Tag Archives: hash

Facebook Fingerprinting Photos to Prevent Revenge Porn

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/11/facebook_finger.html

This is a pilot project in Australia:

Individuals who have shared intimate, nude or sexual images with partners and are worried that the partner (or ex-partner) might distribute them without their consent can use Messenger to send the images to be “hashed.” This means that the company converts the image into a unique digital fingerprint that can be used to identify and block any attempts to re-upload that same image.

I’m not sure I like this. It doesn’t prevent revenge porn in general; it only prevents the same photos being uploaded to Facebook in particular. And it requires the person to send Facebook copies of all their intimate photos.

Facebook will store these images for a short period of time before deleting them to ensure it is enforcing the policy correctly, the company said.

At least there’s that.

More articles.

How to Prepare for AWS’s Move to Its Own Certificate Authority

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Kozolchyk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-prepare-for-aws-move-to-its-own-certificate-authority/

AWS Certificate Manager image

Transport Layer Security (TLS, formerly called Secure Sockets Layer [SSL]) is essential for encrypting information that is exchanged on the internet. For example, Amazon.com uses TLS for all traffic on its website, and AWS uses it to secure calls to AWS services.

An electronic document called a certificate verifies the identity of the server when creating such an encrypted connection. The certificate helps establish proof that your web browser is communicating securely with the website that you typed in your browser’s address field. Certificate Authorities, also known as CAs, issue certificates to specific domains. When a domain presents a certificate that is issued by a trusted CA, your browser or application knows it’s safe to make the connection.

In January 2016, AWS launched AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), a service that lets you easily provision, manage, and deploy SSL/TLS certificates for use with AWS services. These certificates are available for no additional charge through Amazon’s own CA: Amazon Trust Services. For browsers and other applications to trust a certificate, the certificate’s issuer must be included in the browser’s trust store, which is a list of trusted CAs. If the issuing CA is not in the trust store, the browser will display an error message (see an example) and applications will show an application-specific error. To ensure the ubiquity of the Amazon Trust Services CA, AWS purchased the Starfield Services CA, a root found in most browsers and which has been valid since 2005. This means you shouldn’t have to take any action to use the certificates issued by Amazon Trust Services.

AWS has been offering free certificates to AWS customers from the Amazon Trust Services CA. Now, AWS is in the process of moving certificates for services such as Amazon EC2 and Amazon DynamoDB to use certificates from Amazon Trust Services as well. Most software doesn’t need to be changed to handle this transition, but there are exceptions. In this blog post, I show you how to verify that you are prepared to use the Amazon Trust Services CA.

How to tell if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are in your trust store

The following table lists the Amazon Trust Services certificates. To verify that these certificates are in your browser’s trust store, click each Test URL in the following table to verify that it works for you. When a Test URL does not work, it displays an error similar to this example.

Distinguished name SHA-256 hash of subject public key information Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 1,O=Amazon,C=US fbe3018031f9586bcbf41727e417b7d1c45c2f47f93be372a17b96b50757d5a2 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 2,O=Amazon,C=US 7f4296fc5b6a4e3b35d3c369623e364ab1af381d8fa7121533c9d6c633ea2461 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 3,O=Amazon,C=US 36abc32656acfc645c61b71613c4bf21c787f5cabbee48348d58597803d7abc9 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 4,O=Amazon,C=US f7ecded5c66047d28ed6466b543c40e0743abe81d109254dcf845d4c2c7853c5 Test URL
CN=Starfield Services Root Certificate Authority – G2,O=Starfield Technologies\, Inc.,L=Scottsdale,ST=Arizona,C=US 2b071c59a0a0ae76b0eadb2bad23bad4580b69c3601b630c2eaf0613afa83f92 Test URL
Starfield Class 2 Certification Authority 2ce1cb0bf9d2f9e102993fbe215152c3b2dd0cabde1c68e5319b839154dbb7f5 Test URL

What to do if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are not in your trust store

If your tests of any of the Test URLs failed, you must update your trust store. The easiest way to update your trust store is to upgrade the operating system or browser that you are using.

You will find the Amazon Trust Services CAs in the following operating systems (release dates are in parentheses):

  • Microsoft Windows versions that have January 2005 or later updates installed, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and newer versions
  • Mac OS X 10.4 with Java for Mac OS X 10.4 Release 5, Mac OS X 10.5 and newer versions
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (March 2007), Linux 6, and Linux 7 and CentOS 5, CentOS 6, and CentOS 7
  • Ubuntu 8.10
  • Debian 5.0
  • Amazon Linux (all versions)
  • Java 1.4.2_12, Jave 5 update 2, and all newer versions, including Java 6, Java 7, and Java 8

All modern browsers trust Amazon’s CAs. You can update the certificate bundle in your browser simply by updating your browser. You can find instructions for updating the following browsers on their respective websites:

If your application is using a custom trust store, you must add the Amazon root CAs to your application’s trust store. The instructions for doing this vary based on the application or platform. Please refer to the documentation for the application or platform you are using.

AWS SDKs and CLIs

Most AWS SDKs and CLIs are not impacted by the transition to the Amazon Trust Services CA. If you are using a version of the Python AWS SDK or CLI released before February 5, 2015, you must upgrade. The .NET, Java, PHP, Go, JavaScript, and C++ SDKs and CLIs do not bundle any certificates, so their certificates come from the underlying operating system. The Ruby SDK has included at least one of the required CAs since June 10, 2015. Before that date, the Ruby V2 SDK did not bundle certificates.

Certificate pinning

If you are using a technique called certificate pinning to lock down the CAs you trust on a domain-by-domain basis, you must adjust your pinning to include the Amazon Trust Services CAs. Certificate pinning helps defend you from an attacker using misissued certificates to fool an application into creating a connection to a spoofed host (an illegitimate host masquerading as a legitimate host). The restriction to a specific, pinned certificate is made by checking that the certificate issued is the expected certificate. This is done by checking that the hash of the certificate public key received from the server matches the expected hash stored in the application. If the hashes do not match, the code stops the connection.

AWS recommends against using certificate pinning because it introduces a potential availability risk. If the certificate to which you pin is replaced, your application will fail to connect. If your use case requires pinning, we recommend that you pin to a CA rather than to an individual certificate. If you are pinning to an Amazon Trust Services CA, you should pin to all CAs shown in the table earlier in this post.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the ACM forum.

– Jonathan

Artists Highlight YouTube Piracy and Poor Payments in New Ad Campaign

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/artists-highlight-youtube-piracy-and-poor-payments-in-new-ad-campaign-171026/

YouTube is the world’s leading video and music service and has partnerships with thousands of artists and other publishers around the globe.

While many are happy with the revenue they’re generating from the Google-owned platform, there has been a lot of negative commentary as well.

Several major record labels are complaining about the so-called ‘value gap‘ and the low payouts per streaming view, for example. This view is shared by the Content Creators Coalition (c3), an artist-run advocacy organization for musicians.

The group has just released two new ads calling on the streaming service to give artists more options to prevent piracy while calling on Congress to update the DMCA.

Rehashing the old Apple vs. Microsoft ad theme, the first video depicts an artist who is trying to get pirated content removed from the site. In the ad, YouTube is not particularly helpful, suggesting that pirated content is quickly re-uploaded after it’s removed.

Interestingly, there is no mention of the Content-ID program which many creators successfully use to prevent pirated content from reappearing. The vast majority (98%) of all copyright complaints are currently handled automatically through the Content-ID system.

Takedown Whack-a-Mole?

The second ad complains about poor payments. In this video, the artist gets paid more from all smaller streaming services, even though these generated only a fraction of the views compared to YouTube.

This complaint is not new either. Over the past several years, YouTube has been called out repeatedly for not paying enough. Not only that, the streaming service has also been accused of running a DMCA protection racket, profiting from pirated streams while hiding behind the DMCA’s safe harbor protections.

Pennies?

The Content Creators Coalition says that the advertisements will run on YouTube and other digital platforms as part of a significant new ad buy.

“Google’s YouTube has shortchanged artists while earning billions of dollars of our music. Artists know YouTube can do better,” c3 President and award-winning bassist Melvin Gibbs says.

“So, rather than hiding behind outdated laws, YouTube and Google should work to give artists more control over our music and pay music creators fairly when our songs are played on their platform.”

While these complaints are nothing new for YouTube, they are also intended to rally support from the public and lawmakers.

“Our ads send a message to the executives in Mountain View that artists are fighting back and mobilizing fans to push Congress to update the DMCA and end the legal neglect that has given Big Tech too much power over our work and society,” Gibbs adds.

YouTube itself paints an entirely different picture. The company previously stated that it goes above and beyond what it’s required to do by law, while paying billions to copyright holders.

“Content ID goes beyond a simple ‘notice-and-takedown’ system to provide a set of automated tools that empowers rightsholders to automatically claim their content and choose whether to track, block or monetize it on YouTube,” senior policy counsel Katherine Oyama noted.

“YouTube has paid out over $2 billion to rightsholders who have monetized their content through Content ID since it first launched. In fact, today well over 90% of all Content ID claims across the platform result in monetization.”

This music industry vs YouTube battle is far from over.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Pirate-Friendly Coinhive’s DNS Hacked, User Hashes Stolen

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-friendly-coinhives-dns-hacked-user-hashes-stolen-171025/

Just over a month ago, a Javascript cryptocurrency miner was silently added to The Pirate Bay. Noticed by users who observed their CPU usage going through the roof, it later transpired the site was trialing a miner operated by Coinhive.

