Tag Archives: estonia

MPA Reveals Scale of Worldwide Pirate Site Blocking

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/mpa-reveals-scale-of-worldwide-pirate-site-blocking-180410/

Few people following the controversial topic of Internet piracy will be unaware of the site-blocking phenomenon. It’s now one of the main weapons in the entertainment industries’ arsenal and it’s affecting dozens of countries.

While general figures can be culled from the hundreds of news reports covering the issue, the manner in which blocking is handled in several regions means that updates aren’t always provided. New sites are regularly added to blocklists without fanfare, meaning that the public is kept largely in the dark.

Now, however, a submission to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) by Motion Picture Association Canada provides a more detailed overview. It was presented in support of the proposed blocking regime in Canada, so while the key figures are no doubt accurate, some of the supporting rhetoric should be viewed in context.

“Over the last decade, at least 42 countries have either adopted and implemented, or are legally obligated to adopt and implement, measures to ensure that ISPs take steps to disable access to copyright infringing websites, including throughout the European Union, the United Kingdom, Australia, and South Korea,” the submission reads.

The 42 blocking-capable countries referenced by the Hollywood group include the members of the European Union plus the following: Argentina, Australia, Iceland, India, Israel, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand.

While all countries have their own unique sets of legislation, countries within the EU are covered by the requirements of Article 8.3 of the INFOSEC Directive which provides that; “Member States shall ensure that rightholders are in a position to apply for an injunction against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party to infringe a copyright or related right.”

That doesn’t mean that all countries are actively blocking, however. While Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia have the legal basis to block infringing sites, none have yet done so.

In a significant number of other EU countries, however, blocking activity is prolific.

“To date, in at least 17 European countries, over 1,800 infringing sites and over 5,300 domains utilized by such sites have been blocked, including in the following four countries where the positive impact of site-blocking over time has been demonstrated,” MPA Canada notes.

Major blocking nations in the EU

At this point, it’s worth pointing out that authority to block sites is currently being obtained in two key ways, either through the courts or via an administrative process.

In the examples above, the UK and Denmark are dealt with via the former, with Italy and Portugal handled via the latter. At least as far as the volume of sites is concerned, court processes – which can be expensive – tend to yield lower site blocking levels than those carried out through an administrative process. Indeed, the MPAA has praised Portugal’s super-streamlined efforts as something to aspire to.

Outside Europe, the same two processes are also in use. For example, Australia, Argentina, and Singapore utilize the judicial route while South Korea, Mexico, Malaysia and Indonesia have opted for administrative remedies.

“Across 10 of these countries, over 1,100 infringing sites and over 1,500 domains utilized by such sites have been blocked,” MPA Canada reveals.

To date, South Korea has blocked 460 sites and 547 domains, while Australia has blocked 91 sites and 355 domains. In the case of the latter, “research has confirmed the increasingly positive impact that site-blocking has, as a greater number of sites are blocked over time,” the Hollywood group notes.

Although by no means comprehensive, MPA Canada lists the following “Notorious Sites” as subject to blocking in multiple countries via both judicial and administrative means. Most will be familiar, with the truly notorious The Pirate Bay heading the pile. Several no longer exist in their original form but in many cases, clones are blocked as if they still represent the original target.


The methods used to block the sites vary from country to country, dependent on what courts deem fit and in consideration of ISPs’ technical capabilities. Three main tools are in use including DNS blocking, IP address blocking, and URL blocking, which can also include Deep Packet Inspection.

The MPA submission (pdf) is strongly in favor of adding Canada to the list of site-blocking countries detailed above. The Hollywood group believes that the measures are both effective and proportionate, citing reduced usage of blocked sites, reduced traffic to pirate sites in general, and increased visits to legitimate platforms.

“There is every reason to believe that the website blocking measures [presented to the CRTC] will lead to the same beneficial results in Canada,” MPA Canada states.

While plenty of content creators and distributors are in favor of proposals, all signs suggest they will have a battle on their hands, with even some ISPs coming out in opposition.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Lessons Learned from the Estonian National ID Security Flaw

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/12/lessons_learned.html

Estonia recently suffered a major flaw in the security of their national ID card. This article discusses the fix and the lessons learned from the incident:

In the future, the infrastructure dependency on one digital identity platform must be decreased, the use of several alternatives must be encouraged and promoted. In addition, the update and replacement capacity, both remote and physical, should be increased. We also recommend the government to procure the readiness to act fast in force majeure situations from the eID providers.. While deciding on the new eID platforms, the need to replace cryptographic primitives must be taken into account — particularly the possibility of the need to replace algorithms with those that are not even in existence yet.

