : COPY . .
     ---> ea7550c04fea
    Removing intermediate container b558b3ebd406
    Successfully built ea7550c04fea
  3. Run the CloudFormation stack and get the names for the Amazon ECR repo and S3 bucket. In the stack, choose Outputs.
  4. Open the ECS console and choose Repositories. The rdslogs repo has been created. Choose View Push Commands and follow the instructions to connect to the repository and push the image for the code that you built in Step 2. The screenshot shows the final result:
  5. Associate the CloudWatch scheduled task with the created Amazon ECS Task Definition, using a new CloudWatch event rule that is scheduled to run at intervals. The following rule is scheduled to run every 15 minutes:
    aws --profile default --region us-west-2 events put-rule --name demo-ecs-task-rule  --schedule-expression "rate(15 minutes)"

    {
        "RuleArn": "arn:aws:events:us-west-2:12345678901:rule/demo-ecs-task-rule"
    }
  6. CloudWatch requires IAM permissions to place a task on the Amazon ECS cluster when the CloudWatch event rule is executed, in addition to an IAM role that can be assumed by CloudWatch Events. This is done in three steps:
    1. Create the IAM role to be assumed by CloudWatch.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-role --role-name Test-Role --assume-role-policy-document file://event-role.json

      {
          "Role": {
              "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
                  "Version": "2012-10-17", 
                  "Statement": [
                      {
                          "Action": "sts:AssumeRole", 
                          "Effect": "Allow", 
                          "Principal": {
                              "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                          }
                      }
                  ]
              }, 
              "RoleId": "AROAIRYYLDCVZCUACT7FS", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:44:52.627Z", 
              "RoleName": "Test-Role", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-role.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
              {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Principal": {
                    "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                  },
                  "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
              }
          ]
      }
    2. Create the IAM policy defining the ECS cluster and task definition. You need to get these values from the CloudFormation outputs and resources.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-policy --policy-name test-policy --policy-document file://event-policy.json

      {
          "Policy": {
              "PolicyName": "test-policy", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z", 
              "AttachmentCount": 0, 
              "IsAttachable": true, 
              "PolicyId": "ANPAI7XDIQOLTBUMDWGJW", 
              "DefaultVersionId": "v1", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::123455678901:policy/test-policy", 
              "UpdateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-policy.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "ecs:RunTask"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:ecs:*::task-definition/"
                ],
                "Condition": {
                    "ArnLike": {
                        "ecs:cluster": "arn:aws:ecs:*::cluster/"
                    }
                }
            }
          ]
      }
    3. Attach the IAM policy to the role.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam attach-role-policy --role-name Test-Role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::1234567890:policy/test-policy
  7. Associate the CloudWatch rule created earlier to place the task on the ECS cluster. The following command shows an example. Replace the AWS account ID and region with your settings.
    aws events put-targets --rule demo-ecs-task-rule --targets "Id"="1","Arn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:cluster/test-cwe-blog-ecsCluster-15HJFWCH4SP67","EcsParameters"={"TaskDefinitionArn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:task-definition/test-cwe-blog-taskdef:8"},"RoleArn"="arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"

    {
        "FailedEntries": [], 
        "FailedEntryCount": 0
    }

That’s it. The logs now run based on the defined schedule.

To test this, open the Amazon ECS console, select the Amazon ECS cluster that you created, and then choose Tasks, Run New Task. Select the task definition created by the CloudFormation template, and the cluster should be selected automatically. As this runs, the S3 bucket should be populated with the RDS logs for the instance.

Conclusion

In this post, you’ve seen that the choices for workloads that need to run at a scheduled time include Lambda with CloudWatch events or EC2 with cron. However, sometimes the job could run outside of Lambda execution time limits or be not cost-effective for an EC2 instance.

In such cases, you can schedule the tasks on an ECS cluster using CloudWatch rules. In addition, you can use a Spot Fleet cluster with Amazon ECS for cost-conscious workloads that do not have hard requirements on execution time or instance availability in the Spot Fleet. For more information, see Powering your Amazon ECS Cluster with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances and Scheduled Events.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Skill up on how to perform CI/CD with AWS Developer tools

Post Syndicated from Chirag Dhull original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/skill-up-on-how-to-perform-cicd-with-aws-devops-tools/

This is a guest post from Paul Duvall, CTO of Stelligent, a division of HOSTING.

I co-founded Stelligent, a technology services company that provides DevOps Automation on AWS as a result of my own frustration in implementing all the “behind the scenes” infrastructure (including builds, tests, deployments, etc.) on software projects on which I was developing software. At Stelligent, we have worked with numerous customers looking to get software delivered to users quicker and with greater confidence. This sounds simple but it often consists of properly configuring and integrating myriad tools including, but not limited to, version control, build, static analysis, testing, security, deployment, and software release orchestration. What some might not realize is that there’s a new breed of build, deploy, test, and release tools that help reduce much of the undifferentiated heavy lifting of deploying and releasing software to users.

 
I’ve been using AWS since 2009 and I, along with many at Stelligent – have worked with the AWS Service Teams as part of the AWS Developer Tools betas that are now generally available (including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy). I’ve combined the experience we’ve had with customers along with this specialized knowledge of the AWS Developer and Management Tools to provide a unique course that shows multiple ways to use these services to deliver software to users quicker and with confidence.

 
In DevOps Essentials on AWS, you’ll learn how to accelerate software delivery and speed up feedback loops by learning how to use AWS Developer Tools to automate infrastructure and deployment pipelines for applications running on AWS. The course demonstrates solutions for various DevOps use cases for Amazon EC2, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Lambda (Serverless), Amazon ECS (Containers), while defining infrastructure as code and learning more about AWS Developer Tools including AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, and AWS CodeDeploy.

 
In this course, you see me use the AWS Developer and Management Tools to create comprehensive continuous delivery solutions for a sample application using many types of AWS service platforms. You can run the exact same sample and/or fork the GitHub repository (https://github.com/stelligent/devops-essentials) and extend or modify the solutions. I’m excited to share how you can use AWS Developer Tools to create these solutions for your customers as well. There’s also an accompanying website for the course (http://www.devopsessentialsaws.com/) that I use in the video to walk through the course examples which link to resources located in GitHub or Amazon S3. In this course, you will learn how to:

  • Use AWS Developer and Management Tools to create a full-lifecycle software delivery solution
  • Use AWS CloudFormation to automate the provisioning of all AWS resources
  • Use AWS CodePipeline to orchestrate the deployments of all applications
  • Use AWS CodeCommit while deploying an application onto EC2 instances using AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodeDeploy
  • Deploy applications using AWS OpsWorks and AWS Elastic Beanstalk
  • Deploy an application using Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) along with AWS CloudFormation
  • Deploy serverless applications that use AWS Lambda and API Gateway
  • Integrate all AWS Developer Tools into an end-to-end solution with AWS CodeStar

To learn more, see DevOps Essentials on AWS video course on Udemy. For a limited time, you can enroll in this course for $40 and save 80%, a $160 saving. Simply use the code AWSDEV17.

 
Stelligent, an AWS Partner Network Advanced Consulting Partner holds the AWS DevOps Competency and over 100 AWS technical certifications. To stay updated on DevOps best practices, visit www.stelligent.com.

Simplify Your Jenkins Builds with AWS CodeBuild

Post Syndicated from Paul Roberts original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/simplify-your-jenkins-builds-with-aws-codebuild/

Jeff Bezos famously said, “There’s a lot of undifferentiated heavy lifting that stands between your idea and that success.” He went on to say, “…70% of your time, energy, and dollars go into the undifferentiated heavy lifting and only 30% of your energy, time, and dollars gets to go into the core kernel of your idea.”

If you subscribe to this maxim, you should not be spending valuable time focusing on operational issues related to maintaining the Jenkins build infrastructure. Companies such as Riot Games have over 1.25 million builds per year and have written several lengthy blog posts about their experiences designing a complex, custom Docker-powered Jenkins build farm. Dealing with Jenkins slaves at scale is a job in itself and Riot has engineers focused on managing the build infrastructure.

Typical Jenkins Build Farm

 

As with all technology, the Jenkins build farm architectures have evolved. Today, instead of manually building your own container infrastructure, there are Jenkins Docker plugins available to help reduce the operational burden of maintaining these environments. There is also a community-contributed Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) plugin that helps remove some of the overhead, but you still need to configure and manage the overall Amazon ECS environment.

