Tag Archives: Hardware Hacking

Binwalk – Firmware Security Analysis & Extraction Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2020/04/binwalk-firmware-security-analysis-extraction-tool/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Binwalk – Firmware Security Analysis & Extraction Tool

Binwalk is a fast and easy to use Python-based firmware security analysis tool that allows for firmware analysis, reverse engineering, and extraction of firmware images.

Features of Binwalk Firmware Security Analysis & Extraction Tool

  • Scanning Firmware – Binwalk can scan a firmware image for many different embedded file types and file systems
  • File Extraction – You can tell binwalk to extract any files that it finds in the firmware image
  • Entropy Analysis – Can help identify interesting sections of data inside a firmware image
  • String Search – Allows you to search the specified file(s) for a custom string

There are also various filters such as by CPU architecture, number of instructions, include filter, exclude filter,

Installation of Binwalk Firmware Security Analysis & Extraction Tool

Download binwalk:

$ wget https://github.com/ReFirmLabs/binwalk/archive/master.zip
$ unzip master.zip

Install binwalk; if you have a previously installed version of binwalk, it is suggested that you uninstall it before upgrading:

$ (cd binwalk-master && sudo python setup.py uninstall && sudo python setup.py install)

Debian users can install all optional and suggested extractors/dependencies using the included deps.sh script (recommended):

$ sudo ./binwalk-master/deps.sh

If you are not a Debian user, or if you wish to install only selected dependencies, see the INSTALL documentation for more details.

Read the rest of Binwalk – Firmware Security Analysis & Extraction Tool now! Only available at Darknet.

HackSpace: a new magazine for makers

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace/

HackSpace is the new monthly magazine for people who love to make things and those who want to learn. Grab some duct tape, fire up a microcontroller, ready a 3D printer and hack the world around you!

This is HackSpace magazine!

HackSpace is the new monthly magazine for the modern maker. Learn more at http://hsmag.cc. Launching on the 23rd November the magazine will be packed with projects for fixers and tinkerers of all abilities. We’ll teach you new techniques and give you refreshers on familiar ones, from 3D printing, laser cutting, and woodworking to electronics and Internet of Things.

HackSpace magazine

Each month, HackSpace will feature tutorials and projects to help you build and learn. Whether you’re into 3D printing, woodworking, or weird and wonderful IoT projects, HackSpace will help you get more out of hardware hacking by giving you the ideas and skills to take your builds to the next level.

HackSpace is a community magazine written by makers for makers, and we want your input. So if there’s something you want to see in the magazine, tell us about it. And if you have a great project that you believe deserves a place within a future issue, then show it to us.

The front cover of HackSpace magazine issue 1

Get your free copy

Eager to get your hands on HackSpace? Sign up for a free copy of issue 1 by visiting the website! You have until 17 November to do so. Moreover, if you’re the manager of a hack- and makerspace, you can also sign up for a whole box of free copies for your members to enjoy by filling in the details of your venue here.

We want HackSpace magazine to be available to as many people as possible, so we’ll be releasing a free PDF of every monthly issue alongside the print version. You won’t have to wait for us to release articles online — everything will be available free of charge from day one!

The front cover of HackSpace magazine issue 1

Get your monthly copy

For those who’d rather have the hard copy of HackSpace for their home library, garden shed, or coffee table, subscriptions start at just £4.00 a month for a rolling subscription, and even less than that if you’re already a subscriber to The MagPi magazine.

You will also be able to purchase this new magazine from selected newsagents in the UK from 23 November onward, and in the USA and Australia a few weeks later.

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Hi Fi Raspberry Pi – digitising and streaming vinyl

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hi-fi-raspberry-pi/

Over at Mozilla HQ (where Firefox, a browser that many of you are using to read this, is made), some retro hardware hacking has been going on.

vinyl record

The Mozillans have worked their way through several office music services, but nothing, so far, has stuck. Then this home-made project, which started as a bit of a joke, landed on a countertop – and it’s stayed.

Matt Claypotch found a vinyl record player online, and had it delivered to the office, intending to tinker with it at home. It never made it that far. He and his colleagues spent their lunch hour at a local thrift store buying up random vintage vinyl…and the record player stayed in the office so everybody could use it.

Potch’s officemates embarked on a vinyl spending spree.

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What could be better? The warm crackle of vintage vinyl, “random, crappy albums” you definitely can’t find on Spotify (and stuff like the Van Halen album above that you can find on Spotify but possibly would prefer not to)…the problem was, once the machine had been set up in a break room, only the people in that room could listen to the cheese.

Enter the Raspberry Pi, with a custom-made streaming setup. One Mozillan didn’t want to have to sit in the common area to get his daily dose of bangin’ choons, so he set up a Pi to stream music from the analogue vinyl over USB (it’s 2016, record players apparently have USB ports now) via an Icecast stream to headphones anywhere in the office. Analogue > digital > analogue, if you like.

The setup is surprisingly successful; they’ve organised other audio systems which weren’t very popular, but this one, which happened organically, is being used by the whole office.

You can listen to a podcast from Envoy Office Hacks about the setup, and the office’s reaction to it.

Mozilla, keep on bopping to disco Star Wars. (I’m off to see if I can find a copy of that record. It’s probably a lot better in my imagination than it is in real life, but BOY, is it good in my imagination*.)

*I found it on YouTube. It’s a lot better in my imagination.

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