Tag Archives: energy/the-smarter-grid

How an Australian State Fought Back Against Grid-Sparked Wildfires

Post Syndicated from Peter Fairley original https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/the-smarter-grid/how-an-australian-state-faced-devastation-from-gridsparked-wildfires

Nine years before Paradise, California burned to the ground, a similar tragedy unfolded in Australia. On a searing, windy day in 2009 that came to be known as “Black Saturday,” hundreds of fires erupted in the state of Victoria. One of the worst razed the bucolic mountain town of Marysville, northeast of Melbourne. And just as sparks from a Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) power line launched the Camp Fire that destroyed Paradise, Marysville’s undoing began with high-voltage current.

In all, the Black Saturday fires killed 173 people and caused an estimated AUS $4 billion ($2.75 billion) in damage. Fires started by power lines caused 159 of the deaths.

California’s wildfires have “brought it all back,” says Tony Marxsen, an electrical engineering professor at Monash University in Australia. His parents honeymooned in Marysville. “It was a lovely little town nestled up in the hills. To see it destroyed was just wrenching,” he recalls.

Marxsen says faded memories increased Marysville’s death toll. “It had been 26 years since Australia’s last major suite of deadly fires,” he says. “People had come to believe that they could defend their house against a firestorm. Some stayed, and they all died.”

While they go by different names, California’s wildfires and Victoria’s bushfires are driven by the same combination of electrical networks and extreme weather, stoked by climate change. How Victoria responded after the Black Saturday fires—work that continues today—differs significantly from what is happening in California today, especially in PG&E’s territory.

How Tech From Australia Could Prevent California Wildfires and PG&E Blackouts

Post Syndicated from Peter Fairley original https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/the-smarter-grid/breaking-pges-cycle-of-blackouts-and-wildfires

California utility Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) delivered a bitter pill last month when it said that deliberate blackouts to keep its lines from sparking wildfires could be the new normal for millions of customers for the next decade—a dangerous disruption to power-dependent communities that California governor Gavin Newsom says “no state in the 21st Century should experience.” Grid experts say Newsom is right, because technology available today can slash the risk of grid-induced fires, reducing or eliminating the need for PG&E’s “public safety power shutoffs.”

Equipment to slash grid-related fire risk isn’t cheap or problem-free, but could be preferable to the most commonly-advanced solutions: putting lines underground or equipping California with thousands of “microgrids” to reduce reliance on big lines. Widespread undergrounding and microgrids will be costly. And the latter could create inequalities and weaken investment in the big grids as communities with means isolate themselves from power shutoffs with solar systems and batteries.

Some of the most innovative fire-beating grid technologies are the products of an R&D program funded by the state of Victoria in Australia, prompted by deadly grid-sparked bushfires there 10 years ago. Early this year, utilities in Victoria began a massive rollout of one solution: power diverters that are expected to protect all of the substations serving the state’s high fire risk areas by 2024.