There are various ways to create and manage your Jenkins build farm, but there has to be a way that significantly reduces your operational overhead.

Introducing AWS CodeBuild

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that removes the undifferentiated heavy lifting of provisioning, managing, and scaling your own build servers. With CodeBuild, there is no software to install, patch, or update. CodeBuild scales up automatically to meet the needs of your development teams. In addition, CodeBuild is an on-demand service where you pay as you go. You are charged based only on the number of minutes it takes to complete your build.

One AWS customer, Recruiterbox, helps companies hire simply and predictably through their software platform. Two years ago, they began feeling the operational pain of maintaining their own Jenkins build farms. They briefly considered moving to Amazon ECS, but chose an even easier path forward instead. Recuiterbox transitioned to using Jenkins with CodeBuild and are very happy with the results. You can read more about their journey here.

Solution Overview: Jenkins and CodeBuild

To remove the heavy lifting from managing your Jenkins build farm, AWS has developed a Jenkins AWS CodeBuild plugin. After the plugin has been enabled, a developer can configure a Jenkins project to pick up new commits from their chosen source code repository and automatically run the associated builds. After the build is successful, it will create an artifact that is stored inside an S3 bucket that you have configured. If an error is detected somewhere, CodeBuild will capture the output and send it to Amazon CloudWatch logs. In addition to storing the logs on CloudWatch, Jenkins also captures the error so you do not have to go hunting for log files for your build.

 

AWS CodeBuild with Jenkins Plugin

 

The following example uses AWS CodeCommit (Git) as the source control management (SCM) and Amazon S3 for build artifact storage. Logs are stored in CloudWatch. A development pipeline that uses Jenkins with CodeBuild plugin architecture looks something like this:

 

AWS CodeBuild Diagram

Initial Solution Setup

To keep this blog post succinct, I assume that you are using the following components on AWS already and have applied the appropriate IAM policies:

·         AWS CodeCommit repo.

·         Amazon S3 bucket for CodeBuild artifacts.

·         SNS notification for text messaging of the Jenkins admin password.

·         IAM user’s key and secret.

·         A role that has a policy with these permissions. Be sure to edit the ARNs with your region, account, and resource name. Use this role in the AWS CloudFormation template referred to later in this post.

 

Jenkins Installation with CodeBuild Plugin Enabled

To make the integration with Jenkins as frictionless as possible, I have created an AWS CloudFormation template here: https://s3.amazonaws.com/proberts-public/jenkins.yaml. Download the template, sign in the AWS CloudFormation console, and then use the template to create a stack.

 

CloudFormation Inputs

Jenkins Project Configuration

After the stack is complete, log in to the Jenkins EC2 instance using the user name “admin” and the password sent to your mobile device. Now that you have logged in to Jenkins, you need to create your first project. Start with a Freestyle project and configure the parameters based on your CodeBuild and CodeCommit settings.

 

AWS CodeBuild Plugin Configuration in Jenkins

 

Additional Jenkins AWS CodeBuild Plugin Configuration

 

After you have configured the Jenkins project appropriately you should be able to check your build status on the Jenkins polling log under your project settings:

 

Jenkins Polling Log

 

Now that Jenkins is polling CodeCommit, you can check the CodeBuild dashboard under your Jenkins project to confirm your build was successful:

Jenkins AWS CodeBuild Dashboard

Wrapping Up

In a matter of minutes, you have been able to provision Jenkins with the AWS CodeBuild plugin. This will greatly simplify your build infrastructure management. Now kick back and relax while CodeBuild does all the heavy lifting!


About the Author

Paul Roberts is a Strategic Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps, or Artificial Intelligence, he is often found in Lake Tahoe exploring the various mountain ranges with his family.

Deploying an NGINX Reverse Proxy Sidecar Container on Amazon ECS

Post Syndicated from Nathan Peck original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/nginx-reverse-proxy-sidecar-container-on-amazon-ecs/

Reverse proxies are a powerful software architecture primitive for fetching resources from a server on behalf of a client. They serve a number of purposes, from protecting servers from unwanted traffic to offloading some of the heavy lifting of HTTP traffic processing.

This post explains the benefits of a reverse proxy, and explains how to use NGINX and Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) to easily implement and deploy a reverse proxy for your containerized application.

Components

NGINX is a high performance HTTP server that has achieved significant adoption because of its asynchronous event driven architecture. It can serve thousands of concurrent requests with a low memory footprint. This efficiency also makes it ideal as a reverse proxy.

Amazon ECS is a highly scalable, high performance container management service that supports Docker containers. It allows you to run applications easily on a managed cluster of Amazon EC2 instances. Amazon ECS helps you get your application components running on instances according to a specified configuration. It also helps scale out these components across an entire fleet of instances.

Sidecar containers are a common software pattern that has been embraced by engineering organizations. It’s a way to keep server side architecture easier to understand by building with smaller, modular containers that each serve a simple purpose. Just like an application can be powered by multiple microservices, each microservice can also be powered by multiple containers that work together. A sidecar container is simply a way to move part of the core responsibility of a service out into a containerized module that is deployed alongside a core application container.

The following diagram shows how an NGINX reverse proxy sidecar container operates alongside an application server container:

In this architecture, Amazon ECS has deployed two copies of an application stack that is made up of an NGINX reverse proxy side container and an application container. Web traffic from the public goes to an Application Load Balancer, which then distributes the traffic to one of the NGINX reverse proxy sidecars. The NGINX reverse proxy then forwards the request to the application server and returns its response to the client via the load balancer.

Reverse proxy for security

Security is one reason for using a reverse proxy in front of an application container. Any web server that serves resources to the public can expect to receive lots of unwanted traffic every day. Some of this traffic is relatively benign scans by researchers and tools, such as Shodan or nmap:

[18/May/2017:15:10:10 +0000] "GET /YesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScann HTTP/1.1" 404 1389 - Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_11_1) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2490.86 Safari/537.36
[18/May/2017:18:19:51 +0000] "GET /clientaccesspolicy.xml HTTP/1.1" 404 322 - Cloud mapping experiment. Contact [email protected]

But other traffic is much more malicious. For example, here is what a web server sees while being scanned by the hacking tool ZmEu, which scans web servers trying to find PHPMyAdmin installations to exploit:

[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /mysqladmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 391 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /web/phpMyAdmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 394 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /xampp/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /apache-default/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 405 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /phpMyAdmin-2.10.0.0/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 397 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /mysql/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 386 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /admin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 386 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /forum/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /typo3/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:42 +0000] "GET /phpMyAdmin-2.10.0.1/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 399 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:44 +0000] "GET /administrator/components/com_joommyadmin/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 418 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:18:34:45 +0000] "GET /phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 390 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:45 +0000] "GET /w00tw00t.at.blackhats.romanian.anti-sec:) HTTP/1.1" 404 401 - ZmEu

In addition, servers can also end up receiving unwanted web traffic that is intended for another server. In a cloud environment, an application may end up reusing an IP address that was formerly connected to another service. It’s common for misconfigured or misbehaving DNS servers to send traffic intended for a different host to an IP address now connected to your server.

It’s the responsibility of anyone running a web server to handle and reject potentially malicious traffic or unwanted traffic. Ideally, the web server can reject this traffic as early as possible, before it actually reaches the core application code. A reverse proxy is one way to provide this layer of protection for an application server. It can be configured to reject these requests before they reach the application server.

Reverse proxy for performance

Another advantage of using a reverse proxy such as NGINX is that it can be configured to offload some heavy lifting from your application container. For example, every HTTP server should support gzip. Whenever a client requests gzip encoding, the server compresses the response before sending it back to the client. This compression saves network bandwidth, which also improves speed for clients who now don’t have to wait as long for a response to fully download.

NGINX can be configured to accept a plaintext response from your application container and gzip encode it before sending it down to the client. This allows your application container to focus 100% of its CPU allotment on running business logic, while NGINX handles the encoding with its efficient gzip implementation.

An application may have security concerns that require SSL termination at the instance level instead of at the load balancer. NGINX can also be configured to terminate SSL before proxying the request to a local application container. Again, this also removes some CPU load from the application container, allowing it to focus on running business logic. It also gives you a cleaner way to patch any SSL vulnerabilities or update SSL certificates by updating the NGINX container without needing to change the application container.

