Tag Archives: humour

The Fleischer 100: Pi-powered sound effects

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fleischer-100/

If there’s one thing we like more than a project video, it’s a project video that has style. And that’s exactly what we got for the Fleischer 100, a Raspberry Pi-powered cartoon sound effects typewriter created by James McCullen.

The Fleischer 100 | Cartoon Sound Effects Toy

The goal of this practical project was to design and make a hardware device that could play numerous sound effects by pressing buttons and tweaking knobs and dials. Taking inspiration from old cartoons of the 1930s in particular – the sound effects would be in the form of mostly conventional musical instruments that were often used to create sound effects in this period of animation history.

The golden age of Foley

Long before the days of the drag-and-drop sound effects of modern video editing software, there were Foley artists. These artists would create sound effects for cartoons, films, and even live performances, often using everyday objects. Here are Orson Welles and the King of Cool himself, Dean Martin, with a demonstration:

Dean Martin & Orson Welles – Early Radio/Sound Effects

Uploaded by dino4ever on 2014-05-26.

The Fleischer 100

“The goal of this practical project was to design and make a hardware device that could be used to play numerous sound effects by pressing buttons and tweaking knobs and dials,” James says, and explains that he has been “taking inspiration from old cartoons of the 1930s in particular”.

The Fleischer 100

Images on the buttons complete the ‘classic cartoon era’ look

With the Fleischer 100, James has captured that era’s look and feel. Having recorded the majority of the sound effects using a Rode NT2-A microphone, he copied the sound files to a Raspberry Pi. The physical computing side of building the typewriter involved connecting the Pi to multiple buttons and switches via a breadboard. The buttons are used to play back the files, and both a toggle and a rotary switch control access to the sound effects – there are one hundred in total! James also made the costumized housing to achieve an appearance in line with the period of early cartoon animation.

The Fleischer 100

Turning the typewriter roller selects a new collection of sound effects

Regarding the design of his device, James was particularly inspired by the typewriter in the 1930s Looney Tunes short Hold Anything – and to our delight, he decided to style the final project video to match its look.

Hold Anything – Looney Tunes (HD)

Release date 1930 Directed by Hugh Harman Rudolf Ising Produced by Hugh Harman Rudolf Ising Leon Schlesinger(Associate Producer) Voices by Carman Maxwell Rochelle Hudson (both uncredited) Music by Frank Marsales Animation by Isadore Freleng Norm Blackburn Distributed by Warner Bros.

We wish we had a Fleischer 100 hidden under a desk at Pi Towers with which to score office goings-on…

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The importance of paying attention in building community trust

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original http://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/44915.html

Trust is important in any kind of interpersonal relationship. It’s inevitable that there will be cases where something you do will irritate or upset others, even if only to a small degree. Handling small cases well helps build trust that you will do the right thing in more significant cases, whereas ignoring things that seem fairly insignificant (or saying that you’ll do something about them and then failing to do so) suggests that you’ll also fail when there’s a major problem. Getting the small details right is a major part of creating the impression that you’ll deal with significant challenges in a responsible and considerate way.

This isn’t limited to individual relationships. Something that distinguishes good customer service from bad customer service is getting the details right. There are many industries where significant failures happen infrequently, but minor ones happen a lot. Would you prefer to give your business to a company that handles those small details well (even if they’re not overly annoying) or one that just tells you to deal with them?

And the same is true of software communities. A strong and considerate response to minor bug reports makes it more likely that users will be patient with you when dealing with significant ones. Handling small patch contributions quickly makes it more likely that a submitter will be willing to do the work of making more significant contributions. These things are well understood, and most successful projects have actively worked to reduce barriers to entry and to be responsive to user requests in order to encourage participation and foster a feeling that they care.

But what’s often ignored is that this applies to other aspects of communities as well. Failing to use inclusive language may not seem like a big thing in itself, but it leaves people with the feeling that you’re less likely to do anything about more egregious exclusionary behaviour. Allowing a baseline level of sexist humour gives the impression that you won’t act if there are blatant displays of misogyny. The more examples of these “insignificant” issues people see, the more likely they are to choose to spend their time somewhere else, somewhere they can have faith that major issues will be handled appropriately.

There’s a more insidious aspect to this. Sometimes we can believe that we are handling minor issues appropriately, that we’re acting in a way that handles people’s concerns, while actually failing to do so. If someone raises a concern about an aspect of the community, it’s important to discuss solutions with them. Putting effort into “solving” a problem without ensuring that the solution has the desired outcome is not only a waste of time, it alienates those affected even more – they’re now not only left with the feeling that they can’t trust you to respond appropriately, but that you will actively ignore their feelings in the process.

It’s not always possible to satisfy everybody’s concerns. Sometimes you’ll be left in situations where you have conflicting requests. In that case the best thing you can do is to explain the conflict and why you’ve made the choice you have, and demonstrate that you took this issue seriously rather than ignoring it. Depending on the issue, you may still alienate some number of participants, but it’ll be fewer than if you just pretend that it’s not actually a problem.