Many users were disappointed that The Pirate Bay had added the Javascript-based Monero coin miner without their permission. However, it didn’t take long for people to see the potential benefits, with a raft of other sites adding the miner in the hope of generating additional revenue.

Now, however, Coinhive has an unexpected and potentially serious problem to deal with. The company has just revealed that on Monday night its DNS records maintained at Cloudflare were accessed by a third-party, allowing an unnamed attacker to redirect user mining traffic to a server they controlled.

“The DNS records for coinhive.com have been manipulated to redirect requests for the coinhive.min.js to a third party server. This third party server hosted a modified version of the JavaScript file with a hardcoded site key. This essentially let the attacker ‘steal’ hashes from our users,” Coinhive said in a statement.

The company hasn’t revealed how long the unauthorized redirect stayed in place for, but it appears that all coins mined on sites hosting Coinhive’s script were ‘stolen’ during the period, instead of being credited to their accounts.

Coinhive stresses that no user account information was leaked and that its website and database servers were uncompromised. But while that’s good news, the method that the hackers used to access the company’s DNS provider lay in a basic security error.

Back in 2014, crowdfunding platform Kickstarter – which Coinhive used – fell victim to a security breach. After being advised of the fact by law enforcement officials, Kickstarter shut down unauthorized access, began strengthening its systems, while advising customers to do the same.

While Coinhive did respond to the warning to ensure that its data was safe, something slipped through the net. One piece of information – its Cloudflare account password – remained unchanged after the Kickstarter attack. It now seems the most likely culprit for this week’s DNS breach.

“The root cause for this incident was an insecure password for our Cloudflare account that was probably leaked with the Kickstarter data breach back in 2014,” Coinhive says.

“We have learned hard lessons about security and used 2FA and unique passwords with all services since, but we neglected to update our years old Cloudflare account.”

While not mentioning Coinhive explicitly, Kickstarter warned earlier this month that the 2014 incident may not be completely over. In an update posted on the site Oct 6, Kickstarter noted that some of its customers had recently been hearing more information about the breach from notification service Have I been pwned?.

In the meantime, Coinhive has issued an apology and indicated it will find ways to reimburse sites which have lost revenue as a result of the DNS hack.

“We’re deeply sorry about this severe oversight,” the company said. “Our current plan is to credit all sites with an additional 12 hours of their the daily average hashrate. Please give us a few hours to roll this out.”

Based on earlier calculations carried out by TF, The Pirate Bay (if it was mining during the breach) could be potentially owed around $200 for the lost hashes, give or take. After turning off mining in September, the site reactivated it again in October, with no opt-out. The situation appears fluid.

While the hack is obviously a disappointment, Coinhive appears to have advised its users quickly and transparently, which under the circumstances is exactly what’s required. The fact that it’s offering compensation to users will also be welcomed.

The breach is the latest controversy to hit the company. Earlier this month, Cloudflare began banning sites which implemented Coinhive mining without informing their users. The CDN company said it considered non-advised mining as malware.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Blockchain? It’s All Greek To Me…

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/blockchain-its-all-greek-to-me/

The blockchain hype is huge, the ICO craze (“Coindike”) is generating millions if not billions of “funding” for businesses that claim to revolutionize basically anything.

I’ve been following all of that for a while. I got my first (and only) Bitcoin several years ago, I know how the technology works, I’ve implemented the data structure part, I’ve tried (with varying success) to install an Ethereum wallet since almost as soon as Ethereum appeared, and I’ve read and subscribed to newsletters about dozens of projects and new cryptocurrencies, including storj.io, siacoin, namecoin, etc. I would say I’m at least above average in terms of knowledge on how the cryptocurrencies, blockchain, smart contracts, EVM, proof-of-wahtever operates. And I’ve voiced my concerns about the technology in general.

Now it’s rant time.

I’ve been reading whitepapers of various projects, I’ve been to various meetups and talks, I’ve been reading the professed future applications of the blockchain, and I have to admit – it’s all Greek to me. I have no clue what these people are talking about. And why would all of that make any sense. I still think I’m not clever enough to understand the upcoming revolution, but there’s also a cynical side of me that says “this is all a scam”.

Why “X on the blockchain” somehow makes it magical and superior to a good old centralized solution? No, spare me the cliches about “immutable ledger”, “lack of central authority” and the likes. These are the phrases that a person learns after reading literally one article about blockchain. Have you actually written anything apart from a complex-sounding whitepaper or a hello-world smart contract? Do you really know how the overlay network works, how the economic incentives behind that network work, how all the cryptography works? Maybe there are many, many people that indeed know that and they know it better than me and are thus able to imagine the business case behind “X on the blockchain”.

I can’t. I can’t see why it would be useful to abandon a centralized database that you can query in dozens of ways, test easily and scale trivially in favour of a clunky write-only, low-throughput, hard-to-debug privacy nightmare that is any public blockchain. And how do you imagine to gain a substantial userbase with an ecosystem where the Windows client for the 2nd most popular blockchain (Ethereum) has been so buggy, I (a software engineer) couldn’t get it work and sync the whole chain. And why would building a website ontop of that clunky, user-unfriendly database has any benefit over a centralized competitor?

Do we all believe that somehow the huge datacenters with guarnateed power backups, regular hardware and network checks, regular backups and overall – guaranteed redundancy – will somehow be beaten by a few thousand machines hosting a software that has the sole purpose of guaranteeing integrity? Bitcoin has 10 thousand nodes. Ethereum has 22 thousand nodes. And while these nodes are probably very well GPU-equipped, they aren’t supercomputers. Amazon’s AWS has a million servers. How’s that for comparison. And why would anyone take seriously 22 thousand non-servers. Or even 220 thousand, if we believe in some inevitable growth.

Don’t get me wrong, the technology is really cool. The way tamper-evident data structures (hash chains) were combined with a consensus algorithm, an overlay network and a financial incentive is really awesome. When you add a distributed execution environment, it gets even cooler. But is it suitable for literally everything? I fail to see how.

I’m sure I’m missing something. The fact that many of those whitepapers sound increasingly like Greek to me might hint that I’m just a dumb developer and those enlightened people are really onto something huge. I guess time will tell.

But I happen to be living in a country that saw a transition to capitalism in the years of my childhood. And there were a lot of scams and ponzi schemes that people believed in. Because they didn’t know how capitalism works, how the market works. I’m seeing some similarities – we have no idea how the digital realm really works, and so a lot of scams are bound to appear, until we as a society learn the basics.

Until then – enjoy your ICO, enjoy your tokens, enjoy your big-player competitor with practically the same business model, only on a worse database.

And I hope that after the smoke of hype and fraud clears, we’ll be able to enjoy the true benefits of the blockchain innovation.

The post Blockchain? It’s All Greek To Me… appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Cloudflare Counters MPAA and RIAA’s ‘Rehashed’ Piracy Complaints

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/cloudflare-counters-mpaa-and-riaas-rehashed-piracy-complaints-171020/

A few weeks ago several copyright holder groups sent their annual “Notorious Markets” complaints to the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

While the recommendations usually include well-known piracy sites such as The Pirate Bay, third-party services are increasingly mentioned. MPAA and RIAA, for example, wrote that Cloudflare frustrates enforcement efforts by helping pirate sites to “hide”.

The CDN provider is not happy with these characterizations and this week submitted a rebuttal. Cloudflare’s General Counsel Doug Kramer says that the company was surprised to see these mentions. Not only because they “distort” reality, but also because they are pretty much identical to those leveled last year.

“Most surprising is that their comments were basically the same complaints they filed in 2016 and contain the same mistakes and distortions that we pointed out in our rebuttal comments from October, 2016.”

“Simply repeating the same mischaracterizations for a second year in a row does not convert them into facts, so we are compelled to reiterate our objections,” Kramer adds (pdf).

There is indeed quite a bit of overlap between the submissions from both years. In fact, several sections are copied word for word, such as the RIAA’s allegation below.

“In addition, more sites are now employing services of Cloudflare, a content delivery network and distributed domain name server service. BitTorrent sites, like many other pirate sites, are increasing [sic] turning to Cloudflare because routing their site through Cloudflare obfuscates the IP address of the actual hosting provider, masking the location of the site.”

The same can be said about the MPAA’s submission, which includes a lot of the same comments and sentences as last year. That wouldn’t be much of a problem if the information was correct, but according to Cloudflare, that’s not the case.

The two industry groups claim that the CDN provider makes it more difficult to track where pirate sites are hosted. However, Cloudflare argues the opposite.

Both RIAA and MPAA are part of the “Trusted Reporter” program and use it frequently, Cloudflare points out. This program allows rightsholders to easily obtain the actual IP-addresses of Cloudflare-hosted websites that engage in widespread copyright infringement.

Most importantly, according to Cloudflare, is that the company follows the letter of the law.

“Cloudflare does not make the process of enforcing intellectual property rights online any harder — or any easier. We follow all applicable laws and regulations,” Cloudflare explained in its submission last year.

In its 2017 rebuttal, the company reiterates this position once again. Kramer also points to a recent blog post from CEO Matthew Prince, which discusses free speech and censorship issues. The message is that vigilante justice is not the answer to piracy, and all relevant stakeholders should get together to discuss how to handle these issues going forward.

