Tag Archives: IAM users

The 10 Most Viewed Security-Related AWS Knowledge Center Articles and Videos for November 2017

Post Syndicated from Maggie Burke original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-10-most-viewed-security-related-aws-knowledge-center-articles-and-videos-for-november-2017/

AWS Knowledge Center image

The AWS Knowledge Center helps answer the questions most frequently asked by AWS Support customers. The following 10 Knowledge Center security articles and videos have been the most viewed this month. It’s likely you’ve wondered about a few of these topics yourself, so here’s a chance to learn the answers!

  1. How do I create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy to restrict access for an IAM user, group, or role to a particular Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)?
    Learn how to apply a custom IAM policy to restrict IAM user, group, or role permissions for creating and managing Amazon EC2 instances in a specified VPC.
  2. How do I use an MFA token to authenticate access to my AWS resources through the AWS CLI?
    One IAM best practice is to protect your account and its resources by using a multi-factor authentication (MFA) device. If you plan use the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) while using an MFA device, you must create a temporary session token.
  3. Can I restrict an IAM user’s EC2 access to specific resources?
    This article demonstrates how to link multiple AWS accounts through AWS Organizations and isolate IAM user groups in their own accounts.
  4. I didn’t receive a validation email for the SSL certificate I requested through AWS Certificate Manager (ACM)—where is it?
    Can’t find your ACM validation emails? Be sure to check the email address to which you requested that ACM send validation emails.
  5. How do I create an IAM policy that has a source IP restriction but still allows users to switch roles in the AWS Management Console?
    Learn how to write an IAM policy that not only includes a source IP restriction but also lets your users switch roles in the console.
  6. How do I allow users from another account to access resources in my account through IAM?
    If you have the 12-digit account number and permissions to create and edit IAM roles and users for both accounts, you can permit specific IAM users to access resources in your account.
  7. What are the differences between a service control policy (SCP) and an IAM policy?
    Learn how to distinguish an SCP from an IAM policy.
  8. How do I share my customer master keys (CMKs) across multiple AWS accounts?
    To grant another account access to your CMKs, create an IAM policy on the secondary account that grants access to use your CMKs.
  9. How do I set up AWS Trusted Advisor notifications?
    Learn how to receive free weekly email notifications from Trusted Advisor.
  10. How do I use AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) encryption context to protect the integrity of encrypted data?
    Encryption context name-value pairs used with AWS KMS encryption and decryption operations provide a method for checking ciphertext authenticity. Learn how to use encryption context to help protect your encrypted data.

The AWS Security Blog will publish an updated version of this list regularly going forward. You also can subscribe to the AWS Knowledge Center Videos playlist on YouTube.

– Maggie

Using AWS CodeCommit Pull Requests to request code reviews and discuss code

Post Syndicated from Chris Barclay original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-aws-codecommit-pull-requests-to-request-code-reviews-and-discuss-code/

Thank you to Michael Edge, Senior Cloud Architect, for a great blog on CodeCommit pull requests.

~~~~~~~

AWS CodeCommit is a fully managed service for securely hosting private Git repositories. CodeCommit now supports pull requests, which allows repository users to review, comment upon, and interactively iterate on code changes. Used as a collaboration tool between team members, pull requests help you to review potential changes to a CodeCommit repository before merging those changes into the repository. Each pull request goes through a simple lifecycle, as follows:

  • The new features to be merged are added as one or more commits to a feature branch. The commits are not merged into the destination branch.
  • The pull request is created, usually from the difference between two branches.
  • Team members review and comment on the pull request. The pull request might be updated with additional commits that contain changes made in response to comments, or include changes made to the destination branch.
  • Once team members are happy with the pull request, it is merged into the destination branch. The commits are applied to the destination branch in the same order they were added to the pull request.

Commenting is an integral part of the pull request process, and is used to collaborate between the developers and the reviewer. Reviewers add comments and questions to a pull request during the review process, and developers respond to these with explanations. Pull request comments can be added to the overall pull request, a file within the pull request, or a line within a file.

To make the comments more useful, sign in to the AWS Management Console as an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) user. The username will then be associated with the comment, indicating the owner of the comment. Pull request comments are a great quality improvement tool as they allow the entire development team visibility into what reviewers are looking for in the code. They also serve as a record of the discussion between team members at a point in time, and shouldn’t be deleted.

AWS CodeCommit is also introducing the ability to add comments to a commit, another useful collaboration feature that allows team members to discuss code changed as part of a commit. This helps you discuss changes made in a repository, including why the changes were made, whether further changes are necessary, or whether changes should be merged. As is the case with pull request comments, you can comment on an overall commit, on a file within a commit, or on a specific line or change within a file, and other repository users can respond to your comments. Comments are not restricted to commits, they can also be used to comment on the differences between two branches, or between two tags. Commit comments are separate from pull request comments, i.e. you will not see commit comments when reviewing a pull request – you will only see pull request comments.

A pull request example

Let’s get started by running through an example. We’ll take a typical pull request scenario and look at how we’d use CodeCommit and the AWS Management Console for each of the steps.

To try out this scenario, you’ll need:

  • An AWS CodeCommit repository with some sample code in the master branch. We’ve provided sample code below.
