Tag Archives: European Commission

Despite US Criticism, Ukraine Cybercrime Chief Receives Few Piracy Complaints

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/despite-us-criticism-ukraine-cybercrime-chief-receives-few-piracy-complaints-180522/

On a large number of occasions over the past decade, Ukraine has played host to some of the world’s largest pirate sites.

At various points over the years, The Pirate Bay, KickassTorrents, ExtraTorrent, Demonoid and raft of streaming portals could be found housed in the country’s data centers, reportedly taking advantage of laws more favorable than those in the US and EU.

As a result, Ukraine has been regularly criticized for not doing enough to combat piracy but when placed under pressure, it does take action. In 2010, for example, the local government expressed concerns about the hosting of KickassTorrents in the country and in August the same year, the site was kicked out by its host.

“Kickasstorrents.com main web server was shut down by the hosting provider after it was contacted by local authorities. One way or another I’m afraid we must say goodbye to Ukraine and move the servers to other countries,” the site’s founder told TF at the time.

In the years since, Ukraine has launched sporadic action against pirate sites and has taken steps to tighten up copyright law. The Law on State Support of Cinematography came into force during April 2017 and gave copyright owners new tools to combat infringement by forcing (in theory, at least) site operators and web hosts to respond to takedown requests.

But according to the United States and Europe, not enough is being done. After the EU Commission warned that Ukraine risked damaging relations with the EU, last September US companies followed up with another scathing attack.

In a recommendation to the U.S. Government, the IIPA, which counts the MPAA, RIAA, and ESA among its members, asked U.S. authorities to suspend or withdraw Ukraine’s trade benefits until the online piracy situation improves.

“Legislation is needed to institute proper notice and takedown provisions, including a requirement that service providers terminate access to individuals (or entities) that have repeatedly engaged in infringement, and the retention of information for law enforcement, as well as to provide clear third party liability regarding ISPs,” the IIPA wrote.

But amid all the criticism, Ukraine cyber police chief Sergey Demedyuk says that while his department is committed to tackling piracy, it can only do so when complaints are filed with him.

“Yes, we are engaged in piracy very closely. The problem is that piracy is a crime of private accusation. So here we deal with them only in cases where we are contacted,” Demedyuk said in an Interfax interview published yesterday.

Surprisingly, given the number of dissenting voices, it appears that complaints about these matters aren’t exactly prevalent. So are there many at all?

“Unfortunately, no. In the media, many companies claim that their rights are being violated by pirates. But if you count the applications that come to us, they are one,” Demedyuk reveals.

“In general, we are handling Ukrainian media companies, who produce their own product and are worried about its fate. Also on foreign films, the ‘Anti-Piracy Agency’ refers to us, but not as intensively as before.”

Why complaints are going down, Demedyuk does not know, but when his unit is asked to take action it does so, he claims. Indeed, Demedyuk cites two particularly significant historical operations against a pair of large ‘pirate’ sites.

In 2012, Ukraine shut down EX.ua, a massive cyberlocker site following a six-month investigation initiated by international tech companies including Microsoft, Graphisoft and Adobe. Around 200 servers were seized, together hosting around 6,000 terabytes of data.

Then in November 2016, following a complaint from the MPAA, police raided FS.to, one of Ukraine’s most popular pirate sites. Initial reports indicated that 60 servers were seized and 19 people were arrested.

“To see the effect of combating piracy, this should not be done at the level of cyberpolicy, but at the state level,” Demedyuk advises.

“This requires constant close interaction between law enforcement agencies and rights holders. Only by using all these tools will we be able to effectively counteract copyright infringements.”

Meanwhile, the Office of the United States Trade Representative has maintained Ukraine’s position on the Priority Watchlist of its latest Special 301 Report and there a no signs it will be leaving anytime soon.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Adding Visible Electronic Signatures To PDFs

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/adding-visible-electronic-signatures-pdf/

I’m aware this is going to be a very niche topic. Electronically signing PDFs is far from a mainstream usecase. However, I’ll write it for two reasons – first, I think it will be very useful for those few who actually need it, and second, I think it will become more and more common as the eIDAS regulation gain popularity – it basically says that electronic signatures are recognized everywhere in Europe (now, it’s not exactly true, because of some boring legal details, but anyway).

So, what is the usecase – first, you have to electronically sign the PDF with an a digital signature (the legal term is “electronic signature”, so I’ll use them interchangeably, although they don’t fully match – e.g. any electronic data applied to other data can be seen as an electronic signature, where a digital signature is the PKI-based signature).

Second, you may want to actually display the signature on the pages, rather than have the PDF reader recognize it and show it in some side-panel. Why is that? Because people are used to seeing signatures on pages and some may insist on having the signature visible (true story – I’ve got a comment that a detached signature “is not a REAL electronic signature, because it’s not visible on the page”).

Now, notice that I wrote “pages”, on “page”. Yes, an electronic document doesn’t have pages – it’s a stream of bytes. So having the signature just on the last page is okay. But, again, people are used to signing all pages, so they’d prefer the electronic signature to be visible on all pages.

And that makes the task tricky – PDF is good with having a digital signature box on the last page, but having multiple such boxes doesn’t work well. Therefore one has to add other types of annotations that look like a signature box and when clicked open the signature panel (just like an actual signature box).

I have to introduce here DSS – a wonderful set of components by the European Commission that can be used to sign and validate all sorts of electronic signatures. It’s open source, you can use at any way you like. Deploy the demo application, use only the libraries, whatever. It includes the signing functionality out of the box – just check the PAdESService or the PDFBoxSignatureService. It even includes the option to visualize the signature once (on a particular page).

However, it doesn’t have the option to show “stamps” (images) on multiple pages. Which is why I forked it and implemented the functionality. Most of my changes are in the PDFBoxSignatureService in the loadAndStampDocument(..) method. If you want to use that functionality you can just build a jar from my fork and use it (by passing the appropriate SignatureImageParameters to PAdESSErvice.sign(..) to define how the signature will look like).