NGINX configuration

Configuring NGINX for both traffic filtering and gzip encoding is shown below:

http {
  # NGINX will handle gzip compression of responses from the app server
  gzip on;
  gzip_proxied any;
  gzip_types text/plain application/json;
  gzip_min_length 1000;
 
  server {
    listen 80;
 
    # NGINX will reject anything not matching /api
    location /api {
      # Reject requests with unsupported HTTP method
      if ($request_method !~ ^(GET|POST|HEAD|OPTIONS|PUT|DELETE)$) {
        return 405;
      }
 
      # Only requests matching the whitelist expectations will
      # get sent to the application server
      proxy_pass http://app:3000;
      proxy_http_version 1.1;
      proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
      proxy_set_header Connection 'upgrade';
      proxy_set_header Host $host;
      proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
      proxy_cache_bypass $http_upgrade;
    }
  }
}

The above configuration only accepts traffic that matches the expression /api and has a recognized HTTP method. If the traffic matches, it is forwarded to a local application container accessible at the local hostname app. If the client requested gzip encoding, the plaintext response from that application container is gzip-encoded.

Amazon ECS configuration

Configuring ECS to run this NGINX container as a sidecar is also simple. ECS uses a core primitive called the task definition. Each task definition can include one or more containers, which can be linked to each other:

 {
  "containerDefinitions": [
     {
       "name": "nginx",
       "image": "<NGINX reverse proxy image URL here>",
       "memory": "256",
       "cpu": "256",
       "essential": true,
       "portMappings": [
         {
           "containerPort": "80",
           "protocol": "tcp"
         }
       ],
       "links": [
         "app"
       ]
     },
     {
       "name": "app",
       "image": "<app image URL here>",
       "memory": "256",
       "cpu": "256",
       "essential": true
     }
   ],
   "networkMode": "bridge",
   "family": "application-stack"
}

This task definition causes ECS to start both an NGINX container and an application container on the same instance. Then, the NGINX container is linked to the application container. This allows the NGINX container to send traffic to the application container using the hostname app.

The NGINX container has a port mapping that exposes port 80 on a publically accessible port but the application container does not. This means that the application container is not directly addressable. The only way to send it traffic is to send traffic to the NGINX container, which filters that traffic down. It only forwards to the application container if the traffic passes the whitelisted rules.

Conclusion

Running a sidecar container such as NGINX can bring significant benefits by making it easier to provide protection for application containers. Sidecar containers also improve performance by freeing your application container from various CPU intensive tasks. Amazon ECS makes it easy to run sidecar containers, and automate their deployment across your cluster.

To see the full code for this NGINX sidecar reference, or to try it out yourself, you can check out the open source NGINX reverse proxy reference architecture on GitHub.

– Nathan
 @nathankpeck

Now Available: Three New AWS Specialty Training Courses

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-available-three-new-aws-specialty-training-courses/

AWS Training allows you to learn from the experts so you can advance your knowledge with practical skills and get more out of the AWS Cloud. Today I am happy to announce that three of our most popular training bootcamps (a staple at AWS re:Invent and AWS Global Summits) are becoming part of our permanent instructor-led training portfolio:

These one-day courses are intended for individuals who would like to dive deeper into a specialized topic with an expert trainer.

You can explore our complete course catalog, and you can search for a public class near you within the AWS Training and Certification Portal. You can also request a private onsite training session for your team by contacting us.

Jeff;

 

 

Deploying Java Microservices on Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-java-microservices-on-amazon-ec2-container-service/

This post and accompanying code graciously contributed by:

Huy Huynh
Sr. Solutions Architect
Magnus Bjorkman
Solutions Architect

Java is a popular language used by many enterprises today. To simplify and accelerate Java application development, many companies are moving from a monolithic to microservices architecture. For some, it has become a strategic imperative. Containerization technology, such as Docker, lets enterprises build scalable, robust microservice architectures without major code rewrites.

In this post, I cover how to containerize a monolithic Java application to run on Docker. Then, I show how to deploy it on AWS using Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), a high-performance container management service. Finally, I show how to break the monolith into multiple services, all running in containers on Amazon ECS.

Application Architecture

For this example, I use the Spring Pet Clinic, a monolithic Java application for managing a veterinary practice. It is a simple REST API, which allows the client to manage and view Owners, Pets, Vets, and Visits.

It is a simple three-tier architecture:

  • Client
    You simulate this by using curl commands.
  • Web/app server
    This is the Java and Spring-based application that you run using the embedded Tomcat. As part of this post, you run this within Docker containers.
  • Database server
    This is the relational database for your application that stores information about owners, pets, vets, and visits. For this post, use MySQL RDS.

I decided to not put the database inside a container as containers were designed for applications and are transient in nature. The choice was made even easier because you have a fully managed database service available with Amazon RDS.

RDS manages the work involved in setting up a relational database, from provisioning the infrastructure capacity that you request to installing the database software. After your database is up and running, RDS automates common administrative tasks, such as performing backups and patching the software that powers your database. With optional Multi-AZ deployments, Amazon RDS also manages synchronous data replication across Availability Zones with automatic failover.

Walkthrough

You can find the code for the example covered in this post at amazon-ecs-java-microservices on GitHub.

Prerequisites

You need the following to walk through this solution:

  • An AWS account
  • An access key and secret key for a user in the account
  • The AWS CLI installed

Also, install the latest versions of the following:

  • Java
  • Maven
  • Python
  • Docker

Step 1: Move the existing Java Spring application to a container deployed using Amazon ECS

First, move the existing monolith application to a container and deploy it using Amazon ECS. This is a great first step before breaking the monolith apart because you still get some benefits before breaking apart the monolith:

  • An improved pipeline. The container also allows an engineering organization to create a standard pipeline for the application lifecycle.
  • No mutations to machines.

You can find the monolith example at 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic.

Container deployment overview

The following diagram is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The load balancer that distributes requests across all available ports and instances registered in the application’s target group using round-robin.
  • The target group that is updated by Amazon ECS to always have an up-to-date list of all the service containers in the cluster. This includes the port on which they are accessible.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the container for the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Each container has a single application process that is bound to port 8080 within its namespace. In reality, all the containers are exposed on a different, randomly assigned port on the host.

The architecture is containerized but still monolithic because each container has all the same features of the rest of the containers

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository for the application.
  • A service/task definition that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers, so that the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have automated setup with the 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic/ecs-cluster.cf AWS CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The Python script calls the CloudFormation template for the initial setup of the VPC, Amazon ECS cluster, and RDS instance. It then extracts the outputs from the template and uses those for API calls to create Amazon ECR repositories, tasks, services, Application Load Balancer, and target groups.

Environment variables and Spring properties binding

As part of the Python script, you pass in a number of environment variables to the container as part of the task/container definition:

'environment': [
{
'name': 'SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE',
'value': 'mysql'
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_URL',
'value': my_sql_options['dns_name']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_USERNAME',
'value': my_sql_options['username']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_PASSWORD',
'value': my_sql_options['password']
}
],

The preceding environment variables work in concert with the Spring property system. The value in the variable SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE, makes Spring use the MySQL version of the application property file. The other environment files override the following properties in that file:

  • spring.datasource.url
  • spring.datasource.username
  • spring.datasource.password

Optionally, you can also encrypt sensitive values by using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. Instead of handing in the password, you pass in a reference to the parameter and fetch the value as part of the container startup. For more information, see Managing Secrets for Amazon ECS Applications Using Parameter Store and IAM Roles for Tasks.

Spotify Docker Maven plugin

Use the Spotify Docker Maven plugin to create the image and push it directly to Amazon ECR. This allows you to do this as part of the regular Maven build. It also integrates the image generation as part of the overall build process. Use an explicit Dockerfile as input to the plugin.

FROM frolvlad/alpine-oraclejdk8:slim
VOLUME /tmp
ADD spring-petclinic-rest-1.7.jar app.jar
RUN sh -c 'touch /app.jar'
ENV JAVA_OPTS=""
ENTRYPOINT [ "sh", "-c", "java $JAVA_OPTS -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom -jar /app.jar" ]

The Python script discussed earlier uses the AWS CLI to authenticate you with AWS. The script places the token in the appropriate location so that the plugin can work directly against the Amazon ECR repository.