  • Two AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) users, both with the AWSCodeCommitPowerUser managed policy applied to them.
  • Git installed on your local computer, and access configured for AWS CodeCommit.
  • A clone of the AWS CodeCommit repository on your local computer.

In the course of this example, you’ll sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console as one IAM user to create the pull request, and as the other IAM user to review the pull request. To learn more about how to set up your IAM users and how to connect to AWS CodeCommit with Git, see the following topics:

  • Information on creating an IAM user with AWS Management Console access.
  • Instructions on how to access CodeCommit using Git.
  • If you’d like to use the same ‘hello world’ application as used in this article, here is the source code:
package com.amazon.helloworld;

public class Main {
	public static void main(String[] args) {

		System.out.println("Hello, world");
	}
}

The scenario below uses the us-east-2 region.

Creating the branches

Before we jump in and create a pull request, we’ll need at least two branches. In this example, we’ll follow a branching strategy similar to the one described in GitFlow. We’ll create a new branch for our feature from the main development branch (the default branch). We’ll develop the feature in the feature branch. Once we’ve written and tested the code for the new feature in that branch, we’ll create a pull request that contains the differences between the feature branch and the main development branch. Our team lead (the second IAM user) will review the changes in the pull request. Once the changes have been reviewed, the feature branch will be merged into the development branch.

Figure 1: Pull request link

Sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console with the IAM user you want to use as the developer. You can use an existing repository or you can go ahead and create a new one. We won’t be merging any changes to the master branch of your repository, so it’s safe to use an existing repository for this example. You’ll find the Pull requests link has been added just above the Commits link (see Figure 1), and below Commits you’ll find the Branches link. Click Branches and create a new branch called ‘develop’, branched from the ‘master’ branch. Then create a new branch called ‘feature1’, branched from the ‘develop’ branch. You’ll end up with three branches, as you can see in Figure 2. (Your repository might contain other branches in addition to the three shown in the figure).

Figure 2: Create a feature branch

If you haven’t cloned your repo yet, go to the Code link in the CodeCommit console and click the Connect button. Follow the instructions to clone your repo (detailed instructions are here). Open a terminal or command line and paste the git clone command supplied in the Connect instructions for your repository. The example below shows cloning a repository named codecommit-demo:

git clone https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo

If you’ve previously cloned the repo you’ll need to update your local repo with the branches you created. Open a terminal or command line and make sure you’re in the root directory of your repo, then run the following command:

git remote update origin

You’ll see your new branches pulled down to your local repository.

$ git remote update origin
Fetching origin
From https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
 * [new branch]      develop    -> origin/develop
 * [new branch]      feature1   -> origin/feature1

You can also see your new branches by typing:

git branch --all

$ git branch --all
* master
  remotes/origin/develop
  remotes/origin/feature1
  remotes/origin/master

Now we’ll make a change to the ‘feature1’ branch. Open a terminal or command line and check out the feature1 branch by running the following command:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Branch feature1 set up to track remote branch feature1 from origin.
Switched to a new branch 'feature1'

Make code changes

Edit a file in the repo using your favorite editor and save the changes. Commit your changes to the local repository, and push your changes to CodeCommit. For example:

git commit -am 'added new feature'
git push origin feature1

$ git commit -am 'added new feature'
[feature1 8f6cb28] added new feature
1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

$ git push origin feature1
Counting objects: 9, done.
Delta compression using up to 4 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.
Writing objects: 100% (9/9), 617 bytes | 617.00 KiB/s, done.
Total 9 (delta 2), reused 0 (delta 0)
To https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
   2774a53..8f6cb28  feature1 -> feature1

Creating the pull request

Now we have a ‘feature1’ branch that differs from the ‘develop’ branch. At this point we want to merge our changes into the ‘develop’ branch. We’ll create a pull request to notify our team members to review our changes and check whether they are ready for a merge.

In the AWS CodeCommit console, click Pull requests. Click Create pull request. On the next page select ‘develop’ as the destination branch and ‘feature1’ as the source branch. Click Compare. CodeCommit will check for merge conflicts and highlight whether the branches can be automatically merged using the fast-forward option, or whether a manual merge is necessary. A pull request can be created in both situations.

Figure 3: Create a pull request

After comparing the two branches, the CodeCommit console displays the information you’ll need in order to create the pull request. In the ‘Details’ section, the ‘Title’ for the pull request is mandatory, and you may optionally provide comments to your reviewers to explain the code change you have made and what you’d like them to review. In the ‘Notifications’ section, there is an option to set up notifications to notify subscribers of changes to your pull request. Notifications will be sent on creation of the pull request as well as for any pull request updates or comments. And finally, you can review the changes that make up this pull request. This includes both the individual commits (a pull request can contain one or more commits, available in the Commits tab) as well as the changes made to each file, i.e. the diff between the two branches referenced by the pull request, available in the Changes tab. After you have reviewed this information and added a title for your pull request, click the Create button. You will see a confirmation screen, as shown in Figure 4, indicating that your pull request has been successfully created, and can be merged without conflicts into the ‘develop’ branch.

