Tag Archives: Hardware Hacking

ZigDiggity – ZigBee Hacking Toolkit

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2019/08/zigdiggity-zigbee-hacking-toolkit/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

ZigDiggity – ZigBee Hacking Toolkit

ZigDiggity a ZigBee Hacking Toolkit is a Python-based IoT (Internet of Things) penetration testing framework targeting the ZigBee smart home protocol.

ZigBee continues to grow in popularity as a method for providing simple wireless communication between devices (i.e. low power/traffic, short distance), & can be found in a variety of consumer products that range from smart home automation to healthcare. Security concerns introduced by these systems are just as diverse and plentiful, underscoring a need for quality assessment tools.

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CHIPSEC – Platform Security Assessment Framework For Firmware Hacking

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/10/chipsec-platform-security-assessment-framework-for-firmware-hacking/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

CHIPSEC – Platform Security Assessment Framework For Firmware Hacking

CHIPSEC is a platform security assessment framework for PCs including hardware, system firmware (BIOS/UEFI), and platform components for firmware hacking.

It includes a security test suite, tools for accessing various low-level interfaces, and forensic capabilities. It can be run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and UEFI shell.

You can use CHIPSEC to find vulnerabilities in firmware, hypervisors and hardware configuration, explore low-level system assets and even detect firmware implants.

Read the rest of CHIPSEC – Platform Security Assessment Framework For Firmware Hacking now! Only available at Darknet.

HackSpace: a new magazine for makers

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace/

HackSpace is the new monthly magazine for people who love to make things and those who want to learn. Grab some duct tape, fire up a microcontroller, ready a 3D printer and hack the world around you!

This is HackSpace magazine!

HackSpace is the new monthly magazine for the modern maker. Learn more at http://hsmag.cc. Launching on the 23rd November the magazine will be packed with projects for fixers and tinkerers of all abilities. We’ll teach you new techniques and give you refreshers on familiar ones, from 3D printing, laser cutting, and woodworking to electronics and Internet of Things.

HackSpace magazine

Each month, HackSpace will feature tutorials and projects to help you build and learn. Whether you’re into 3D printing, woodworking, or weird and wonderful IoT projects, HackSpace will help you get more out of hardware hacking by giving you the ideas and skills to take your builds to the next level.

HackSpace is a community magazine written by makers for makers, and we want your input. So if there’s something you want to see in the magazine, tell us about it. And if you have a great project that you believe deserves a place within a future issue, then show it to us.

The front cover of HackSpace magazine issue 1

Get your free copy

Eager to get your hands on HackSpace? Sign up for a free copy of issue 1 by visiting the website! You have until 17 November to do so. Moreover, if you’re the manager of a hack- and makerspace, you can also sign up for a whole box of free copies for your members to enjoy by filling in the details of your venue here.

We want HackSpace magazine to be available to as many people as possible, so we’ll be releasing a free PDF of every monthly issue alongside the print version. You won’t have to wait for us to release articles online — everything will be available free of charge from day one!

The front cover of HackSpace magazine issue 1

Get your monthly copy

For those who’d rather have the hard copy of HackSpace for their home library, garden shed, or coffee table, subscriptions start at just £4.00 a month for a rolling subscription, and even less than that if you’re already a subscriber to The MagPi magazine.

You will also be able to purchase this new magazine from selected newsagents in the UK from 23 November onward, and in the USA and Australia a few weeks later.

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US Voting Machines Hacked At DEF CON – Every One

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/2jfq8D4XaNo/

US Voting Machines Hacked, some in minutes at this year’s DEF CON “Voting Village” – not something you want to hear really. Especially with the results of recent elections that the World is currently dealing with the consequences from. Of course with physical access, most machines can be dominated in some way or another – […]

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DJI Firmware Hacking Removes Drone Flight Restrictions

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/WrLMjVOTRig/

Drones have been taking over the world, everyone with a passing interest in making videos has one and DJI firmware hacking gives you the ability to remove all restrictions (no-fly zones, height and distance) which under most jurisdictions is illegal (mostly EU and FAA for the US). It’s an interesting subject, and also a controversial…

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Intel Finally Patches Critical AMT Bug (Kinda)

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/z67oowwmxyE/

Intel finally patches the critical AMT bug discovered in March by security researcher Maksim Malyutin at Embedi, I say ‘kinda’ because it’s not really up to Intel to deploy the fix to the problem. They can’t really push out updates to CPUs, but at least they have fixed it in the firmware and now the […]

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Hajime Botnet Reaches 300,000 Hosts With No Malicious Functions

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/wnezouCrPAc/

This is not the first IoT heavy botnet, Mirai takes that title, the interesting part is the Hajime botnet appears to be benign. So far no malicious functions have been detected in the codebase, other than the ability to replicate itself and block other malware, Hajime seems to have no DDoS or offensive mechanisms. Hajime […]

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Ubiquiti Wi-Fi Gear Hackable Via 1997 PHP Version