For now, however, the USTR should disregard the comments regarding Cloudflare as irrelevant and inaccurate, the company argues.

“We trust that USTR will once again agree with Cloudflare that complaints implying that Cloudflare is aiding illegal activities have no place whatsoever in USTR’s Notorious Markets inquiry. It would seem to distract from and dilute the message of that report to focus on companies that are working to make the internet more cybersecure,” Kramer concludes.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Backing Up Linux to Backblaze B2 with Duplicity and Restic

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/backing-linux-backblaze-b2-duplicity-restic/

Linux users have a variety of options for handling data backup. The choices range from free and open-source programs to paid commercial tools, and include applications that are purely command-line based (CLI) and others that have a graphical interface (GUI), or both.

If you take a look at our Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage Integrations page, you will see a number of offerings that enable you to back up your Linux desktops and servers to Backblaze B2. These include CloudBerry, Duplicity, Duplicacy, 45 Drives, GoodSync, HashBackup, QNAP, Restic, and Rclone, plus other choices for NAS and hybrid uses.

In this post, we’ll discuss two popular command line and open-source programs: one older, Duplicity, and a new player, Restic.

Old School vs. New School

We’re highlighting Duplicity and Restic today because they exemplify two different philosophical approaches to data backup: “Old School” (Duplicity) vs “New School” (Restic).

Old School (Duplicity)

In the old school model, data is written sequentially to the storage medium. Once a section of data is recorded, new data is written starting where that section of data ends. It’s not possible to go back and change the data that’s already been written.

This old-school model has long been associated with the use of magnetic tape, a prime example of which is the LTO (Linear Tape-Open) standard. In this “write once” model, files are always appended to the end of the tape. If a file is modified and overwritten or removed from the volume, the associated tape blocks used are not freed up: they are simply marked as unavailable, and the used volume capacity is not recovered. Data is deleted and capacity recovered only if the whole tape is reformatted. As a Linux/Unix user, you undoubtedly are familiar with the TAR archive format, which is an acronym for Tape ARchive. TAR has been around since 1979 and was originally developed to write data to sequential I/O devices with no file system of their own.

It is from the use of tape that we get the full backup/incremental backup approach to backups. A backup sequence beings with a full backup of data. Each incremental backup contains what’s been changed since the last full backup until the next full backup is made and the process starts over, filling more and more tape or whatever medium is being used.

This is the model used by Duplicity: full and incremental backups. Duplicity backs up files by producing encrypted, digitally signed, versioned, TAR-format volumes and uploading them to a remote location, including Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage. Released under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL), Duplicity is free software.

With Duplicity, the first archive is a complete (full) backup, and subsequent (incremental) backups only add differences from the latest full or incremental backup. Chains consisting of a full backup and a series of incremental backups can be recovered to the point in time that any of the incremental steps were taken. If any of the incremental backups are missing, then reconstructing a complete and current backup is much more difficult and sometimes impossible.

Duplicity is available under many Unix-like operating systems (such as Linux, BSD, and Mac OS X) and ships with many popular Linux distributions including Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora. It also can be used with Windows under Cygwin.

We recently published a KB article on How to configure Backblaze B2 with Duplicity on Linux that demonstrates how to set up Duplicity with B2 and back up and restore a directory from Linux.

New School (Restic)

With the arrival of non-sequential storage medium, such as disk drives, and new ideas such as deduplication, comes the new school approach, which is used by Restic. Data can be written and changed anywhere on the storage medium. This efficiency comes largely through the use of deduplication. Deduplication is a process that eliminates redundant copies of data and reduces storage overhead. Data deduplication techniques ensure that only one unique instance of data is retained on storage media, greatly increasing storage efficiency and flexibility.

Restic is a recently available multi-platform command line backup software program that is designed to be fast, efficient, and secure. Restic supports a variety of backends for storing backups, including a local server, SFTP server, HTTP Rest server, and a number of cloud storage providers, including Backblaze B2.

Files are uploaded to a B2 bucket as deduplicated, encrypted chunks. Each time a backup runs, only changed data is backed up. On each backup run, a snapshot is created enabling restores to a specific date or time.

Restic assumes that the storage location for repository is shared, so it always encrypts the backed up data. This is in addition to any encryption and security from the storage provider.

Restic is open source and free software and licensed under the BSD 2-Clause License and actively developed on GitHub.

There’s a lot more you can do with Restic, including adding tags, mounting a repository locally, and scripting. To learn more, you can review the documentation at https://restic.readthedocs.io.

Coincidentally with this blog post, we published a KB article, How to configure Backblaze B2 with Restic on Linux, in which we show how to set up Restic for use with B2 and how to back up and restore a home directory from Linux to B2.

Which is Right for You?

While Duplicity is a popular, widely-available, and useful program, many users of cloud storage solutions such as B2 are moving to new-school solutions like Restic that take better advantage of the non-sequential access capabilities and speed of modern storage media used by cloud storage providers.

Tell us how you’re backing up Linux

Please let us know in the comments what you’re using for Linux backups, and if you have experience using Duplicity, Restic, or other backup software with Backblaze B2.

The post Backing Up Linux to Backblaze B2 with Duplicity and Restic appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Popular Zer0day Torrent Tracker Taken Offline By Mass Copyright Complaint

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/popular-zer0day-torrent-tracker-taken-offline-by-mass-copyright-complaint-171014/

In January 2016, a BitTorrent enthusiast decided to launch a stand-alone tracker, purely for fun.

The Zer0day platform, which hosts no torrents, is a tracker in the purest sense, directing traffic between peers, no matter what content is involved and no matter where people are in the world.

With this type of tracker in short supply, it was soon utilized by The Pirate Bay and the now-defunct ExtraTorrent. By August 2016, it was tracking almost four million peers and a million torrents, a considerable contribution to the BitTorrent ecosystem.

After handling many ups and downs associated with a service of this type, the tracker eventually made it to the end of 2016 intact. This year it grew further still and by the end of September was tracking an impressive 5.5 million peers spread over 1.2 million torrents. Soon after, however, the tracker disappeared from the Internet without warning.

In an effort to find out what had happened, TorrentFreak contacted Zer0day’s operator who told us a familiar story. Without any warning at all, the site’s host pulled the plug on the service, despite having been paid 180 euros for hosting just a week earlier.

“We’re hereby informing you of the termination of your dedicated server due to a breach of our terms of service,” the host informed Zer0day.

“Hosting trackers on our servers that distribute infringing and copyrighted content is prohibited. This server was found to distribute such content. Should we identify additional similar activity in your services, we will be forced to close your account.”

While hosts tend not to worry too much about what their customers are doing, this one had just received a particularly lengthy complaint. Sent by the head of anti-piracy at French collecting society SCPP, it laid out the group’s problems with the Zer0day tracker.

“SCPP has been responsible for the collective management and protection of sound recordings and music videos producers’ rights since 1985. SCPP counts more than 2,600 members including the majority of independent French producers, in addition to independent European producers, and the major international companies: Sony, Universal and Warner,” the complaints reads.

“SCPP administers a catalog of 7,200,000 sound tracks and 77,000 music videos. SCPP is empowered by its members to take legal action in order to put an end to any infringements of the producers’ rights set out in Article L335-4 of the French Intellectual Property Code…..punishable by a three-year prison sentence or a fine of €300,000.”

Noting that it works on behalf of a number of labels and distributors including BMG, Sony Music, Universal Music, Warner Music and others, SCPP listed countless dozens of albums under its protection, each allegedly tracked by the Zer0day platform.

“It has come to our attention that these music albums are illegally being communicated to the public (made available for download) by various users of the BitTorrent-Network,” the complaint reads.

Noting that Zer0day is involved in the process, the anti-piracy outfit presented dozens of hash codes relating to protected works, demanding that the site stop facilitation of infringement on each and every one of them.

“We have proof that your tracker udp://tracker.zer0day.to:1337/announce provided peers of the BitTorrent-Network with information regarding these torrents, to be specific IP Addresses of peers that were offering without authorization the full albums for download, and that this information enabled peers to download files that contain the sound recordings to which our members producers have the exclusive rights.

“These sound recordings are thus being illegally communicated to the public, and your tracker is enabling the seeders to do so.”

Rather than take the hashes down from the tracker, SCPP actually demanded that Zer0day create a permanent blacklist within 24 hours, to ensure the corresponding torrents wouldn’t be tracked again.

“You should understand that this letter constitutes a notice to you that you may be liable for the infringing activity occurring on your service. In addition, if you ignore this notice, you may also be liable for any resulting infringement,” the complaint added.

But despite all the threats, SCPP didn’t receive the response they’d demanded since the operator of the site refused to take any action.

“Obviously, ‘info hashes’ are not copyrightable nor point to specific copyrighted content, or even have any meaning. Further, I cannot verify that request strings parameters (‘info hashes’) you sent me contain copyrighted material,” he told SCPP.

“Like the website says; for content removal kindly ask the indexing site to remove the listing and the .torrent file. Also, tracker software does not have an option to block request strings parameters (‘info hashes’).”

The net effect of non-compliance with SCPP was fairly dramatic and swift. Zer0day’s host took down the whole tracker instead and currently it remains offline. Whether it reappears depends on the site’s operator finding a suitable web host, but at the moment he says he has no idea where one will appear from.

“Currently I’m searching for some virtual private server as a temporary home for the tracker,” he concludes.