Figure 4: Pull request confirmation page

Reviewing the pull request

Now let’s view the pull request from the perspective of the team lead. If you set up notifications for this CodeCommit repository, creating the pull request would have sent an email notification to the team lead, and he/she can use the links in the email to navigate directly to the pull request. In this example, sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console as the IAM user you’re using as the team lead, and click Pull requests. You will see the same information you did during creation of the pull request, plus a record of activity related to the pull request, as you can see in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Team lead reviewing the pull request

Commenting on the pull request

You now perform a thorough review of the changes and make a number of comments using the new pull request comment feature. To gain an overall perspective on the pull request, you might first go to the Commits tab and review how many commits are included in this pull request. Next, you might visit the Changes tab to review the changes, which displays the differences between the feature branch code and the develop branch code. At this point, you can add comments to the pull request as you work through each of the changes. Let’s go ahead and review the pull request. During the review, you can add review comments at three levels:

  • The overall pull request
  • A file within the pull request
  • An individual line within a file

The overall pull request
In the Changes tab near the bottom of the page you’ll see a ‘Comments on changes’ box. We’ll add comments here related to the overall pull request. Add your comments as shown in Figure 6 and click the Save button.

Figure 6: Pull request comment

A specific file in the pull request
Hovering your mouse over a filename in the Changes tab will cause a blue ‘comments’ icon to appear to the left of the filename. Clicking the icon will allow you to enter comments specific to this file, as in the example in Figure 7. Go ahead and add comments for one of the files changed by the developer. Click the Save button to save your comment.

Figure 7: File comment

A specific line in a file in the pull request
A blue ‘comments’ icon will appear as you hover over individual lines within each file in the pull request, allowing you to create comments against lines that have been added, removed or are unchanged. In Figure 8, you add comments against a line that has been added to the source code, encouraging the developer to review the naming standards. Go ahead and add line comments for one of the files changed by the developer. Click the Save button to save your comment.

Figure 8: Line comment

A pull request that has been commented at all three levels will look similar to Figure 9. The pull request comment is shown expanded in the ‘Comments on changes’ section, while the comments at file and line level are shown collapsed. A ‘comment’ icon indicates that comments exist at file and line level. Clicking the icon will expand and show the comment. Since you are expecting the developer to make further changes based on your comments, you won’t merge the pull request at this stage, but will leave it open awaiting feedback. Each comment you made results in a notification being sent to the developer, who can respond to the comments. This is great for remote working, where developers and team lead may be in different time zones.

Figure 9: Fully commented pull request

Adding a little complexity

A typical development team is going to be creating pull requests on a regular basis. It’s highly likely that the team lead will merge other pull requests into the ‘develop’ branch while pull requests on feature branches are in the review stage. This may result in a change to the ‘Mergable’ status of a pull request. Let’s add this scenario into the mix and check out how a developer will handle this.

To test this scenario, we could create a new pull request and ask the team lead to merge this to the ‘develop’ branch. But for the sake of simplicity we’ll take a shortcut. Clone your CodeCommit repo to a new folder, switch to the ‘develop’ branch, and make a change to one of the same files that were changed in your pull request. Make sure you change a line of code that was also changed in the pull request. Commit and push this back to CodeCommit. Since you’ve just changed a line of code in the ‘develop’ branch that has also been changed in the ‘feature1’ branch, the ‘feature1’ branch cannot be cleanly merged into the ‘develop’ branch. Your developer will need to resolve this merge conflict.

A developer reviewing the pull request would see the pull request now looks similar to Figure 10, with a ‘Resolve conflicts’ status rather than the ‘Mergable’ status it had previously (see Figure 5).

Figure 10: Pull request with merge conflicts

Reviewing the review comments

Once the team lead has completed his review, the developer will review the comments and make the suggested changes. As a developer, you’ll see the list of review comments made by the team lead in the pull request Activity tab, as shown in Figure 11. The Activity tab shows the history of the pull request, including commits and comments. You can reply to the review comments directly from the Activity tab, by clicking the Reply button, or you can do this from the Changes tab. The Changes tab shows the comments for the latest commit, as comments on previous commits may be associated with lines that have changed or been removed in the current commit. Comments for previous commits are available to view and reply to in the Activity tab.

In the Activity tab, use the shortcut link (which looks like this </>) to move quickly to the source code associated with the comment. In this example, you will make further changes to the source code to address the pull request review comments, so let’s go ahead and do this now. But first, you will need to resolve the ‘Resolve conflicts’ status.

Figure 11: Pull request activity

Resolving the ‘Resolve conflicts’ status

The ‘Resolve conflicts’ status indicates there is a merge conflict between the ‘develop’ branch and the ‘feature1’ branch. This will require manual intervention to restore the pull request back to the ‘Mergable’ state. We will resolve this conflict next.

Open a terminal or command line and check out the develop branch by running the following command:

git checkout develop

$ git checkout develop
Switched to branch 'develop'
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/develop'.

To incorporate the changes the team lead made to the ‘develop’ branch, merge the remote ‘develop’ branch with your local copy:

git pull

$ git pull
remote: Counting objects: 9, done.
Unpacking objects: 100% (9/9), done.