Изхарчени са милиарди за електронно управление?

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://blog.bozho.net/blog/2999

Излязоха данни на БСК за разходите за електронно управление, сравнени с Естония. Изхарчени са милиарди от 2001-ва до 2016-та.

Като цяло данните най-вероятно са верни.

Е, Естония не е похарчила само 50 милиона. Всъщност, притеснително е, че БСК не е проверила тези данни и няма източник (Евростат дава разбивка по функции, но там няма е-управление/информационните технологии). Ето един очевиден източник през Google: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/09/business/international/estonians-embrace-life-in-a-digital-world.html (Естония харчи 60 милиона годишно за информационните технологии).

Но да оставим настрана тази грешка – тя прави нещата по-бомбастични, но не прави останалите наблюдения неверни. Всъщност, в доклада, с който внесохме пакета от реформи през 2015-та, имаше почти същите числа. И тогава, след заседание на парламентарната комисия по транспорт, излязоха новини колко много е похарчено. И пак бяхме недоволни за половин ден, и пак ги забравихме.

Всъщност е доста трудно да се измерят парите за „електронно управление“ – централен регистър за проекти и дейности за електронно управление нямаше допреди последните изменения на закона – оценките са „на око“ и никога не са пълни.

Но важни са причините – похарченото няма да се върне.

До 2016-та нямаше ясни правила и ясна посока за електронно управление, и най-вече – орган, който да преследва, стъпка по стъпка, политиката за е-управление. Да, има стратегии отдавна, има дори закон отдавна, но това всичко са пожелания. Докато не обвържеш разходите на министерствата и агенциите с контрол по същество и оценка на постигнатите резултати, те ще си харчат колкото им дойде за каквото им дойде. И в редките случаи, когато имат доброто желание нещо да направят, няма да имат експертизата да го направят.

Другата фундаментална разлика е електронната идентификация. БСК правилно посочват, че естонците имат електронна лична карта от 2001-ва. Според естонският президент това е ключов фактор и без него нищо не става. Затова и прокарахме законови изменения, за да имаме и ние електронна лична карта, макар и 17 години по-късно. През август правителството обаче ги отложи с още една година.

Държавна агенция „Електронно управление“, макар и с малък капацитет, успява да бута нещата напред. По-бавно, отколкото ни се иска, и не с темпове, с които да настигнем Естония, но и БСК отбелязва напредъка по някои направления (подкарването на системата за електронно връчване, например). За съжаление все още не е влязла в пълните си правомощия, които сме предвидили в закона и все още е неефективна по немалко направления – „държавен облак“, например, още няма. Няма и електрона идентификация, която да даде необходимата масовост на използване. Писал съм за всички тези неща многократно (обобщени тук), но нещата в крайна сметка опират до два фактора. И те не са колко пари са изхарчени.

Политическа воля и експертен потенциал. Ако няма минимум вицепремиер, който да натиска постоянно за случването на електронното управление, то няма да се случи. Но простото желание също не е достатъчно, защото администрацията, министрите, опитните „играчи“ имат добри оправдания защо нещо не може да стане или защо не трябва да стане. Затова трябва експертния потенциал на високо ниво, който да отсее оправданията от реалните проблеми и да ги реши почти собственоръчно, с помощта на „белите лястовици“ в администрацията (има такива).

Иначе ще продължава да има стратегии, ще продължаваме през две години да отчитаме колко милиарда са изхарчени, ще въздъхваме, като чуем Естония. А там се е получило много „лесно“. Просто е имало политически консенсус, че страната ще става дигитална и достатъчно добронамерени експерти, които да вземат правилните технологични решения. И Естония не е започнала от 2001-ва година дигитализацията – започнала е много по-рано, в училищата, с изграждане на дигиталната култура у гражданите. Далновидно. В годините, в които у нас са се гонили мутри, а БСП е фалирало държавата. 20 години по-късно ние отлагаме електронните лични карти още веднъж и говорим основно за инфраструктурни проекти.

А парите за електронно управление си изтичат, нерядко към „наши фирми“, нерядко много повече, отколкото предполага обхвата на проекта.

Просто начин на мислене. Който не се санкционира на избори, така че продължава да се възпроизвежда.

Brand new and blue: our Brazilian Raspberry Pi 3

Post Syndicated from Mike Buffham original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-brazil/

Programa de revendedor aprovado agora no Brasil — our Approved Reseller programme is live in Brazil, with Anatel-approved Raspberry Pis in a rather delicious shade of blue on sale from today.

