Tag Archives: erts

Canadian Pirate Site Blocks Could Spread to VPNs, Professor Warns

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/canadian-pirate-site-blocks-could-spread-to-vpns-professor-warns-180219/

ISP blocking has become a prime measure for the entertainment industry to target pirate sites on the Internet.

In recent years sites have been blocked throughout Europe, in Asia, and even Down Under.

Last month, a coalition of Canadian companies called on the local telecom regulator CRTC to establish a local pirate site blocking program, which would be the first of its kind in North America.

The Canadian deal is backed by both copyright holders and major players in the Telco industry, such as Bell and Rogers, which also have media companies of their own. Instead of court-ordered blockades, they call for a mutually agreed deal where ISPs will block pirate sites.

The plan has triggered a fair amount of opposition. Tens of thousands of people have protested against the proposal and several experts are warning against the negative consequences it may have.

One of the most vocal opponents is University of Ottawa law professor Micheal Geist. In a series of articles, processor Geist highlighted several problems, including potential overblocking.

The Fairplay Canada coalition downplays overblocking, according to Geist. They say the measures will only affect sites that are blatantly, overwhelmingly or structurally engaged in piracy, which appears to be a high standard.

However, the same coalition uses a report from MUSO as its primary evidence. This report draws on a list of 23,000 pirate sites, which may not all be blatant enough to meet the blocking standard.

For example, professor Geist notes that it includes a site dedicated to user-generated subtitles as well as sites that offer stream ripping tools which can be used for legal purposes.

“Stream ripping is a concern for the music industry, but these technologies (which are also found in readily available software programs from a local BestBuy) also have considerable non-infringing uses, such as for downloading Creative Commons licensed videos also found on video sites,” Geist writes.

If the coalition tried to have all these sites blocked the scope would be much larger than currently portrayed. Conversely, if only a few of the sites would be blocked, then the evidence that was used to put these blocks in place would have been exaggerated.

“In other words, either the scope of block list coverage is far broader than the coalition admits or its piracy evidence is inflated by including sites that do not meet its piracy standard,” Geist notes.

Perhaps most concerning is the slippery slope that the blocking efforts can turn into. Professor Geist fears that after the standard piracy sites are dealt with, related targets may be next.

This includes VPN services. While this may sound far-fetched to some, several members of the coalition, such as Bell and Rogers, have already criticized VPNs in the past since these allow people to watch geo-blocked content.

“Once the list of piracy sites (whatever the standard) is addressed, it is very likely that the Bell coalition will turn its attention to other sites and services such as virtual private networks (VPNs).

“This is not mere speculation. Rather, it is taking Bell and its allies at their word on how they believe certain services and sites constitute theft,” Geist adds.

The issue may even be more relevant in this case, since the same VPNs can also be used to circumvent pirate sites blockades.

“Further, since the response to site blocking from some Internet users will surely involve increased use of VPNs to evade the blocks, the attempt to characterize VPNs as services engaged in piracy will only increase,” Geist adds.

Potential overblocking is just one of the many issues with the current proposal, according to the law professor. Geist previously highlighted that current copyright law already provides sufficient remedies to deal with piracy and that piracy isn’t that much of a problem in Canada in the first place.

The CRTC has yet to issue its review of the proposal but now that the cat is out of the bag, rightsholders and ISPs are likely to keep pushing for blockades, one way or the other.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Join Us for AWS Security Week February 20–23 in San Francisco!

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/join-us-for-aws-security-week-february-20-23-in-san-francisco/

AWS Pop-up Loft image

Join us for AWS Security Week, February 20–23 at the AWS Pop-up Loft in San Francisco, where you can participate in four days of themed content that will help you secure your workloads on AWS. Each day will highlight a different security and compliance topic, and will include an overview session, a customer or partner speaker, a deep dive into the day’s topic, and a hands-on lab or demos of relevant AWS or partner services.

Tuesday (February 20) will kick off the week with a day devoted to identity and governance. On Wednesday, we will dig into secure configuration and automation, including a discussion about upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirements. On Thursday, we will cover threat detection and remediation, which will include an Amazon GuardDuty lab. And on Friday, we will discuss incident response on AWS.

Sessions, demos, and labs about each of these topics will be led by seasoned security professionals from AWS, who will help you understand not just the basics, but also the nuances of building applications in the AWS Cloud in a robust and secure manner. AWS subject-matter experts will be available for “Ask the Experts” sessions during breaks.

Register today!

– Craig

How I built a data warehouse using Amazon Redshift and AWS services in record time

Post Syndicated from Stephen Borg original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/how-i-built-a-data-warehouse-using-amazon-redshift-and-aws-services-in-record-time/

This is a customer post by Stephen Borg, the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

Cerberus Technologies, in their own words: Cerberus is a company founded in 2017 by a team of visionary iGaming veterans. Our mission is simple – to offer the best tech solutions through a data-driven and a customer-first approach, delivering innovative solutions that go against traditional forms of working and process. This mission is based on the solid foundations of reliability, flexibility and security, and we intend to fundamentally change the way iGaming and other industries interact with technology.

Over the years, I have developed and created a number of data warehouses from scratch. Recently, I built a data warehouse for the iGaming industry single-handedly. To do it, I used the power and flexibility of Amazon Redshift and the wider AWS data management ecosystem. In this post, I explain how I was able to build a robust and scalable data warehouse without the large team of experts typically needed.

In two of my recent projects, I ran into challenges when scaling our data warehouse using on-premises infrastructure. Data was growing at many tens of gigabytes per day, and query performance was suffering. Scaling required major capital investment for hardware and software licenses, and also significant operational costs for maintenance and technical staff to keep it running and performing well. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get the resources needed to scale the infrastructure with data growth, and these projects were abandoned. Thanks to cloud data warehousing, the bottleneck of infrastructure resources, capital expense, and operational costs have been significantly reduced or have totally gone away. There is no more excuse for allowing obstacles of the past to delay delivering timely insights to decision makers, no matter how much data you have.

With Amazon Redshift and AWS, I delivered a cloud data warehouse to the business very quickly, and with a small team: me. I didn’t have to order hardware or software, and I no longer needed to install, configure, tune, or keep up with patches and version updates. Instead, I easily set up a robust data processing pipeline and we were quickly ingesting and analyzing data. Now, my data warehouse team can be extremely lean, and focus more time on bringing in new data and delivering insights. In this post, I show you the AWS services and the architecture that I used.

Handling data feeds

I have several different data sources that provide everything needed to run the business. The data includes activity from our iGaming platform, social media posts, clickstream data, marketing and campaign performance, and customer support engagements.

To handle the diversity of data feeds, I developed abstract integration applications using Docker that run on Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) and feed data to Amazon Kinesis Data Streams. These data streams can be used for real time analytics. In my system, each record in Kinesis is preprocessed by an AWS Lambda function to cleanse and aggregate information. My system then routes it to be stored where I need on Amazon S3 by Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose. Suppose that you used an on-premises architecture to accomplish the same task. A team of data engineers would be required to maintain and monitor a Kafka cluster, develop applications to stream data, and maintain a Hadoop cluster and the infrastructure underneath it for data storage. With my stream processing architecture, there are no servers to manage, no disk drives to replace, and no service monitoring to write.

Setting up a Kinesis stream can be done with a few clicks, and the same for Kinesis Firehose. Firehose can be configured to automatically consume data from a Kinesis Data Stream, and then write compressed data every N minutes to Amazon S3. When I want to process a Kinesis data stream, it’s very easy to set up a Lambda function to be executed on each message received. I can just set a trigger from the AWS Lambda Management Console, as shown following.

I also monitor the duration of function execution using Amazon CloudWatch and AWS X-Ray.

Regardless of the format I receive the data from our partners, I can send it to Kinesis as JSON data using my own formatters. After Firehose writes this to Amazon S3, I have everything in nearly the same structure I received but compressed, encrypted, and optimized for reading.

This data is automatically crawled by AWS Glue and placed into the AWS Glue Data Catalog. This means that I can immediately query the data directly on S3 using Amazon Athena or through Amazon Redshift Spectrum. Previously, I used Amazon EMR and an Amazon RDS–based metastore in Apache Hive for catalog management. Now I can avoid the complexity of maintaining Hive Metastore catalogs. Glue takes care of high availability and the operations side so that I know that end users can always be productive.