As mentioned in an earlier article detailing the problems sites like Zer0day.to face, trackers aren’t absolutely essential for the functioning of BitTorrent transfers. Nevertheless, their existence certainly improves matters for file-sharers so when they go down, millions can be affected.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 17

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/10/13/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-17/

It’s been a busy week here at Grafana Labs. While we’ve been working on GrafanaCon EU preparations here at the NYC office, the Stockholm office has been diligently working to release Grafana 4.6-beta-1. We’re really excited about this latest release and look forward to your feedback on the new features.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6-beta-1 is now available! Grafana v4.6 brings many enhancements to Annotations, Cloudwatch and Prometheus. It also adds support for Postgres as a metric and table data source!

To see more details on what’s in the newest version, please see the release notes.

Download Grafana 4.6.0-beta-1 Now


From the Blogosphere

Using Kafka and Grafana to Monitor Meteorological Conditions: Oliver was looking for a way to track historical mountain conditions around the UK, but only had available data for the last 24 hours. It seemed like a perfect job for Kafka. This post discusses how to get going with Kafka very easily, store the data in Graphite and visualize the data in Grafana.

Web Interfaces for your Syslog Server – An Overview: System administrators often prefer to use the command line, but complex queries can be completed much faster with logs indexed in a database and a web interface. This article provides a run-down of various GUI-based tools available for your syslog server.

JEE Performance with JMeter, Prometheus and Grafana. Complete Project from Scratch: This comprehensive article walks you through the steps of monitoring JEE application performance from scratch. We start with making implementation decisions, then how to collect data, visualization and dashboarding configuration, and conclude with alerting. Buckle up; it’s a long article, with a ton of information.


Early Bird Tickets Now Available

Early bird tickets are going fast, so take advantage of the discounted price before they’re gone! We will be announcing the first block of speakers in the coming week.

There’s still time to submit a talk. We’ll accept submissions through the end of October. We’re accepting technical and non-technical talks of all sizes. Submit a CFP.

Get Your Early Bird Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

This week we add the Prometheus Alertmanager Data Source to our growing list of plugins, lots of updates to the GLPI Data source, and have a urgent bugfix for the WorldMap Panel. To update plugins from on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or with 1 click if you are using Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

Prometheus Alertmanager Data Source – This new data source lets you show data from the Prometheus Alertmanager in Grafana. The Alertmanager handles alerts sent by client applications such as the Prometheus server. With this data source, you can show data in Table form or as a SingleStat.

Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

WorldMap Panel – A new version with an urgent bugfix for Elasticsearch users:

  • A fix for Geohash maps after a breaking change in Grafana 4.5.0.
  • Last Geohash as center for the map – it centers the map on the last geohash position received. Useful for real time tracking (with auto refresh on in Grafana).

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

GLPI App – Lots of fixes in the new version:

  • Compatibility with GLPI 9.2
  • Autofill the Timerange field based on the query
  • When adding new query, add by default a ticket query instead of undefined
  • Correct values in hover tooltip
  • Can have element count by hour of the day with the panel histogram

Update


Contributions of the week:

Each week we highlight some of the important contributions from our amazing open source community. Thank you for helping make Grafana better!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


New Annotation Function

In addition to being able to add annotations easily in the graph panel, you can also create ranges as shown above. Give 4.6.0-beta-1 a try and give us your feedback.

We Need Your Help!

Do you have a graph that you love because the data is beautiful or because the graph provides interesting information? Please get in touch. Tweet or send us an email with a screenshot, and we’ll tell you about this fun experiment.

Tell Me More


What do you think?

We want to keep these articles interesting and relevant, so please tell us how we’re doing. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/10/taringa-hack-27-million-user-records-leaked/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked

The Taringa hack is actually one of the biggest leaks of the year with 27 million weakly hashed passwords breached, but it’s not often covered in the Western media with it being a Latin American site (something like Reddit).

The leak happened in August and it seems like the hackers were able to brute force around 95% of the account passwords fairly quickly with Taringa using an outdated and flawing hashing algorithm – md5.

Read the rest of Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked now! Only available at Darknet.

Spooky Halloween Video Contest

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/spooky-halloween-video-contest/

Would You LIke to Play a Game? Let's make a scary movie or at least a silly one.

Think you can create a really spooky Halloween video?

We’re giving out $100 Visa gift cards just in time for the holidays. Want a chance to win? You’ll need to make a spooky 30-second Halloween-themed video. We had a lot of fun with this the last time we did it a few years back so we’re doing it again this year.

Here’s How to Enter

  1. Prepare a short, 30 seconds or less, video recreating your favorite horror movie scene using your computer or hard drive as the victim — or make something original!
  2. Insert the following image at the end of the video (right-click and save as):
    Backblaze cloud backup
  3. Upload your video to YouTube
  4. Post a link to your video on the Backblaze Facebook wall or on Twitter with the hashtag #Backblaze so we can see it and enter it into the contest. Or, link to it in the comments below!
  5. Share your video with friends

Common Questions
Q: How many people can be in the video?
A: However many you need in order to recreate the scene!
Q: Can I make it longer than 30 seconds?
A: Maybe 32 seconds, but that’s it. If you want to make a longer “director’s cut,” we’d love to see it, but the contest video should be close to 30 seconds. Please keep it short and spooky.
Q: Can I record it on an iPhone, Android, iPad, Camera, etc?
A: You can use whatever device you wish to record your video.
Q: Can I submit multiple videos?
A: If you have multiple favorite scenes, make a vignette! But please submit only one video.
Q: How many winners will there be?
A: We will select up to three winners total.

Contest Rules

  • To upload the video to YouTube, you must have a valid YouTube account and comply with all YouTube rules for age, content, copyright, etc.
  • To post a link to your video on the Backblaze Facebook wall, you must use a valid Facebook account and comply with all Facebook rules for age, content, copyrights, etc.
  • We reserve the right to remove and/or not consider as a valid entry, any videos which we deem inappropriate. We reserve the exclusive right to determine what is inappropriate.
  • Backblaze reserves the right to use your video for promotional purposes.
  • The contest will end on October 29, 2017 at 11:59:59 PM Pacific Daylight Time. The winners (up to three) will be selected by Backblaze and will be announced on October 31, 2017.
  • We will be giving away gift cards to the top winners. The prize will be mailed to the winner in a timely manner.
  • Please keep the content of the post PG rated — no cursing or extreme gore/violence.
  • By submitting a video you agree to all of these rules.

Need an example?

The post Spooky Halloween Video Contest appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Private Torrent Sites Allow Users to Mine Cryptocurrency for Upload Credit

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/private-torrent-sites-allow-users-to-mine-cryptocurrency-for-upload-credit-171008/

Ever since The Pirate Bay crew added a cryptocurrency miner to their site last month, the debate over user mining has sizzled away in the background.

The basic premise is that a piece of software embedded in a website runs on a user’s machine, utilizing its CPU cycles in order to generate revenue for the site in question. But not everyone likes it.

The main problem has centered around consent. While some sites are giving users the option of whether to be involved or not, others simply run the miner without asking. This week, one site operator suggested to TF that since no one asks whether they can run “shitty” ads on a person’s machine, why should they ask permission to mine?

It’s a controversial point, but it would be hard to find users agreeing on either front. They almost universally insist on consent, wherever possible. That’s why when someone comes up with something innovative to solve a problem, it catches the eye.

Earlier this week a user on Reddit posted a screenshot of a fairly well known private tracker. The site had implemented a mining solution not dissimilar to that appearing on other similar platforms. This one, however, gives the user something back.

Mining for coins – with a twist

First of all, it’s important to note the implementation. The decision to mine is completely under the control of the user, with buttons to start or stop mining. There are even additional controls for how many CPU threads to commit alongside a percentage utilization selector. While still early days, that all sounds pretty fair.

Where this gets even more interesting is how this currency mining affects so-called “upload credit”, an important commodity on a private tracker without which users can be prevented from downloading any content at all.

Very quickly: when BitTorrent users download content, they simultaneously upload to other users too. The idea is that they download X megabytes and upload the same number (at least) to other users, to ensure that everyone in a torrent swarm (a number of users sharing together) gets a piece of the action, aka the content in question.

The amount of content downloaded and uploaded on a private tracker is monitored and documented by the site. If a user has 1TB downloaded and 2TB uploaded, for example, he has 1TB in credit. In basic terms, this means he can download at least 1TB of additional content before he goes into deficit, a position undesirable on a private tracker.

Now, getting more “upload credit” can be as simple as uploading more, but some users find that difficult, either due to the way a tracker’s economy works or simply due to not having resources. If this is the case, some sites allow people to donate real money to receive “upload credit”. On the tracker highlighted in the mining example above, however, it’s possible to virtually ‘trade-in’ some of the mining effort instead.

Tracker politics aside (some people believe this is simply a cash grab opportunity), from a technical standpoint the prospect is quite intriguing.

In a way, the current private tracker system allows users to “mine” upload credits by donating bandwidth to other users of the site. Now they have the opportunity to mine an actual cryptocurrency on the tracker and have some of it converted back into the tracker’s native ‘currency’ – upload credit – which can only be ‘spent’ on the site. Meanwhile, the site’s operator can make a few bucks towards site maintenance.

Another example showing how innovative these mining implementations can be was posted by a member of a second private tracker. Although it’s unclear whether mining is forced or optional, there appears to be complete transparency for the benefit of the user.