From https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
   af13c82..7b36f52  develop    -> origin/develop
Updating af13c82..7b36f52
Fast-forward
 src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java | 2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

Then checkout the ‘feature1’ branch:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Switched to branch 'feature1'
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/feature1'.

Now merge the changes from the ‘develop’ branch into your ‘feature1’ branch:

git merge develop

$ git merge develop
Auto-merging src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java
Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result.

Yes, this fails. The file Main.java has been changed in both branches, resulting in a merge conflict that can’t be resolved automatically. However, Main.java will now contain markers that indicate where the conflicting code is, and you can use these to resolve the issues manually. Edit Main.java using your favorite IDE, and you’ll see it looks something like this:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * This class prints a hello world message
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

<<<<<<< HEAD
        Date todaysdate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earthling. Today's date is: " + todaysdate);
=======
      System.out.println("Hello, earth");
>>>>>>> develop
   }
}

The code between HEAD and ‘===’ is the code the developer added in the ‘feature1’ branch (HEAD represents ‘feature1’ because this is the current checked out branch). The code between ‘===’ and ‘>>> develop’ is the code added to the ‘develop’ branch by the team lead. We’ll resolve the conflict by manually merging both changes, resulting in an updated Main.java:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * This class prints a hello world message
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

        Date todaysdate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earth. Today's date is: " + todaysdate);
   }
}

After saving the change you can add and commit it to your local repo:

git add src/
git commit -m 'fixed merge conflict by merging changes'

Fixing issues raised by the reviewer

Now you are ready to address the comments made by the team lead. If you are no longer pointing to the ‘feature1’ branch, check out the ‘feature1’ branch by running the following command:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Branch feature1 set up to track remote branch feature1 from origin.
Switched to a new branch 'feature1'

Edit the source code in your favorite IDE and make the changes to address the comments. In this example, the developer has updated the source code as follows:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 *  This class prints a hello world message
 *
 * @author Michael Edge
 * @see HelloEarth
 * @version 1.0
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

        Date todaysDate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earth. Today's date is: " + todaysDate);
   }
}

After saving the changes, commit and push to the CodeCommit ‘feature1’ branch as you did previously:

git commit -am 'updated based on review comments'
git push origin feature1

Responding to the reviewer

Now that you’ve fixed the code issues you will want to respond to the review comments. In the AWS CodeCommit console, check that your latest commit appears in the pull request Commits tab. You now have a pull request consisting of more than one commit. The pull request in Figure 12 has four commits, which originated from the following activities:

  • 8th Nov: the original commit used to initiate this pull request
  • 10th Nov, 3 hours ago: the commit by the team lead to the ‘develop’ branch, merged into our ‘feature1’ branch
  • 10th Nov, 24 minutes ago: the commit by the developer that resolved the merge conflict
  • 10th Nov, 4 minutes ago: the final commit by the developer addressing the review comments

Figure 12: Pull request with multiple commits

Let’s reply to the review comments provided by the team lead. In the Activity tab, reply to the pull request comment and save it, as shown in Figure 13.

Figure 13: Replying to a pull request comment

At this stage, your code has been committed and you’ve updated your pull request comments, so you are ready for a final review by the team lead.

Final review

The team lead reviews the code changes and comments made by the developer. As team lead, you own the ‘develop’ branch and it’s your decision on whether to merge the changes in the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch. You can close the pull request with or without merging using the Merge and Close buttons at the bottom of the pull request page (see Figure 13). Clicking Close will allow you to add comments on why you are closing the pull request without merging. Merging will perform a fast-forward merge, incorporating the commits referenced by the pull request. Let’s go ahead and click the Merge button to merge the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch.

Figure 14: Merging the pull request

After merging a pull request, development of that feature is complete and the feature branch is no longer needed. It’s common practice to delete the feature branch after merging. CodeCommit provides a check box during merge to automatically delete the associated feature branch, as seen in Figure 14. Clicking the Merge button will merge the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch, as shown in Figure 15. This will update the status of the pull request to ‘Merged’, and will close the pull request.

Conclusion

This blog has demonstrated how pull requests can be used to request a code review, and enable reviewers to get a comprehensive summary of what is changing, provide feedback to the author, and merge the code into production. For more information on pull requests, see the documentation.

Visualize AWS Cloudtrail Logs using AWS Glue and Amazon Quicksight

Post Syndicated from Luis Caro Perez original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/streamline-aws-cloudtrail-log-visualization-using-aws-glue-and-amazon-quicksight/

Being able to easily visualize AWS CloudTrail logs gives you a better understanding of how your AWS infrastructure is being used. It can also help you audit and review AWS API calls and detect security anomalies inside your AWS account. To do this, you must be able to perform analytics based on your CloudTrail logs.

In this post, I walk through using AWS Glue and AWS Lambda to convert AWS CloudTrail logs from JSON to a query-optimized format dataset in Amazon S3. I then use Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight to query and visualize the data.

Solution overview

To process CloudTrail logs, you must implement the following architecture:

CloudTrail delivers log files in an Amazon S3 bucket folder. To correctly crawl these logs, you modify the file contents and folder structure using an Amazon S3-triggered Lambda function that stores the transformed files in an S3 bucket single folder. When the files are in a single folder, AWS Glue scans the data, converts it into Apache Parquet format, and catalogs it to allow for querying and visualization using Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight.

