Tag Archives: Etcher

Here, have some videos!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/easter-monday-2018/

Today is Easter Monday and as such, the drawbridge is up at Pi Towers. So while we spend time with familytoo much chocolate…family and chocolate, here are some great Pi-themed videos from members of our community. Enjoy!

Eggies live stream!

Bluebird Birdhouse

Raspberry Pi and NoIR camera installed in roof of Bluebird house with IR LEDs. Currently 5 eggs being incubated.

Doctor Who TARDIS doorbell

Raspberry pi Tardis

Raspberry pi Tardis doorbell

Google AIY with Tech-nic-Allie

Ok Google! AIY Voice Kit MagPi

Allie assembles this Google Home kit, that runs on a Raspberry Pi, then uses the Google Home to test her space knowledge with a little trivia game. Stay tuned at the end to see a few printed cases you can use instead of the cardboard.

Buying a Coke with a Raspberry Pi rover

Buy a coke with raspberry pi rover

Mission date : March 26 2018 My raspberry pi project. I use LTE modem to connect internet. python programming. raspberry pi controls pi cam, 2servo motor, 2dc motor. (This video recoded with gopro to upload youtube. Actually I controll this rover by pi cam.

Raspberry Pi security camera

🔴How to Make a Smart Security Camera With Movement Notification – Under 60$

I built my first security camera with motion-control connected to my raspberry pi with MotionEyeOS. What you need: *Raspberry pi 3 (I prefer pi 3) *Any Webcam or raspberry pi cam *Mirco SD card (min 8gb) Useful links : Download the motioneyeOS software here ➜ https://github.com/ccrisan/motioneyeos/releases How to do it: – Download motioneyeOS to your empty SD card (I mounted it via Etcher ) – I always do a sudo apt-upgrade & sudo apt-update on my projects, in the Pi.

Happy Easter!

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Let’s see if I’ve got Metldown right

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2018/01/lets-see-if-ive-got-metldown-right.html

I thought I’d write down the proof-of-concept to see if I got it right.

So the Meltdown paper lists the following steps:

 ; flush cache
 ; rcx = kernel address
 ; rbx = probe array
 retry:
 mov al, byte [rcx]
 shl rax, 0xc
 jz retry
 mov rbx, qword [rbx + rax]
 ; measure which of 256 cachelines were accessed

So the first step is to flush the cache, so that none of the 256 possible cache lines in our “probe array” are in the cache. There are many ways this can be done.

Now pick a byte of secret kernel memory to read. Presumably, we’ll just read all of memory, one byte at a time. The address of this byte is in rcx.

Now execute the instruction:
    mov al, byte [rcx]
This line of code will crash (raise an exception). That’s because [rcx] points to secret kernel memory which we don’t have permission to read. The value of the real al (the low-order byte of rax) will never actually change.

But fear not! Intel is massively out-of-order. That means before the exception happens, it will provisionally and partially execute the following instructions. While Intel has only 16 visible registers, it actually has 100 real registers. It’ll stick the result in a pseudo-rax register. Only at the end of the long execution change, if nothing bad happen, will pseudo-rax register become the visible rax register.

But in the meantime, we can continue (with speculative execution) operate on pseudo-rax. Right now it contains a byte, so we need to make it bigger so that instead of referencing which byte it can now reference which cache-line. (This instruction multiplies by 4096 instead of just 64, to prevent the prefetcher from loading multiple adjacent cache-lines).
 shl rax, 0xc

Now we use pseudo-rax to provisionally load the indicated bytes.
 mov rbx, qword [rbx + rax]

Since we already crashed up top on the first instruction, these results will never be committed to rax and rbx. However, the cache will change. Intel will have provisionally loaded that cache-line into memory.

At this point, it’s simply a matter of stepping through all 256 cache-lines in order to find the one that’s fast (already in the cache) where all the others are slow.

Thank you for my new Raspberry Pi, Santa! What next?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/thank-you-for-my-new-raspberry-pi-santa-what-next/

Note: the Pi Towers team have peeled away from their desks to spend time with their families over the festive season, and this blog will be quiet for a while as a result. We’ll be back in the New Year with a bushel of amazing projects, awesome resources, and much merriment and fun times. Happy holidays to all!

Now back to the matter at hand. Your brand new Christmas Raspberry Pi.

Your new Raspberry Pi

Did you wake up this morning to find a new Raspberry Pi under the tree? Congratulations, and welcome to the Raspberry Pi community! You’re one of us now, and we’re happy to have you on board.

But what if you’ve never seen a Raspberry Pi before? What are you supposed to do with it? What’s all the fuss about, and why does your new computer look so naked?

Setting up your Raspberry Pi

Are you comfy? Good. Then let us begin.