The mining ‘Top 10’ on a private tracker

In addition to displaying the total number of users mining and the hashes solved per second, the site publishes a ‘Top 10’ list of users mining the most currently, and overall. Again, some people might not like the concept of users mining at all, but psychologically this is a particularly clever implementation.

Utilizing the desire of many private tracker users to be recognizable among their peers due to their contribution to the platform, the charts give a user a measurable status in the community, at least among those who care about such things. Previously these charts would list top uploaders of content but the addition of a ‘Top miner’ category certainly adds some additional spice to the mix.

Mining is a controversial topic which isn’t likely to go away anytime soon. But, for all its faults, it’s still a way for sites to generate revenue, away from the pitfalls of increasingly hostile and easy-to-trace alternative payment systems. The Pirate Bay may have set the cat among the pigeons last month, but it also gave the old gray matter a boost too.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Dynamic Users with systemd

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/dynamic-users-with-systemd.html

TL;DR: you may now configure systemd to dynamically allocate a UNIX
user ID for service processes when it starts them and release it when
it stops them. It’s pretty secure, mixes well with transient services,
socket activated services and service templating.

Today we released systemd
235
. Among
other improvements this greatly extends the dynamic user logic of
systemd. Dynamic users are a powerful but little known concept,
supported in its basic form since systemd 232. With this blog story I
hope to make it a bit better known.

The UNIX user concept is the most basic and well-understood security
concept in POSIX operating systems. It is UNIX/POSIX’ primary security
concept, the one everybody can agree on, and most security concepts
that came after it (such as process capabilities, SELinux and other
MACs, user name-spaces, …) in some form or another build on it, extend
it or at least interface with it. If you build a Linux kernel with all
security features turned off, the user concept is pretty much the one
you’ll still retain.

Originally, the user concept was introduced to make multi-user systems
a reality, i.e. systems enabling multiple human users to share the
same system at the same time, cleanly separating their resources and
protecting them from each other. The majority of today’s UNIX systems
don’t really use the user concept like that anymore though. Most of
today’s systems probably have only one actual human user (or even
less!), but their user databases (/etc/passwd) list a good number
more entries than that. Today, the majority of UNIX users in most
environments are system users, i.e. users that are not the technical
representation of a human sitting in front of a PC anymore, but the
security identity a system service — an executable program — runs
as. Event though traditional, simultaneous multi-user systems slowly
became less relevant, their ground-breaking basic concept became the
cornerstone of UNIX security. The OS is nowadays partitioned into
isolated services — and each service runs as its own system user, and
thus within its own, minimal security context.

The people behind the Android OS realized the relevance of the UNIX
user concept as the primary security concept on UNIX, and took its use
even further: on Android not only system services take benefit of the
UNIX user concept, but each UI app gets its own, individual user
identity too — thus neatly separating app resources from each other,
and protecting app processes from each other, too.

Back in the more traditional Linux world things are a bit less
advanced in this area. Even though users are the quintessential UNIX
security concept, allocation and management of system users is still a
pretty limited, raw and static affair. In most cases, RPM or DEB
package installation scripts allocate a fixed number of (usually one)
system users when you install the package of a service that wants to
take benefit of the user concept, and from that point on the system
user remains allocated on the system and is never deallocated again,
even if the package is later removed again. Most Linux distributions
limit the number of system users to 1000 (which isn’t particularly a
lot). Allocating a system user is hence expensive: the number of
available users is limited, and there’s no defined way to dispose of
them after use. If you make use of system users too liberally, you are
very likely to run out of them sooner rather than later.

You may wonder why system users are generally not deallocated when the
package that registered them is uninstalled from a system (at least on
most distributions). The reason for that is one relevant property of
the user concept (you might even want to call this a design flaw):
user IDs are sticky to files (and other objects such as IPC
objects). If a service running as a specific system user creates a
file at some location, and is then terminated and its package and user
removed, then the created file still belongs to the numeric ID (“UID”)
the system user originally got assigned. When the next system user is
allocated and — due to ID recycling — happens to get assigned the same
numeric ID, then it will also gain access to the file, and that’s
generally considered a problem, given that the file belonged to a
potentially very different service once upon a time, and likely should
not be readable or changeable by anything coming after
it. Distributions hence tend to avoid UID recycling which means system
users remain registered forever on a system after they have been
allocated once.

The above is a description of the status quo ante. Let’s now focus on
what systemd’s dynamic user concept brings to the table, to improve
the situation.

Introducing Dynamic Users

With systemd dynamic users we hope to make make it easier and cheaper
to allocate system users on-the-fly, thus substantially increasing the
possible uses of this core UNIX security concept.

If you write a systemd service unit file, you may enable the dynamic
user logic for it by setting the
DynamicUser=
option in its [Service] section to yes. If you do a system user is
dynamically allocated the instant the service binary is invoked, and
released again when the service terminates. The user is automatically
allocated from the UID range 61184–65519, by looking for a so far
unused UID.

Now you may wonder, how does this concept deal with the sticky user
issue discussed above? In order to counter the problem, two strategies
easily come to mind:

  1. Prohibit the service from creating any files/directories or IPC objects

  2. Automatically removing the files/directories or IPC objects the
    service created when it shuts down.

In systemd we implemented both strategies, but for different parts of
the execution environment. Specifically:

  1. Setting DynamicUser=yes implies
    ProtectSystem=strict
    and
    ProtectHome=read-only. These
    sand-boxing options turn off write access to pretty much the whole OS
    directory tree, with a few relevant exceptions, such as the API file
    systems /proc, /sys and so on, as well as /tmp and
    /var/tmp. (BTW: setting these two options on your regular services
    that do not use DynamicUser= is a good idea too, as it drastically
    reduces the exposure of the system to exploited services.)

  2. Setting DynamicUser=yes implies
    PrivateTmp=yes. This
    option sets up /tmp and /var/tmp for the service in a way that it
    gets its own, disconnected version of these directories, that are not
    shared by other services, and whose life-cycle is bound to the
    service’s own life-cycle. Thus if the service goes down, the user is
    removed and all its temporary files and directories with it. (BTW: as
    above, consider setting this option for your regular services that do
    not use DynamicUser= too, it’s a great way to lock things down
    security-wise.)

  3. Setting DynamicUser=yes implies
    RemoveIPC=yes. This
    option ensures that when the service goes down all SysV and POSIX IPC
    objects (shared memory, message queues, semaphores) owned by the
    service’s user are removed. Thus, the life-cycle of the IPC objects is
    bound to the life-cycle of the dynamic user and service, too. (BTW:
    yes, here too, consider using this in your regular services, too!)

With these four settings in effect, services with dynamic users are
nicely sand-boxed. They cannot create files or directories, except in
/tmp and /var/tmp, where they will be removed automatically when
the service shuts down, as will any IPC objects created. Sticky
ownership of files/directories and IPC objects is hence dealt with
effectively.

The
RuntimeDirectory=
option may be used to open up a bit the sandbox to external
programs. If you set it to a directory name of your choice, it will be
created below /run when the service is started, and removed in its
entirety when it is terminated. The ownership of the directory is
assigned to the service’s dynamic user. This way, a dynamic user
service can expose API interfaces (AF_UNIX sockets, …) to other
services at a well-defined place and again bind the life-cycle of it to
the service’s own run-time. Example: set RuntimeDirectory=foobar in
your service, and watch how a directory /run/foobar appears at the
moment you start the service, and disappears the moment you stop
it again. (BTW: Much like the other settings discussed above,
RuntimeDirectory= may be used outside of the DynamicUser= context
too, and is a nice way to run any service with a properly owned,
life-cycle-managed run-time directory.)

Persistent Data

Of course, a service running in such an environment (although already
very useful for many cases!), has a major limitation: it cannot leave
persistent data around it can reuse on a later run. As pretty much the
whole OS directory tree is read-only to it, there’s simply no place it
could put the data that survives from one service invocation to the
next.

With systemd 235 this limitation is removed: there are now three new
settings:
StateDirectory=,
LogsDirectory= and CacheDirectory=. In many ways they operate like
RuntimeDirectory=, but create sub-directories below /var/lib,
/var/log and /var/cache, respectively. There’s one major
difference beyond that however: directories created that way are
persistent, they will survive the run-time cycle of a service, and
thus may be used to store data that is supposed to stay around between
invocations of the service.

Of course, the obvious question to ask now is: how do these three
settings deal with the sticky file ownership problem?

For that we lifted a concept from container managers. Container
managers have a very similar problem: each container and the host
typically end up using a very similar set of numeric UIDs, and unless
user name-spacing is deployed this means that host users might be able
to access the data of specific containers that also have a user by the
same numeric UID assigned, even though it actually refers to a very
different identity in a different context. (Actually, it’s even worse
than just getting access, due to the existence of setuid file bits,
access might translate to privilege elevation.) The way container
managers protect the container images from the host (and from each
other to some level) is by placing the container trees below a
boundary directory, with very restrictive access modes and ownership
(0700 and root:root or so). A host user hence cannot take advantage
of the files/directories of a container user of the same UID inside of
a local container tree, simply because the boundary directory makes it
impossible to even reference files in it. After all on UNIX, in order
to get access to a specific path you need access to every single
component of it.

