Tag Archives: IaaS

Replacing macOS Server with Synology NAS

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/replacing-macos-server-with-synology-nas/

Synology NAS boxes backed up to the cloud

Businesses and organizations that rely on macOS server for essential office and data services are facing some decisions about the future of their IT services.

Apple recently announced that it is deprecating a significant portion of essential network services in macOS Server, as they described in a support statement posted on April 24, 2018, “Prepare for changes to macOS Server.” Apple’s note includes:

macOS Server is changing to focus more on management of computers, devices, and storage on your network. As a result, some changes are coming in how Server works. A number of services will be deprecated, and will be hidden on new installations of an update to macOS Server coming in spring 2018.

The note lists the services that will be removed in a future release of macOS Server, including calendar and contact support, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name Services (DNS), mail, instant messages, virtual private networking (VPN), NetInstall, Web server, and the Wiki.

Apple assures users who have already configured any of the listed services that they will be able to use them in the spring 2018 macOS Server update, but the statement ends with links to a number of alternative services, including hosted services, that macOS Server users should consider as viable replacements to the features it is removing. These alternative services are all FOSS (Free and Open-Source Software).

As difficult as this could be for organizations that use macOS server, this is not unexpected. Apple left the server hardware space back in 2010, when Steve Jobs announced the company was ending its line of Xserve rackmount servers, which were introduced in May, 2002. Since then, macOS Server has hardly been a prominent part of Apple’s product lineup. It’s not just the product itself that has lost some luster, but the entire category of SMB office and business servers, which has been undergoing a gradual change in recent years.

Some might wonder how important the news about macOS Server is, given that macOS Server represents a pretty small share of the server market. macOS Server has been important to design shops, agencies, education users, and small businesses that likely have been on Macs for ages, but it’s not a significant part of the IT infrastructure of larger organizations and businesses.

What Comes After macOS Server?

Lovers of macOS Server don’t have to fear having their Mac minis pried from their cold, dead hands quite yet. Installed services will continue to be available. In the fall of 2018, new installations and upgrades of macOS Server will require users to migrate most services to other software. Since many of the services of macOS Server were already open-source, this means that a change in software might not be required. It does mean more configuration and management required from those who continue with macOS Server, however.

Users can continue with macOS Server if they wish, but many will see the writing on the wall and look for a suitable substitute.

The Times They Are A-Changin’

For many people working in organizations, what is significant about this announcement is how it reflects the move away from the once ubiquitous server-based IT infrastructure. Services that used to be centrally managed and office-based, such as storage, file sharing, communications, and computing, have moved to the cloud.

In selecting the next office IT platforms, there’s an opportunity to move to solutions that reflect and support how people are working and the applications they are using both in the office and remotely. For many, this means including cloud-based services in office automation, backup, and business continuity/disaster recovery planning. This includes Software as a Service, Platform as a Service, and Infrastructure as a Service (Saas, PaaS, IaaS) options.

IT solutions that integrate well with the cloud are worth strong consideration for what comes after a macOS Server-based environment.

Synology NAS as a macOS Server Alternative

One solution that is becoming popular is to replace macOS Server with a device that has the ability to provide important office services, but also bridges the office and cloud environments. Using Network-Attached Storage (NAS) to take up the server slack makes a lot of sense. Many customers are already using NAS for file sharing, local data backup, automatic cloud backup, and other uses. In the case of Synology, their operating system, Synology DiskStation Manager (DSM), is Linux based, and integrates the basic functions of file sharing, centralized backup, RAID storage, multimedia streaming, virtual storage, and other common functions.

Synology NAS box

Synology NAS

Since DSM is based on Linux, there are numerous server applications available, including many of the same ones that are available for macOS Server, which shares conceptual roots with Linux as it comes from BSD Unix.

Synology DiskStation Manager Package Center screenshot

Synology DiskStation Manager Package Center

According to Ed Lukacs, COO at 2FIFTEEN Systems Management in Salt Lake City, their customers have found the move from macOS Server to Synology NAS not only painless, but positive. DSM works seamlessly with macOS and has been faster for their customers, as well. Many of their customers are running Adobe Creative Suite and Google G Suite applications, so a workflow that combines local storage, remote access, and the cloud, is already well known to them. Remote users are supported by Synology’s QuickConnect or VPN.

Business continuity and backup are simplified by the flexible storage capacity of the NAS. Synology has built-in backup to Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage with Synology’s Cloud Sync, as well as a choice of a number of other B2-compatible applications, such as Cloudberry, Comet, and Arq.