Walkthrough

Let’s look at the steps that are required to build the solution.

Set up CloudTrail logs

First, you need to set up a trail that delivers log files to an S3 bucket. To create a trail in CloudTrail, follow the instructions in Creating a Trail.

When you finish, the trail settings page should look like the following screenshot:

In this example, I set up log files to be delivered to the cloudtraillfcaro bucket.

Consolidate CloudTrail reports into a single folder using Lambda

AWS CloudTrail delivers log files using the following folder structure inside the configured Amazon S3 bucket:

AWSLogs/ACCOUNTID/CloudTrail/REGION/YEAR/MONTH/HOUR/filename.json.gz

Additionally, log files have the following structure:

{
    "Records": [{
        "eventVersion": "1.01",
        "userIdentity": {
            "type": "IAMUser",
            "principalId": "AIDAJDPLRKLG7UEXAMPLE",
            "arn": "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:user/Alice",
            "accountId": "123456789012",
            "accessKeyId": "AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE",
            "userName": "Alice",
            "sessionContext": {
                "attributes": {
                    "mfaAuthenticated": "false",
                    "creationDate": "2014-03-18T14:29:23Z"
                }
            }
        },
        "eventTime": "2014-03-18T14:30:07Z",
        "eventSource": "cloudtrail.amazonaws.com",
        "eventName": "StartLogging",
        "awsRegion": "us-west-2",
        "sourceIPAddress": "72.21.198.64",
        "userAgent": "signin.amazonaws.com",
        "requestParameters": {
            "name": "Default"
        },
        "responseElements": null,
        "requestID": "cdc73f9d-aea9-11e3-9d5a-835b769c0d9c",
        "eventID": "3074414d-c626-42aa-984b-68ff152d6ab7"
    },
    ... additional entries ...
    ]

If AWS Glue crawlers are used to catalog these files as they are written, the following obstacles arise:

  1. AWS Glue identifies different tables per different folders because they don’t follow a traditional partition format.
  2. Based on the structure of the file content, AWS Glue identifies the tables as having a single column of type array.
  3. CloudTrail logs have JSON attributes that use uppercase letters. According to the Best Practices When Using Athena with AWS Glue, it is recommended that you convert these to lowercase.

To have AWS Glue catalog all log files in a single table with all the columns describing each event, implement the following Lambda function:

from __future__ import print_function
import json
import urllib
import boto3
import gzip

s3 = boto3.resource('s3')
client = boto3.client('s3')

def convertColumntoLowwerCaps(obj):
    for key in obj.keys():
        new_key = key.lower()
        if new_key != key:
            obj[new_key] = obj[key]
            del obj[key]
    return obj


def lambda_handler(event, context):

    bucket = event['Records'][0]['s3']['bucket']['name']
    key = urllib.unquote_plus(event['Records'][0]['s3']['object']['key'].encode('utf8'))
    print(bucket)
    print(key)
    try:
        newKey = 'flatfiles/' + key.replace("/", "")
        client.download_file(bucket, key, '/tmp/file.json.gz')
        with gzip.open('/tmp/out.json.gz', 'w') as output, gzip.open('/tmp/file.json.gz', 'rb') as file:
            i = 0
            for line in file: 
                for record in json.loads(line,object_hook=convertColumntoLowwerCaps)['records']:
            		if i != 0:
            		    output.write("\n")
            		output.write(json.dumps(record))
            		i += 1
        client.upload_file('/tmp/out.json.gz', bucket,newKey)
        return "success"
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        print('Error processing object {} from bucket {}. Make sure they exist and your bucket is in the same region as this function.'.format(key, bucket))
        raise e

The function goes over each element of the records array, changes uppercase letters to lowercase in column names, and inserts each element of the array as a single line of a new file. The new file is saved inside a flatfiles folder created by the function without any subfolders in the S3 bucket.

The function should have a role containing a policy with at least the following permissions:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Action": [
                "s3:*"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::cloudtraillfcaro/*",
                "arn:aws:s3:::cloudtraillfcaro"
            ],
            "Effect": "Allow"
        }
    ]
}

In this example, CloudTrail delivers logs to the cloudtraillfcaro bucket. Make sure that you replace this name with your bucket name in the policy. For more information about how to work with inline policies, see Working with Inline Policies.

After the Lambda function is created, you can set up the following trigger using the Triggers tab on the AWS Lambda console.

Choose Add trigger, and choose S3 as a source of the trigger.

After choosing the source, configure the following settings:

In the trigger, any file that is written to the path for the log files—which in this case is AWSLogs/119582755581/CloudTrail/—is processed. Make sure that the Enable trigger check box is selected and that the bucket and prefix parameters match your use case.

After you set up the function and receive log files, the bucket (in this case cloudtraillfcaro) should contain the processed files inside the flatfiles folder.

Catalog source data

Once the files are processed by the Lambda function, set up a crawler named cloudtrail to catalog them.

The crawler must point to the flatfiles folder.