Why is this needed in the first place? Because when a document is signed, you cannot modify it anymore, as you will change the hash. However, PDFs have incremental updates which allow appending to the document and thus having a newer version without modifying anything in the original version. That way the signature is still valid (the originally signed content is not modified), but new stuff is added. In our case, this new stuff is some “annotations”, which represent an image and a clickable area that opens the signature panel (in Adobe Reader at least). And while they are added before the signature box is added, if there are more than one signer, then the 2nd signer’s annotations are added after the first signature.

Sadly, PDFBox doesn’t support that out of the box. Well, it almost does – the piece of code below looks hacky, and it took a while to figure what exactly should be called and when, but it works with just a single reflection call:

    for (PDPage page : pdDocument.getPages()) {
        // reset existing annotations (needed in order to have the stamps added)
        page.setAnnotations(null);
    }
    // reset document outline (needed in order to have the stamps added)
    pdDocument.getDocumentCatalog().setDocumentOutline(null);
    List<PDAnnotation> annotations = addStamps(pdDocument, parameters);
			
    setDocumentId(parameters, pdDocument);
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    try (COSWriter writer = new COSWriter(baos, new RandomAccessBuffer(pdfBytes))) {
        // force-add the annotations (wouldn't be saved in incremental updates otherwise)
        annotations.forEach(ann -> addObjectToWrite(writer, ann.getCOSObject()));
				
        // technically the same as saveIncremental but with more control
        writer.write(pdDocument);
    }
    pdDocument.close();
    pdDocument = PDDocument.load(baos.toByteArray());
    ...
}

private void addObjectToWrite(COSWriter writer, COSDictionary cosObject) {
    // the COSWriter does not expose the addObjectToWrite method, so we need reflection to add the annotations
    try {
        Method method = writer.getClass().getDeclaredMethod("addObjectToWrite", COSBase.class);
        method.setAccessible(true);
        method.invoke(writer, cosObject);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        throw new RuntimeException(ex);
    }
}

What it does is – loads the original PDF, clears some internal catalogs, adds the annotations (images) to all pages, and then “force-add the annotations” because they “wouldn’t be saved in incremental updates otherwise”. I hope PDFBox make this a little more straightforward, but for the time being this works, and it doesn’t invalidate the existing signatures.

I hope that this posts introduces you to:

  • the existence of legally binding electronic signatures
  • the existence of the DSS utilities
  • the PAdES standard for PDF signing
  • how to place more than just one signature box in a PDF document

And I hope this article becomes more and more popular over time, as more and more businesses realize they could make use of electronic signatures.

The post Adding Visible Electronic Signatures To PDFs appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Съд на ЕС: медийни концентрации

Post Syndicated from nellyo original https://nellyo.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/kpn19560/

Стана известно решение  на Общия съд по дело T‑394/15 KPN BV  (Netherlands),  v European Commission

 

Жалбоподателят KPN BV е активен в сектора на кабелните мрежи за телевизионни, широколентови интернет, фиксирани телефонни услуги и мобилни телекомуникационни услуги, по-специално в Нидерландия.

Liberty Global plc е международен кабелен оператор, който притежава и експлоатира кабелни мрежи, предлагащи телевизия, широколентов интернет, фиксирана телефония и мобилни телекомуникационни услуги в единадесет държави-членки на Европейския съюз и Швейцария. Г-н Джон Малоун, американски гражданин, притежава най-голямото миноритарно участие в Liberty Global.

Ziggo NV притежава и управлява широколентова кабелна мрежа, която обхваща повече от половината от територията на Нидерландия. Това предприятие предоставя цифрови и аналогови кабелни видео, широколентов интернет, мобилни телекомуникации и услуги за цифрова телефония (Voice over Internet Protocol). Ziggo притежава 50% от HBO Nederland.

На 10 октомври 2014 г. Комисията приема Решение C (2014) 7241, с което обявява концентрацията, включваща придобиването от Liberty Global на изключителен контрол над Ziggo, за съвместима с вътрешния пазар и със Споразумението за ЕИП (Дело COMP / M.7000 – Liberty Global / Ziggo) (ОВ 2015, C 145, стр. 7) .

KPN обжалва решението  на три правни основания –  явна грешка в преценката относно евентуалните вертикални последици на концентрацията на пазара на pay tv,  нарушение на задължението за анализ на евентуалните вертикални антиконкурентни ефекти на пазара на спортни телевизионни канали  и   явна грешка в преценката относно упражняването на решаващо влияние върху г-н Malone върху Liberty Global.

Съдът анализира второто основание – липсата на мотиви – и потвърждава, че обжалваното решение не съдържа достатъчен  анализ относно вертикалните ефекти, които биха произтекли от предложената концентрация.

В резултат отменя решението на ЕК.

Filed under: EU Law, Media Law Tagged: съд на ес

AWS and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Post Syndicated from Stephen Schmidt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-and-the-general-data-protection-regulation/

European Union image

Just over a year ago, the European Commission approved and adopted the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR is the biggest change in data protection laws in Europe since the 1995 introduction of the European Union (EU) Data Protection Directive, also known as Directive 95/46/EC. The GDPR aims to strengthen the security and protection of personal data in the EU and will replace the Directive and all local laws relating to it.

AWS welcomes the arrival of the GDPR. The new, robust requirements raise the bar for data protection, security, and compliance, and will push the industry to follow the most stringent controls, helping to make everyone more secure. I am happy to announce today that all AWS services will comply with the GDPR when it becomes enforceable on May 25, 2018.

In this blog post, I explain the work AWS is doing to help customers with the GDPR as part of our continued commitment to help ensure they can comply with EU Data Protection requirements.

What has AWS been doing?