Working with Amazon Athena and Amazon Redshift for analysis

I found Amazon Athena extremely useful out of the box for ad hoc analysis. Our engineers (me) use Athena to understand new datasets that we receive and to understand what transformations will be needed for long-term query efficiency.

For our data analysts and data scientists, we’ve selected Amazon Redshift. Amazon Redshift has proven to be the right tool for us over and over again. It easily processes 20+ million transactions per day, regardless of the footprint of the tables and the type of analytics required by the business. Latency is low and query performance expectations have been more than met. We use Redshift Spectrum for long-term data retention, which enables me to extend the analytic power of Amazon Redshift beyond local data to anything stored in S3, and without requiring me to load any data. Redshift Spectrum gives me the freedom to store data where I want, in the format I want, and have it available for processing when I need it.

To load data directly into Amazon Redshift, I use AWS Data Pipeline to orchestrate data workflows. I create Amazon EMR clusters on an intra-day basis, which I can easily adjust to run more or less frequently as needed throughout the day. EMR clusters are used together with Amazon RDS, Apache Spark 2.0, and S3 storage. The data pipeline application loads ETL configurations from Spring RESTful services hosted on AWS Elastic Beanstalk. The application then loads data from S3 into memory, aggregates and cleans the data, and then writes the final version of the data to Amazon Redshift. This data is then ready to use for analysis. Spark on EMR also helps with recommendations and personalization use cases for various business users, and I find this easy to set up and deliver what users want. Finally, business users use Amazon QuickSight for self-service BI to slice, dice, and visualize the data depending on their requirements.

Each AWS service in this architecture plays its part in saving precious time that’s crucial for delivery and getting different departments in the business on board. I found the services easy to set up and use, and all have proven to be highly reliable for our use as our production environments. When the architecture was in place, scaling out was either completely handled by the service, or a matter of a simple API call, and crucially doesn’t require me to change one line of code. Increasing shards for Kinesis can be done in a minute by editing a stream. Increasing capacity for Lambda functions can be accomplished by editing the megabytes allocated for processing, and concurrency is handled automatically. EMR cluster capacity can easily be increased by changing the master and slave node types in Data Pipeline, or by using Auto Scaling. Lastly, RDS and Amazon Redshift can be easily upgraded without any major tasks to be performed by our team (again, me).

In the end, using AWS services including Kinesis, Lambda, Data Pipeline, and Amazon Redshift allows me to keep my team lean and highly productive. I eliminated the cost and delays of capital infrastructure, as well as the late night and weekend calls for support. I can now give maximum value to the business while keeping operational costs down. My team pushed out an agile and highly responsive data warehouse solution in record time and we can handle changing business requirements rapidly, and quickly adapt to new data and new user requests.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Deploy a Data Warehouse Quickly with Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and Tableau Server and Top 8 Best Practices for High-Performance ETL Processing Using Amazon Redshift.


About the Author

Stephen Borg is the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies. He has a background in platform software engineering, and first became involved in data warehousing using the typical RDBMS, SQL, ETL, and BI tools. He quickly became passionate about providing insight to help others optimize the business and add personalization to products. He is now the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

 

 

 

Comcast Explains How It Deals With Persistent Pirates

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/comcast-explains-how-it-deals-with-persistent-pirates-180210/

Dating back to the turn of the last century, copyright holders have alerted Internet providers about alleged copyright infringers on their network.

While many ISPs forwarded these notices to their subscribers, most were not very forthcoming about what would happen after multiple accusations.

This vagueness was in part shaped by law. While it’s clear that the DMCA requires Internet providers to implement a meaningful “repeat infringer” policy, the DMCA doesn’t set any clear boundaries on what constitutes a repeat infringer and when one should be punished.

With the recent Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling against Cox, it is now clear that “infringers” doesn’t imply people who are adjudicated, valid accusations from copyright holders are enough. However, an ISP still has some flexibility when it comes to the rest of its “repeat infringer” policy.

In this light, it’s interesting to see that Comcast recently published details of its repeat infringer policy online. While the ISP has previously confirmed that persistent pirates could be terminated, it has never publicly spelled out its policy in such detail.

First up, Comcast clarifies that subscribers to its Xfinity service can be flagged based on reports from rightsholders alone, which is in line with the Fourth Circuit ruling.

“Any infringement of third party copyright rights violates the law. We reserve the right to treat any customer account for whom we receive multiple DMCA notifications from content owners as a repeat infringer,” the company notes.

If Comcast receives multiple notices in a calendar month, the associated subscriber moves from one policy step to the next one. This means that the ISP will issue warnings with increased visibility.

These alerts can come in the form of emails, letters to a home address, text messages, phone calls, and also alerts sent to the subscriber’s web browser. The alerts then have to be acknowledged by the user, so it clear that he or she understands what’s at stake.

From Comcast’s repeat infringer policy

Comcast doesn’t state specifically how many alerts will trigger tougher action, but it stresses that repeat infringers risk having their accounts suspended. As a result, all devices that rely on Internet access will be interrupted or stop working.

“If your XFINITY Internet account is suspended, you will have no Internet access or service during suspension. This means any services and devices that use the Internet will not properly work or will not work at all,” Comcast states.

The suspension is applied as a last warning before the lights go out completely. Subscribers who reach this stage can still reinstate their Internet connectivity by calling Comcast. It’s unclear whether they have to take any additional action, but it could be that these subscribers have to ‘promise’ to behave.

After this last warning, the subscriber risks the most severe penalty, account termination. This is not limited to regular access to the web, but also affects XFINITY TV, XFINITY Voice, and XFINITY Home, including smart thermostats and home security equipment.

“If you reach the point of service termination, we will terminate your XFINITY Internet service and related add-ons. Unreturned equipment charges will still apply. If you also have XFINITY TV and/or XFINITY Voice services, they will also be terminated,” Comcast warns.

Comcast doesn’t specify how long the Internet termination lasts but the company states that it’s typically no less than 180 days. This means that terminated subscribers will need to find an Internet subscription elsewhere if one’s available.

The good news is that other XFINITY services can be restored after termination, without Internet access. Subscribers will have to contact Comcast to request a quote for an Internet-less package.

While this policy may sound harsh to some, Comcast has few other options if it wants to avoid liability. The good news is that the company requires users to acknowledge the warnings, which means that any measures shouldn’t come as a surprise.

There is no mention of any option to contest any copyright holder notices, which may become an issue in the future. After all, when copyright holders have the power to have people’s Internet connections terminated, their accusations have to be spot on.



Comcast’s repeat infringer policy is available here and was, according to the information we have available, quietly published around December last year.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Anti-Piracy Video Scares Kids With ‘Fake’ Malware Info

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/anti-piracy-video-scares-kids-with-fake-malware-info-180206/

Today is Safer Internet Day, a global awareness campaign to educate the public on all sorts of threats that people face online.

It is a laudable initiative supported by the Industry Trust for IP Awareness which, together with the children’s charity Into Film, has released an informative video and associated course materials.

The organizations have created a British version of an animation previously released as part of the Australian “Price of Piracy” campaign. While the video includes an informative description of the various types of malware, there appears to be a secondary agenda.

Strangely enough, the video itself contains no advice on how to avoid malware at all, other than to avoid pirate sites. In that sense, it looks more like an indirect anti-piracy ad.

While there’s no denying that kids might run into malware if they randomly click on pirate site ads, this problem is certainly not exclusive to these sites. Email and social media are frequently used to link to malware too, and YouTube comments can pose the same risk. The problem is everywhere.

What really caught our eye, however, is the statement that pirate sites are the most used propagation method for malware. “Did you know, the number one way we infect your device is via illegal pirate sites,” an animated piece of malware claims in the video.

Forget about email attachments, spam links, compromised servers, or even network attacks. Pirate sites are the number one spot through which malware spreads. According to the video at least. But where do they get this knowledge?

Meet the malwares

When we asked the Industry Trust for IP Awareness for further details, the organization checked with their Australian colleagues, who pointed us to a working paper (pdf) from 2014. This paper includes the following line: “Illegal streaming websites are now the number one propagation mechanism for malicious software as 97% of them contain malware.”