Customers have been able to get up and running quickly, with only initial data transfers requiring some time to complete. After that, management of the NAS can be handled in-house or with the support of a Managed Service Provider (MSP).

Are You Sticking with macOS Server or Moving to Another Platform?

If you’re affected by this change in macOS Server, please let us know in the comments how you’re planning to cope. Are you using Synology NAS for server services? Please tell us how that’s working for you.

The post Replacing macOS Server with Synology NAS appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Strategies for Backing Up Windows Computers

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/strategies-for-backing-up-windows-computers/

Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10 logos

There’s a little company called Apple making big announcements this week, but about 45% of you are on Windows machines, so we thought it would be a good idea to devote a blog post today to Windows users and the options they have for backing up Windows computers.

We’ll be talking about the various options for backing up Windows desktop OS’s 7, 8, and 10, and Windows servers. We’ve written previously about this topic in How to Back Up Windows, and Computer Backup Options, but we’ll be covering some new topics and ways to combine strategies in this post. So, if you’re a Windows user looking for shelter from all the Apple hoopla, welcome to our Apple Announcement Day Windows Backup Day post.

Windows laptop

First, Let’s Talk About What We Mean by Backup

This might seem to our readers like an unneeded appetizer on the way to the main course of our post, but we at Backblaze know that people often mean very different things when they use backup and related terms. Let’s start by defining what we mean when we say backup, cloud storage, sync, and archive.

Backup
A backup is an active copy of the system or files that you are using. It is distinguished from an archive, which is the storing of data that is no longer in active use. Backups fall into two main categories: file and image. File backup software will back up whichever files you designate by either letting you include files you wish backed up or by excluding files you don’t want backed up, or both. An image backup, sometimes called a disaster recovery backup or a system clone, is useful if you need to recreate your system on a new drive or computer.
The first backup generally will be a full backup of all files. After that, the backup will be incremental, meaning that only files that have been changed since the full backup will be added. Often, the software will keep changed versions of the files for some period of time, so you can maintain a number of previous revisions of your files in case you wish to return to something in an earlier version of your file.
The destination for your backup could be another drive on your computer, an attached drive, a network-attached drive (NAS), or the cloud.
Cloud Storage
Cloud storage vendors supply data storage just as a utility company supplies power, gas, or water. Cloud storage can be used for data backups, but it can also be used for data archives, application data, records, or libraries of photos, videos, and other media.
You contract with the service for storing any type of data, and the storage location is available to you via the internet. Cloud storage providers generally charge by some combination of data ingress, egress, and the amount of data stored.
Sync
File sync is useful for files that you wish to have access to from different places or computers, or for files that you wish to share with others. While sync has its uses, it has limitations for keeping files safe and how much it could cost you to store large amounts of data. As opposed to backup, which keeps revision of files, sync is designed to keep two or more locations exactly the same. Sync costs are based on how much data you sync and can get expensive for large amounts of data.
Archive
A data archive is for data that is no longer in active use but needs to be saved, and may or may not ever be retrieved again. In old-style storage parlance, it is called cold storage. An archive could be stored with a cloud storage provider, or put on a hard drive or flash drive that you disconnect and put in the closet, or mail to your brother in Idaho.

What’s the Best Strategy for Backing Up?

Now that we’ve got our terminology clear, let’s talk backup strategies for Windows.

At Backblaze, we advocate the 3-2-1 strategy for safeguarding your data, which means that you should maintain three copies of any valuable data — two copies stored locally and one stored remotely. I follow this strategy at home by working on the active data on my Windows 10 desktop computer (copy one), which is backed up to a Drobo RAID device attached via USB (copy two), and backing up the desktop to Backblaze’s Personal Backup in the cloud (copy three). I also keep an image of my primary disk on a separate drive and frequently update it using Windows 10’s image tool.

I use Dropbox for sharing specific files I am working on that I might wish to have access to when I am traveling or on another computer. Once my subscription with Dropbox expires, I’ll use the latest release of Backblaze that has individual file preview with sharing built-in.

Before you decide which backup strategy will work best for your situation, you’ll need to ask yourself a number of questions. These questions include where you wish to store your backups, whether you wish to supply your own storage media, whether the backups will be manual or automatic, and whether limited or unlimited data storage will work best for you.