AWS continually maintains a high bar for security and compliance across all of our regions around the world. This has always been our highest priority—truly “job zero.” The AWS Cloud infrastructure has been architected to offer customers the most powerful, flexible, and secure cloud-computing environment available today. AWS also gives you a number of services and tools to enable you to build GDPR-compliant infrastructure on top of AWS.

One tool we give you is a Data Processing Agreement (DPA). I’m happy to announce today that we have a DPA that will meet the requirements of the GDPR. This GDPR DPA is available now to all AWS customers to help you prepare for May 25, 2018, when the GDPR becomes enforceable. For additional information about the new GDPR DPA or to obtain a copy, contact your AWS account manager.

In addition to account managers, we have teams of compliance experts, data protection specialists, and security experts working with customers across Europe to answer their questions and help them prepare for running workloads in the AWS Cloud after the GDPR comes into force. To further answer customers’ questions, we have updated our EU Data Protection website. This website includes information about what the GDPR is, the changes it brings to organizations operating in the EU, the services AWS offers to help you comply with the GDPR, and advice about how you can prepare.

Another topic we cover on the EU Data Protection website is AWS’s compliance with the CISPE Code of Conduct. The CISPE Code of Conduct helps cloud customers ensure that their cloud infrastructure provider is using appropriate data protection standards to protect their data in a manner consistent with the GDPR. AWS has declared that Amazon EC2, Amazon S3, Amazon RDS, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon Elastic Block Storage (Amazon EBS) are fully compliant with the CISPE Code of Conduct. This declaration provides customers with assurances that they fully control their data in a safe, secure, and compliant environment when they use AWS. For more information about AWS’s compliance with the CISPE Code of Conduct, go to the CISPE website.

As well as giving customers a number of tools and services to build GDPR-compliant environments, AWS has achieved a number of internationally recognized certifications and accreditations. In the process, AWS has demonstrated compliance with third-party assurance frameworks such as ISO 27017 for cloud security, ISO 27018 for cloud privacy, PCI DSS Level 1, and SOC 1, SOC 2, and SOC 3. AWS also helps customers meet local security standards such as BSI’s Common Cloud Computing Controls Catalogue (C5) that is important in Germany. We will continue to pursue certifications and accreditations that are important to AWS customers.

What can you do?

Although the GDPR will not be enforceable until May 25, 2018, we are encouraging our customers and partners to start preparing now. If you have already implemented a high bar for compliance, security, and data privacy, the move to GDPR should be simple. However, if you have yet to start your journey to GDPR compliance, we urge you to start reviewing your security, compliance, and data protection processes now to ensure a smooth transition in May 2018.

You should consider the following key points in preparation for GDPR compliance:

  • Territorial reach – Determining whether the GDPR applies to your organization’s activities is essential to ensuring your organization’s ability to satisfy its compliance obligations.
  • Data subject rights – The GDPR enhances the rights of data subjects in a number of ways. You will need to make sure you can accommodate the rights of data subjects if you are processing their personal data.
  • Data breach notifications – If you are a data controller, you must report data breaches to the data protection authorities without undue delay and in any event within 72 hours of you becoming aware of a data breach.
  • Data protection officer (DPO) – You may need to appoint a DPO who will manage data security and other issues related to the processing of personal data.
  • Data protection impact assessment (DPIA) – You may need to conduct and, in some circumstances, you might be required to file with the supervisory authority a DPIA for your processing activities.
  • Data processing agreement (DPA) – You may need a DPA that will meet the requirements of the GDPR, particularly if personal data is transferred outside the European Economic Area.

AWS offers a wide range of services and features to help customers meet requirements of the GDPR, including services for access controls, monitoring, logging, and encryption. For more information about these services and features, see EU Data Protection.

At AWS, security, data protection, and compliance are our top priorities, and we will continue to work vigilantly to ensure that our customers are able to enjoy the benefits of AWS securely, compliantly, and without disruption in Europe and around the world. As we head toward May 2018, we will share more news and resources with you to help you comply with the GDPR.

– Steve

Coming in 2018 – New AWS Region in Sweden

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/coming-in-2018-new-aws-region-in-sweden/

Last year we launched new AWS Regions in Canada, India, Korea, the UK (London), and the United States (Ohio), and announced that new regions are coming to France (Paris) and China (Ningxia).

Today, I am happy to be able to tell you that we are planning to open up an AWS Region in Stockholm, Sweden in 2018. This region will give AWS partners and customers in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden low-latency connectivity and the ability to run their workloads and store their data close to home.

The Nordics is well known for its vibrant startup community and highly innovative business climate. With successful global enterprises like ASSA ABLOY, IKEA, and Scania along with fast growing startups like Bambora, Supercell, Tink, and Trustpilot, it comes as no surprise that Forbes ranks Sweden as the best country for business, with all the other Nordic countries in the top 10. Even better, the European Commission ranks Sweden as the most innovative country in EU.

This will be the fifth AWS Region in Europe joining four other Regions there — EU (Ireland), EU (London), EU (Frankfurt) and an additional Region in France expected to launch in the coming months. Together, these Regions will provide our customers with a total of 13 Availability Zones (AZs) and allow them to architect highly fault tolerant applications while storing their data in the EU.

Today, our infrastructure comprises 42 Availability Zones across 16 geographic regions worldwide, with another three AWS Regions (and eight Availability Zones) in France, China and Sweden coming online throughout 2017 and 2018, (see the AWS Global Infrastructure page for more info).

We are looking forward to serving new and existing Nordic customers and working with partners across Europe. Of course, the new region will also be open to existing AWS customers who would like to process and store data in Sweden. Public sector organizations (government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofits) in Sweden will be able to use this region to store sensitive data in-country (the AWS in the Public Sector page has plenty of success stories drawn from our worldwide customer base).

If you are a customer or a partner and have specific questions about this Region, you can contact our Nordic team.

Help Wanted
As part of our launch, we are hiring individual contributors and managers for IT support, electrical, logistics, and physical security positions. If you are interested in learning more, please contact [email protected].