Unfortunately, there’s a lot wrong with this claim.

Through another citation, the 97% figure points to this unpublished study of which only the highlights were shared. This “malware” research looked at the prevalence of malware and other unwanted software linked to pirate sites. Not just streaming sites as the other paper said, but let’s ignore that last bit.

What the study actually found is that of the 30 researched pirate sites, “90% contained malware or other ‘Potentially Unwanted Programmes’.” Note that this is not the earlier mentioned 97%, and that this broad category not only includes malware but also popup ads, which were most popular. This means that the percentage of actual malware on these sites can be anywhere from 0.1% to 90%.

Importantly, none of the malware found in this research was installed without an action performed by the user, such as clicking on a flashy download button or installing a mysterious .exe file.

Aside from clearly erroneous references, the more worrying issue is that even the original incorrect statement that “97% of all pirate sites contain malware” provides no evidence for the claim in the video that pirate sites are “the number one way” through which malware spreads.

Even if 100% of all pirate sites link to malware, that’s no proof that it’s the most used propagation method.

The malware issue has been a popular talking point for a while, but after searching for answers for days, we couldn’t find a grain of evidence. There are a lot of malware propagation methods, including email, which traditionally is a very popular choice.

Even more confusingly, the same paper that was cited as a source for the pirate site malware claim notes that 80% of all web-based malware is hosted on “innocent” but compromised websites.

As the provided evidence gave no answers, we asked the experts to chime in. Luckily, security company Malwarebytes was willing to share its assessment. As leaders in the anti-malware industry, they should know better than researchers who have their numbers and terminology mixed up.

“These days, most common infections come from malicious spam campaigns and drive-by exploit attacks,” Adam Kujawa, Director of Malware Intelligence at Malwarebytes informs us.

“Torrent sites are still frequently used by criminals to host malware disguised as something the user wants, like an application, movie, etc. However they are really only a threat to people who use torrent sites regularly and those people have likely learned how to avoid malicious torrents,” he adds.

In other words, most people who regularly visit pirate sites know how to avoid these dangers. That doesn’t mean that they are not a threat to unsuspecting kids who visit them for the first time of course.

“Now, if users who were not familiar with torrent and pirate sites started using these services, there is a high probability that they could encounter some kind of malware. However, many of these sites have user review processes to let other users know if a particular torrent or download is likely malicious.

“So, unless a user is completely new to this process and ignores all the warning signs, they could walk away from a pirate site without getting infected,” Kujawa says.

Overall, the experts at Malwarebytes see no evidence for the claim that pirate sites are the number one propagation method for malware.

“So in summary, I don’t think the claim that ‘pirate sites’ are the number one way to infect users is accurate at all,” Kujawa concludes.

While it’s always a good idea to avoid places that can have a high prevalence of malware, including pirate sites, the claims in the video are not backed up by real evidence. There are tens of thousands of non-pirate sites that pose similar or worse risks, so it’s always a good idea to have anti-malware and virus software installed.

The organizations and people involved in the British “Meet the Malwares” video might not have been aware of the doubtful claims, but it’s unfortunate that they didn’t opt for a broader campaign instead of the focused anti-piracy message.

Finally, since it’s still Safer Internet Day, we encourage kids to take a close look at the various guides on how to avoid “fake news” while engaging in critical thinking.

Be safe!

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Researchers Use a Blockchain to Boost Anonymous Torrent Sharing

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/researchers-use-a-blockchain-to-boost-anonymous-torrent-sharing-180129/

The Tribler client has been around for over a decade. We first covered it in 2006 and since then it’s developed into a truly decentralized BitTorrent client.

Even if all torrent sites were shut down today, Tribler users would still be able to find and add new content.

The project is not run by regular software developers but by a team of quality researchers at Delft University of Technology. There are currently more than 45 masters students, various thesis students, five dedicated scientific developers, and several professors involved.

Simply put, Triber aims to make the torrent ecosystem truly decentralized and anonymous. A social network of peers that can survive even if all torrent sites ceased to exist.

“Search and download torrents with less worries or censorship,” Triber’s tagline reads.

Like many other BitTorrent clients, Tribler has a search box at the top of the application. However, the search results that appear when users type in a keyword don’t come from a central index. Instead, they come directly from other peers.

Thriber’s search results

With the latest release, Tribler 7.0, the project adds another element to the mix, it’s very own blockchain. This blockchain keeps track of how much people are sharing and rewards them accordingly.

“Tribler is a torrent client for social people, who help each other. You can now earn tokens by helping others. It is specifically designed to prevent freeriding and detect hit-and-run peers.” Tribler leader Dr. Johan Pouwelse tells TF.

“You help other Tribler users by seeding and by enhancing their privacy. In return, you get faster downloads, as your tokens show you contribute to the community.”

Pouwelse, who aims to transform BitTorrent into an ethical Darknet, just presented the latest release at Stanford University. In addition, the Internet Engineering Task Force is also considering the blockchain implementation as an official Internet standard.

This recognition from academics and technology experts is welcome, of course, but Triber’s true power comes from the users. The client has gathered a decent userbase of the years but there sure is plenty room for improvement on this front.

The anonymity aspect is perhaps one of the biggest selling points and Pouwelse believes that this will greatly benefit from the blockchain implementation.

Triber provides users with pseudo anonymity by routing the transfers through other users. However, this means that the amount of bandwith used by the application inceases as well. Thus far, this hasn’t worked very well, which resulted in slow anonymous downloads.

“With the integrated blockchain release today we think we can start fixing the problem of both underseeded swarms and fast proxies,” Dr. Pouwelse says.

“Our solution is basically very simple, only social people get decent performance on Tribler. This means in a few years we will end up with only users that act nice. Others leave.”

Tribler’s trust stats

Tribler provides users with quite a bit of flexibility on the anonymity site. The feature can be turned off completely, or people can choose a protection layer ranging from one to four hops.

What’s also important to note is that users don’t operate as exit nodes by default. The IP-addresses of the exit nodes are public ouitside the network and can be monitored, so that would only increase liability.

So who are the exit-nodes in this process then? According to Pouwelse’s rather colorful description, these appear to be volunteers that run their code through a VPN a or a VPS server.

“The past years we have created an army of bots we call ‘Self-replicating Autonomous Entities’. These are Terminator-style self-replicating pieces of code which have their own Bitcoin wallet to go out there and buy servers to run more copies of themselves,” he explains.

“They utilize very primitive genetic evolution to improve survival, buy a VPN for protection, earn credits using our experimental credit mining preview release, and sell our bandwidth tokens on our integrated decentral market for cold hard Bitcoin cash to renew the cycle of life for the next month billing cycle of their VPS provider.”

Some might question why there’s such a massive research project dedicated to building an anonymous BitTorrent network. What are the benefits to society?

The answer is clear, according to Pouwelse. The ethical darknet they envision will be a unique micro-economy where sharing is rewarded, without having to expose one’s identity.

“We are building the Internet of Trust. The Internet can do amazing things, it even created honesty among drugs dealers,” he says, referring to the infamous Silk Road.

“Reliability rating of drugs lords gets you life imprisonment. That’s not something we want. We are creating our own trustworthy micro-economy for bandwidth tokens and real Bitcoins,” he adds.

People who are interested in taking Tribler for a spin can download the latest version from the official website.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

NAFTA Negotiations Heat Up Copyright “Safe Harbor” Clash

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/nafta-negotiations-heat-up-copyright-safe-harbor-clash-180123/

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Canada, and Mexico was negotiated more than 25 years ago.

Over the past quarter-century trade has changed drastically, especially online, so the United States is now planning to modernize the international deal.

One of the topics that has received a lot of interest from various experts and stakeholders are safe harbors. In the US, Internet services are shielded from copyright infringement liability under the safe harbor provisions of the DMCA, but in Mexico and Canada, that’s not the case.

The latest round of NAFTA renegotiations are currently taking place in Montreal and this is heating up the debate once again. Several legal scholars and advocacy groups believe that such US-style safe harbor provisions are essential for Internet services to operate freely on the Internet.