Test setup

You can test the setup by running the Python script:
python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:
curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

You can clean this up before going to the next section:
python setup.py -m cleanup -r <your region>

Step 2: Converting the monolith into microservices running on Amazon ECS

The second step is to convert the monolith into microservices. For a real application, you would likely not do this as one step, but re-architect an application piece by piece. You would continue to run your monolith but it would keep getting smaller for each piece that you are breaking apart.

By migrating microservices, you would get four benefits associated with microservices:

  • Isolation of crashes
    If one microservice in your application is crashing, then only that part of your application goes down. The rest of your application continues to work properly.
  • Isolation of security
    When microservice best practices are followed, the result is that if an attacker compromises one service, they only gain access to the resources of that service. They can’t horizontally access other resources from other services without breaking into those services as well.
  • Independent scaling
    When features are broken out into microservices, then the amount of infrastructure and number of instances of each microservice class can be scaled up and down independently.
  • Development velocity
    In a monolith, adding a new feature can potentially impact every other feature that the monolith contains. On the other hand, a proper microservice architecture has new code for a new feature going into a new service. You can be confident that any code you write won’t impact the existing code at all, unless you explicitly write a connection between two microservices.

Find the monolith example at 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices.
You break apart the Spring Pet Clinic application by creating a microservice for each REST API operation, as well as creating one for the system services.

Java code changes

Comparing the project structure between the monolith and the microservices version, you can see that each service is now its own separate build.
First, the monolith version:

You can clearly see how each API operation is its own subpackage under the org.springframework.samples.petclinic package, all part of the same monolithic application.
This changes as you break it apart in the microservices version:

Now, each API operation is its own separate build, which you can build independently and deploy. You have also duplicated some code across the different microservices, such as the classes under the model subpackage. This is intentional as you don’t want to introduce artificial dependencies among the microservices and allow these to evolve differently for each microservice.

Also, make the dependencies among the API operations more loosely coupled. In the monolithic version, the components are tightly coupled and use object-based invocation.

Here is an example of this from the OwnerController operation, where the class is directly calling PetRepository to get information about pets. PetRepository is the Repository class (Spring data access layer) to the Pet table in the RDS instance for the Pet API:

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Inject
    private PetRepository pets;
    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> visitList.addAll(pet.getVisits()));
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }
}

In the microservice version, call the Pet API operation and not PetRepository directly. Decouple the components by using interprocess communication; in this case, the Rest API. This provides for fault tolerance and disposability.

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Value("#{environment['SERVICE_ENDPOINT'] ?: 'localhost:8080'}")
    private String serviceEndpoint;

    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> {
            logger.info(getPetVisits(pet.getId()).toString());
            visitList.addAll(getPetVisits(pet.getId()));
        });
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }

    private List<Visit> getPetVisits(int petId){
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
        Pet pet = restTemplate.getForObject("http://"+serviceEndpoint+"/pet/"+petId, Pet.class);
        logger.info(pet.getVisits().toString());
        return pet.getVisits();
    }
}

You now have an additional method that calls the API. You are also handing in the service endpoint that should be called, so that you can easily inject dynamic endpoints based on the current deployment.

Container deployment overview

Here is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and the related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The Application Load Balancer that inspects the client request. Based on routing rules, it directs the request to an instance and port from the target group that matches the rule.
  • The Application Load Balancer that has a target group for each microservice. The target groups are used by the corresponding services to register available container instances. Each target group has a path, so when you call the path for a particular microservice, it is mapped to the correct target group. This allows you to use one Application Load Balancer to serve all the different microservices, accessed by the path. For example, https:///owner/* would be mapped and directed to the Owner microservice.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the containers for each microservice of the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Because you are running multiple containers on the same instances, use dynamic port mapping to avoid port clashing. By using dynamic port mapping, the container is allocated an anonymous port on the host to which the container port (8080) is mapped. The anonymous port is registered with the Application Load Balancer and target group so that traffic is routed correctly.

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon ECR repository for each microservice.
  • A service/task definition per microservice that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers. That way, the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have again automated setup with the 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices/ecs-cluster.cf CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The CloudFormation template remains the same as in the previous section. In the Python script, you are now building five different Java applications, one for each microservice (also includes a system application). There is a separate Maven POM file for each one. The resulting Docker image gets pushed to its own Amazon ECR repository, and is deployed separately using its own service/task definition. This is critical to get the benefits described earlier for microservices.

Here is an example of the POM file for the Owner microservice:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>org.springframework.samples</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-petclinic-rest</artifactId>
    <version>1.7</version>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>1.5.2.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>
    <properties>
        <!-- Generic properties -->
        <java.version>1.8</java.version>
        <docker.registry.host>${env.docker_registry_host}</docker.registry.host>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.inject</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.inject</artifactId>
            <version>1</version>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Spring and Spring Boot dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-rest</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-cache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Databases - Uses HSQL by default -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.hsqldb</groupId>
            <artifactId>hsqldb</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>mysql</groupId>
            <artifactId>mysql-connector-java</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- caching -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.cache</groupId>
            <artifactId>cache-api</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.ehcache</groupId>
            <artifactId>ehcache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <!-- end of webjars -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.spotify</groupId>
                <artifactId>docker-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>0.4.13</version>
                <configuration>
                    <imageName>${env.docker_registry_host}/${project.artifactId}</imageName>
                    <dockerDirectory>src/main/docker</dockerDirectory>
                    <useConfigFile>true</useConfigFile>
                    <registryUrl>${env.docker_registry_host}</registryUrl>
                    <!--dockerHost>https://${docker.registry.host}</dockerHost-->
                    <resources>
                        <resource>
                            <targetPath>/</targetPath>
                            <directory>${project.build.directory}</directory>
                            <include>${project.build.finalName}.jar</include>
                        </resource>
                    </resources>
                    <forceTags>false</forceTags>
                    <imageTags>
                        <imageTag>${project.version}</imageTag>
                    </imageTags>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Test setup

You can test this by running the Python script:

python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:

curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

Conclusion

Migrating a monolithic application to a containerized set of microservices can seem like a daunting task. Following the steps outlined in this post, you can begin to containerize monolithic Java apps, taking advantage of the container runtime environment, and beginning the process of re-architecting into microservices. On the whole, containerized microservices are faster to develop, easier to iterate on, and more cost effective to maintain and secure.

This post focused on the first steps of microservice migration. You can learn more about optimizing and scaling your microservices with components such as service discovery, blue/green deployment, circuit breakers, and configuration servers at http://aws.amazon.com/containers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Blue/Green Deployments with Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/bluegreen-deployments-with-amazon-ecs/

This post and accompanying code was generously contributed by:

Jeremy Cowan
Solutions Architect
Anuj Sharma
DevOps Cloud Architect
Peter Dalbhanjan
Solutions Architect

Deploying software updates in traditional non-containerized environments is hard and fraught with risk. When you write your deployment package or script, you have to assume that the target machine is in a particular state. If your staging environment is not an exact mirror image of your production environment, your deployment could fail. These failures frequently cause outages that persist until you re-deploy the last known good version of your application. If you are an Operations Manager, this is what keeps you up at night.

Increasingly, customers want to do testing in production environments without exposing customers to the new version until the release has been vetted. Others want to expose a small percentage of their customers to the new release to gather feedback about a feature before it’s released to the broader population. This is often referred to as canary analysis or canary testing. In this post, I introduce patterns to implement blue/green and canary deployments using Application Load Balancers and target groups.

If you’d like to try this approach to blue/green deployments, we have open sourced the code and AWS CloudFormation templates in the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo. The workflow builds an automated CI/CD pipeline that deploys your service onto an ECS cluster and offers a controlled process to swap target groups when you’re ready to promote the latest version of your code to production. You can quickly set up the environment in three steps and see the blue/green swap in action. We’d love for you to try it and send us your feedback!

Benefits of blue/green

Blue/green deployments are a type of immutable deployment that help you deploy software updates with less risk. The risk is reduced by creating separate environments for the current running or “blue” version of your application, and the new or “green” version of your application.