Download our free operating system

First of all, you need to make sure you have an operating system on your micro SD card: we suggest Raspbian, the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s official supported operating system. If your Pi is part of a starter kit, you might find that it comes with a micro SD card that already has Raspbian preinstalled. If not, you can download Raspbian for free from our website.

An easy way to get Raspbian onto your SD card is to use a free tool called Etcher. Watch The MagPi’s Lucy Hattersley show you what you need to do. You can also use NOOBS to install Raspbian on your SD card, and our Getting Started guide explains how to do that.

Plug it in and turn it on

Your new Raspberry Pi 3 comes with four USB ports and an HDMI port. These allow you to plug in a keyboard, a mouse, and a television or monitor. If you have a Raspberry Pi Zero, you may need adapters to connect your devices to its micro USB and micro HDMI ports. Both the Raspberry Pi 3 and the Raspberry Pi Zero W have onboard wireless LAN, so you can connect to your home network, and you can also plug an Ethernet cable into the Pi 3.

Make sure to plug the power cable in last. There’s no ‘on’ switch, so your Pi will turn on as soon as you connect the power. Raspberry Pi uses a micro USB power supply, so you can use a phone charger if you didn’t receive one as part of a kit.

Learn with our free projects

If you’ve never used a Raspberry Pi before, or you’re new to the world of coding, the best place to start is our projects site. It’s packed with free projects that will guide you through the basics of coding and digital making. You can create projects right on your screen using Scratch and Python, connect a speaker to make music with Sonic Pi, and upgrade your skills to physical making using items from around your house.

Here’s James to show you how to build a whoopee cushion using a Raspberry Pi, paper plates, tin foil and a sponge:

Whoopee cushion PRANK with a Raspberry Pi: HOW-TO

Explore the world of Raspberry Pi physical computing with our free FutureLearn courses: http://rpf.io/futurelearn Free make your own Whoopi Cushion resource: http://rpf.io/whoopi For more information on Raspberry Pi and the charitable work of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, including Code Club and CoderDojo, visit http://rpf.io Our resources are free to use in schools, clubs, at home and at events.

Diving deeper

You’ve plundered our projects, you’ve successfully rigged every chair in the house to make rude noises, and now you want to dive deeper into digital making. Good! While you’re digesting your Christmas dinner, take a moment to skim through the Raspberry Pi blog for inspiration. You’ll find projects from across our worldwide community, with everything from home automation projects and retrofit upgrades, to robots, gaming systems, and cameras.

You’ll also find bucketloads of ideas in The MagPi magazine, the official monthly Raspberry Pi publication, available in both print and digital format. You can download every issue for free. If you subscribe, you’ll get a Raspberry Pi Zero W to add to your new collection. HackSpace magazine is another fantastic place to turn for Raspberry Pi projects, along with other maker projects and tutorials.

And, of course, simply typing “Raspberry Pi projects” into your preferred search engine will find thousands of ideas. Sites like Hackster, Hackaday, Instructables, Pimoroni, and Adafruit all have plenty of fab Raspberry Pi tutorials that they’ve devised themselves and that community members like you have created.

And finally

If you make something marvellous with your new Raspberry Pi – and we know you will – don’t forget to share it with us! Our Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ accounts are brimming with chatter, projects, and events. And our forums are a great place to visit if you have questions about your Raspberry Pi or if you need some help.

It’s good to get together with like-minded folks, so check out the growing Raspberry Jam movement. Raspberry Jams are community-run events where makers and enthusiasts can meet other makers, show off their projects, and join in with workshops and discussions. Find your nearest Jam here.

Have a great festive holiday and welcome to the community. We’ll see you in 2018!

The post Thank you for my new Raspberry Pi, Santa! What next? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Proof that HMAC-DRBG has No Back Doors

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/08/proof_that_hmac.html

New research: “Verified Correctness and Security of mbedTLS HMAC-DRBG,” by Katherine Q. Ye, Matthew Green, Naphat Sanguansin, Lennart Beringer, Adam Petcher, and Andrew W. Appel.

Abstract: We have formalized the functional specification of HMAC-DRBG (NIST 800-90A), and we have proved its cryptographic security — that its output is pseudorandom — using a hybrid game-based proof. We have also proved that the mbedTLS implementation (C program) correctly implements this functional specification. That proof composes with an existing C compiler correctness proof to guarantee, end-to-end, that the machine language program gives strong pseudorandomness. All proofs (hybrid games, C program verification, compiler, and their composition) are machine-checked in the Coq proof assistant. Our proofs are modular: the hybrid game proof holds on any implementation of HMAC-DRBG that satisfies our functional specification. Therefore, our functional specification can serve as a high-assurance reference.

MagPi video tutorials: installing an operating system with Etcher

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-video-tutorials-installing-an-operating-system-with-etcher/

Hi folks, Rob from The MagPi here again. I’ve dropped by the blog a bit early this month to present to you our very first tutorial video: installing Raspbian (and other operating systems) with Etcher.