A group of more than fifty Internet law experts and organizations made this clear in a letter sent to the negotiators this week, urging them to make safe harbors part of the new deal.

“When NAFTA was negotiated, the Internet was an obscure electronic network. Since then, the Internet has become a significant — and essential — part of our societies and our economies,” the letter reads.

“To acknowledge this, if a modernized NAFTA contains a digital trade chapter, it should contain protections for online intermediaries from liability for third party online content, similar to the United States’ ‘Section 230’.”

The safe harbors in the Communications Decency Act and the DMCA ensure that services which deal with user-generated content, including Google, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Wikipedia, are shielded from liability.

This immunity makes it easier for new user-generated services to launch, without the fear of expensive lawsuits, the argument goes.

However, not everyone sees it this way. In a letter cited by Variety, a group of 37 industry groups urges U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to negotiate ‘strong’ safe harbor protections. Strong, in this case, means that simply responding to takedown notices is not always enough.

“If these anti-IP voices succeed, they will turn long-standing trade policy, with creativity and innovation at its core, on its head by transforming our trade agreements into blueprints for how to evade liability for IP theft,” they write.

The MPAA and RIAA, which also signed the letter, previously stressed that the current US safe harbors are not working. These industry groups believe that services such as YouTube exploit their safe harbor immunity and profit from it.

The RIAA, therefore, wants any negotiated safe harbor provisions in NAFTA to be flexible in the event that the DMCA is tightened up in response to the ongoing safe harbor rules study.

So, what should a content industry-approved safe harbor look like then?

The music industry group says that these should only be available to passive platforms that are not actively engaged in communicating and do not generate any revenue from pirated content. This would exclude YouTube and many other Internet services.

While it’s clear that the ideas of both camps are hard to unite, there’s still the question of whether there will be a new and improved NAFTA version at all. President Trump has previously threatened to terminate the agreement.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Cloud Babble: The Jargon of Cloud Storage

Post Syndicated from Andy Klein original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/what-is-cloud-computing/

Cloud Babble

One of the things we in the technology business are good at is coming up with names, phrases, euphemisms, and acronyms for the stuff that we create. The Cloud Storage market is no different, and we’d like to help by illuminating some of the cloud storage related terms that you might come across. We know this is just a start, so please feel free to add in your favorites in the comments section below and we’ll update this post accordingly.

Clouds

The cloud is really just a collection of purpose built servers. In a public cloud the servers are shared between multiple unrelated tenants. In a private cloud, the servers are dedicated to a single tenant or sometimes a group of related tenants. A public cloud is off-site, while a private cloud can be on-site or off-site – or on-prem or off-prem, if you prefer.

Both Sides Now: Hybrid Clouds

Speaking of on-prem and off-prem, there are Hybrid Clouds or Hybrid Data Clouds depending on what you need. Both are based on the idea that you extend your local resources (typically on-prem) to the cloud (typically off-prem) as needed. This extension is controlled by software that decides, based on rules you define, what needs to be done where.

A Hybrid Data Cloud is specific to data. For example, you can set up a rule that says all accounting files that have not been touched in the last year are automatically moved off-prem to cloud storage. The files are still available; they are just no longer stored on your local systems. The rules can be defined to fit an organization’s workflow and data retention policies.

A Hybrid Cloud is similar to a Hybrid Data Cloud except it also extends compute. For example, at the end of the quarter, you can spin up order processing application instances off-prem as needed to add to your on-prem capacity. Of course, determining where the transactional data used and created by these applications resides can be an interesting systems design challenge.

Clouds in my Coffee: Fog

Typically, public and private clouds live in large buildings called data centers. Full of servers, networking equipment, and clean air, data centers need lots of power, lots of networking bandwidth, and lots of space. This often limits where data centers are located. The further away you are from a data center, the longer it generally takes to get your data to and from there. This is known as latency. That’s where “Fog” comes in.

Fog is often referred to as clouds close to the ground. Fog, in our cloud world, is basically having a “little” data center near you. This can make data storage and even cloud based processing faster for everyone nearby. Data, and less so processing, can be transferred to/from the Fog to the Cloud when time is less a factor. Data could also be aggregated in the Fog and sent to the Cloud. For example, your electric meter could report its minute-by-minute status to the Fog for diagnostic purposes. Then once a day the aggregated data could be send to the power company’s Cloud for billing purposes.

Another term used in place of Fog is Edge, as in computing at the Edge. In either case, a given cloud (data center) usually has multiple Edges (little data centers) connected to it. The connection between the Edge and the Cloud is sometimes known as the middle-mile. The network in the middle-mile can be less robust than that required to support a stand-alone data center. For example, the middle-mile can use 1 Gbps lines, versus a data center, which would require multiple 10 Gbps lines.

Heavy Clouds No Rain: Data

We’re all aware that we are creating, processing, and storing data faster than ever before. All of this data is stored in either a structured or more likely an unstructured way. Databases and data warehouses are structured ways to store data, but a vast amount of data is unstructured – meaning the schema and data access requirements are not known until the data is queried. A large pool of unstructured data in a flat architecture can be referred to as a Data Lake.

A Data Lake is often created so we can perform some type of “big data” analysis. In an over simplified example, let’s extend the lake metaphor a bit and ask the question; “how many fish are in our lake?” To get an answer, we take a sufficient sample of our lake’s water (data), count the number of fish we find, and extrapolate based on the size of the lake to get an answer within a given confidence interval.

A Data Lake is usually found in the cloud, an excellent place to store large amounts of non-transactional data. Watch out as this can lead to our data having too much Data Gravity or being locked in the Hotel California. This could also create a Data Silo, thereby making a potential data Lift-and-Shift impossible. Let me explain:

  • Data Gravity — Generally, the more data you collect in one spot, the harder it is to move. When you store data in a public cloud, you have to pay egress and/or network charges to download the data to another public cloud or even to your own on-premise systems. Some public cloud vendors charge a lot more than others, meaning that depending on your public cloud provider, your data could financially have a lot more gravity than you expected.
  • Hotel California — This is like Data Gravity but to a lesser scale. Your data is in the Hotel California if, to paraphrase, “your data can check out any time you want, but it can never leave.” If the cost of downloading your data is limiting the things you want to do with that data, then your data is in the Hotel California. Data is generally most valuable when used, and with cloud storage that can include archived data. This assumes of course that the archived data is readily available, and affordable, to download. When considering a cloud storage project always figure in the cost of using your own data.
  • Data Silo — Over the years, businesses have suffered from organizational silos as information is not shared between different groups, but instead needs to travel up to the top of the silo before it can be transferred to another silo. If your data is “trapped” in a given cloud by the cost it takes to share such data, then you may have a Data Silo, and that’s exactly opposite of what the cloud should do.
  • Lift-and-Shift — This term is used to define the movement of data or applications from one data center to another or from on-prem to off-prem systems. The move generally occurs all at once and once everything is moved, systems are operational and data is available at the new location with few, if any, changes. If your data has too much gravity or is locked in a hotel, a data lift-and-shift may break the bank.

I Can See Clearly Now

Hopefully, the cloudy terms we’ve covered are well, less cloudy. As we mentioned in the beginning, our compilation is just a start, so please feel free to add in your favorite cloud term in the comments section below and we’ll update this post with your contributions. Keep your entries “clean,” and please no words or phrases that are really adverts for your company. Thanks.

The post Cloud Babble: The Jargon of Cloud Storage appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

[$] Monitoring with Prometheus 2.0

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/744410/rss

Prometheus is a monitoring tool
built from scratch by SoundCloud in 2012. It works by pulling metrics from
monitored services and storing them in a time series database (TSDB). It
has a powerful query language to inspect that database, create alerts, and
plot basic graphs. Those graphs can then be used to detect anomalies or
trends for (possibly automated) resource provisioning. Prometheus also has
extensive service discovery features and supports high availability
configurations.

That’s what the brochure says, anyway; let’s see how it works in the hands
of an old grumpy system administrator. I’ll be drawing comparisons
with Munin and Nagios frequently because those are the tools I have
used for over a decade in monitoring Unix clusters.

Hello World Issue 4: Professional Development

Post Syndicated from Carrie Anne Philbin original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hello-world-issue-4/

Another new year brings with it thoughts of setting goals and targets. Thankfully, there is a new issue of Hello World packed with practical advise to set you on the road to success.