Strategy 1 — Back Up to a Local or Attached Drive

The first copy of the data you are working on is often on your desktop or laptop. You can create a second copy of your data on another drive or directory on your computer, or copy the data to a drive directly attached to your computer, such as via USB.

external hard drive and RAID NAS devices

Windows has built-in tools for both file and image level backup. Depending on which version of Windows you use, these tools are called Backup and Restore, File History, or Image. These tools enable you to set a schedule for automatic backups, which ensures that it is done regularly. You also have the choice to use Windows Explorer (aka File Explorer) to manually copy files to another location. Some external disk drives and USB Flash Drives come with their own backup software, and other backup utilities are available for free or for purchase.

Windows Explorer File History screenshot

This is a supply-your-own media solution, meaning that you need to have a hard disk or other medium available of sufficient size to hold all your backup data. When a disk becomes full, you’ll need to add a disk or swap out the full disk to continue your backups.

We’ve written previously on this strategy at Should I use an external drive for backup?

Strategy 2 — Back Up to a Local Area Network (LAN)

Computers, servers, and network-attached-storage (NAS) on your local network all can be used for backing up data. Microsoft’s built-in backup tools can be used for this job, as can any utility that supports network protocols such as NFS or SMB/CIFS, which are common protocols that allow shared access to files on a network for Windows and other operatings systems. There are many third-party applications available as well that provide extensive options for managing and scheduling backups and restoring data when needed.

NAS cloud

Multiple computers can be backed up to a single network-shared computer, server, or NAS, which also could then be backed up to the cloud, which rounds out a nice backup strategy, because it covers both local and remote copies of your data. System images of multiple computers on the LAN can be included in these backups if desired.

Again, you are managing the backup media on the local network, so you’ll need to be sure you have sufficient room on the destination drives to store all your backup data.

Strategy 3 — Back Up to Detached Drive at Another Location

You may have have read our recent blog post, Getting Data Archives Out of Your Closet, in which we discuss the practice of filling hard drives and storing them in a closet. Of course, to satisfy the off-site backup guideline, these drives would need to be stored in a closet that’s in a different geographical location than your main computer. If you’re willing to do all the work of copying the data to drives and transporting them to another location, this is a viable option.

stack of hard drives

The only limitation to the amount of backup data is the number of hard drives you are willing to purchase — and maybe the size of your closet.

Strategy 4 — Back Up to the Cloud

Backing up to the cloud has become a popular option for a number of reasons. Internet speeds have made moving large amounts of data possible, and not having to worry about supplying the storage media simplifies choices for users. Additionally, cloud vendors implement features such as data protection, deduplication, and encryption as part of their services that make cloud storage reliable, secure, and efficient. Unlimited cloud storage for data from a single computer is a popular option.

A backup vendor likely will provide a software client that runs on your computer and backs up your data to the cloud in the background while you’re doing other things, such as Backblaze Personal Backup, which has clients for Windows computers, Macintosh computers, and mobile apps for both iOS and Android. For restores, Backblaze users can download one or all of their files for free from anywhere in the world. Optionally, a 128 GB flash drive or 4 TB drive can be overnighted to the customer, with a refund available if the drive is returned.

Storage Pod in the cloud

Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage is an option for those who need capabilities beyond Backblaze’s Personal Backup. B2 provides cloud storage that is priced based on the amount of data the customer uses, and is suitable for long-term data storage. B2 supports integrations with NAS devices, as well as Windows, Macintosh, and Linux computers and servers.

Services such as BackBlaze B2 are often called Cloud Object Storage or IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), because they provide a complete solution for storing all types of data in partnership with vendors who integrate various solutions for working with B2. B2 has its own API (Application Programming Interface) and CLI (Command-line Interface) to work with B2, but B2 becomes even more powerful when paired with any one of a number of other solutions for data storage and management provided by third parties who offer both hardware and software solutions.

Backing Up Windows Servers

Windows Servers are popular workstations for some users, and provide needed network services for others. They also can be used to store backups from other computers on the network. They, in turn, can be backed up to attached drives or the cloud. While our Personal Backup client doesn’t support Windows servers, our B2 Cloud Storage has a number of integrations with vendors who supply software or hardware for storing data both locally and on B2. We’ve written a number of blog posts and articles that address these solutions, including How to Back Up your Windows Server with B2 and CloudBerry.

Sometimes the Best Strategy is to Mix and Match

The great thing about computers, software, and networks is that there is an endless number of ways to combine them. Our users and hardware and software partners are ingenious in configuring solutions that save data locally, copy it to an attached or network drive, and then store it to the cloud.

image of cloud backup

Among our B2 partners, Synology, CloudBerry Archiware, QNAP, Morro Data, and GoodSync have integrations that allow their NAS devices to store and retrieve data to and from B2 Cloud Storage. For a drag-and-drop experience on the desktop, take a look at CyberDuck, MountainDuck, and Dropshare, which provide users with an easy and interactive way to store and use data in B2.