This type of deployment gives you an opportunity to test features in the green environment without impacting the current running version of your application. When you’re satisfied that the green version is working properly, you can gradually reroute the traffic from the old blue environment to the new green environment by modifying DNS. By following this method, you can update and roll back features with near zero downtime.

A typical blue/green deployment involves shifting traffic between 2 distinct environments.

This ability to quickly roll traffic back to the still-operating blue environment is one of the key benefits of blue/green deployments. With blue/green, you should be able to roll back to the blue environment at any time during the deployment process. This limits downtime to the time it takes to realize there’s an issue in the green environment and shift the traffic back to the blue environment. Furthermore, the impact of the outage is limited to the portion of traffic going to the green environment, not all traffic. If the blast radius of deployment errors is reduced, so is the overall deployment risk.

Containers make it simpler

Historically, blue/green deployments were not often used to deploy software on-premises because of the cost and complexity associated with provisioning and managing multiple environments. Instead, applications were upgraded in place.

Although this approach worked, it had several flaws, including the ability to roll back quickly from failures. Rollbacks typically involved re-deploying a previous version of the application, which could affect the length of an outage caused by a bad release. Fixing the issue took precedence over the need to debug, so there were fewer opportunities to learn from your mistakes.

Containers can ease the adoption of blue/green deployments because they’re easily packaged and behave consistently as they’re moved between environments. This consistency comes partly from their immutability. To change the configuration of a container, update its Dockerfile and rebuild and re-deploy the container rather than updating the software in place.

Containers also provide process and namespace isolation for your applications, which allows you to run multiple versions of them side by side on the same Docker host without conflicts. Given their small sizes relative to virtual machines, you can binpack more containers per host than VMs. This lets you make more efficient use of your computing resources, reducing the cost of blue/green deployments.

Fully Managed Updates with Amazon ECS

Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) performs rolling updates when you update an existing Amazon ECS service. A rolling update involves replacing the current running version of the container with the latest version. The number of containers Amazon ECS adds or removes from service during a rolling update is controlled by adjusting the minimum and maximum number of healthy tasks allowed during service deployments.

When you update your service’s task definition with the latest version of your container image, Amazon ECS automatically starts replacing the old version of your container with the latest version. During a deployment, Amazon ECS drains connections from the current running version and registers your new containers with the Application Load Balancer as they come online.

Target groups

A target group is a logical construct that allows you to run multiple services behind the same Application Load Balancer. This is possible because each target group has its own listener.

When you create an Amazon ECS service that’s fronted by an Application Load Balancer, you have to designate a target group for your service. Ordinarily, you would create a target group for each of your Amazon ECS services. However, the approach we’re going to explore here involves creating two target groups: one for the blue version of your service, and one for the green version of your service. We’re also using a different listener port for each target group so that you can test the green version of your service using the same path as the blue service.

With this configuration, you can run both environments in parallel until you’re ready to cut over to the green version of your service. You can also do things such as restricting access to the green version to testers on your internal network, using security group rules and placement constraints. For example, you can target the green version of your service to only run on instances that are accessible from your corporate network.

Swapping Over

When you’re ready to replace the old blue service with the new green service, call the ModifyListener API operation to swap the listener’s rules for the target group rules. The change happens instantaneously. Afterward, the green service is running in the target group with the port 80 listener and the blue service is running in the target group with the port 8080 listener. The diagram below is an illustration of the approach described.

Scenario

Two services are defined, each with their own target group registered to the same Application Load Balancer but listening on different ports. Deployment is completed by swapping the listener rules between the two target groups.

The second service is deployed with a new target group listening on a different port but registered to the same Application Load Balancer.

By using 2 listeners, requests to blue services are directed to the target group with the port 80 listener, while requests to the green services are directed to target group with the port 8080 listener.

After automated or manual testing, the deployment can be completed by swapping the listener rules on the Application Load Balancer and sending traffic to the green service.

Caveats

There are a few caveats to be mindful of when using this approach. This method:

  • Assumes that your application code is completely stateless. Store state outside of the container.
  • Doesn’t gracefully drain connections. The swapping of target groups is sudden and abrupt. Therefore, be cautious about using this approach if your service has long-running transactions.
  • Doesn’t allow you to perform canary deployments. While the method gives you the ability to quickly switch between different versions of your service, it does not allow you to divert a portion of the production traffic to a canary or control the rate at which your service is deployed across the cluster.

Canary testing

While this type of deployment automates much of the heavy lifting associated with rolling deployments, it doesn’t allow you to interrupt the deployment if you discover an issue midstream. Rollbacks using the standard Amazon ECS deployment require updating the service’s task definition with the last known good version of the container. Then, you wait for Amazon ECS to schedule and deploy it across the cluster. If the latest version introduces a breaking change that went undiscovered during testing, this might be too slow.

With canary testing, if you discover the green environment is not operating as expected, there is no impact on the blue environment. You can route traffic back to it, minimizing impaired operation or downtime, and limiting the blast radius of impact.

This type of deployment is particularly useful for A/B testing where you want to expose a new feature to a subset of users to get their feedback before making it broadly available.

For canary style deployments, you can use a variation of the blue/green swap that involves deploying the blue and the green service to the same target group. Although this method is not as fast as the swap, it allows you to control the rate at which your containers are replaced by adjusting the task count for each service. Furthermore, it gives you the ability to roll back by adjusting the number of tasks for the blue and green services respectively. Unlike the swap approach described above, connections to your containers are drained gracefully. We plan to address canary style deployments for Amazon ECS in a future post.

Conclusion

With AWS, you can operationalize your blue/green deployments using Amazon ECS, an Application Load Balancer, and target groups. I encourage you to adapt the code published to the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo for your use cases and look forward to reading your feedback.

If you’re interested in learning more, I encourage you to read the Blue/Green Deployments on AWS and Practicing Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery on AWS whitepapers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

AWS Hot Startups – June 2017

Post Syndicated from Tina Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-june-2017/

Thanks for stopping by for another round of AWS Hot Startups! This month we are featuring:

  • CloudRanger – helping companies understand the cloud with visual representation.
  • quintly – providing social media analytics for brands on a single dashboard.
  • Tango Card – reinventing rewards programs for businesses and their customers worldwide.

Don’t forget to check out May’s Hot Startups in case you missed them.

CloudRanger (Letterkenny, Ireland)   

The idea for CloudRanger started where most great ideas do – at a bar in Las Vegas. During a late-night conversation with his friends at re:Invent 2014, Dave Gildea (Founder and CEO) used cocktail napkins and drink coasters to visually illustrate servers and backups, and the light on his phone to represent scheduling. By the end of the night, the idea for automated visual server management was born. With CloudRanger, companies can easily create backup and retention policies, visual scheduling, and simple restoration of snapshots and AMIs. The team behind CloudRanger believes that when servers and cloud resources are represented visually, they are easier to manage and understand. Users are able to see their servers, which turns them into a tangible and important piece of business inventory.

CloudRanger is an excellent platform for MSPs who manage many different AWS accounts, and need a quick method to display many servers and audit certain attributes. The company’s goal is to give anyone the ability to create backup policies in multiple regions, apply them using a tag-based methodology, and manage backups. Servers can be scheduled from one simple dashboard, and restoration is easy and step-by-step. With CloudRanger’s visual representation of resources, customers are encouraged to fully understand their backup policies, schedules, and servers.

As an AWS Partner, CloudRanger has built a globally redundant system after going all-in with AWS. They are using over 25 AWS services for everything including enterprise-level security, automation and 24/7 runtimes, and an emphasis on Machine Learning for efficiency in the sales process. CloudRanger continues to rely more on AWS as new services and features are released, and are replacing current services with AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeBuild. CloudRanger was also named Startup Company of the Year at a recent Irish tech event!

To learn more about CloudRanger, visit their website.

quintly (Cologne, Germany)

In 2010, brothers Alexander Peiniger and Frederik Peiniger started a journey to help companies track their social media profiles and improve their strategies against competitors. The startup began under the name “Social.Media.Tracking” and then “AllFacebook Stats” before officially becoming quintly in 2013. With quintly, brands and agencies can analyze, benchmark, and optimize their social media activities on a global scale. The innovative dashboarding system gives clients an overview across all social media profiles on the most important networks (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+, LinkedIn, Instagram, etc.) and then derives an optimal social media strategy from those profiles. Today, quintly has users in over 180 countries and paying clients in over 65 countries including major agency networks and Fortune 500 companies.