Hello World is our magazine about computing and digital making for educators, and it’s a collaboration between the Raspberry Pi Foundation and Computing at School, which is part of the British Computing Society.

Hello World 4 Professional Development Raspberry Pi CAS

In issue 4, our international panel of educators and experts recommends approaches to continuing professional development in computer science education.

Approaches to professional development, and much more

With recommendations for more professional development in the Royal Society’s report, and government funding to support this, our cover feature explores some successful approaches. In addition, the issue is packed with other great resources, guides, features, and lesson plans to support educators.

Hello World 4 Professional Development Raspberry Pi CAS
Hello World 4 Professional Development Raspberry Pi CAS
Hello World 4 Professional Development Raspberry Pi CAS
Hello World 4 Professional Development Raspberry Pi CAS

Highlights include:

  • The Royal Society: After the Reboot — learn about the latest report and its findings about computing education
  • The Cyber Games — a new programme looking for the next generation of security experts
  • Engaging Students with Drones
  • Digital Literacy: Lost in Translation?
  • Object-oriented Coding with Python

Get your copy of Hello World 4

Hello World is available as a free Creative Commons download for anyone around the world who is interested in computer science and digital making education. You can get the latest issue as a PDF file straight from the Hello World website.

Thanks to the very generous sponsorship of BT, we are able to offer free print copies of the magazine to serving educators in the UK. It’s for teachers, Code Club volunteers, teaching assistants, teacher trainers, and others who help children and young people learn about computing and digital making. So remember to subscribe to have your free print magazine posted directly to your home — 6000 educators have already signed up to receive theirs!

Could you write for Hello World?

By sharing your knowledge and experience of working with young people to learn about computing, computer science, and digital making in Hello World, you will help inspire others to get involved. You will also help bring the power of digital making to more and more educators and learners.

The computing education community is full of people who lend their experience to help colleagues. Contributing to Hello World is a great way to take an active part in this supportive community, and you’ll be adding to a body of free, open-source learning resources that are available for anyone to use, adapt, and share. It’s also a tremendous platform to broadcast your work: Hello World digital versions alone have been downloaded more than 50000 times!

Wherever you are in the world, get in touch with us by emailing our editorial team about your article idea.

The post Hello World Issue 4: Professional Development appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Judge Issues Devastating Order Against BitTorrent Copyright Troll

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/judge-issues-devastating-order-bittorrent-copyright-troll-180110/

In recent years, file-sharers around the world have been pressured to pay significant settlement fees, or face legal repercussions.

These so-called “copyright trolling” efforts have been a common occurrence in the United States since the turn of the last decade.

Increasingly, however, courts are growing weary of these cases. Many districts have turned into no-go zones for copyright trolls and the people behind Prenda law were arrested and are being prosecuted in a criminal case.

In the Western District of Washington, the tide also appears to have turned. After Venice PI, a copyright holder of the film “Once Upon a Time in Venice”, sued a man who later passed away, concerns were raised over the validity of the evidence.

Venice PI responded to the concerns with a declaration explaining its data gathering technique and assuring the Court that false positives are out of the question.

That testimony didn’t help much though, as a recently filed minute order shows this week. The order applies to a dozen cases and prohibits the company from reaching out to any defendants until further notice, as there are several alarming issues that have to be resolved first.

One of the problems is that Venice PI declared that it’s owned by a company named Lost Dog Productions, which in turn is owned by Voltage Productions. Interestingly, these companies don’t appear in the usual records.

“A search of the California Secretary of State’s online database, however, reveals no registered entity with the name ‘Lost Dog’ or ‘Lost Dog Productions’,” the Court notes.

“Moreover, although ‘Voltage Pictures, LLC’ is registered with the California Secretary of State, and has the same address as Venice PI, LLC, the parent company named in plaintiff’s corporate disclosure form, ‘Voltage Productions, LLC,’ cannot be found in the California Secretary of State’s online database and does not appear to exist.”

In other words, the company that filed the lawsuit, as well as its parent company, are extremely questionable.

While the above is a reason for concern, it’s just the tip of the iceberg. The Court not only points out administrative errors, but it also has serious doubts about the evidence collection process. This was carried out by the German company MaverickEye, which used the tracking technology of another German company, GuardaLey.

GuardaLey CEO Benjamin Perino, who claims that he coded the tracking software, wrote a declaration explaining that the infringement detection system at issue “cannot yield a false positive.” However, the Court doubts this statement and Perino’s qualifications in general.

“Perino has been proffered as an expert, but his qualifications consist of a technical high school education and work experience unrelated to the peer-to-peer file-sharing technology known as BitTorrent,” the Court writes.

“Perino does not have the qualifications necessary to be considered an expert in the field in question, and his opinion that the surveillance program is incapable of error is both contrary to common sense and inconsistent with plaintiff’s counsel’s conduct in other matters in this district. Plaintiff has not submitted an adequate offer of proof”

It seems like the Court would prefer to see an assessment from a qualified independent expert instead of the person who wrote the software. For now, this means that the IP-address evidence, in these cases, is not good enough. That’s quite a blow for the copyright holder.

If that wasn’t enough the Court also highlights another issue that’s possibly even more problematic. When Venice PI requested the subpoenas to identify alleged pirates, they relied on declarations from Daniel Arheidt, a consultant for MaverickEye.

These declarations fail to mention, however, that MaverickEye has the proper paperwork to collect IP addresses.

“Nowhere in Arheidt’s declarations does he indicate that either he or MaverickEye is licensed in Washington to conduct private investigation work,” the order reads.

This is important, as doing private investigator work without a license is a gross misdemeanor in Washington. The copyright holder was aware of this requirement because it was brought up in related cases in the past.

“Plaintiff’s counsel has apparently been aware since October 2016, when he received a letter concerning LHF Productions, Inc. v. Collins, C16-1017 RSM, that Arheidt might be committing a crime by engaging in unlicensed surveillance of Washington citizens, but he did not disclose this fact to the Court.”

The order is very bad news for Venice PI. The company had hoped to score a few dozen easy settlements but the tables have now been turned. The Court instead asks the company to explain the deficiencies and provide additional details. In the meantime, the copyright holder is urged not to spend or transfer any of the settlement money that has been collected thus far.

The latter indicates that Venice PI might have to hand defendants their money back, which would be pretty unique.

The order suggests that the Judge is very suspicious of these trolling activities. In a footnote there’s a link to a Fight Copyright Trolls article which revealed that the same counsel dismissed several cases, allegedly to avoid having IP-address evidence scrutinized.

Even more bizarrely, in another footnote the Court also doubts if MaverickEye’s aforementioned consultant, Daniel Arheidt, actually exists.

“The Court has recently become aware that Arheidt is the latest in a series of German declarants (Darren M. Griffin, Daniel Macek, Daniel Susac, Tobias Fieser, Michael Patzer) who might be aliases or even fictitious.

“Plaintiff will not be permitted to rely on Arheidt’s declarations or underlying data without explaining to the Court’s satisfaction Arheidt’s relationship to the above-listed declarants and producing proof beyond a reasonable doubt of Arheidt’s existence,” the court adds.

These are serious allegations, to say the least.

If a copyright holder uses non-existent companies and questionable testimony from unqualified experts after obtaining evidence illegally to get a subpoena backed by a fictitious person….something’s not quite right.

A copy of the minute order, which affects a series of cases, is available here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Wanted: Sales Engineer

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/wanted-sales-engineer/

At inception, Backblaze was a consumer company. Thousands upon thousands of individuals came to our website and gave us $5/mo to keep their data safe. But, we didn’t sell business solutions. It took us years before we had a sales team. In the last couple of years, we’ve released products that businesses of all sizes love: Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage and Backblaze for Business Computer Backup. Those businesses want to integrate Backblaze deeply into their infrastructure, so it’s time to hire our first Sales Engineer!

Company Description:
Founded in 2007, Backblaze started with a mission to make backup software elegant and provide complete peace of mind. Over the course of almost a decade, we have become a pioneer in robust, scalable low cost cloud backup. Recently, we launched B2 – robust and reliable object storage at just $0.005/gb/mo. Part of our differentiation is being able to offer the lowest price of any of the big players while still being profitable.