All the crawlers and AWS Glue jobs created for this solution must have a role with the AWSGlueServiceRole managed policy and an inline policy with permissions to modify the S3 buckets used on the Lambda function. For more information, see Working with Managed Policies.

The role should look like the following:

In this example, the inline policy named s3perms contains the permissions to modify the S3 buckets.

After you choose the role, you can schedule the crawler to run on demand.

A new database is created, and the crawler is set to use it. In this case, the cloudtrail database is used for all the tables.

After the crawler runs, a single table should be created in the catalog with the following structure:

The table should contain the following columns:

Create and run the AWS Glue job

To convert all the CloudTrail logs to a columnar store in Parquet, set up an AWS Glue job by following these steps.

Upload the following script into a bucket in Amazon S3:

import sys
from awsglue.transforms import *
from awsglue.utils import getResolvedOptions
from pyspark.context import SparkContext
from awsglue.context import GlueContext
from awsglue.job import Job
import boto3
import time

## @params: [JOB_NAME]
args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME'])

sc = SparkContext()
glueContext = GlueContext(sc)
spark = glueContext.spark_session
job = Job(glueContext)
job.init(args['JOB_NAME'], args)

datasource0 = glueContext.create_dynamic_frame.from_catalog(database = "cloudtrail", table_name = "flatfiles", transformation_ctx = "datasource0")
resolvechoice1 = ResolveChoice.apply(frame = datasource0, choice = "make_struct", transformation_ctx = "resolvechoice1")
relationalized1 = resolvechoice1.relationalize("trail", args["TempDir"]).select("trail")
datasink = glueContext.write_dynamic_frame.from_options(frame = relationalized1, connection_type = "s3", connection_options = {"path": "s3://cloudtraillfcaro/parquettrails"}, format = "parquet", transformation_ctx = "datasink4")
job.commit()

In the example, you load the script as a file named cloudtrailtoparquet.py. Make sure that you modify the script and update the “{"path": "s3://cloudtraillfcaro/parquettrails"}” with the destination in which you want to store your results.

After uploading the script, add a new AWS Glue job. Choose a name and role for the job, and choose the option of running the job from An existing script that you provide.

To avoid processing the same data twice, enable the Job bookmark setting in the Advanced properties section of the job properties.

Choose Next twice, and then choose Finish.

If logs are already in the flatfiles folder, you can run the job on demand to generate the first set of results.

Once the job starts running, wait for it to complete.

When the job is finished, its Run status should be Succeeded. After that, you can verify that the Parquet files are written to the Amazon S3 location.

Catalog results

To be able to process results from Athena, you can use an AWS Glue crawler to catalog the results of the AWS Glue job.

In this example, the crawler is set to use the same database as the source named cloudtrail.

You can run the crawler using the console. When the crawler finishes running and has processed the Parquet results, a new table should be created in the AWS Glue Data Catalog. In this example, it’s named parquettrails.

The table should have the classification set to parquet.

It should have the same columns as the flatfiles table, with the exception of the struct type columns, which should be relationalized into several columns:

In this example, notice how the requestparameters column, which was a struct in the original table (flatfiles), was transformed to several columns—one for each key value inside it. This is done using a transformation native to AWS Glue called relationalize.

Query results with Athena

After crawling the results, you can query them using Athena. For example, to query what events took place in the time frame between 2017-10-23t12:00:00 and 2017-10-23t13:00, use the following select statement:

select *
from cloudtrail.parquettrails
where eventtime > '2017-10-23T12:00:00Z' AND eventtime < '2017-10-23T13:00:00Z'
order by eventtime asc;

Be sure to replace cloudtrail.parquettrails with the names of your database and table that references the Parquet results. Replace the datetimes with an hour when your account had activity and was processed by the AWS Glue job.

Visualize results using Amazon QuickSight

Once you can query the data using Athena, you can visualize it using Amazon QuickSight. Before connecting Amazon QuickSight to Athena, be sure to grant QuickSight access to Athena and the associated S3 buckets in your account. For more information, see Managing Amazon QuickSight Permissions to AWS Resources. You can then create a new data set in Amazon QuickSight based on the Athena table that you created.

After setting up permissions, you can create a new analysis in Amazon QuickSight by choosing New analysis.

Then add a new data set.

Choose Athena as the source.

Give the data source a name (in this case, I named it cloudtrail).

Choose the name of the database and the table referencing the Parquet results.

Then choose Visualize.

After that, you should see the following screen:

Now you can create some visualizations. First, search for the sourceipaddress column, and drag it to the AutoGraph section.

You can see a list of the IP addresses that you have used to interact with AWS. To review whether these IP addresses have been used from IAM users, internal AWS services, or roles, use the type value that is inside the useridentity field of the original log files. Thanks to the relationalize transformation, this value is available as the useridentity.type column. After the column is added into the Group/Color box, the visualization should look like the following:

You can now see and distinguish the most used IPs and whether they are used from roles, AWS services, or IAM users.

After following all these steps, you can use Amazon QuickSight to add different columns from CloudTrail and perform different types of visualizations. You can build operational dashboards that continuously monitor AWS infrastructure usage and access. You can share those dashboards with others in your organization who might need to see this data.