If you’d like to explore more options for combining software, hardware, and cloud solutions, we invite you to browse the integrations for our many B2 partners.

Have Questions?

Windows versions, tools, and backup terminology all can be confusing, and we know how hard it can be to make sense of all of it. If there’s something we haven’t addressed here, or if you have a question or contribution, please let us know in the comments.

And happy Windows Backup Day! (Just don’t tell Apple.)

The post Strategies for Backing Up Windows Computers appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

AWS Named as a Leader in Gartner’s Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Magic Quadrant for 7th Consecutive Year

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-named-as-a-leader-in-gartners-infrastructure-as-a-service-iaas-magic-quadrant-for-7th-consecutive-year/

Every product planning session at AWS revolves around customers. We do our best to listen and to learn, and to use what we hear to build the roadmaps for future development. Approximately 90% of the items on the roadmap originate with customer requests and are designed to meet specific needs and requirements that they share with us.

I strongly believe that this customer-driven innovation has helped us to secure the top-right corner of the Leaders quadrant in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) for the 7th consecutive year, earning highest placement for ability to execute and furthest for completeness of vision:

To learn more, read the full report. It contains a lot of detail and is a great summary of the features and factors that our customers examine when choosing a cloud provider.

Jeff;

Operating OpenStack at Scale

Post Syndicated from mikesefanov original https://yahooeng.tumblr.com/post/159795571841

By James Penick, Cloud Architect & Gurpreet Kaur, Product Manager

A version of this byline was originally written for and appears in CIO Review.

A successful private cloud presents a consistent and reliable facade over the complexities of hyperscale infrastructure. It must simultaneously handle constant organic traffic growth, unanticipated spikes, a multitude of hardware vendors, and discordant customer demands. The depth of this complexity only increases with the age of the business, leaving a private cloud operator saddled with legacy hardware, old network infrastructure, customers dependent on legacy operating systems, and the list goes on. These are the foundations of the horror stories told by grizzled operators around the campfire.

Providing a plethora of services globally for over a billion active users requires a hyperscale infrastructure. Yahoo’s on-premises infrastructure is comprised of datacenters housing hundreds of thousands of physical and virtual compute resources globally, connected via a multi-terabit network backbone. As one of the very first hyperscale internet companies in the world, Yahoo’s infrastructure had grown organically – things were built, and rebuilt, as the company learned and grew. The resulting web of modern and legacy infrastructure became progressively more difficult to manage. Initial attempts to manage this via IaaS (Infrastructure-as-a-Service) taught some hard lessons. However, those lessons served us well when OpenStack was selected to manage Yahoo’s datacenters, some of which are shared below.

Centralized team offering Infrastructure-as-a-Service

Chief amongst the lessons learned prior to OpenStack was that IaaS must be presented as a core service to the whole organization by a dedicated team. An a-la-carte-IaaS, where each user is expected to manage their own control plane and inventory, just isn’t sustainable at scale. Multiple teams tackling the same challenges involved in the curation of software, deployment, upkeep, and security within an organization is not just a duplication of effort; it removes the opportunity for improved synergy with all levels of the business. The first OpenStack cluster, with a centralized dedicated developer and service engineering team, went live in June 2012.  This model has served us well and has been a crucial piece of making OpenStack succeed at Yahoo. One of the biggest advantages to a centralized, core team is the ability to collaborate with the foundational teams upon which any business is built: Supply chain, Datacenter Site-Operations, Finance, and finally our customers, the engineering teams. Building a close relationship with these vital parts of the business provides the ability to streamline the process of scaling inventory and presenting on-demand infrastructure to the company.

Developers love instant access to compute resources

Our developer productivity clusters, named “OpenHouse,” were a huge hit. Ideation and experimentation are core to developers’ DNA at Yahoo. It empowers our engineers to innovate, prototype, develop, and quickly iterate on ideas. No longer is a developer reliant on a static and costly development machine under their desk. OpenHouse enables developer agility and cost savings by obviating the desktop.

Dynamic infrastructure empowers agile products

From a humble beginning of a single, small OpenStack cluster, Yahoo’s OpenStack footprint is growing beyond 100,000 VM instances globally, with our single largest virtual machine cluster running over a thousand compute nodes, without using Nova Cells.