Jeff;

 

European Commission Pushing For Encryption Backdoors

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/ocno8CjeP-U/

The debate surrounding encryption backdoors has been raging on for years with governments (that typically don’t really understand the things they are pushing for) requesting all software have government ‘secured’ backdoor keys. This is now getting more serious in Europe with the EC actually forcing the issue (in a passive aggressive kind of way…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from June, July, and August

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/security/post/Tx3KVD6T490MM47/In-Case-You-Missed-These-AWS-Security-Blog-Posts-from-June-July-and-August

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts from June, July, and August, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from a tagging limit increase to recording SSH sessions established through a bastion host.

August

August 16: Updated Whitepaper Available: AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency
We recently released the 2016 version of the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency Whitepaper, which can be helpful if you have public-facing endpoints that might attract unwanted distributed denial of service (DDoS) activity.

August 15: Now Organize Your AWS Resources by Using up to 50 Tags per Resource
Tagging AWS resources simplifies the way you organize and discover resources, allocate costs, and control resource access across services. Many of you have told us that as the number of applications, teams, and projects running on AWS increases, you need more than 10 tags per resource. Based on this feedback, we now support up to 50 tags per resource. You do not need to take additional action—you can begin applying as many as 50 tags per resource today.

August 11: New! Import Your Own Keys into AWS Key Management Service
Today, we are happy to announce the launch of the new import key feature that enables you to import keys from your own key management infrastructure (KMI) into AWS Key Management Service (KMS). After you have exported keys from your existing systems and imported them into KMS, you can use them in all KMS-integrated AWS services and custom applications.

August 2: Customer Update: Amazon Web Services and the EU-US Privacy Shield
Recently, the European Commission and the US Government agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield, and on July 12, the European Commission formally adopted it. AWS welcomes this new framework for transatlantic data flow. As the EU-US Privacy Shield replaces Safe Harbor, we understand many of our customers have questions about what this means for them. The security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, so I wanted to take a few moments to explain what this all means.

August 2: How to Remove Single Points of Failure by Using a High-Availability Partition Group in Your AWS CloudHSM Environment
In this post, I will walk you through steps to remove single points of failure in your AWS CloudHSM environment by setting up a high-availability (HA) partition group. Single points of failure occur when a single CloudHSM device fails in a non-HA configuration, which can result in the permanent loss of keys and data. The HA partition group, however, allows for one or more CloudHSM devices to fail, while still keeping your environment operational.

July

July 28: Enable Your Federated Users to Work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 Hours
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) supports identity federation, which enables external identities, such as users in your corporate directory, to sign in to the AWS Management Console via single sign-on (SSO). Now with a small configuration change, your AWS administrators can allow your federated users to work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 hours, instead of having to reauthenticate every 60 minutes. In addition, administrators can now revoke active federated user sessions. In this blog post, I will show how to configure the console session duration for two common federation use cases: using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 and using a custom federation broker that leverages the sts:AssumeRole* APIs (see this downloadable sample of a federation proxy). I will wrap up this post with a walkthrough of the new session revocation process.

July 28: Amazon Cognito Your User Pools is Now Generally Available
Amazon Cognito makes it easy for developers to add sign-up, sign-in, and enhanced security functionality to mobile and web apps. With Amazon Cognito Your User Pools, you get a simple, fully managed service for creating and maintaining your own user directory that can scale to hundreds of millions of users.

July 27: How to Audit Cross-Account Roles Using AWS CloudTrail and Amazon CloudWatch Events
In this blog post, I will walk through the process of auditing access across AWS accounts by a cross-account role. This process links API calls that assume a role in one account to resource-related API calls in a different account. To develop this process, I will use AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda functions. When complete, the process will provide a full audit chain from end user to resource access across separate AWS accounts.

July 25: AWS Becomes First Cloud Service Provider to Adopt New PCI DSS 3.2
We are happy to announce the availability of the Amazon Web Services PCI DSS 3.2 Compliance Package for the 2016/2017 cycle. AWS is the first cloud service provider (CSP) to successfully complete the assessment against the newly released PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) version 3.2, 18 months in advance of the mandatory February 1, 2018, deadline. The AWS Attestation of Compliance (AOC), available upon request, now features 26 PCI DSS certified services, including the latest additions of Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS), AWS Config, and AWS WAF (a web application firewall). We at AWS are committed to this international information security and compliance program, and adopting the new standard as early as possible once again demonstrates our commitment to information security as our highest priority. Our customers (and customers of our customers) can operate confidently as they store and process credit card information (and any other sensitive data) in the cloud knowing that AWS products and services are tested against the latest and most mature set of PCI compliance requirements.

July 20: New AWS Compute Blog Post: Help Secure Container-Enabled Applications with IAM Roles for ECS Tasks
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) now allows you to specify an IAM role that can be used by the containers in an ECS task, as a new AWS Compute Blog post explains. 

July 14: New Whitepaper Now Available: The Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework
Today, AWS released the Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework (AWS CAF). The AWS CAF provides a framework to help you structure and plan your cloud adoption journey, and build a comprehensive approach to cloud computing throughout the IT lifecycle. The framework provides seven specific areas of focus or Perspectives: business, platform, maturity, people, process, operations, and security.

July 14: New Amazon Inspector Blog Post on the AWS Blog
On the AWS Blog yesterday, Jeff Barr published a new security-related blog post written by AWS Principal Security Engineer Eric Fitzgerald. Here’s the beginning of the post, which is entitled, Scale Your Security Vulnerability Testing with Amazon Inspector:

July 12: How to Use AWS CloudFormation to Automate Your AWS WAF Configuration with Example Rules and Match Conditions
We recently announced AWS CloudFormation support for all current features of AWS WAF. This enables you to leverage CloudFormation templates to configure, customize, and test AWS WAF settings across all your web applications. Using CloudFormation templates can help you reduce the time required to configure AWS WAF. In this blog post, I will show you how to use CloudFormation to automate your AWS WAF configuration with example rules and match conditions.