Getting an overview of a brand’s social media activities can be time-consuming, and turning insights into actions is a challenge that not all brands master. Quintly offers a variety of features designed to help clients improve their social media reach. With their web-based SaaS product, brands and agencies can compare their social media performance against competitors and their best practices. Not only can clients learn from their own historic performance, but they can leverage data from any other brand around the world.

Since the company’s founding, quintly built and operates its SaaS offering on top of AWS services, leveraging Amazon EC2, Amazon ECS, Elastic Load Balancing, and Amazon Route53 to host their Docker-based environment. Large amounts of data are stored in Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon RDS, and they use Amazon CloudWatch to monitor and seamlessly scale to the current needs. In addition, quintly is using Amazon Machine Learning to add additional attributes to the data and to drive better decisions for their clients. With the help of AWS, quintly has been able to focus on their core business while having a scalable and well-performing solution to solve their technical needs.

For more on quintly, check out their Social Media Analytics blog.

Tango Card (Seattle, Washington)

Based in the heart of West Seattle, Tango Card is revolutionizing rewards programs for companies around the world. Too often customers redeem points in a loyalty or rebate program only to wait weeks for their prize to arrive. Companies generously give their employees appreciation gifts, but the gifts can be generic and impersonal. With Tango Card, companies can choose from a variety of rewards that fit the needs of their specific program, event, or business incentive. The extensive Rewards Catalog includes options for e-gift cards that are sure to excite any recipient. There are plenty of options for everyone from traditional e-gift cards to nonprofit donations to cash equivalent rewards.

Tango Card uses a combination of desired rewards, modern technology, and expert service to change the rewards and incentive experience. The Reward Delivery Platform offers solutions including Blast Rewards, Reward Link, and Rewards as a Service API (RaaS). Blast Rewards enables companies to purchase and send e-gift cards in bulk in just one business day. Reward Link lets recipients choose from an assortment of e-gift cards, prepaid cards, digital checks, and donations and is delivered instantly. Finally, Rewards as a Service is a robust digital gift card API that is built to support apps and platforms. With RaaS, Tango Card can send out e-gift cards on company-branded email templates or deliver them directly within a user interface.

The entire Tango Card Reward Delivery Platform leverages many AWS services. They use Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) for rapid deployment of containerized micro services, and Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) for low overhead managed databases. Tango Card is also leveraging Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), and AWS Identity and Access Management (IMS).

To learn more about Tango Card, check out their blog!

I would also like to thank Alexander Moss-Bolanos for helping with the Hot Startups posts this year.

Thanks for reading and we’ll see you next month!

-Tina Barr

Amazon EC2 Container Service – Launch Recap, Customer Stories, and Code

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ec2-container-service-launch-recap-customer-stories-and-code/

Today seems like a good time to recap some of the features that we have added to Amazon EC2 Container Service over the last year or so, and to share some customer success stories and code with you! The service makes it easy for you to run any number of Docker containers across a managed cluster of EC2 instances, with full console, API, CloudFormation, CLI, and PowerShell support. You can store your Linux and Windows Docker images in the EC2 Container Registry for easy access.

Launch Recap
Let’s start by taking a look at some of the newest ECS features and some helpful how-to blog posts that will show you how to use them:

Application Load Balancing – We added support for the application load balancer last year. This high-performance load balancing option runs at the application level and allows you to define content-based routing rules. It provides support for dynamic ports and can be shared across multiple services, making it easier for you to run microservices in containers. To learn more, read about Service Load Balancing.

IAM Roles for Tasks – You can secure your infrastructure by assigning IAM roles to ECS tasks. This allows you to grant permissions on a fine-grained, per-task basis, customizing the permissions to the needs of each task. Read IAM Roles for Tasks to learn more.

Service Auto Scaling – You can define scaling policies that scale your services (tasks) up and down in response to changes in demand. You set the desired minimum and maximum number of tasks, create one or more scaling policies, and Service Auto Scaling will take care of the rest. The documentation for Service Auto Scaling will help you to make use of this feature.

Blox – Scheduling, in a container-based environment, is the process of assigning tasks to instances. ECS gives you three options: automated (via the built-in Service Scheduler), manual (via the RunTask function), and custom (via a scheduler that you provide). Blox is an open source scheduler that supports a one-task-per-host model, with room to accommodate other models in the future. It monitors the state of the cluster and is well-suited to running monitoring agents, log collectors, and other daemon-style tasks.

Windows – We launched ECS with support for Linux containers and followed up with support for running Windows Server 2016 Base with Containers.

Container Instance Draining – From time to time you may need to remove an instance from a running cluster in order to scale the cluster down or to perform a system update. Earlier this year we added a set of lifecycle hooks that allow you to better manage the state of the instances. Read the blog post How to Automate Container Instance Draining in Amazon ECS to see how to use the lifecycle hooks and a Lambda function to automate the process of draining existing work from an instance while preventing new work from being scheduled for it.

CI/CD Pipeline with Code* – Containers simplify software deployment and are an ideal target for a CI/CD (Continuous Integration / Continuous Deployment) pipeline. The post Continuous Deployment to Amazon ECS using AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, Amazon ECR, and AWS CloudFormation shows you how to build and operate a CI/CD pipeline using multiple AWS services.

CloudWatch Logs Integration – This launch gave you the ability to configure the containers that run your tasks to send log information to CloudWatch Logs for centralized storage and analysis. You simply install the Amazon ECS Container Agent and enable the awslogs log driver.

CloudWatch Events – ECS generates CloudWatch Events when the state of a task or a container instance changes. These events allow you to monitor the state of the cluster using a Lambda function. To learn how to capture the events and store them in an Elasticsearch cluster, read Monitor Cluster State with Amazon ECS Event Stream.

Task Placement Policies – This launch provided you with fine-grained control over the placement of tasks on container instances within clusters. It allows you to construct policies that include cluster constraints, custom constraints (location, instance type, AMI, and attribute), placement strategies (spread or bin pack) and to use them without writing any code. Read Introducing Amazon ECS Task Placement Policies to see how to do this!

EC2 Container Service in Action
Many of our customers from large enterprises to hot startups and across all industries, such as financial services, hospitality, and consumer electronics, are using Amazon ECS to run their microservices applications in production. Companies such as Capital One, Expedia, Okta, Riot Games, and Viacom rely on Amazon ECS.

Mapbox is a platform for designing and publishing custom maps. The company uses ECS to power their entire batch processing architecture to collect and process over 100 million miles of sensor data per day that they use for powering their maps. They also optimize their batch processing architecture on ECS using Spot Instances. The Mapbox platform powers over 5,000 apps and reaches more than 200 million users each month. Its backend runs on ECS allowing it to serve more than 1.3 billion requests per day. To learn more about their recent migration to ECS, read their recent blog post, We Switched to Amazon ECS, and You Won’t Believe What Happened Next.

Travel company Expedia designed their backends with a microservices architecture. With the popularization of Docker, they decided they would like to adopt Docker for its faster deployments and environment portability. They chose to use ECS to orchestrate all their containers because it had great integration with the AWS platform, everything from ALB to IAM roles to VPC integration. This made ECS very easy to use with their existing AWS infrastructure. ECS really reduced the heavy lifting of deploying and running containerized applications. Expedia runs 75% of all apps on AWS in ECS allowing it to process 4 billion requests per hour. Read Kuldeep Chowhan‘s blog post, How Expedia Runs Hundreds of Applications in Production Using Amazon ECS to learn more.

Realtor.com provides home buyers and sellers with a comprehensive database of properties that are currently for sale. Their move to AWS and ECS has helped them to support business growth that now numbers 50 million unique monthly users who drive up to 250,000 requests per second at peak times. ECS has helped them to deploy their code more quickly while increasing utilization of their cloud infrastructure. Read the Realtor.com Case Study to learn more about how they use ECS, Kinesis, and other AWS services.

Instacart talks about how they use ECS to power their same-day grocery delivery service:

Capital One talks about how they use ECS to automate their operations and their infrastructure management:

Code
Clever developers are using ECS as a base for their own work. For example:

Rack is an open source PaaS (Platform as a Service). It focuses on infrastructure automation, runs in an isolated VPC, and uses a single-tenant build service for security.