We’ve managed to nurture a team oriented culture with amazingly low turnover. We value our people and their families. Don’t forget to check out our “About Us” page to learn more about the people and some of our perks.

We have built a profitable, high growth business. While we love our investors, we have maintained control over the business. That means our corporate goals are simple – grow sustainably and profitably.

Some Backblaze Perks:

  • Competitive healthcare plans
  • Competitive compensation and 401k
  • All employees receive Option grants
  • Unlimited vacation days
  • Strong coffee
  • Fully stocked Micro kitchen
  • Catered breakfast and lunches
  • Awesome people who work on awesome projects
  • Childcare bonus
  • Normal work hours
  • Get to bring your pets into the office
  • San Mateo Office – located near Caltrain and Highways 101 & 280.

Backblaze B2 cloud storage is a building block for almost any computing service that requires storage. Customers need our help integrating B2 into iOS apps to Docker containers. Some customers integrate directly to the API using the programming language of their choice, others want to solve a specific problem using ready made software, already integrated with B2.

At the same time, our computer backup product is deepening it’s integration into enterprise IT systems. We are commonly asked for how to set Windows policies, integrate with Active Directory, and install the client via remote management tools.

We are looking for a sales engineer who can help our customers navigate the integration of Backblaze into their technical environments.

Are you 1/2” deep into many different technologies, and unafraid to dive deeper?

Can you confidently talk with customers about their technology, even if you have to look up all the acronyms right after the call?

Are you excited to setup complicated software in a lab and write knowledge base articles about your work?

Then Backblaze is the place for you!

Enough about Backblaze already, what’s in it for me?
In this role, you will be given the opportunity to learn about the technologies that drive innovation today; diverse technologies that customers are using day in and out. And more importantly, you’ll learn how to learn new technologies.

Just as an example, in the past 12 months, we’ve had the opportunity to learn and become experts in these diverse technologies:

  • How to setup VM servers for lab environments, both on-prem and using cloud services.
  • Create an automatically “resetting” demo environment for the sales team.
  • Setup Microsoft Domain Controllers with Active Directory and AD Federation Services.
  • Learn the basics of OAUTH and web single sign on (SSO).
  • Archive video workflows from camera to media asset management systems.
  • How upload/download files from Javascript by enabling CORS.
  • How to install and monitor online backup installations using RMM tools, like JAMF.
  • Tape (LTO) systems. (Yes – people still use tape for storage!)

How can I know if I’ll succeed in this role?

You have:

  • Confidence. Be able to ask customers questions about their environments and convey to them your technical acumen.
  • Curiosity. Always want to learn about customers’ situations, how they got there and what problems they are trying to solve.
  • Organization. You’ll work with customers, integration partners, and Backblaze team members on projects of various lengths. You can context switch and either have a great memory or keep copious notes. Your checklists have their own checklists.

You are versed in:

  • The fundamentals of Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. You shouldn’t be afraid to use a command line.
  • Building, installing, integrating and configuring applications on any operating system.
  • Debugging failures – reading logs, monitoring usage, effective google searching to fix problems excites you.
  • The basics of TCP/IP networking and the HTTP protocol.
  • Novice development skills in any programming/scripting language. Have basic understanding of data structures and program flow.
  • Your background contains:

  • Bachelor’s degree in computer science or the equivalent.
  • 2+ years of experience as a pre or post-sales engineer.
  • The right extra credit:
    There are literally hundreds of previous experiences you can have had that would make you perfect for this job. Some experiences that we know would be helpful for us are below, but make sure you tell us your stories!

  • Experience using or programming against Amazon S3.
  • Experience with large on-prem storage – NAS, SAN, Object. And backing up data on such storage with tools like Veeam, Veritas and others.
  • Experience with photo or video media. Media archiving is a key market for Backblaze B2.
  • Program arduinos to automatically feed your dog.
  • Experience programming against web or REST APIs. (Point us towards your projects, if they are open source and available to link to.)
  • Experience with sales tools like Salesforce.
  • 3D print door stops.
  • Experience with Windows Servers, Active Directory, Group policies and the like.
  • What’s it like working with the Sales team?
    The Backblaze sales team collaborates. We help each other out by sharing ideas, templates, and our customer’s experiences. When we talk about our accomplishments, there is no “I did this,” only “we”. We are truly a team.

    We are honest to each other and our customers and communicate openly. We aim to have fun by embracing crazy ideas and creative solutions. We try to think not outside the box, but with no boxes at all. Customers are the driving force behind the success of the company and we care deeply about their success.

    If this all sounds like you:

    1. Send an email to [email protected] with the position in the subject line.
    2. Tell us a bit about your Sales Engineering experience.
    3. Include your resume.

    The post Wanted: Sales Engineer appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

    12 B2 Power Tips for Experts and Developers

    Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/advanced-cloud-storage-tips/

    B2 Tips for Pros
    If you’ve been using B2 Cloud Storage for a while, you probably think you know all that you can do with it. But do you?

    We’ve put together a list of blazing power tips for experts and developers that will take you to the next level. Take a look below.

    If you’re new to B2, we have a list of power tips for you, too.
    Visit 12 Power Tips for New B2 Users.
    Backblaze logo

    1    Manage File Versions

    Use Lifecycle Rules on a Bucket to set how many days to keep files that are no longer the current version. This is a great way to manage the amount of space your B2 account is using.

    Backblaze logo

    2    Easily Stay on Top of Your B2 Account Limits

    Set usage caps and get text/email alerts for your B2 account when you approach limits that you define.

    Backblaze logo

    3    Bring on Your Big Files

    You can upload files as large as 10TB to B2.

    Backblaze logo

    4    You Can Use FedEx to Get Your Data into B2

    If you have over 20TB of data, you can use Backblaze’s Fireball hard disk array to load large volumes of data directly into your B2 account. We ship a Fireball to you and you ship it back.

    Backblaze logo

    5    You Have Command-Line Control of All B2 Functions

    You have complete control over B2 using our command line tool that is available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux.

    Backblaze logo

    6    You Can Use Your Own Domain Name To Front a Public B2 Bucket

    You can create a vanity URL for your B2 account.

    Backblaze logo

    7    See What’s Happening in Your Account with Graphical Reports

    You can view graphical reports summarizing your B2 usage — transactions, downloads, averages, data stored — in your B2 account dashboard.

    Backblaze logo

    8    Create a B2 SDK

    You can build your own B2 SDK for JVM-based or JVM-compatible languages using our B2 Java SDK on Github.

    Backblaze logo

    9    B2’s API is Easy to Use

    B2’s API is similar to, but simpler than Amazon’s S3 API, making it super easy for developers to integrate with B2 Cloud Storage.

    Backblaze logo

    10    View Code Examples To Get Your B2 Project Started

    The B2 API is well documented and has code examples for cURL, Java, Python, Swift, Ruby, C#, and PHP. For example, here’s how to create a B2 Bucket.

    Backblaze logo

    11    Developers can set the B2 part size as low as 5 MB

    When working with large files, the minimum file part size can be set as low as 5MB or as high as 5GB. This gives developers the ability to maximize the throughput of B2 data uploads and downloads. See Large Files and Downloading for more developer tips.

    Backblaze logo

    12    Your App or Device Can Work with B2, as well

    Your B2 integration can be listed on Backblaze’s website. Visit Submit an Integration to get started.

    Want to Learn More About B2?

    You can find more information on B2 on our website and in our help pages.

    The post 12 B2 Power Tips for Experts and Developers appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

    AWS Online Tech Talks – January 2018

    Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-january-2018/

    Happy New Year! Kick of 2018 right by expanding your AWS knowledge with a great batch of new Tech Talks. We’re covering some of the biggest launches from re:Invent including Amazon Neptune, Amazon Rekognition Video, AWS Fargate, AWS Cloud9, Amazon Kinesis Video Streams, AWS PrivateLink, AWS Single-Sign On and more!

    January 2018– Schedule

    Noted below are the upcoming scheduled live, online technical sessions being held during the month of January. Make sure to register ahead of time so you won’t miss out on these free talks conducted by AWS subject matter experts.