July 11: How to Restrict Amazon S3 Bucket Access to a Specific IAM Role
In this blog post, I show how you can restrict S3 bucket access to a specific IAM role or user within an account using Conditions instead of with the NotPrincipal element. Even if another user in the same account has an Admin policy or a policy with s3:*, they will be denied if they are not explicitly listed. You can use this approach, for example, to configure a bucket for access by instances within an Auto Scaling group. You can also use this approach to limit access to a bucket with a high-level security need.

July 7: How to Use SAML to Automatically Direct Federated Users to a Specific AWS Management Console Page
In this blog post, I will show you how to create a deep link for federated users via the SAML 2.0 RelayState parameter in Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS). By using a deep link, your users will go directly to the specified console page without additional navigation.

July 6: How to Prevent Uploads of Unencrypted Objects to Amazon S3
In this blog post, I will show you how to create an S3 bucket policy that prevents users from uploading unencrypted objects, unless they are using server-side encryption with S3–managed encryption keys (SSE-S3) or server-side encryption with AWS KMS–managed keys (SSE-KMS).

June

June 30: The Top 20 AWS IAM Documentation Pages so Far This Year
The following 20 pages have been the most viewed AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation pages so far this year. I have included a brief description with each link to give you a clearer idea of what each page covers. Use this list to see what other people have been viewing and perhaps to pique your own interest about a topic you’ve been meaning to research. 

June 29: The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts so Far in 2016
The following 10 posts are the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during the first six months of this year. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

June 25: AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization
I am pleased to share that, for our AWS GovCloud (US) Region, AWS has received a Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Provisional Authorization (PA) at Impact Level 4 (IL4). This will allow Department of Defense (DoD) agencies to use the AWS Cloud for production workloads with export-controlled data, privacy information, and protected health information as well as other controlled unclassified information. This new authorization continues to demonstrate our advanced work in the public sector space; you might recall AWS was the first cloud service provider to obtain an Impact Level 4 PA in August 2014, paving the way for DoD pilot workloads and applications in the cloud. Additionally, we recently achieved a FedRAMP High provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB), also for AWS GovCloud (US), and today’s announcement allows DoD mission owners to continue to leverage AWS for critical production applications.

June 23: AWS re:Invent 2016 Registration Is Now Open
Register now for the fifth annual AWS re:Invent, the largest gathering of the global cloud computing community. Join us in Las Vegas for opportunities to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS solutions. This year we are offering all-new technical deep-dives on topics such as security, IoT, serverless computing, and containers. We are also delivering more than 400 sessions, more hands-on labs, bootcamps, and opportunities for one-on-one engagements with AWS experts.

June 23: AWS Achieves FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization
We are pleased to announce that AWS has received a FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) for the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. The new Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) High JAB Provisional Authorization is mapped to more than 400 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) security controls. This P-ATO recognizes AWS GovCloud (US) as a secure environment on which to run highly sensitive government workloads, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), sensitive patient records, financial data, law enforcement data, and other Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

June 22: AWS IAM Service Last Accessed Data Now Available for South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which helps you identify overly permissive policies attached to an IAM entity (a user, group, or role). Today, we have extended service last accessed data to support two additional regions: South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul). With this release, you can now view the date when an IAM entity last accessed an AWS service in these two regions. You can use this information to identify unnecessary permissions and update policies to remove access to unused services.

June 20: New Twitter Handle Now Live: @AWSSecurityInfo
Today, we launched a new Twitter handle: @AWSSecurityInfo. The purpose of this new handle is to share security bulletins, security whitepapers, compliance news and information, and other AWS security-related and compliance-related information. The scope of this handle is broader than that of @AWSIdentity, which focuses primarily on Security Blog posts. However, feel free to follow both handles!

June 15: Announcing Two New AWS Quick Start Reference Deployments for Compliance
As part of the Professional Services Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance program, AWS has published two new Quick Start reference deployments to assist federal government customers and others who need to meet National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SP 800-53 (Revision 4) security control requirements, including those at the high-impact level. The new Quick Starts are AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: NIST-based Assurance Frameworks and AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: Standardized Architecture for NIST High-Impact Controls Featuring Trend Micro Deep Security. These Quick Starts address many of the NIST controls at the infrastructure layer. Furthermore, for systems categorized as high impact, AWS has worked with Trend Micro to incorporate its Deep Security product into a Quick Start deployment in order to address many additional high-impact controls at the workload layer (app, data, and operating system). In addition, we have worked with Telos Corporation to populate security control implementation details for each of these Quick Starts into the Xacta product suite for customers who rely upon that suite for governance, risk, and compliance workflows.

June 14: Now Available: Get Even More Details from Service Last Accessed Data
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which shows the time when an IAM entity (a user, group, or role) last accessed an AWS service. This provided a powerful tool to help you grant least privilege permissions. Starting today, it’s easier to identify where you can reduce permissions based on additional service last accessed data.

June 14: How to Record SSH Sessions Established Through a Bastion Host
A bastion host is a server whose purpose is to provide access to a private network from an external network, such as the Internet. Because of its exposure to potential attack, a bastion host must minimize the chances of penetration. For example, you can use a bastion host to mitigate the risk of allowing SSH connections from an external network to the Linux instances launched in a private subnet of your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). In this blog post, I will show you how to leverage a bastion host to record all SSH sessions established with Linux instances. Recording SSH sessions enables auditing and can help in your efforts to comply with regulatory requirements.

June 14: AWS Granted Authority to Operate for Department of Commerce and NOAA
AWS already has a number of federal agencies onboarded to the cloud, including the Department of Energy, The Department of the Interior, and NASA. Today we are pleased to announce the addition of two more ATOs (authority to operate) for the Department of Commerce (DOC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Specifically, the DOC will be utilizing AWS for their Commerce Data Service, and NOAA will be leveraging the cloud for their “Big Data Project." According to NOAA, the goal of the Big Data Project is to “create a sustainable, market-driven ecosystem that lowers the cost barrier to data publication. This project will create a new economic space for growth and job creation while providing the public far greater access to the data created with its tax dollars.”