A photo of the blue-variant Raspberry Pi 3

Blue Raspberry is more than just the best Jolly Ranger flavour

The challenge

The difficulty in buying our products — and the lack of Anatel certification — have been consistent points of feedback from our many Brazilian customers and followers. In much the same way that electrical products in the USA must be FCC-approved in order to be produced or sold there, products sold in Brazil must be approved by Anatel. And so we’re pleased to tell you that the Raspberry Pi finally has this approval.

Blue Raspberry

Today we’re also announcing the appointment of our first Approved Reseller in Brazil: FilipeFlop will be able to sell Raspberry Pi 3 units across the country.

Filipeflop logo - Raspberry Pi Brazil

A big shout-out to the team at FilipeFlop that has worked so hard with us to ensure that we’re getting the product on sale in Brazil at the right price. (They also helped us understand the various local duties and taxes which need to be paid!)

Please note: the blue colouring of the Raspberry Pi 3 sold in Brazil is the only difference between it and the standard green model. People outside Brazil will not be able to purchase the blue variant from FilipeFlop.

More Raspberry Pi Approved Resellers

Raspberry Pi Approved Reseller logo - Raspberry Pi Brazil

Since first announcing it back in August, we have further expanded our Approved Reseller programme by adding resellers for Austria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. All Approved Resellers are listed on our products page, and more will follow over the next few weeks!

Make and share

If you’re based in Brazil and you’re ordering the new, blue Raspberry Pi, make sure to share your projects with us on social media. We can’t wait to see what you get up to with them!

The post Brand new and blue: our Brazilian Raspberry Pi 3 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Security Flaw in Infineon Smart Cards and TPMs

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/10/security_flaw_i_1.html

A security flaw in Infineon smart cards and TPMs allows an attacker to recover private keys from the public keys. Basically, the key generation algorithm sometimes creates public keys that are vulnerable to Coppersmith’s attack:

While all keys generated with the library are much weaker than they should be, it’s not currently practical to factorize all of them. For example, 3072-bit and 4096-bit keys aren’t practically factorable. But oddly enough, the theoretically stronger, longer 4096-bit key is much weaker than the 3072-bit key and may fall within the reach of a practical (although costly) factorization if the researchers’ method improves.

To spare time and cost, attackers can first test a public key to see if it’s vulnerable to the attack. The test is inexpensive, requires less than 1 millisecond, and its creators believe it produces practically zero false positives and zero false negatives. The fingerprinting allows attackers to expend effort only on keys that are practically factorizable.

This is the flaw in the Estonian national ID card we learned about last month.

The paper isn’t online yet. I’ll post it when it is.

Ouch. This is a bad vulnerability, and it’s in systems — like the Estonian national ID card — that are critical.

Security Flaw in Estonian National ID Card

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/09/security_flaw_i.html

We have no idea how bad this really is:

On 30 August, an international team of researchers informed the Estonian Information System Authority (RIA) of a vulnerability potentially affecting the digital use of Estonian ID cards. The possible vulnerability affects a total of almost 750,000 ID-cards issued starting from October 2014, including cards issued to e-residents. The ID-cards issued before 16 October 2014 use a different chip and are not affected. Mobile-IDs are also not impacted.

My guess is that it’s worse than the politicians are saying:

According to Peterkop, the current data shows this risk to be theoretical and there is no evidence of anyone’s digital identity being misused. “All ID-card operations are still valid and we will take appropriate actions to secure the functioning of our national digital-ID infrastructure. For example, we have restricted the access to Estonian ID-card public key database to prevent illegal use.”

And because this system is so important in local politics, the effects are significant:

In the light of current events, some Estonian politicians called to postpone the upcoming local elections, due to take place on 16 October. In Estonia, approximately 35% of the voters use digital identity to vote online.

But the Estonian prime minister, Jüri Ratas, said at a press conference on 5 September that “this incident will not affect the course of the Estonian e-state.” Ratas also recommended to use Mobile-IDs where possible. The prime minister said that the State Electoral Office will decide whether it will allow the usage of ID cards at the upcoming local elections.

The Estonian Police and Border Guard estimates it will take approximately two months to fix the issue with faulty cards. The authority will involve as many Estonian experts as possible in the process.

This is exactly the sort of thing I worry about as ID systems become more prevalent and more centralized. Anyone want to place bets on whether a foreign country is going to try to hack the next Estonian election?

Another article.