How is that applied to dynamic user services? Let’s say
StateDirectory=foobar is set for a service that has DynamicUser=
turned off. The instant the service is started, /var/lib/foobar is
created as state directory, owned by the service’s user and remains in
existence when the service is stopped. If the same service now is run
with DynamicUser= turned on, the implementation is slightly
altered. Instead of a directory /var/lib/foobar a symbolic link by
the same path is created (owned by root), pointing to
/var/lib/private/foobar (the latter being owned by the service’s
dynamic user). The /var/lib/private directory is created as boundary
directory: it’s owned by root:root, and has a restrictive access
mode of 0700. Both the symlink and the service’s state directory will
survive the service’s life-cycle, but the state directory will remain,
and continues to be owned by the now disposed dynamic UID — however it
is protected from other host users (and other services which might get
the same dynamic UID assigned due to UID recycling) by the boundary
directory.

The obvious question to ask now is: but if the boundary directory
prohibits access to the directory from unprivileged processes, how can
the service itself which runs under its own dynamic UID access it
anyway? This is achieved by invoking the service process in a slightly
modified mount name-space: it will see most of the file hierarchy the
same way as everything else on the system (modulo /tmp and
/var/tmp as mentioned above), except for /var/lib/private, which
is over-mounted with a read-only tmpfs file system instance, with a
slightly more liberal access mode permitting the service read
access. Inside of this tmpfs file system instance another mount is
placed: a bind mount to the host’s real /var/lib/private/foobar
directory, onto the same name. Putting this together these means that
superficially everything looks the same and is available at the same
place on the host and from inside the service, but two important
changes have been made: the /var/lib/private boundary directory lost
its restrictive character inside the service, and has been emptied of
the state directories of any other service, thus making the protection
complete. Note that the symlink /var/lib/foobar hides the fact that
the boundary directory is used (making it little more than an
implementation detail), as the directory is available this way under
the same name as it would be if DynamicUser= was not used. Long
story short: for the daemon and from the view from the host the
indirection through /var/lib/private is mostly transparent.

This logic of course raises another question: what happens to the
state directory if a dynamic user service is started with a state
directory configured, gets UID X assigned on this first invocation,
then terminates and is restarted and now gets UID Y assigned on the
second invocation, with X ≠ Y? On the second invocation the directory
— and all the files and directories below it — will still be owned by
the original UID X so how could the second instance running as Y
access it? Our way out is simple: systemd will recursively change the
ownership of the directory and everything contained within it to UID Y
before invoking the service’s executable.

Of course, such recursive ownership changing (chown()ing) of whole
directory trees can become expensive (though according to my
experiences, IRL and for most services it’s much cheaper than you
might think), hence in order to optimize behavior in this regard, the
allocation of dynamic UIDs has been tweaked in two ways to avoid the
necessity to do this expensive operation in most cases: firstly, when
a dynamic UID is allocated for a service an allocation loop is
employed that starts out with a UID hashed from the service’s
name. This means a service by the same name is likely to always use
the same numeric UID. That means that a stable service name translates
into a stable dynamic UID, and that means recursive file ownership
adjustments can be skipped (of course, after validation). Secondly, if
the configured state directory already exists, and is owned by a
suitable currently unused dynamic UID, it’s preferably used above
everything else, thus maximizing the chance we can avoid the
chown()ing. (That all said, ultimately we have to face it, the
currently available UID space of 4K+ is very small still, and
conflicts are pretty likely sooner or later, thus a chown()ing has to
be expected every now and then when this feature is used extensively).

Note that CacheDirectory= and LogsDirectory= work very similar to
StateDirectory=. The only difference is that they manage directories
below the /var/cache and /var/logs directories, and their boundary
directory hence is /var/cache/private and /var/log/private,
respectively.

Examples

So, after all this introduction, let’s have a look how this all can be
put together. Here’s a trivial example:

# cat > /etc/systemd/system/dynamic-user-test.service <<EOF
[Service]
ExecStart=/usr/bin/sleep 4711
DynamicUser=yes
EOF
# systemctl daemon-reload
# systemctl start dynamic-user-test
# systemctl status dynamic-user-test
● dynamic-user-test.service
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/dynamic-user-test.service; static; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Fri 2017-10-06 13:12:25 CEST; 3s ago
 Main PID: 2967 (sleep)
    Tasks: 1 (limit: 4915)
   CGroup: /system.slice/dynamic-user-test.service
           └─2967 /usr/bin/sleep 4711

Okt 06 13:12:25 sigma systemd[1]: Started dynamic-user-test.service.
# ps -e -o pid,comm,user | grep 2967
 2967 sleep           dynamic-user-test
# id dynamic-user-test
uid=64642(dynamic-user-test) gid=64642(dynamic-user-test) groups=64642(dynamic-user-test)
# systemctl stop dynamic-user-test
# id dynamic-user-test
id: ‘dynamic-user-test’: no such user

In this example, we create a unit file with DynamicUser= turned on,
start it, check if it’s running correctly, have a look at the service
process’ user (which is named like the service; systemd does this
automatically if the service name is suitable as user name, and you
didn’t configure any user name to use explicitly), stop the service
and verify that the user ceased to exist too.

That’s already pretty cool. Let’s step it up a notch, by doing the
same in an interactive transient service (for those who don’t know
systemd well: a transient service is a service that is defined and
started dynamically at run-time, for example via the systemd-run
command from the shell. Think: run a service without having to write a
unit file first):

# systemd-run --pty --property=DynamicUser=yes --property=StateDirectory=wuff /bin/sh
Running as unit: run-u15750.service
Press ^] three times within 1s to disconnect TTY.
sh-4.4$ id
uid=63122(run-u15750) gid=63122(run-u15750) groups=63122(run-u15750) context=system_u:system_r:initrc_t:s0
sh-4.4$ ls -al /var/lib/private/
total 0
drwxr-xr-x. 3 root       root        60  6. Okt 13:21 .
drwxr-xr-x. 1 root       root       852  6. Okt 13:21 ..
drwxr-xr-x. 1 run-u15750 run-u15750   8  6. Okt 13:22 wuff
sh-4.4$ ls -ld /var/lib/wuff
lrwxrwxrwx. 1 root root 12  6. Okt 13:21 /var/lib/wuff -> private/wuff
sh-4.4$ ls -ld /var/lib/wuff/
drwxr-xr-x. 1 run-u15750 run-u15750 0  6. Okt 13:21 /var/lib/wuff/
sh-4.4$ echo hello > /var/lib/wuff/test
sh-4.4$ exit
exit
# id run-u15750
id: ‘run-u15750’: no such user
# ls -al /var/lib/private
total 0
drwx------. 1 root  root   66  6. Okt 13:21 .
drwxr-xr-x. 1 root  root  852  6. Okt 13:21 ..
drwxr-xr-x. 1 63122 63122   8  6. Okt 13:22 wuff
# ls -ld /var/lib/wuff
lrwxrwxrwx. 1 root root 12  6. Okt 13:21 /var/lib/wuff -> private/wuff
# ls -ld /var/lib/wuff/
drwxr-xr-x. 1 63122 63122 8  6. Okt 13:22 /var/lib/wuff/
# cat /var/lib/wuff/test
hello

The above invokes an interactive shell as transient service
run-u15750.service (systemd-run picked that name automatically,
since we didn’t specify anything explicitly) with a dynamic user whose
name is derived automatically from the service name. Because
StateDirectory=wuff is used, a persistent state directory for the
service is made available as /var/lib/wuff. In the interactive shell
running inside the service, the ls commands show the
/var/lib/private boundary directory and its contents, as well as the
symlink that is placed for the service. Finally, before exiting the
shell, a file is created in the state directory. Back in the original
command shell we check if the user is still allocated: it is not, of
course, since the service ceased to exist when we exited the shell and
with it the dynamic user associated with it. From the host we check
the state directory of the service, with similar commands as we did
from inside of it. We see that things are set up pretty much the same
way in both cases, except for two things: first of all the user/group
of the files is now shown as raw numeric UIDs instead of the
user/group names derived from the unit name. That’s because the user
ceased to exist at this point, and “ls” shows the raw UID for files
owned by users that don’t exist. Secondly, the access mode of the
boundary directory is different: when we look at it from outside of
the service it is not readable by anyone but root, when we looked from
inside we saw it it being world readable.

Now, let’s see how things look if we start another transient service,
reusing the state directory from the first invocation:

# systemd-run --pty --property=DynamicUser=yes --property=StateDirectory=wuff /bin/sh
Running as unit: run-u16087.service
Press ^] three times within 1s to disconnect TTY.
sh-4.4$ cat /var/lib/wuff/test
hello
sh-4.4$ ls -al /var/lib/wuff/
total 4
drwxr-xr-x. 1 run-u16087 run-u16087  8  6. Okt 13:22 .
drwxr-xr-x. 3 root       root       60  6. Okt 15:42 ..
-rw-r--r--. 1 run-u16087 run-u16087  6  6. Okt 13:22 test
sh-4.4$ id
uid=63122(run-u16087) gid=63122(run-u16087) groups=63122(run-u16087) context=system_u:system_r:initrc_t:s0
sh-4.4$ exit
exit

Here, systemd-run picked a different auto-generated unit name, but
the used dynamic UID is still the same, as it was read from the
pre-existing state directory, and was otherwise unused. As we can see
the test file we generated earlier is accessible and still contains
the data we left in there. Do note that the user name is different
this time (as it is derived from the unit name, which is different),
but the UID it is assigned to is the same one as on the first
invocation. We can thus see that the mentioned optimization of the UID
allocation logic (i.e. that we start the allocation loop from the UID
owner of any existing state directory) took effect, so that no
recursive chown()ing was required.