One warning, though: while building trust in this way enhances people’s willingness to join your community, it also builds expectations. If a significant issue does arise, and if you fail to handle it well, you’ll burn a lot of that trust in the process. The fact that you’ve built that trust in the first place may be what saves your community from disintegrating completely, but people will feel even more betrayed if you don’t actively work to rebuild it. And if there’s a pattern of mishandling major problems, no amount of getting the details right will matter.

Communities that ignore these issues are, long term, likely to end up weaker than communities that pay attention to them. Making sure you get this right in the first place, and setting expectations that you will pay attention to your contributors, is a vital part of building a meaningful relationship between your community and its members.

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The importance of paying attention in building community trust

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/44915.html

Trust is important in any kind of interpersonal relationship. It’s inevitable that there will be cases where something you do will irritate or upset others, even if only to a small degree. Handling small cases well helps build trust that you will do the right thing in more significant cases, whereas ignoring things that seem fairly insignificant (or saying that you’ll do something about them and then failing to do so) suggests that you’ll also fail when there’s a major problem. Getting the small details right is a major part of creating the impression that you’ll deal with significant challenges in a responsible and considerate way.

This isn’t limited to individual relationships. Something that distinguishes good customer service from bad customer service is getting the details right. There are many industries where significant failures happen infrequently, but minor ones happen a lot. Would you prefer to give your business to a company that handles those small details well (even if they’re not overly annoying) or one that just tells you to deal with them?

And the same is true of software communities. A strong and considerate response to minor bug reports makes it more likely that users will be patient with you when dealing with significant ones. Handling small patch contributions quickly makes it more likely that a submitter will be willing to do the work of making more significant contributions. These things are well understood, and most successful projects have actively worked to reduce barriers to entry and to be responsive to user requests in order to encourage participation and foster a feeling that they care.

But what’s often ignored is that this applies to other aspects of communities as well. Failing to use inclusive language may not seem like a big thing in itself, but it leaves people with the feeling that you’re less likely to do anything about more egregious exclusionary behaviour. Allowing a baseline level of sexist humour gives the impression that you won’t act if there are blatant displays of misogyny. The more examples of these “insignificant” issues people see, the more likely they are to choose to spend their time somewhere else, somewhere they can have faith that major issues will be handled appropriately.

There’s a more insidious aspect to this. Sometimes we can believe that we are handling minor issues appropriately, that we’re acting in a way that handles people’s concerns, while actually failing to do so. If someone raises a concern about an aspect of the community, it’s important to discuss solutions with them. Putting effort into “solving” a problem without ensuring that the solution has the desired outcome is not only a waste of time, it alienates those affected even more – they’re now not only left with the feeling that they can’t trust you to respond appropriately, but that you will actively ignore their feelings in the process.

It’s not always possible to satisfy everybody’s concerns. Sometimes you’ll be left in situations where you have conflicting requests. In that case the best thing you can do is to explain the conflict and why you’ve made the choice you have, and demonstrate that you took this issue seriously rather than ignoring it. Depending on the issue, you may still alienate some number of participants, but it’ll be fewer than if you just pretend that it’s not actually a problem.

One warning, though: while building trust in this way enhances people’s willingness to join your community, it also builds expectations. If a significant issue does arise, and if you fail to handle it well, you’ll burn a lot of that trust in the process. The fact that you’ve built that trust in the first place may be what saves your community from disintegrating completely, but people will feel even more betrayed if you don’t actively work to rebuild it. And if there’s a pattern of mishandling major problems, no amount of getting the details right will matter.

Communities that ignore these issues are, long term, likely to end up weaker than communities that pay attention to them. Making sure you get this right in the first place, and setting expectations that you will pay attention to your contributors, is a vital part of building a meaningful relationship between your community and its members.

comment count unavailable comments

Useless Duck Company

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/useless-duck-company/

The Useless Duck Company’s very splendid videos, demonstrating some of their thoughtful and helpful Internet of Things applications, have been making us LITERALLY DIE WITH HAPPINESS (literally!) ever since we discovered them. Even better: we got in touch with the Chief Duck, and he let us know which of his inventions use a Raspberry Pi. Here are two of the most safe-for-work ones.

Sock Removal Robot

Two months ago I made an app for removing socks, but people complained that you need a dog for it to work. I made this robot so everyone can use my app! Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3660602 Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/UselessDuck/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/UselessDuck/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/UselessDuckCompany/ Music by http://www.bensound.com/

Wireless baby crib

If your baby does not fall asleep after use simply press the button again. Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/UselessDuck/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/UselessDuck/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/UselessDuckCompany/ Intro music by http://www.bensound.com/

Useless Duck Company, we salute you. Please invent something to clear up the coffee we’ve all spat across our desks.

 

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