Until this point, Yahoo’s production footprint was nearly 100% focused on baremetal – a part of the business that one cannot simply ignore. In 2013, Yahoo OpenStack Baremetal began to manage all new compute deployments. Interestingly, after moving to a common API to provision baremetal and virtual machines, there was a marked increase in demand for virtual machines.

Developers across all major business units ranging from Yahoo Mail, Video, News, Finance, Sports and many more, were thrilled with getting instant access to compute resources to hit the ground running on their projects. Today, the OpenStack team is continuing to fully migrate the business to OpenStack-managed. Our baremetal footprint is well beyond that of our VMs, with over 100,000 baremetal instances provisioned by OpenStack Nova via Ironic.

How did Yahoo hit this scale?  

Scaling OpenStack begins with understanding how its various components work and how they communicate with one another. This topic can be very deep and for the sake of brevity, we’ll hit the high points.

1. Start at the bottom and think about the underlying hardware

Do not overlook the unique resource constraints for the services which power your cloud, nor the fashion in which those services are to be used. Leverage that understanding to drive hardware selection. For example, when one examines the role of the database server in an OpenStack cluster, and considers the multitudinous calls to the database: compute node heartbeats, instance state changes, normal user operations, and so on; they would conclude this core component is extremely busy in even a modest-sized Nova cluster, and in need of adequate computational resources to perform. Yet many deployers skimp on the hardware. The performance of the whole cluster is bottlenecked by the DB I/O. By thinking ahead you can save yourself a lot of heartburn later on.

2. Think about how things communicate

Our cluster databases are configured to be multi-master single-writer with automated failover. Control plane services have been modified to split DB reads directly to the read slaves and only write to the write-master. This distributes load across the database servers.

3. Scale wide

OpenStack has many small horizontally-scalable components which can peacefully cohabitate on the same machines: the Nova, Keystone, and Glance APIs, for example. Stripe these across several small or modest hardware. Some services, such as the Nova scheduler, run the risk of race conditions when running multi-active. If the risk of race conditions is unacceptable, use ZooKeeper to manage leader election.

4. Remove dependencies

In a Yahoo datacenter, DHCP is only used to provision baremetal servers. By statically declaring IPs in our instances via cloud-init, our infrastructure is less prone to outage from a failure in the DHCP infrastructure.

5. Don’t be afraid to replace things

Neutron used Dnsmasq to provide DHCP services, however it was not designed to address the complexity or scale of a dynamic environment. For example, Dnsmasq must be restarted for any config change, such as when a new host is being provisioned.  In the Yahoo OpenStack clusters this has been replaced by ISC-DHCPD, which scales far better than Dnsmasq and allows dynamic configuration updates via an API.

6. Or split them apart

Some of the core imaging services provided by Ironic, such as DHCP, TFTP, and HTTPS communicate with a host during the provisioning process. These services are normally  part of the Ironic Conductor (IC) service. In our environment we split these services into a new and physically-distinct service called the Ironic Transport Service (ITS). This brings value by:

  • Adding security: Splitting the ITS from the IC allows us to block all network traffic from production compute nodes to the IC, and other parts of our control plane. If a malicious entity attacks a node serving production traffic, they cannot escalate from it  to our control plane.
  • Scale: The ITS hosts allow us to horizontally scale the core provisioning services with which nodes communicate.
  • Flexibility: ITS allows Yahoo to manage remote sites, such as peering points, without building a new cluster in that site. Resources in those sites can now be managed by the nearest Yahoo owned & operated (O&O) datacenter, without needing to build a whole cluster in each site.

Be prepared for faulty hardware!

Running IaaS reliably at hyperscale is more than just scaling the control plane. One must take a holistic look at the system and consider everything. In fact, when examining provisioning failures, our engineers determined the majority root cause was faulty hardware. For example, there are a number of machines from varying vendors whose IPMI firmware fails from time to time, leaving the host inaccessible to remote power management. Some fail within minutes or weeks of installation. These failures occur on many different models, across many generations, and across many hardware vendors. Exposing these failures to users would create a very negative experience, and the cloud must be built to tolerate this complexity.

Focus on the end state

Yahoo’s experience shows that one can run OpenStack at hyperscale, leveraging it to wrap infrastructure and remove perceived complexity. Correctly leveraged, OpenStack presents an easy, consistent, and error-free interface. Delivering this interface is core to our design philosophy as Yahoo continues to double down on our OpenStack investment. The Yahoo OpenStack team looks forward to continue collaborating with the OpenStack community to share feedback and code.