    Webinars featured this month are:

    Monday January 22

    Analytics & Big Data
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Analyze your Data Lake, Fast @ Any Scale  Lvl 300

    Database
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Deep Dive on Amazon Neptune Lvl 200

    Tuesday, January 23

    Artificial Intelligence
    9:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  How to get the most out of Amazon Rekognition Video, a deep learning based video analysis service Lvl 300

    Containers

    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM Introducing AWS Fargate Lvl 200

    Serverless
    01:00 PM – 02:00 PM PT Overview of Serverless Application Deployment Patterns Lvl 400

    Wednesday, January 24

    DevOps
    09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing AWS Cloud9  Lvl 200

    Analytics & Big Data
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Deep Dive: Amazon Kinesis Video Streams
    Lvl 300
    Database
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Introducing Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL Compatibility Lvl 200

    Thursday, January 25

    Artificial Intelligence
    09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing Amazon SageMaker Lvl 200

    Mobile
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Ionic and React Hybrid Web/Native Mobile Applications with Mobile Hub Lvl 200

    IoT
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Connected Product Development: Secure Cloud & Local Connectivity for Microcontroller-based Devices Lvl 200

    Monday, January 29

    Enterprise
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Enterprise Solutions Best Practices 100 Achieving Business Value with AWS Lvl 100

    Compute
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Introduction to Amazon Lightsail Lvl 200

    Tuesday, January 30

    Security, Identity & Compliance
    09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing Managed Rules for AWS WAF Lvl 200

    Storage
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT  Improving Backup & DR – AWS Storage Gateway Lvl 300

    Compute
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT  Introducing the New Simplified Access Model for EC2 Spot Instances Lvl 200

    Wednesday, January 31

    Networking
    09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  Deep Dive on AWS PrivateLink Lvl 300

    Enterprise
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Preparing Your Team for a Cloud Transformation Lvl 200

    Compute
    01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT  The Nitro Project: Next-Generation EC2 Infrastructure Lvl 300

    Thursday, February 1

    Security, Identity & Compliance
    09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  Deep Dive on AWS Single Sign-On Lvl 300

    Storage
    11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT How to Build a Data Lake in Amazon S3 & Amazon Glacier Lvl 300

    Now Available: New Digital Training to Help You Learn About AWS Big Data Services

    Post Syndicated from Sara Snedeker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/now-available-new-digital-training-to-help-you-learn-about-aws-big-data-services/

    AWS Training and Certification recently released free digital training courses that will make it easier for you to build your cloud skills and learn about using AWS Big Data services. This training includes courses like Introduction to Amazon EMR and Introduction to Amazon Athena.

    You can get free and unlimited access to more than 100 new digital training courses built by AWS experts at aws.training. It’s easy to access training related to big data. Just choose the Analytics category on our Find Training page to browse through the list of courses. You can also use the keyword filter to search for training for specific AWS offerings.

    Recommended training

    Just getting started, or looking to learn about a new service? Check out the following digital training courses:

    Introduction to Amazon EMR (15 minutes)
    Covers the available tools that can be used with Amazon EMR and the process of creating a cluster. It includes a demonstration of how to create an EMR cluster.

    Introduction to Amazon Athena (10 minutes)
    Introduces the Amazon Athena service along with an overview of its operating environment. It covers the basic steps in implementing Athena and provides a brief demonstration.

    Introduction to Amazon QuickSight (10 minutes)
    Discusses the benefits of using Amazon QuickSight and how the service works. It also includes a demonstration so that you can see Amazon QuickSight in action.

    Introduction to Amazon Redshift (10 minutes)
    Walks you through Amazon Redshift and its core features and capabilities. It also includes a quick overview of relevant use cases and a short demonstration.

    Introduction to AWS Lambda (10 minutes)
    Discusses the rationale for using AWS Lambda, how the service works, and how you can get started using it.

    Introduction to Amazon Kinesis Analytics (10 minutes)
    Discusses how Amazon Kinesis Analytics collects, processes, and analyzes streaming data in real time. It discusses how to use and monitor the service and explores some use cases.

    Introduction to Amazon Kinesis Streams (15 minutes)
    Covers how Amazon Kinesis Streams is used to collect, process, and analyze real-time streaming data to create valuable insights.

    Introduction to AWS IoT (10 minutes)
    Describes how the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) communication architecture works, and the components that make up AWS IoT. It discusses how AWS IoT works with other AWS services and reviews a case study.

    Introduction to AWS Data Pipeline (10 minutes)
    Covers components like tasks, task runner, and pipeline. It also discusses what a pipeline definition is, and reviews the AWS services that are compatible with AWS Data Pipeline.

    Go deeper with classroom training

    Want to learn more? Enroll in classroom training to learn best practices, get live feedback, and hear answers to your questions from an instructor.

    Big Data on AWS (3 days)
    Introduces you to cloud-based big data solutions such as Amazon EMR, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Kinesis, and the rest of the AWS big data platform.

    Data Warehousing on AWS (3 days)
    Introduces you to concepts, strategies, and best practices for designing a cloud-based data warehousing solution, and demonstrates how to collect, store, and prepare data for the data warehouse.

    Building a Serverless Data Lake (1 day)
    Teaches you how to design, build, and operate a serverless data lake solution with AWS services. Includes topics such as ingesting data from any data source at large scale, storing the data securely and durably, using the right tool to process large volumes of data, and understanding the options available for analyzing the data in near-real time.

    More training coming in 2018

    We’re always evaluating and expanding our training portfolio, so stay tuned for more training options in the new year. You can always visit us at aws.training to explore our latest offerings.

    Security updates for Friday

    Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/742134/rss

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (bouncycastle, enigmail, and sensible-utils), Fedora (kernel), Mageia (dhcp, flash-player-plugin, glibc, graphicsmagick, java-1.8.0-openjdk, kernel, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, mariadb, pcre, rootcerts, rsync, shadow-utils, and xrdp), and SUSE (java-1_8_0-ibm and kernel).

    Serverless @ re:Invent 2017

    Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/serverless-reinvent-2017/

    At re:Invent 2014, we announced AWS Lambda, what is now the center of the serverless platform at AWS, and helped ignite the trend of companies building serverless applications.

    This year, at re:Invent 2017, the topic of serverless was everywhere. We were incredibly excited to see the energy from everyone attending 7 workshops, 15 chalk talks, 20 skills sessions and 27 breakout sessions. Many of these sessions were repeated due to high demand, so we are happy to summarize and provide links to the recordings and slides of these sessions.

    Over the course of the week leading up to and then the week of re:Invent, we also had over 15 new features and capabilities across a number of serverless services, including AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, AWS [email protected], AWS SAM, and the newly announced AWS Serverless Application Repository!

    AWS Lambda

    Amazon API Gateway

    • Amazon API Gateway Supports Endpoint Integrations with Private VPCs – You can now provide access to HTTP(S) resources within your VPC without exposing them directly to the public internet. This includes resources available over a VPN or Direct Connect connection!
    • Amazon API Gateway Supports Canary Release Deployments – You can now use canary release deployments to gradually roll out new APIs. This helps you more safely roll out API changes and limit the blast radius of new deployments.
    • Amazon API Gateway Supports Access Logging – The access logging feature lets you generate access logs in different formats such as CLF (Common Log Format), JSON, XML, and CSV. The access logs can be fed into your existing analytics or log processing tools so you can perform more in-depth analysis or take action in response to the log data.
    • Amazon API Gateway Customize Integration Timeouts – You can now set a custom timeout for your API calls as low as 50ms and as high as 29 seconds (the default is 30 seconds).
    • Amazon API Gateway Supports Generating SDK in Ruby – This is in addition to support for SDKs in Java, JavaScript, Android and iOS (Swift and Objective-C). The SDKs that Amazon API Gateway generates save you development time and come with a number of prebuilt capabilities, such as working with API keys, exponential back, and exception handling.

    AWS Serverless Application Repository

    Serverless Application Repository is a new service (currently in preview) that aids in the publication, discovery, and deployment of serverless applications. With it you’ll be able to find shared serverless applications that you can launch in your account, while also sharing ones that you’ve created for others to do the same.