And that’s the end of our example, which hopefully illustrated a bit
how this concept and implementation works.

Use-cases

Now that we had a look at how to enable this logic for a unit and how
it is implemented, let’s discuss where this actually could be useful
in real life.

  • One major benefit of dynamic user IDs is that running a
    privilege-separated service leaves no artifacts in the system. A
    system user is allocated and made use of, but it is discarded
    automatically in a safe and secure way after use, in a fashion that is
    safe for later recycling. Thus, quickly invoking a short-lived service
    for processing some job can be protected properly through a user ID
    without having to pre-allocate it and without this draining the
    available UID pool any longer than necessary.

  • In many cases, starting a service no longer requires
    package-specific preparation. Or in other words, quite often
    useradd/mkdir/chown/chmod invocations in “post-inst” package
    scripts, as well as
    sysusers.d
    and
    tmpfiles.d
    drop-ins become unnecessary, as the DynamicUser= and
    StateDirectory=/CacheDirectory=/LogsDirectory= logic can do the
    necessary work automatically, on-demand and with a well-defined
    life-cycle.

  • By combining dynamic user IDs with the transient unit concept, new
    creative ways of sand-boxing are made available. For example, let’s say
    you don’t trust the correct implementation of the sort command. You
    can now lock it into a simple, robust, dynamic UID sandbox with a
    simple systemd-run and still integrate it into a shell pipeline like
    any other command. Here’s an example, showcasing a shell pipeline
    whose middle element runs as a dynamically on-the-fly allocated UID,
    that is released when the pipelines ends.

    # cat some-file.txt | systemd-run ---pipe --property=DynamicUser=1 sort -u | grep -i foobar > some-other-file.txt
    
  • By combining dynamic user IDs with the systemd templating logic it
    is now possible to do much more fine-grained and fully automatic UID
    management. For example, let’s say you have a template unit file
    /etc/systemd/system/[email protected]:

    [Service]
    ExecStart=/usr/bin/myfoobarserviced
    DynamicUser=1
    StateDirectory=foobar/%i
    

    Now, let’s say you want to start one instance of this service for
    each of your customers. All you need to do now for that is:

    # systemctl enable [email protected] --now
    

    And you are done. (Invoke this as many times as you like, each time
    replacing customerxyz by some customer identifier, you get the
    idea.)

  • By combining dynamic user IDs with socket activation you may easily
    implement a system where each incoming connection is served by a
    process instance running as a different, fresh, newly allocated UID
    within its own sandbox. Here’s an example waldo.socket:

    [Socket]
    ListenStream=2048
    Accept=yes
    

    With a matching [email protected]:

    [Service]
    ExecStart=-/usr/bin/myservicebinary
    DynamicUser=yes
    

    With the two unit files above, systemd will listen on TCP/IP port
    2048, and for each incoming connection invoke a fresh instance of
    [email protected], each time utilizing a different, new,
    dynamically allocated UID, neatly isolated from any other
    instance.

  • Dynamic user IDs combine very well with state-less systems,
    i.e. systems that come up with an unpopulated /etc and /var. A
    service using dynamic user IDs and the StateDirectory=,
    CacheDirectory=, LogsDirectory= and RuntimeDirectory= concepts
    will implicitly allocate the users and directories it needs for
    running, right at the moment where it needs it.

Dynamic users are a very generic concept, hence a multitude of other
uses are thinkable; the list above is just supposed to trigger your
imagination.

What does this mean for you as a packager?

I am pretty sure that a large number of services shipped with today’s
distributions could benefit from using DynamicUser= and
StateDirectory= (and related settings). It often allows removal of
post-inst packaging scripts altogether, as well as any sysusers.d
and tmpfiles.d drop-ins by unifying the needed declarations in the
unit file itself. Hence, as a packager please consider switching your
unit files over. That said, there are a number of conditions where
DynamicUser= and StateDirectory= (and friends) cannot or should
not be used. To name a few:

  1. Service that need to write to files outside of /run/<package>,
    /var/lib/<package>, /var/cache/<package>, /var/log/<package>,
    /var/tmp, /tmp, /dev/shm are generally incompatible with this
    scheme. This rules out daemons that upgrade the system as one example,
    as that involves writing to /usr.

  2. Services that maintain a herd of processes with different user
    IDs. Some SMTP services are like this. If your service has such a
    super-server design, UID management needs to be done by the
    super-server itself, which rules out systemd doing its dynamic UID
    magic for it.

  3. Services which run as root (obviously…) or are otherwise
    privileged.

  4. Services that need to live in the same mount name-space as the host
    system (for example, because they want to establish mount points
    visible system-wide). As mentioned DynamicUser= implies
    ProtectSystem=, PrivateTmp= and related options, which all require
    the service to run in its own mount name-space.

  5. Your focus is older distributions, i.e. distributions that do not
    have systemd 232 (for DynamicUser=) or systemd 235 (for
    StateDirectory= and friends) yet.

  6. If your distribution’s packaging guides don’t allow it. Consult
    your packaging guides, and possibly start a discussion on your
    distribution’s mailing list about this.

Notes

A couple of additional, random notes about the implementation and use
of these features:

  1. Do note that allocating or deallocating a dynamic user leaves
    /etc/passwd untouched. A dynamic user is added into the user
    database through the glibc NSS module
    nss-systemd,
    and this information never hits the disk.

  2. On traditional UNIX systems it was the job of the daemon process
    itself to drop privileges, while the DynamicUser= concept is
    designed around the service manager (i.e. systemd) being responsible
    for that. That said, since v235 there’s a way to marry DynamicUser=
    and such services which want to drop privileges on their own. For
    that, turn on DynamicUser= and set
    User=
    to the user name the service wants to setuid() to. This has the
    effect that systemd will allocate the dynamic user under the specified
    name when the service is started. Then, prefix the command line you
    specify in
    ExecStart=
    with a single ! character. If you do, the user is allocated for the
    service, but the daemon binary is is invoked as root instead of the
    allocated user, under the assumption that the daemon changes its UID
    on its own the right way. Not that after registration the user will
    show up instantly in the user database, and is hence resolvable like
    any other by the daemon process. Example:
    ExecStart=!/usr/bin/mydaemond

  3. You may wonder why systemd uses the UID range 61184–65519 for its
    dynamic user allocations (side note: in hexadecimal this reads as
    0xEF00–0xFFEF). That’s because distributions (specifically Fedora)
    tend to allocate regular users from below the 60000 range, and we
    don’t want to step into that. We also want to stay away from 65535 and
    a bit around it, as some of these UIDs have special meanings (65535 is
    often used as special value for “invalid” or “no” UID, as it is
    identical to the 16bit value -1; 65534 is generally mapped to the
    “nobody” user, and is where some kernel subsystems map unmappable
    UIDs). Finally, we want to stay within the 16bit range. In a user
    name-spacing world each container tends to have much less than the full
    32bit UID range available that Linux kernels theoretically
    provide. Everybody apparently can agree that a container should at
    least cover the 16bit range though — already to include a nobody
    user. (And quite frankly, I am pretty sure assigning 64K UIDs per
    container is nicely systematic, as the the higher 16bit of the 32bit
    UID values this way become a container ID, while the lower 16bit
    become the logical UID within each container, if you still follow what
    I am babbling here…). And before you ask: no this range cannot be
    changed right now, it’s compiled in. We might change that eventually
    however.

  4. You might wonder what happens if you already used UIDs from the
    61184–65519 range on your system for other purposes. systemd should
    handle that mostly fine, as long as that usage is properly registered
    in the user database: when allocating a dynamic user we pick a UID,
    see if it is currently used somehow, and if yes pick a different one,
    until we find a free one. Whether a UID is used right now or not is
    checked through NSS calls. Moreover the IPC object lists are checked to
    see if there are any objects owned by the UID we are about to
    pick. This means systemd will avoid using UIDs you have assigned
    otherwise. Note however that this of course makes the pool of
    available UIDs smaller, and in the worst cases this means that
    allocating a dynamic user might fail because there simply are no
    unused UIDs in the range.

  5. If not specified otherwise the name for a dynamically allocated
    user is derived from the service name. Not everything that’s valid in
    a service name is valid in a user-name however, and in some cases a
    randomized name is used instead to deal with this. Often it makes
    sense to pick the user names to register explicitly. For that use
    User= and choose whatever you like.

  6. If you pick a user name with User= and combine it with
    DynamicUser= and the user already exists statically it will be used
    for the service and the dynamic user logic is automatically
    disabled. This permits automatic up- and downgrades between static and
    dynamic UIDs. For example, it provides a nice way to move a system
    from static to dynamic UIDs in a compatible way: as long as you select
    the same User= value before and after switching DynamicUser= on,
    the service will continue to use the statically allocated user if it
    exists, and only operates in the dynamic mode if it does not. This is
    useful for other cases as well, for example to adapt a service that
    normally would use a dynamic user to concepts that require statically
    assigned UIDs, for example to marry classic UID-based file system
    quota with such services.

  7. systemd always allocates a pair of dynamic UID and GID at the same
    time, with the same numeric ID.