June 2: How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS by Using Unbound
In previous AWS Security Blog posts, Drew Dennis covered two options for establishing DNS connectivity between your on-premises networks and your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) environments. His first post explained how to use Simple AD to forward DNS requests originating from on-premises networks to an Amazon Route 53 private hosted zone. His second post showed how you can use Microsoft Active Directory (also provisioned with AWS Directory Service) to provide the same DNS resolution with some additional forwarding capabilities. In this post, I will explain how you can set up DNS resolution between your on-premises DNS with Amazon VPC by using Unbound, an open-source, recursive DNS resolver. This solution is not a managed solution like Microsoft AD and Simple AD, but it does provide the ability to route DNS requests between on-premises environments and an Amazon VPC–provided DNS.

June 1: How to Manage Secrets for Amazon EC2 Container Service–Based Applications by Using Amazon S3 and Docker
In this blog post, I will show you how to store secrets on Amazon S3, and use AWS IAM roles to grant access to those stored secrets using an example WordPress application deployed as a Docker image using ECS. Using IAM roles means that developers and operations staff do not have the credentials to access secrets. Only the application and staff who are responsible for managing the secrets can access them. The deployment model for ECS ensures that tasks are run on dedicated EC2 instances for the same AWS account and are not shared between customers, which gives sufficient isolation between different container environments.

If you have comments  about any of these posts, please add your comments in the "Comments" section of the appropriate post. If you have questions about or issues implementing the solutions in any of these posts, please start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum.

– Craig

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from June, July, and August

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/in-case-you-missed-these-aws-security-blog-posts-from-june-july-and-august/

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts from June, July, and August, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from a tagging limit increase to recording SSH sessions established through a bastion host.

August

August 16: Updated Whitepaper Available: AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency
We recently released the 2016 version of the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency Whitepaper, which can be helpful if you have public-facing endpoints that might attract unwanted distributed denial of service (DDoS) activity.

August 15: Now Organize Your AWS Resources by Using up to 50 Tags per Resource
Tagging AWS resources simplifies the way you organize and discover resources, allocate costs, and control resource access across services. Many of you have told us that as the number of applications, teams, and projects running on AWS increases, you need more than 10 tags per resource. Based on this feedback, we now support up to 50 tags per resource. You do not need to take additional action—you can begin applying as many as 50 tags per resource today.

August 11: New! Import Your Own Keys into AWS Key Management Service
Today, we are happy to announce the launch of the new import key feature that enables you to import keys from your own key management infrastructure (KMI) into AWS Key Management Service (KMS). After you have exported keys from your existing systems and imported them into KMS, you can use them in all KMS-integrated AWS services and custom applications.

August 2: Customer Update: Amazon Web Services and the EU-US Privacy Shield
Recently, the European Commission and the US Government agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield, and on July 12, the European Commission formally adopted it. AWS welcomes this new framework for transatlantic data flow. As the EU-US Privacy Shield replaces Safe Harbor, we understand many of our customers have questions about what this means for them. The security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, so I wanted to take a few moments to explain what this all means.

August 2: How to Remove Single Points of Failure by Using a High-Availability Partition Group in Your AWS CloudHSM Environment
In this post, I will walk you through steps to remove single points of failure in your AWS CloudHSM environment by setting up a high-availability (HA) partition group. Single points of failure occur when a single CloudHSM device fails in a non-HA configuration, which can result in the permanent loss of keys and data. The HA partition group, however, allows for one or more CloudHSM devices to fail, while still keeping your environment operational.

July

July 28: Enable Your Federated Users to Work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 Hours
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) supports identity federation, which enables external identities, such as users in your corporate directory, to sign in to the AWS Management Console via single sign-on (SSO). Now with a small configuration change, your AWS administrators can allow your federated users to work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 hours, instead of having to reauthenticate every 60 minutes. In addition, administrators can now revoke active federated user sessions. In this blog post, I will show how to configure the console session duration for two common federation use cases: using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 and using a custom federation broker that leverages the sts:AssumeRole* APIs (see this downloadable sample of a federation proxy). I will wrap up this post with a walkthrough of the new session revocation process.

July 28: Amazon Cognito Your User Pools is Now Generally Available
Amazon Cognito makes it easy for developers to add sign-up, sign-in, and enhanced security functionality to mobile and web apps. With Amazon Cognito Your User Pools, you get a simple, fully managed service for creating and maintaining your own user directory that can scale to hundreds of millions of users.

July 27: How to Audit Cross-Account Roles Using AWS CloudTrail and Amazon CloudWatch Events
In this blog post, I will walk through the process of auditing access across AWS accounts by a cross-account role. This process links API calls that assume a role in one account to resource-related API calls in a different account. To develop this process, I will use AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda functions. When complete, the process will provide a full audit chain from end user to resource access across separate AWS accounts.

July 25: AWS Becomes First Cloud Service Provider to Adopt New PCI DSS 3.2
We are happy to announce the availability of the Amazon Web Services PCI DSS 3.2 Compliance Package for the 2016/2017 cycle. AWS is the first cloud service provider (CSP) to successfully complete the assessment against the newly released PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) version 3.2, 18 months in advance of the mandatory February 1, 2018, deadline. The AWS Attestation of Compliance (AOC), available upon request, now features 26 PCI DSS certified services, including the latest additions of Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS), AWS Config, and AWS WAF (a web application firewall). We at AWS are committed to this international information security and compliance program, and adopting the new standard as early as possible once again demonstrates our commitment to information security as our highest priority. Our customers (and customers of our customers) can operate confidently as they store and process credit card information (and any other sensitive data) in the cloud knowing that AWS products and services are tested against the latest and most mature set of PCI compliance requirements.