Summary

In this post, you saw how you can use a simple Lambda function and an AWS Glue script to convert text files into Parquet to improve Athena query performance and data compression. The post also demonstrated how to use AWS Lambda to preprocess files in Amazon S3 and transform them into a format that is recognizable by AWS Glue crawlers.

This example, used AWS CloudTrail logs, but you can apply the proposed solution to any set of files that after preprocessing, can be cataloged by AWS Glue.


Additional Reading

Learn how to Harmonize, Query, and Visualize Data from Various Providers using AWS Glue, Amazon Athena, and Amazon QuickSight.


About the Authors

Luis Caro is a Big Data Consultant for AWS Professional Services. He works with our customers to provide guidance and technical assistance on big data projects, helping them improving the value of their solutions when using AWS.

 

 

 

Federate Database User Authentication Easily with IAM and Amazon Redshift

Post Syndicated from Thiyagarajan Arumugam original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/federate-database-user-authentication-easily-with-iam-and-amazon-redshift/

Managing database users though federation allows you to manage authentication and authorization procedures centrally. Amazon Redshift now supports database authentication with IAM, enabling user authentication though enterprise federation. No need to manage separate database users and passwords to further ease the database administration. You can now manage users outside of AWS and authenticate them for access to an Amazon Redshift data warehouse. Do this by integrating IAM authentication and a third-party SAML-2.0 identity provider (IdP), such as AD FS, PingFederate, or Okta. In addition, database users can also be automatically created at their first login based on corporate permissions.

In this post, I demonstrate how you can extend the federation to enable single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse.

SAML and Amazon Redshift

AWS supports Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0, which is an open standard for identity federation used by many IdPs. SAML enables federated SSO, which enables your users to sign in to the AWS Management Console. Users can also make programmatic calls to AWS API actions by using assertions from a SAML-compliant IdP. For example, if you use Microsoft Active Directory for corporate directories, you may be familiar with how Active Directory and AD FS work together to enable federation. For more information, see the Enabling Federation to AWS Using Windows Active Directory, AD FS, and SAML 2.0 AWS Security Blog post.

Amazon Redshift now provides the GetClusterCredentials API operation that allows you to generate temporary database user credentials for authentication. You can set up an IAM permissions policy that generates these credentials for connecting to Amazon Redshift. Extending the IAM authentication, you can configure the federation of AWS access though a SAML 2.0–compliant IdP. An IAM role can be configured to permit the federated users call the GetClusterCredentials action and generate temporary credentials to log in to Amazon Redshift databases. You can also set up policies to restrict access to Amazon Redshift clusters, databases, database user names, and user group.

Amazon Redshift federation workflow

In this post, I demonstrate how you can use a JDBC– or ODBC-based SQL client to log in to the Amazon Redshift cluster using this feature. The SQL clients used with Amazon Redshift JDBC or ODBC drivers automatically manage the process of calling the GetClusterCredentials action, retrieving the database user credentials, and establishing a connection to your Amazon Redshift database. You can also use your database application to programmatically call the GetClusterCredentials action, retrieve database user credentials, and connect to the database. I demonstrate these features using an example company to show how different database users accounts can be managed easily using federation.

The following diagram shows how the SSO process works:

  1. JDBC/ODBC
  2. Authenticate using Corp Username/Password
  3. IdP sends SAML assertion
  4. Call STS to assume role with SAML
  5. STS Returns Temp Credentials
  6. Use Temp Credentials to get Temp cluster credentials
  7. Connect to Amazon Redshift using temp credentials

Walkthrough

Example Corp. is using Active Directory (idp host:demo.examplecorp.com) to manage federated access for users in its organization. It has an AWS account: 123456789012 and currently manages an Amazon Redshift cluster with the cluster ID “examplecorp-dw”, database “analytics” in us-west-2 region for its Sales and Data Science teams. It wants the following access:

  • Sales users can access the examplecorp-dw cluster using the sales_grp database group
  • Sales users access examplecorp-dw through a JDBC-based SQL client
  • Sales users access examplecorp-dw through an ODBC connection, for their reporting tools
  • Data Science users access the examplecorp-dw cluster using the data_science_grp database group.
  • Partners access the examplecorp-dw cluster and query using the partner_grp database group.
  • Partners are not federated through Active Directory and are provided with separate IAM user credentials (with IAM user name examplecorpsalespartner).
  • Partners can connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster programmatically, using language such as Python.
  • All users are automatically created in Amazon Redshift when they log in for the first time.
  • (Optional) Internal users do not specify database user or group information in their connection string. It is automatically assigned.
  • Data warehouse users can use SSO for the Amazon Redshift data warehouse using the preceding permissions.

Step 1:  Set up IdPs and federation

The Enabling Federation to AWS Using Windows Active Directory post demonstrated how to prepare Active Directory and enable federation to AWS. Using those instructions, you can establish trust between your AWS account and the IdP and enable user access to AWS using SSO.  For more information, see Identity Providers and Federation.