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/mrgf1UX8tHA/

We actually use Ubiquiti Wi-Fi Gear and have found it pretty good, I didn’t realise their security was so whack and they were using PHP 2.0.1 from 1997! In this case a malicious URL can inject commands into a Ubiquiti device which surprise, surprise, runs the web service as root. Apparently, they also got scammed […]

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Termineter – Smart Meter Security Testing Framework

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/zZEoeAaVBJI/

Termineter is a Python Smart Meter Security Testing framework which allows authorised individuals to test Smart Meters for vulnerabilities such as energy consumption fraud, network hijacking, and more. Many of these vulnerabilities have been highlighted by the media and advisories have been sent out by law enforcement agencies. The goal of a…

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160,000 Network Printers Hacked

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/UDyj8J_Rqfw/

It’s a pretty simple hack (in a rather grey-hat fashion), but it’s getting a LOT of media coverage and 160,000 network printers hacked just goes to show once again the whole Internet of Things chapter we are entering is pretty scary. Definitely a neat hack tho, utilising the mass scanning power of Zmap and scanning […]

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Kiev Power Outage Linked To Cyber Attacks

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/OT83DeO3Huc/

A Kiev power outage last weekend in Ukraine has been linked to a cyber attack, which is worryingly similar to an attack that happened around the same time last year. Sub-stations and transmission stations have always been a weak point for nation-state attacks as EVERYTHING relies on them now. Plus with smart grids and remotely […]

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Kautilya – Human Interface Device Hacking Toolkit

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/6etwKq8HIxI/

Kautilya is a human interface device hacking toolkit which provides various payloads for HIDs which may help with breaking into a computer during penetration tests. The Windows payloads and modules are written mostly in powershell (in combination with native commands) and are tested on Windows 7 and Windows 8. In principal Kautilya should work…

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Tesla Hack – Remote Access Whilst Parked or Driving

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/iSiN44TZlvw/

The big buzz on my Twitter this week was about the Tesla Hack carried out by a Chinese crew called Keen Security Lab. It’s no big surprise even though Tesla is known for being fairly security concious and proactive about it. With it being a connected car, that’s pretty important that any remote control capabilities […]

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In 2016 Your Wireless Keyboard Security Still SUCKS – KeySniffer

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/NRsSv_BLlgg/

So you’d probably imagine that Wireless Keyboard Security is a 1998 problem and you shouldn’t even have to worry about that any more. And you’d be wrong – two-thirds of wireless keyboards, from MAJOR manufacturers are not even vaguely secure. It turns out, in 2016 when cryptography is mainstream, open-source and fairly easy to implement…

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Hi Fi Raspberry Pi – digitising and streaming vinyl

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hi-fi-raspberry-pi/

Over at Mozilla HQ (where Firefox, a browser that many of you are using to read this, is made), some retro hardware hacking has been going on.

vinyl record

The Mozillans have worked their way through several office music services, but nothing, so far, has stuck. Then this home-made project, which started as a bit of a joke, landed on a countertop – and it’s stayed.

Matt Claypotch found a vinyl record player online, and had it delivered to the office, intending to tinker with it at home. It never made it that far. He and his colleagues spent their lunch hour at a local thrift store buying up random vintage vinyl…and the record player stayed in the office so everybody could use it.

Potch’s officemates embarked on a vinyl spending spree.

1-SuvYfwtYQ7xAfUYACc7GtA

1-cx_LPjsu4DmlNoxWdxtEPQ

What could be better? The warm crackle of vintage vinyl, “random, crappy albums” you definitely can’t find on Spotify (and stuff like the Van Halen album above that you can find on Spotify but possibly would prefer not to)…the problem was, once the machine had been set up in a break room, only the people in that room could listen to the cheese.

Enter the Raspberry Pi, with a custom-made streaming setup. One Mozillan didn’t want to have to sit in the common area to get his daily dose of bangin’ choons, so he set up a Pi to stream music from the analogue vinyl over USB (it’s 2016, record players apparently have USB ports now) via an Icecast stream to headphones anywhere in the office. Analogue > digital > analogue, if you like.

The setup is surprisingly successful; they’ve organised other audio systems which weren’t very popular, but this one, which happened organically, is being used by the whole office.

You can listen to a podcast from Envoy Office Hacks about the setup, and the office’s reaction to it.

Mozilla, keep on bopping to disco Star Wars. (I’m off to see if I can find a copy of that record. It’s probably a lot better in my imagination than it is in real life, but BOY, is it good in my imagination*.)

*I found it on YouTube. It’s a lot better in my imagination.

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Intel Hidden Management Engine – x86 Security Risk?

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/2q4u2J6S1mA/

So it seems the latest generation of Intel x86 CPUs have implemented a Intel hidden management engine that cannot be audited or examined. We can also assume at some point it will be compromised and security researchers are labelling this as a Ring -3 level vulnerability. This isn’t a new issue though, people have been […]

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