Install Raspbian with Etcher

Lucy Hattersley shows you how to install Raspberry Pi operating systems such as Raspbian onto an SD card, using the excellent Etcher. For more tutorials, check out The MagPi at http://magpi.cc! Don’t want to miss an issue? Subscribe, and get every issue delivered straight to your door.

You might remember that I hosted a video about the Raspberry Pi Zero W launch, telling you all about it and why it’s amazing. That was the first in a series of videos we’ll be bringing you, including guides and tutorials like Lucy’s video today.

Our job at The MagPi is to serve the Raspberry Pi community, so this is where I turn to you, blog readers and community-at-large: what sort of tutorials would you like to see in our videos? Whether you’ve done a few Pi projects or are just starting out, we want to hear from you about what you’d like to learn.

Let us know what you’d like us to show you next. Fill up the comments!

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Case 226: Spring, Fall

Post Syndicated from The Codeless Code original http://thecodelesscode.com/case/226

On the Monday after the first budding of spring, the
entire Temple was called to assembly in the Great Hall by
old Madame Jinyu, the Abbess Over All Clans And Concerns.
Not a single person was excused—indeed, two desperately ill
monks were carried in on stretchers and hoisted upright
against the back wall, next to the propped-up corpse of a
senior nun who had died the previous Thursday without giving
the mandatory two weeks’ notice.

Directly in front of old Jinyu’s podium sat the diligent
monks of the Elephant’s Footprint Clan, who together had
mastered the arcane arts of database design and a hundred
persistence libraries. The monks had arrayed themselves in
perfect rows and columns atop low ceremonial look-up tables
that had been joined together for the occasion.

Behind the Elephant’s Footprint sat the knowledgable
monks of the Laughing Monkey Clan, who implemented the
business logic of the Temple’s many customers. So frightfully
intelligent was the behavior of their rule engines that
their codebase was rumored to be possessed by the spirits of
long-dead business analysts.

Behind the Laughing Monkey sat the prolific monks of the
Spider Clan, who built the web interfaces and services
of every Temple application. Because web technology stacks
came and went so frequently, their novices were trained to
instinctively forget everything that was no longer relevant,
lest they go mad. Curiously, though, when asked how this
Art of Forgetting worked, the monks invariably laughed and
said that there was no such Art; for if there were, they
would surely have remembered learning it.

Proud were these, the Three Great Clans of the Temple. So
it was with great dismay that they learned of Jinyu’s plans
for their future.

- - -

“In autumn, the abbot Ruh Cheen convinced us to taste
the nectar of the Agile methodology,” said old
Jinyu to her audience. “Through the winter we nibbled its
fruit and found it sweet. Now spring has arrived, and we
wish to plant the seeds of a great harvest.

“No longer will we haphazardly select monks from the Three
Clans to work on tasks as they arise. Instead, each product
will have a Tiny Clan of its own, whose members will not
change.

“Some of you will belong to a single Tiny Clan; some to two
or three. Each Tiny Clan will have its own rules, set its own
standards, establish its own traditions. The monks of your
Tiny Clans will be your new brethren. You will work with
them, eat with them, do chores with them, and share a
hall with them.

“Tonight I will post your new assignments. Tomorrow the
Three Clans will be no more. Now, go: prepare yourselves.”

Thus did old Jinyu depart the Great Hall, to a chorus of
worried murmuring. Even the dead senior nun seemed
a trifle unhappier.

- - -

Young master Zjing turned to old Banzen
with a look that was equal parts dread and disbelief.

Said Zjing, “When the Spider learns her craft from the
Monkey and the Elephant, what manner of webs shall we see in
the trees?”

“Creative ones,” replied Banzen.

“And how shall we manage such ‘creativity’?” continued the
nun. “How shall we review code? How shall we mentor? How
shall we plan?”

“Differently,” said Banzen.

“You are infuriatingly calm!” scowled Zjing. “I thought
that Banzen of all people would share my concerns.”

Banzen chuckled. “When Ruh Cheen was brought into the
temple by Jinyu, you told your fellows that
the abbess is no fool. And though you were lying,
you spoke true. Jinyu sees that the new Way of the World
is not the Temple’s Way. She has chosen to follow the World.”

“She is following it over the edge of cliff,” grumbled
the nun.

“Indeed!” said Banzen with a smile. “Yet what is the
Temple: a stone, or a bird?” The old master took Zjing’s
arm in his own and started for the doors, nodding his head
respectfully as they passed the dead senior nun. “I have
lived through such times before. The initial plunge is
always unsettling to the stomach, but we have yet to crash
into the rocks below.”

“So, how long must I wait before I see the Temple
sprout feathers?” asked Zjing.

“My dear young master,” said Banzen. “Did you not understand
the terms of your own promotion? We are the feathers.”