Empire is also an open source PaaS. It provides a Heroku-like workflow and is targeted at small and medium sized startups, with an emphasis on microservices.

Cloud Container Cluster Visualizer (c3vis) helps to visualize resource utilization within ECS clusters:

Stay Tuned
We have plenty of new features in the works for ECS, so stay tuned!

Jeff;

 

AWS Enables Consortium Science to Accelerate Discovery

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-enables-consortium-science-to-accelerate-discovery/

My colleague Mia Champion is a scientist (check out her publications), an AWS Certified Solutions Architect, and an AWS Certified Developer. The time that she spent doing research on large-data datasets gave her an appreciation for the value of cloud computing in the bioinformatics space, which she summarizes and explains in the guest post below!

Jeff;


Technological advances in scientific research continue to enable the collection of exponentially growing datasets that are also increasing in the complexity of their content. The global pace of innovation is now also fueled by the recent cloud-computing revolution, which provides researchers with a seemingly boundless scalable and agile infrastructure. Now, researchers can remove the hindrances of having to own and maintain their own sequencers, microscopes, compute clusters, and more. Using the cloud, scientists can easily store, manage, process and share datasets for millions of patient samples with gigabytes and more of data for each individual. As American physicist, John Bardeen once said: “Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone”.

Prioritizing Reproducible Innovation, Democratization, and Data Protection
Today, we have many individual researchers and organizations leveraging secure cloud enabled data sharing on an unprecedented scale and producing innovative, customized analytical solutions using the AWS cloud.  But, can secure data sharing and analytics be done on such a collaborative scale as to revolutionize the way science is done across a domain of interest or even across discipline/s of science? Can building a cloud-enabled consortium of resources remove the analytical variability that leads to diminished reproducibility, which has long plagued the interpretability and impact of research discoveries? The answers to these questions are ‘yes’ and initiatives such as the Neuro Cloud Consortium, The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH), and The Sage Bionetworks Synapse platform, which powers many research consortiums including the DREAM challenges, are starting to put into practice model cloud-initiatives that will not only provide impactful discoveries in the areas of neuroscience, infectious disease, and cancer, but are also revolutionizing the way in which scientific research is done.

Bringing Crowd Developed Models, Algorithms, and Functions to the Data
Collaborative projects have traditionally allowed investigators to download datasets such as those used for comparative sequence analysis or for training a deep learning algorithm on medical imaging data. Investigators were then able to develop and execute their analysis using institutional clusters, local workstations, or even laptops:

This method of collaboration is problematic for many reasons. The first concern is data security, since dataset download essentially permits “chain-data-sharing” with any number of recipients. Second, analytics done using compute environments that are not templated at some level introduces the risk of variable analytics that itself is not reproducible by a different investigator, or even the same investigator using a different compute environment. Third, the required data dump, processing, and then re-upload or distribution to the collaborative group is highly inefficient and dependent upon each individual’s networking and compute capabilities. Overall, traditional methods of scientific collaboration have introduced methods in which security is compromised and time to discovery is hampered.

Using the AWS cloud, collaborative researchers can share datasets easily and securely by taking advantage of Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy restrictions for user bucket access as well as S3 bucket policies or Access Control Lists (ACLs). To streamline analysis and ensure data security, many researchers are eliminating the necessity to download datasets entirely by leveraging resources that facilitate moving the analytics to the data source and/or taking advantage of remote API requests to access a shared database or data lake. One way our customers are accomplishing this is to leverage container based Docker technology to provide collaborators with a way to submit algorithms or models for execution on the system hosting the shared datasets:

Docker container images have all of the application’s dependencies bundled together, and therefore provide a high degree of versatility and portability, which is a significant advantage over using other executable-based approaches. In the case of collaborative machine learning projects, each docker container will contain applications, language runtime, packages and libraries, as well as any of the more popular deep learning frameworks commonly used by researchers including: MXNet, Caffe, TensorFlow, and Theano.

A common feature in these frameworks is the ability to leverage a host machine’s Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) for significant acceleration of the matrix and vector operations involved in the machine learning computations. As such, researchers with these objectives can leverage EC2’s new P2 instance types in order to power execution of submitted machine learning models. In addition, GPUs can be mounted directly to containers using the NVIDIA Docker tool and appear at the system level as additional devices. By leveraging Amazon EC2 Container Service and the EC2 Container Registry, collaborators are able to execute analytical solutions submitted to the project repository by their colleagues in a reproducible fashion as well as continue to build on their existing environment.  Researchers can also architect a continuous deployment pipeline to run their docker-enabled workflows.

In conclusion, emerging cloud-enabled consortium initiatives serve as models for the broader research community for how cloud-enabled community science can expedite discoveries in Precision Medicine while also providing a platform where data security and discovery reproducibility is inherent to the project execution.

Mia D. Champion, Ph.D.

 

New – Host-Based Routing Support for AWS Application Load Balancers

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-host-based-routing-support-for-aws-application-load-balancers/

Last year I told you about the new AWS Application Load Balancer (an important part of Elastic Load Balancing) and showed you how to set it up to route incoming HTTP and HTTPS traffic based on the path element of the URL in the request. This path-based routing allows you to route requests to, for example, /api to one set of servers (also known as target groups) and /mobile to another set. Segmenting your traffic in this way gives you the ability to control the processing environment for each category of requests. Perhaps /api requests are best processed on Compute Optimized instances, while /mobile requests are best handled by Memory Optimized instances.

Host-Based Routing & More Rules
Today we are giving you another routing option. You can now create Application Load Balancer rules that route incoming traffic based on the domain name specified in the Host header. Requests to api.example.com can be sent to one target group, requests to mobile.example.com to another, and all others (by way of a default rule) can be sent to a third. You can also create rules that combine host-based routing and path-based routing. This would allow you to route requests to api.example.com/production and api.example.com/sandbox to distinct target groups.

In the past, some of our customers set up and ran a fleet of proxy servers and used them for host-based routing. With today’s launch, the proxy server fleet is no longer needed since the routing can be done using Application Load Balancer rules. Getting rid of this layer of processing will simplify your architecture and reduce operational overhead.

Application Load Balancer already provides several features that support container-based applications including port mapping, health checks, and service discovery. The ability to route on both host and path allows you to build and efficiently scale applications that are comprised of multiple microservices running in individual Amazon EC2 Container Service containers. You can use host-based routing to further simplify your service discovery mechanism by aligning your service names and your container names.

As part of today’s launch we are raising the maximum number of rules per Application Load Balancer from 10 to 75, and also introducing a new rule editor. I’ll start with the following target groups:

The Load Balancing Console shows the listeners that are associated with my Application Load Balancer: From there I simply click on View/edit rules to access the new rule editor:

I already have a default rule that forwards all requests to my web-target-production target:

I click on the Insert icon (the “+” sign) and then select a location. Rules are processed in the order that they are displayed:

I click on Insert Rule and define my new rule. Rules can reference a host, a path, or both. I’ll start with just a host:

I add two rules for host-based routing and the editor now looks like this:

If I want to route production and sandbox traffic to distinct targets, I can create new rules that reference the path. Here’s the first one:

With a few more clicks and a little typing I can create a powerful set of rules:

Rules that match the Host header can include up to three “*” (match 0 or more characters) or “?” (match 1 character) wildcards. Let’s say that I give each of my large customers a unique host name for tracking purposes. I can write rules that route all of the requests to the same target group, regardless of the final portion of the host name. Here’s a simple example:

The pencil icon in the rule editor allows me to make changes to the rule sequence. I select rules, move them to a new position, and then save the updated sequence:

I can also edit existing rules or delete unneeded ones.

Available Now
This feature is available today in all 15 AWS public AWS regions.

There is no extra charge for the first 10 rules (host-based, path-based, or both) evaluated by each load balancer. After that you will be charged based on the number of rule evaluations (this is a new dimension added to the Load Balancer Capacity units (LCU) model that I described in an earlier post). Each LCU supports up to 1000 rule evaluations. We measure on all four dimensions of the LCU, but you are charged only for the dimension with the highest usage in the given hour. Rules that are configured, but not processed will not be charged.

Jeff;

 

AWS Hot Startups – March 2017

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-march-2017/

As the madness of March rounds up, take a break from all the basketball and check out the cool startups Tina Barr brings you for this month!