  8. If the Linux kernel had a “shiftfs” or similar functionality,
    i.e. a way to mount an existing directory to a second place, but map
    the exposed UIDs/GIDs in some way configurable at mount time, this
    would be excellent for the implementation of StateDirectory= in
    conjunction with DynamicUser=. It would make the recursive
    chown()ing step unnecessary, as the host version of the state
    directory could simply be mounted into a the service’s mount
    name-space, with a shift applied that maps the directory’s owner to the
    services’ UID/GID. But I don’t have high hopes in this regard, as all
    work being done in this area appears to be bound to user name-spacing
    — which is a concept not used here (and I guess one could say user
    name-spacing is probably more a source of problems than a solution to
    one, but you are welcome to disagree on that).

And that’s all for now. Enjoy your dynamic users!

EU Proposes Take Down Stay Down Approach to Combat Online Piracy

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/eu-proposes-take-down-stay-down-approach-to-combat-online-piracy-170928/

In recent years, many copyright holders have grown frustrated with pirates copies of their content (re)appearing on hundreds of online platforms.

This problem is not restricted to pirate sites, but also affects other services where users can freely upload content, including Dropbox, Google, YouTube, and Facebook.

In an attempt to streamline these takedown procedures the European Commission published a detailed set of guidelines today. Their communication titled “Tackling Illegal Content Online” includes a comprehensive overview of how illegal content, including piracy, should be dealt with.

The recommendation, of which a non-final copy leaked earlier this month, is non-binding. However, future legislative measures are not ruled out if no significant progress is made.

One of the motivations to release the guidelines is to define clearly what a good takedown policy would look like. A harmonized and coherent takedown approach is currently missing in the EU, the Commission notes.

“A more aligned approach would make the fight against illegal content more effective. It would also benefit the development of the Digital Single Market and reduce the cost of compliance with a multitude of rules for online platforms, including for new entrants,” the recommendation reads.

One of the suggestions that stand out is “proactive” filtering. The Commission recommends that online services should implement measures that can automatically detect and remove suspected illegal content.

“Online platforms should do their utmost to proactively detect, identify and remove illegal content online. The Commission strongly encourages online platforms to use voluntary, proactive measures aimed at the detection and removal of illegal content and to step up cooperation and investment in, and use of, automatic detection technologies.”

This is similar to the much-discussed upload filters and raises the question whether such practice is in line with existing EU law. In the Sabam v Netlog case, the European Court of Justice previously ruled that hosting sites can’t be forced to filter copyrighted content, as this would violate the privacy of users and hinder freedom of information.

Importantly, the Commission emphasizes that when online services explicitly search for pirated material, they won’t lose the benefit of the liability exemption provided for in Article 14 of the E-Commerce Directive. In other words, copyright holders can’t hold these services accountable for content that slips through the net.

The recommendation further includes some specific suggestions to make sure that content, once removed, does not reappear. This is the notice-and-stay-down approach copyright holders are lobbying for, which can be addressed by content recognition tools including hash filtering.

“The Commission strongly encourages the further use and development of automatic technologies to prevent the re-appearance of illegal content online,” the document reads, adding that errors should not be overlooked.

“Where automatic tools are used to prevent re-appearance of illegal content a reversibility safeguard should be available for erroneous decisions, and the use and performance of this technology should be made transparent in the platforms’ terms of service.”

Hash-based and other automatic filters are not new of course. Services such as Google Drive and Dropbox already have these in place and YouTube’s Content-ID system also falls into this category.

Another measure to prevent re-uploading of content is to ban frequent offenders. The Commission notes that services should take appropriate measures against such users, which could include the suspension or termination of accounts.

Most of the suggestions come with a recommendation to have sufficient safeguards in place to repair or prevent errors. This includes a counter-notice process as well as regularly published transparency reports. In some cases where context is relevant, it is important to have a human reviewer in the loop.

Finally, the Commission encourages cooperation between online services and so-called “trusted flaggers.” The latter are known representatives of copyright holders who are trusted. As such, their takedown notices can be prioritized.

“Notices from trusted flaggers should be able to be fast-tracked by the platform. This cooperation should provide for mutual information exchange so as to evaluate and improve the removal process over time.”

The proposals go above and beyond current legal requirements. For many larger online services, it might not be too hard to comply with most of the above. But, for smaller services, it could be quite a burden.

European Digital Rights (EDRi) has highlighted some good and bad elements but remains critical.

“The document puts virtually all its focus on internet companies monitoring online communications, in order to remove content that they decide might be illegal. It presents few safeguards for free speech, and little concern for dealing with content that is actually criminal,” EDRi writes.

Google has also been critical of the notice-and-stay-down principle in the past. Copyright counsel Cédric Manara previously outlined several problems, concluding that the system “just won’t work.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

How Much Money Can Pirate Bay Make From a Cryptocoin Miner?

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/how-much-money-can-pirate-bay-make-from-a-cryptocoin-miner-170924/

In recent years many pirate sites have struggled to make a decent income.

Not only are more people using ad-blockers now, the ad-quality is also dropping as copyright holders actively go after this revenue source, trying to dry up the funds of pirate sites.

Last weekend The Pirate Bay tested a cryptocurrency miner to see whether that could offer a viable alternative. This created quite a bit of backlash, but there were plenty of positive comments too.

The question still remains whether the mining efforts can bring in enough money to pay all the bills.

The miner is provided by Coinhive which, at the time of writing, pays out 0.00015 XMR per 1M hashes. So how much can The Pirate Bay make from this?

To get a rough idea we did some back-of-the-envelope calculations, starting with the site’s visitor numbers.

SimilarWeb estimates that The Pirate Bay has roughly 315 million visits per month. On average, users spend five minutes on the site per “visit”. While we have reason to believe that this underestimates the site’s popularity, we’ll use it as an illustration.

We spoke to Coinhive and they estimate that a user with a mid-range laptop would have a hashrate of 30 h/s.

In Pirate Bay’s case this would translate to 30 hashes * 300 seconds * 315M visits = 2,835,000M hashes per month. If the miner is throttled at 30% this would drop to 850,000M hashes.

If Coinhive pays out 0.00015 XMR per million hashes, TPB would get 127.5 XMR per month, which is roughly $12,000 at the moment. Since the miner doesn’t appear on all pages and because some may actively block it, this number will drop a bit further.

Keep in mind that this is just an illustration using several estimated variables which may vary greatly over time. Still, it gives a broad idea of the potential.

Since Pirate Bay tested the miner several other sites jumped on board as well. We’ll keep a close eye on the developments and hope we can share some real data in the future.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Are Cryptocurrency Miners The Future for Pirate Sites?

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/are-cryptocurrency-miners-the-future-for-pirate-sites-170921/

Last weekend The Pirate Bay surprised friend and foe by adding a Javascript-based cryptocurrency miner to its website.

The miner utilizes CPU power from visitors to generate Monero coins for the site, providing an extra revenue source.

Initially, this caused the CPUs of visitors to max out due to a configuration error, but it was later adjusted to be less demanding. Still, there was plenty of discussion on the move, with greatly varying opinions.

Some criticized the site for “hijacking” their computer resources for personal profit, without prior warning. However, there are also people who are happy to give something back to TPB, especially if it can help the site to remain online.

Aside from the configuration error, there was another major mistake everyone agreed on. The Pirate Bay team should have alerted its visitors to this change beforehand, and not after the fact, as they did last weekend.

Despite the sensitivities, The Pirate Bay’s move has inspired others to follow suit. Pirate linking site Alluc.ee is one of the first. While they use the same mining service, their implementation is more elegant.

Alluc shows how many hashes are mined and the site allows users to increase or decrease the CPU load, or turn the miner off completely.

Alluc.ee miner

Putting all the controversy aside for a minute, the idea to let visitors mine coins is a pretty ingenious idea. The Pirate Bay said it was testing the feature to see if it’s possible as a replacement for ads, which might be much needed in the future.

In recent years many pirate sites have struggled to make a decent income. Not only are more people using ad-blockers now, the ad-quality is also dropping as copyright holders actively go after this revenue source, trying to dry up the funds of pirate sites. And with Chrome planning to add a default ad-blocker to its browser, the outlook is grim.

A cryptocurrency miner might alleviate this problem. That is, as long as ad-blockers don’t start to interfere with this revenue source as well.

Interestingly, this would also counter one of the main anti-piracy talking points. Increasingly, industry groups are using the “public safety” argument as a reason to go after pirate sites. They point to malicious advertisements as a great danger, hoping that this will further their calls for tougher legislation and enforcement.

If The Pirate Bay and other pirate sites can ditch the ads, they would be less susceptible to these and other anti-piracy pushes. Of course, copyright holders could still go after the miner revenues, but this might not be easy.

TorrentFreak spoke to Coinhive, the company that provides the mining service to The Pirate Bay, and they don’t seem eager to take action without a court order.

“We don’t track where users come from. We are just providing servers and a script to submit hashes for the Monero blockchain. We don’t see it as our responsibility to determine if a website is ‘valid’ and we don’t have the technical capabilities to do so,” a Coinhive representative says.

We also contacted several site owners and thus far the response has been mixed. Some like the idea and would consider adding a miner, if it doesn’t affect visitors too much. Others are more skeptical and don’t believe that the extra revenue is worth the trouble.

The Pirate Bay itself, meanwhile, has completed its test run and has removed the miner from the site. They will now analyze the results before deciding whether or not it’s “the future” for them.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.