Tag Archives: games console

MagPi 68: an in-depth look at the new Raspberry Pi 3B+

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-68/

Hi folks, Rob from The MagPi here! You may remember that a couple of weeks ago, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ was released, the updated version of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. It’s better, faster, and stronger than the original and it’s also the main topic in The MagPi issue 68, out now!

Everything you need to know about the new Raspberry Pi 3B+

What goes into ‘plussing’ a Raspberry Pi? We talked to Eben Upton and Roger Thornton about the work that went into making the Raspberry Pi 3B+, and we also have all the benchmarks to show you just how much the new Pi 3B+ has been improved.

Super fighting robots

Did you know that the next Pi Wars is soon? The 2018 Raspberry Pi robotics competition is taking place later in April, and we’ve got a full feature on what to expect, as well as top tips on how to make your own kick-punching robot for the next round.

More to read

Still want more after all that? Well, we have our usual excellent selection of outstanding project showcases, reviews, and tutorials to keep you entertained.

See pictures from Raspberry Pi’s sixth birthday, celebrated around the world!

This includes amazing projects like a custom Pi-powered, Switch-esque retro games console, a Minecraft Pi hack that creates a house at the touch of a button, and the Matrix Voice.

With a Pi and a 3D printer, you can make something as cool as this!

Get The MagPi 68

Issue 68 is available today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, head over to your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center in the next few days for a print copy. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android and iOS apps. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

New subscription offer!

Want to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation and the magazine? We’ve launched a new way to subscribe to the print version of The MagPi: you can now take out a monthly £4 subscription to the magazine, effectively creating a rolling pre-order system that saves you money on each issue.

You can also take out a twelve-month print subscription and get a Pi Zero W, Pi Zero case, and adapter cables absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

That’s it for now. See you next month!

The post MagPi 68: an in-depth look at the new Raspberry Pi 3B+ appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi Chiptune Player

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-chiptune-player/

I have been staring at a blank screen for whole minutes. There are no words for just how much I love this project. I’ve already been on eBay to find a General Instrument AY-3-8910 series sound chip so I can play with one myself. Before we get into details, feast your ears.

vmw ay-3-8910 ym player

Raspeberry Pi Driving an AY-3-8910 sound chip It’s playing “intro2.ym” by Surgeon (Aleksy Lutsenko) More details on the setup can be found here: http://www.deater.net/weave/vmwprod/hardware/ay-3-8910/

What’s going on here? The Raspberry Pi is playing chiptunes by serving the files directly on to a AY-3-8910 (brought direct to you from the 1980s), while doing some rather jolly LED visualisation too.

The AY-3-8910 is no longer made: it was a piece of kit you’d find in most arcade machines, games consoles and home computers in the 1980s (if you had a ZX Spectrum, an Amstrad CPC or an Apple II, you’ll be familiar with its gorgeously grungy bleeps and bloops). Nowadays there’s dwindling stock that goes to service old machines, or to make entirely new things that’ll play chiptunes – like this beast.

chiptune player

Vince Weaver, the maker, says:

The AY-3-8910 is fairly straightforward. Three channels of square waves plus various noise and envelope effects. Provide a clock (1MHz in our case) and there are 16 (well, 14) on-chip registers you write to. Just put the address then the 8 bit value on the bus, toggle the 3 bus control pins, and you are set. You’ll want to do this fairly fast. A typical YM music file wants you to write all 14 registers every 50Hz.

I use the Pi’s GPIOs to shift an 8 bit value into a shift register. Then I use a few more to drive the control bus.

Visualization is done with some i2c LED displays.

The amplifier is an LM386 design from the AY-3-8910 datasheet.

Vince has plans to make some improvements (adding stereo, printing a PCB, swapping out for a better amplifier, using SPI to drive the shift register instead of GPIO and refining the software), but even in this prototype version, this is a piece of kit I’d love to have on my desk. Fortunately, we can replicate the project: everything you need is on Vince’s website and on GitHub. Thanks Vince!

The post Raspberry Pi Chiptune Player appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Wall-mounted Raspberry Pi games console for kids

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/wall-mounted-raspberry-pi-games-console-for-kids/

YouTuber buildxyz is happy for his kids to play video games, but he’s keen for them to have a properly decent selection, and he wanted something that would look a little better in his living room than your average games console. He also wanted a no-nonsense way to retain parental control over the amount of time the children spend engaging with this particular kind of entertainment. Using a Raspberry Pi 2, an Arduino Uno, an old monitor and speakers, and EmulationStation, he came up with this.

RPiKids: Raspberry Pi2 / Arduino / EmulationStaion Powered Kids Entertainment Center

Share this video: https://youtu.be/SEao9h7Zg9Y www.buildxyz.xyz I hope you enjoyed my remix of the Illusion of Gaia from SNES

An accomplished hobbyist woodworker, buildxyz constructed the cabinet from Baltic Birch plywood and custom laser-cut and 3D-printed parts, adding old speakers he had lying around and an HP monitor.

A rotary combination lock on the front allows buildxyz’s kids to enter a passcode for time-limited access, and sits inside a NeoPixel ring from Adafruit that shows the current status of the timer. An Arduino Uno controls power to the set-up, polling for a press of the rotary lock’s integrated push-button to turn on the Pi, which runs RetroPie and EmulationStation; the Uno shuts everything down gracefully either when the button is pressed again or when a player runs out of gaming time. When the kids figure out that the current system allows them to brute-force the passcode, they’ll be rewarded with unlimited access for a while, until buildxyz fixes this intentional vulnerability.

This is a simple and well executed project that, buildxyz comments, is “far more reliable then I anticipated.” We hope he and his kids have tons of fun using it, and my experience with kids and screens makes me think the whole family is likely to benefit from the fact that you plainly can’t argue with an electronic timer. You can read more about buildxyz’s project on Hackaday or in his build log, and if you’ve used a Pi to make a gaming set-up that meets your own particular spec, please tell us about your build in the comments!

The post Wall-mounted Raspberry Pi games console for kids appeared first on Raspberry Pi.