July 20: New AWS Compute Blog Post: Help Secure Container-Enabled Applications with IAM Roles for ECS Tasks
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) now allows you to specify an IAM role that can be used by the containers in an ECS task, as a new AWS Compute Blog post explains.

July 14: New Whitepaper Now Available: The Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework
Today, AWS released the Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework (AWS CAF). The AWS CAF provides a framework to help you structure and plan your cloud adoption journey, and build a comprehensive approach to cloud computing throughout the IT lifecycle. The framework provides seven specific areas of focus or Perspectives: business, platform, maturity, people, process, operations, and security.

July 14: New Amazon Inspector Blog Post on the AWS Blog
On the AWS Blog yesterday, Jeff Barr published a new security-related blog post written by AWS Principal Security Engineer Eric Fitzgerald. Here’s the beginning of the post, which is entitled, Scale Your Security Vulnerability Testing with Amazon Inspector:

July 12: How to Use AWS CloudFormation to Automate Your AWS WAF Configuration with Example Rules and Match Conditions
We recently announced AWS CloudFormation support for all current features of AWS WAF. This enables you to leverage CloudFormation templates to configure, customize, and test AWS WAF settings across all your web applications. Using CloudFormation templates can help you reduce the time required to configure AWS WAF. In this blog post, I will show you how to use CloudFormation to automate your AWS WAF configuration with example rules and match conditions.

July 11: How to Restrict Amazon S3 Bucket Access to a Specific IAM Role
In this blog post, I show how you can restrict S3 bucket access to a specific IAM role or user within an account using Conditions instead of with the NotPrincipal element. Even if another user in the same account has an Admin policy or a policy with s3:*, they will be denied if they are not explicitly listed. You can use this approach, for example, to configure a bucket for access by instances within an Auto Scaling group. You can also use this approach to limit access to a bucket with a high-level security need.

July 7: How to Use SAML to Automatically Direct Federated Users to a Specific AWS Management Console Page
In this blog post, I will show you how to create a deep link for federated users via the SAML 2.0 RelayState parameter in Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS). By using a deep link, your users will go directly to the specified console page without additional navigation.

July 6: How to Prevent Uploads of Unencrypted Objects to Amazon S3
In this blog post, I will show you how to create an S3 bucket policy that prevents users from uploading unencrypted objects, unless they are using server-side encryption with S3–managed encryption keys (SSE-S3) or server-side encryption with AWS KMS–managed keys (SSE-KMS).

June

June 30: The Top 20 AWS IAM Documentation Pages so Far This Year
The following 20 pages have been the most viewed AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation pages so far this year. I have included a brief description with each link to give you a clearer idea of what each page covers. Use this list to see what other people have been viewing and perhaps to pique your own interest about a topic you’ve been meaning to research.

June 29: The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts so Far in 2016
The following 10 posts are the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during the first six months of this year. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

June 25: AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization
I am pleased to share that, for our AWS GovCloud (US) Region, AWS has received a Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Provisional Authorization (PA) at Impact Level 4 (IL4). This will allow Department of Defense (DoD) agencies to use the AWS Cloud for production workloads with export-controlled data, privacy information, and protected health information as well as other controlled unclassified information. This new authorization continues to demonstrate our advanced work in the public sector space; you might recall AWS was the first cloud service provider to obtain an Impact Level 4 PA in August 2014, paving the way for DoD pilot workloads and applications in the cloud. Additionally, we recently achieved a FedRAMP High provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB), also for AWS GovCloud (US), and today’s announcement allows DoD mission owners to continue to leverage AWS for critical production applications.

June 23: AWS re:Invent 2016 Registration Is Now Open
Register now for the fifth annual AWS re:Invent, the largest gathering of the global cloud computing community. Join us in Las Vegas for opportunities to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS solutions. This year we are offering all-new technical deep-dives on topics such as security, IoT, serverless computing, and containers. We are also delivering more than 400 sessions, more hands-on labs, bootcamps, and opportunities for one-on-one engagements with AWS experts.

June 23: AWS Achieves FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization
We are pleased to announce that AWS has received a FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) for the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. The new Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) High JAB Provisional Authorization is mapped to more than 400 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) security controls. This P-ATO recognizes AWS GovCloud (US) as a secure environment on which to run highly sensitive government workloads, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), sensitive patient records, financial data, law enforcement data, and other Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

June 22: AWS IAM Service Last Accessed Data Now Available for South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which helps you identify overly permissive policies attached to an IAM entity (a user, group, or role). Today, we have extended service last accessed data to support two additional regions: South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul). With this release, you can now view the date when an IAM entity last accessed an AWS service in these two regions. You can use this information to identify unnecessary permissions and update policies to remove access to unused services.

June 20: New Twitter Handle Now Live: @AWSSecurityInfo
Today, we launched a new Twitter handle: @AWSSecurityInfo. The purpose of this new handle is to share security bulletins, security whitepapers, compliance news and information, and other AWS security-related and compliance-related information. The scope of this handle is broader than that of @AWSIdentity, which focuses primarily on Security Blog posts. However, feel free to follow both handles!

June 15: Announcing Two New AWS Quick Start Reference Deployments for Compliance
As part of the Professional Services Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance program, AWS has published two new Quick Start reference deployments to assist federal government customers and others who need to meet National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SP 800-53 (Revision 4) security control requirements, including those at the high-impact level. The new Quick Starts are AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: NIST-based Assurance Frameworks and AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: Standardized Architecture for NIST High-Impact Controls Featuring Trend Micro Deep Security. These Quick Starts address many of the NIST controls at the infrastructure layer. Furthermore, for systems categorized as high impact, AWS has worked with Trend Micro to incorporate its Deep Security product into a Quick Start deployment in order to address many additional high-impact controls at the workload layer (app, data, and operating system). In addition, we have worked with Telos Corporation to populate security control implementation details for each of these Quick Starts into the Xacta product suite for customers who rely upon that suite for governance, risk, and compliance workflows.