    AWS [email protected]

    [email protected] now supports content-based dynamic origin selection, network calls from viewer events, and advanced response generation. This combination of capabilities greatly increases the use cases for [email protected], such as allowing you to send requests to different origins based on request information, showing selective content based on authentication, and dynamically watermarking images for each viewer.

    AWS SAM

    Twitch Launchpad live announcements

    Other service announcements

    Here are some of the other highlights that you might have missed. We think these could help you make great applications:

    AWS re:Invent 2017 sessions

    Coming up with the right mix of talks for an event like this can be quite a challenge. The Product, Marketing, and Developer Advocacy teams for Serverless at AWS spent weeks reading through dozens of talk ideas to boil it down to the final list.

    From feedback at other AWS events and webinars, we knew that customers were looking for talks that focused on concrete examples of solving problems with serverless, how to perform common tasks such as deployment, CI/CD, monitoring, and troubleshooting, and to see customer and partner examples solving real world problems. To that extent we tried to settle on a good mix based on attendee experience and provide a track full of rich content.

    Below are the recordings and slides of breakout sessions from re:Invent 2017. We’ve organized them for those getting started, those who are already beginning to build serverless applications, and the experts out there already running them at scale. Some of the videos and slides haven’t been posted yet, and so we will update this list as they become available.

    Find the entire Serverless Track playlist on YouTube.

    Talks for people new to Serverless

    Advanced topics

    Expert mode

    Talks for specific use cases

    Talks from AWS customers & partners

    Looking to get hands-on with Serverless?

    At re:Invent, we delivered instructor-led skills sessions to help attendees new to serverless applications get started quickly. The content from these sessions is already online and you can do the hands-on labs yourself!
    Build a Serverless web application

    Still looking for more?

    We also recently completely overhauled the main Serverless landing page for AWS. This includes a new Resources page containing case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

    AWS Training & Certification Update – Free Digital Training + Certified Cloud Practitioner Exam

    Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-training-certification-update-free-digital-training-certified-cloud-practitioner-exam/

    We recently made some updates to AWS Training and Certification to make it easier for you to build your cloud skills and to learn about many of the new services that we launched at AWS re:Invent.

    Free AWS Digital Training
    You can now find over 100 new digital training classes at aws.training, all with unlimited access at no charge.

    The courses were built by AWS experts and allow you to learn AWS at your own pace, helping you to build foundational knowledge for dozens of AWS services and solutions. You can also access some more advanced training on Machine Learning and Storage.

    Here are some of the new digital training topics:

    You can browse through the available topics, enroll in one that interests you, watch it, and track your progress by looking at your transcript:

    AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner
    Our newest certification exam, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner, lets you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud with an industry-recognized credential. It covers four domains: cloud concepts, security, technology, and billing and pricing. We recommend that you have at least six months of experience (or equivalent training) with the AWS Cloud in any role, including technical, managerial, sales, purchasing, or financial.

    To help you prepare for this exam, take our new AWS Cloud Practitioner Essentials course , one of the new AWS digital training courses. This course will give you an overview of cloud concepts, AWS services, security, architecture, pricing, and support. In addition to helping you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner also serves as a new prerequisite option for the Big Data Specialty and Advanced Networking Specialty certification exams.

    Go For It!
    I’d like to encourage you to check out aws.training and to enroll in our free digital training in order to learn more about AWS and our newest services. You can strengthen your skills, add to your knowledge base, and set a goal of earning your AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner certification in the new year.

    Jeff;

    Using Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to Notify when AWS X-Ray Detects Elevated Levels of Latency, Errors, and Faults in Your Application

    Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-amazon-cloudwatch-and-amazon-sns-to-notify-when-aws-x-ray-detects-elevated-levels-of-latency-errors-and-faults-in-your-application/

    AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug production applications built using microservices or serverless architectures and quantify customer impact. With X-Ray, you can understand how your application and its underlying services are performing and identify and troubleshoot the root cause of performance issues and errors. You can use these insights to identify issues and opportunities for optimization.

    In this blog post, I will show you how you can use Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to get notified when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. Specifically, I will show you how to use this sample app to get notified through an email or SMS message when your end users observe high latencies or server-side errors when they use your application. You can customize the alarms and events by updating the sample app code.

    Sample App Overview

    The sample app uses the X-Ray GetServiceGraph API to get the following information:

    • Aggregated response time.
    • Requests that failed with 4xx status code (errors).
    • 429 status code (throttle).
    • 5xx status code (faults).
    Sample app architecture

    Overview of sample app architecture

    Getting started

    The sample app uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the required resources.
    To install the sample app:

    1. Run git clone to get the sample app.
    2. Update the JSON file in the Setup folder with threshold limits and notification details.
    3. Run the install.py script to install the sample app.

    For more information about the installation steps, see the readme file on GitHub.

    You can update the app configuration to include your phone number or email to get notified when your application in X-Ray breaches the latency, error, and fault limits you set in the configuration. If you prefer to not provide your phone number and email, then you can use the CloudWatch alarm deployed by the sample app to monitor your application in X-Ray.

    The sample app deploys resources with the sample app namespace you provided during setup. This enables you to have multiple sample apps in the same region.

    CloudWatch rules

    The sample app uses two CloudWatch rules:

    1. SCHEDULEDLAMBDAFOR-sample_app_name to trigger at regular intervals the AWS Lambda function that queries the GetServiceGraph API.
    2. XRAYALERTSFOR-sample_app_name to look for published CloudWatch events that match the pattern defined in this rule.
    CloudWatch Rules for sample app

    CloudWatch rules created for the sample app

    CloudWatch alarms

    If you did not provide your phone number or email in the JSON file, the sample app uses a CloudWatch alarm named XRayCloudWatchAlarm-sample_app_name in combination with the CloudWatch event that you can use for monitoring.

    CloudWatch Alarm for sample app

    CloudWatch alarm created for the sample app

    Amazon SNS messages

    The sample app creates two SNS topics:

    • sample_app_name-cloudwatcheventsnstopic to send out an SMS message when the CloudWatch event matches a pattern published from the Lambda function.
    • sample_app_name-cloudwatchalarmsnstopic to send out an email message when the CloudWatch alarm goes into an ALARM state.
    Amazon SNS for sample app

    Amazon SNS created for the sample app

    Getting notifications

    The CloudWatch event looks for the following matching pattern:

    {
      "detail-type": [
        "XCW Notification for Alerts"
      ],
      "source": [
        "<sample_app_name>-xcw.alerts"
      ]
    }
    

    The event then invokes an SNS topic that sends out an SMS message.

    SMS in sample app

    SMS that is sent when CloudWatch Event invokes Amazon SNS topic

    The CloudWatch alarm looks for the TriggeredRules metric that is published whenever the CloudWatch event matches the event pattern. It goes into the ALARM state whenever TriggeredRules > 0 for the specified evaluation period and invokes an SNS topic that sends an email message.

    Email sent in sample app

    Email that is sent when CloudWatch Alarm goes to ALARM state

    Stopping notifications

    If you provided your phone number or email address, but would like to stop getting notified, change the SUBSCRIBE_TO_EMAIL_SMS environment variable in the Lambda function to No. Then, go to the Amazon SNS console and delete the subscriptions. You can still monitor your application for elevated levels of latency, errors, and faults by using the CloudWatch console.

    Lambda environment variable in sample app

    Change environment variable in Lambda

     

    Delete subscription in SNS for sample app

    Delete subscriptions to stop getting notified

    Uninstalling the sample app

    To uninstall the sample app, run the uninstall.py script in the Setup folder.

    Extending the sample app

    The sample app notifes you when when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. You can extend it to provide more value for your use cases (for example, to perform an action on a resource when the state of a CloudWatch alarm changes).

    To summarize, after this set up you will be able to get notified through Amazon SNS when X-Ray detects high latency, errors and faults in your application.

    I hope you found this information about setting up alarms and alerts for your application in AWS X-Ray helpful. Feel free to leave questions or other feedback in the comments. Feel free to learn more about AWS X-Ray, Amazon SNS and Amazon CloudWatch

    About the Author

    Bharath Kumar is a Sr.Product Manager with AWS X-Ray. He has developed and launched mobile games, web applications on microservices and serverless architecture.