-Ana


The arrival of spring brings five new startups this month:

  • Amino Apps – providing social networks for hundreds of thousands of communities.
  • Appboy – empowering brands to strengthen customer relationships.
  • Arterys – revolutionizing the medical imaging industry.
  • Protenus – protecting patient data for healthcare organizations.
  • Syapse – improving targeted cancer care with shared data from across the country.

In case you missed them, check out February’s hot startups here.

Amino Apps (New York, NY)
Amino Logo
Amino Apps was founded on the belief that interest-based communities were underdeveloped and outdated, particularly when it came to mobile. CEO Ben Anderson and CTO Yin Wang created the app to give users access to hundreds of thousands of communities, each of them a complete social network dedicated to a single topic. Some of the largest communities have over 1 million members and are built around topics like popular TV shows, video games, sports, and an endless number of hobbies and other interests. Amino hosts communities from around the world and is currently available in six languages with many more on the way.

Navigating the Amino app is easy. Simply download the app (iOS or Android), sign up with a valid email address, choose a profile picture, and start exploring. Users can search for communities and join any that fit their interests. Each community has chatrooms, multimedia content, quizzes, and a seamless commenting system. If a community doesn’t exist yet, users can create it in minutes using the Amino Creator and Manager app (ACM). The largest user-generated communities are turned into their own apps, which gives communities their own piece of real estate on members’ phones, as well as in app stores.

Amino’s vast global network of hundreds of thousands of communities is run on AWS services. Every day users generate, share, and engage with an enormous amount of content across hundreds of mobile applications. By leveraging AWS services including Amazon EC2, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, Amazon SQS, and Amazon CloudFront, Amino can continue to provide new features to their users while scaling their service capacity to keep up with user growth.

Interested in joining Amino? Check out their jobs page here.

Appboy (New York, NY)
In 2011, Bill Magnuson, Jon Hyman, and Mark Ghermezian saw a unique opportunity to strengthen and humanize relationships between brands and their customers through technology. The trio created Appboy to empower brands to build long-term relationships with their customers and today they are the leading lifecycle engagement platform for marketing, growth, and engagement teams. The team recognized that as rapid mobile growth became undeniable, many brands were becoming frustrated with the lack of compelling and seamless cross-channel experiences offered by existing marketing clouds. Many of today’s top mobile apps and enterprise companies trust Appboy to take their marketing to the next level. Appboy manages user profiles for nearly 700 million monthly active users, and is used to power more than 10 billion personalized messages monthly across a multitude of channels and devices.

Appboy creates a holistic user profile that offers a single view of each customer. That user profile in turn powers contextual cross-channel messaging, lifecycle engagement automation, and robust campaign insights and optimization opportunities. Appboy offers solutions that allow brands to create push notifications, targeted emails, in-app and in-browser messages, news feed cards, and webhooks to enhance the user experience and increase customer engagement. The company prides itself on its interoperability, connecting to a variety of complimentary marketing tools and technologies so brands can build the perfect stack to enable their strategies and experiments in real time.

AWS makes it easy for Appboy to dynamically size all of their service components and automatically scale up and down as needed. They use an array of services including Elastic Load Balancing, AWS Lambda, Amazon CloudWatch, Auto Scaling groups, and Amazon S3 to help scale capacity and better deal with unpredictable customer loads.

To keep up with the latest marketing trends and tactics, visit the Appboy digital magazine, Relate. Appboy was also recently featured in the #StartupsOnAir video series where they gave insight into their AWS usage.

Arterys (San Francisco, CA)
Getting test results back from a physician can often be a time consuming and tedious process. Clinicians typically employ a variety of techniques to manually measure medical images and then make their assessments. Arterys founders Fabien Beckers, John Axerio-Cilies, Albert Hsiao, and Shreyas Vasanawala realized that much more computation and advanced analytics were needed to harness all of the valuable information in medical images, especially those generated by MRI and CT scanners. Clinicians were often skipping measurements and making assessments based mostly on qualitative data. Their solution was to start a cloud/AI software company focused on accelerating data-driven medicine with advanced software products for post-processing of medical images.

Arterys’ products provide timely, accurate, and consistent quantification of images, improve speed to results, and improve the quality of the information offered to the treating physician. This allows for much better tracking of a patient’s condition, and thus better decisions about their care. Advanced analytics, such as deep learning and distributed cloud computing, are used to process images. The first Arterys product can contour cardiac anatomy as accurately as experts, but takes only 15-20 seconds instead of the 45-60 minutes required to do it manually. Their computing cloud platform is also fully HIPAA compliant.

Arterys relies on a variety of AWS services to process their medical images. Using deep learning and other advanced analytic tools, Arterys is able to render images without latency over a web browser using AWS G2 instances. They use Amazon EC2 extensively for all of their compute needs, including inference and rendering, and Amazon S3 is used to archive images that aren’t needed immediately, as well as manage costs. Arterys also employs Amazon Route 53, AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon EC2 Container Service.

Check out this quick video about the technology that Arterys is creating. They were also recently featured in the #StartupsOnAir video series and offered a quick demo of their product.

Protenus (Baltimore, MD)
Protenus Logo
Protenus founders Nick Culbertson and Robert Lord were medical students at Johns Hopkins Medical School when they saw first-hand how Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could be used to improve patient care and share clinical data more efficiently. With increased efficiency came a huge issue – an onslaught of serious security and privacy concerns. Over the past two years, 140 million medical records have been breached, meaning that approximately 1 in 3 Americans have had their health data compromised. Health records contain a repository of sensitive information and a breach of that data can cause major havoc in a patient’s life – namely identity theft, prescription fraud, Medicare/Medicaid fraud, and improper performance of medical procedures. Using their experience and knowledge from former careers in the intelligence community and involvement in a leading hedge fund, Nick and Robert developed the prototype and algorithms that launched Protenus.

Today, Protenus offers a number of solutions that detect breaches and misuse of patient data for healthcare organizations nationwide. Using advanced analytics and AI, Protenus’ health data insights platform understands appropriate vs. inappropriate use of patient data in the EHR. It also protects privacy, aids compliance with HIPAA regulations, and ensures trust for patients and providers alike.

Protenus built and operates its SaaS offering atop Amazon EC2, where Dedicated Hosts and encrypted Amazon EBS volume are used to ensure compliance with HIPAA regulation for the storage of Protected Health Information. They use Elastic Load Balancing and Amazon Route 53 for DNS, enabling unique, secure client specific access points to their Protenus instance.

To learn more about threats to patient data, read Hospitals’ Biggest Threat to Patient Data is Hiding in Plain Sight on the Protenus blog. Also be sure to check out their recent video in the #StartupsOnAir series for more insight into their product.

Syapse (Palo Alto, CA)
Syapse provides a comprehensive software solution that enables clinicians to treat patients with precision medicine for targeted cancer therapies — treatments that are designed and chosen using genetic or molecular profiling. Existing hospital IT doesn’t support the robust infrastructure and clinical workflows required to treat patients with precision medicine at scale, but Syapse centralizes and organizes patient data to clinicians at the point of care. Syapse offers a variety of solutions for oncologists that allow them to access the full scope of patient data longitudinally, view recommended treatments or clinical trials for similar patients, and track outcomes over time. These solutions are helping health systems across the country to improve patient outcomes by offering the most innovative care to cancer patients.

Leading health systems such as Stanford Health Care, Providence St. Joseph Health, and Intermountain Healthcare are using Syapse to improve patient outcomes, streamline clinical workflows, and scale their precision medicine programs. A group of experts known as the Molecular Tumor Board (MTB) reviews complex cases and evaluates patient data, documents notes, and disseminates treatment recommendations to the treating physician. Syapse also provides reports that give health system staff insight into their institution’s oncology care, which can be used toward quality improvement, business goals, and understanding variables in the oncology service line.

Syapse uses Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Amazon EC2 Dedicated Instances, and Amazon Elastic Block Store to build a high-performance, scalable, and HIPAA-compliant data platform that enables health systems to make precision medicine part of routine cancer care for patients throughout the country.

Be sure to check out the Syapse blog to learn more and also their recent video on the #StartupsOnAir video series where they discuss their product, HIPAA compliance, and more about how they are using AWS.

Thank you for checking out another month of awesome hot startups!

-Tina Barr