June 14: Now Available: Get Even More Details from Service Last Accessed Data
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which shows the time when an IAM entity (a user, group, or role) last accessed an AWS service. This provided a powerful tool to help you grant least privilege permissions. Starting today, it’s easier to identify where you can reduce permissions based on additional service last accessed data.

June 14: How to Record SSH Sessions Established Through a Bastion Host
A bastion host is a server whose purpose is to provide access to a private network from an external network, such as the Internet. Because of its exposure to potential attack, a bastion host must minimize the chances of penetration. For example, you can use a bastion host to mitigate the risk of allowing SSH connections from an external network to the Linux instances launched in a private subnet of your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). In this blog post, I will show you how to leverage a bastion host to record all SSH sessions established with Linux instances. Recording SSH sessions enables auditing and can help in your efforts to comply with regulatory requirements.

June 14: AWS Granted Authority to Operate for Department of Commerce and NOAA
AWS already has a number of federal agencies onboarded to the cloud, including the Department of Energy, The Department of the Interior, and NASA. Today we are pleased to announce the addition of two more ATOs (authority to operate) for the Department of Commerce (DOC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Specifically, the DOC will be utilizing AWS for their Commerce Data Service, and NOAA will be leveraging the cloud for their “Big Data Project.” According to NOAA, the goal of the Big Data Project is to “create a sustainable, market-driven ecosystem that lowers the cost barrier to data publication. This project will create a new economic space for growth and job creation while providing the public far greater access to the data created with its tax dollars.”

June 2: How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS by Using Unbound
In previous AWS Security Blog posts, Drew Dennis covered two options for establishing DNS connectivity between your on-premises networks and your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) environments. His first post explained how to use Simple AD to forward DNS requests originating from on-premises networks to an Amazon Route 53 private hosted zone. His second post showed how you can use Microsoft Active Directory (also provisioned with AWS Directory Service) to provide the same DNS resolution with some additional forwarding capabilities. In this post, I will explain how you can set up DNS resolution between your on-premises DNS with Amazon VPC by using Unbound, an open-source, recursive DNS resolver. This solution is not a managed solution like Microsoft AD and Simple AD, but it does provide the ability to route DNS requests between on-premises environments and an Amazon VPC–provided DNS.

June 1: How to Manage Secrets for Amazon EC2 Container Service–Based Applications by Using Amazon S3 and Docker
In this blog post, I will show you how to store secrets on Amazon S3, and use AWS IAM roles to grant access to those stored secrets using an example WordPress application deployed as a Docker image using ECS. Using IAM roles means that developers and operations staff do not have the credentials to access secrets. Only the application and staff who are responsible for managing the secrets can access them. The deployment model for ECS ensures that tasks are run on dedicated EC2 instances for the same AWS account and are not shared between customers, which gives sufficient isolation between different container environments.

If you have comments  about any of these posts, please add your comments in the “Comments” section of the appropriate post. If you have questions about or issues implementing the solutions in any of these posts, please start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum.

– Craig

Customer Update: Amazon Web Services and the EU-US Privacy Shield

Post Syndicated from Stephen Schmidt original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/security/post/Tx154OKLVWMHKVW/Customer-Update-Amazon-Web-Services-and-the-EU-US-Privacy-Shield

Recently, the European Commission and the US Government agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield, and on July 12, the European Commission formally adopted it. Amazon Web Services (AWS) welcomes this new framework for transatlantic data flow. 

As the EU-US Privacy Shield replaces Safe Harbor, we understand many of our customers have questions about what this means for them. The security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, so I wanted to take a few moments to explain what this all means.

The new EU-US Privacy Shield does not impact AWS customers for two reasons. First, customers using AWS have full control of the movement of their data and have always had the choice of the region in which their data is kept. AWS customers choose the AWS region where their data will be stored and can be assured that their data will remain there unless moved by them. Second, for customers who wish to transfer personal data from an AWS region in the European Economic Area (EEA) to one in another part of the world, including the US. AWS customers can do this in compliance with EU data protection law under the terms of the AWS Data Processing Addendum with Model Clauses, which was approved in 2015 by the EU data protection authorities (called the Article 29 Working Party). These options are available to all AWS customers who are processing personal data, whether they are established in, or a global company operating in, the EEA.

Additionally, Amazon.com, Inc. is taking the necessary steps to certify under the EU-US Privacy Shield (as of August 1, companies can begin the process of certifying themselves against it). Upon completion of this process, AWS will be covered under this certification.

For customers not looking to transfer data out of the EEA, we continue to give them all of the security, privacy, and control they have always had with AWS:

  • Customers maintain ownership of their content and select which AWS services process, store, and host their data.
  • Customers concerned about security can encrypt their content in transit or at rest, and we also provide customers with the option to manage their own encryption keys—or we can do this for them.
  • Customers determine the location in which their data is stored and completely control any movement of that data. This allows customers to deploy AWS services in the locations of their choice, in accordance with their specific geographic requirements, including in established AWS regions in Dublin and Frankfurt—meaning customers can keep their content in the EU.
  • Customers will soon have the option to store their content in the UK when the AWS UK Region becomes available by the beginning of next year. This region will provide the same high levels of control, security, and data privacy customers receive in AWS’s other global regions.

European customers were among the first to adopt AWS services when we launched in 2006 and they have continued to move their mission-critical workloads to AWS at a rapid pace. Customers of every size, from every European country, and every industry, running all imaginable workloads, have been moving to AWS. We will continue to work closely with our customers across the EEA to help them move to the AWS Cloud, and we look forward to seeing the continued innovation and growth of all European businesses.

At AWS, security is our top priority, and we will continue to work vigilantly to ensure that our customers are able to continue to enjoy the benefits of AWS securely, compliantly, and without disruption in Europe and around the world.

– Steve