For this walkthrough, assume that this company has already configured SSO to their AWS account: 123456789012 for their Active Directory domain demo.examplecorp.com. The Sales and Data Science teams are not required to specify database user and group information in the connection string. The connection string can be configured by adding SAML Attribute elements to your IdP. Configuring these optional attributes enables internal users to conveniently avoid providing the DbUser and DbGroup parameters when they log in to Amazon Redshift.

The user-name attribute can be set up as follows, with a user ID (for example, nancy) or an email address (for example. [email protected]):

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/DbUser">  
  <AttributeValue>user-name</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

The AutoCreate attribute can be defined as follows:

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/AutoCreate">
    <AttributeValue>true</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

The sales_grp database group can be included as follows:

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/DbGroups">
    <AttributeValue>sales_grp</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

For more information about attribute element configuration, see Configure SAML Assertions for Your IdP.

Step 2: Create IAM roles for access to the Amazon Redshift cluster

The next step is to create IAM policies with permissions to call GetClusterCredentials and provide authorization for Amazon Redshift resources. To grant a SQL client the ability to retrieve the cluster endpoint, region, and port automatically, include the redshift:DescribeClusters action with the Amazon Redshift cluster resource in the IAM role.  For example, users can connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster using a JDBC URL without the need to hardcode the Amazon Redshift endpoint:

Previous:  jdbc:redshift://endpoint:port/database

Current:  jdbc:redshift:iam://clustername:region/dbname

Use IAM to create the following policies. You can also use an existing user or role and assign these policies. For example, if you already created an IAM role for IdP access, you can attach the necessary policies to that role. Here is the policy created for sales users for this example:

Sales_DW_IAM_Policy

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:DescribeClusters"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ],
            "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "aws:userid": "AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com"
                }
            }
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:CreateClusterUser"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:JoinGroup"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

The policy uses the following parameter values:

  • Region: us-west-2
  • AWS Account: 123456789012
  • Cluster name: examplecorp-dw
  • Database group: sales_grp
  • IAM role: AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE
Policy Statement Description
{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:DescribeClusters"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
]
}

Allow users to retrieve the cluster endpoint, region, and port automatically for the Amazon Redshift cluster examplecorp-dw. This specification uses the resource format arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:cluster:clustername. For example, the SQL client JDBC can be specified in the format jdbc:redshift:iam://clustername:region/dbname.

For more information, see Amazon Resource Names.

{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
],
"Condition":{
"StringEquals":{
"aws:userid":"AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com"
}
}
}

Generates a temporary token to authenticate into the examplecorp-dw cluster. “arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}” restricts the corporate user name to the database user name for that user. This resource is specified using the format: arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:dbuser:clustername/dbusername.

The Condition block enforces that the AWS user ID should match “AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com”, so that individual users can authenticate only as themselves. The AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE role has the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy policy attached.

{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:CreateClusterUser"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
]
}
Automatically creates database users in examplecorp-dw, when they log in for the first time. Subsequent logins reuse the existing database user.
{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:JoinGroup"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp"
]
}
Allows sales users to join the sales_grp database group through the resource “arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp” that is specified in the format arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:dbgroup:clustername/dbgroupname.

Similar policies can be created for Data Science users with access to join the data_science_grp group in examplecorp-dw. You can now attach the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy policy to the role that is mapped to IdP application for SSO.
 For more information about how to define the claim rules, see Configuring SAML Assertions for the Authentication Response.

Because partners are not authorized using Active Directory, they are provided with IAM credentials and added to the partner_grp database group. The Partner_DW_IAM_Policy is attached to the IAM users for partners. The following policy allows partners to log in using the IAM user name as the database user name.

Partner_DW_IAM_Policy

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:DescribeClusters"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ],
            "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "redshift:DbUser": "${aws:username}"
                }
            }
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:CreateClusterUser"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:JoinGroup"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/partner_grp"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

redshift:DbUser“: “${aws:username}” forces an IAM user to use the IAM user name as the database user name.

With the previous steps configured, you can now establish the connection to Amazon Redshift through JDBC– or ODBC-supported clients.

Step 3: Set up database user access

Before you start connecting to Amazon Redshift using the SQL client, set up the database groups for appropriate data access. Log in to your Amazon Redshift database as superuser to create a database group, using CREATE GROUP.

Log in to examplecorp-dw/analytics as superuser and create the following groups and users:

CREATE GROUP sales_grp;
CREATE GROUP datascience_grp;
CREATE GROUP partner_grp;

Use the GRANT command to define access permissions to database objects (tables/views) for the preceding groups.

Step 4: Connect to Amazon Redshift using the JDBC SQL client

Assume that sales user “nancy” is using the SQL Workbench client and JDBC driver to log in to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse. The following steps help set up the client and establish the connection:

  1. Download the latest Amazon Redshift JDBC driver from the Configure a JDBC Connection page
  2. Build the JDBC URL with the IAM option in the following format:
    jdbc:redshift:iam://examplecorp-dw:us-west-2/sales_db

Because the redshift:DescribeClusters action is assigned to the preceding IAM roles, it automatically resolves the cluster endpoints and the port. Otherwise, you can specify the endpoint and port information in the JDBC URL, as described in Configure a JDBC Connection.

Identify the following JDBC options for providing the IAM credentials (see the “Prepare your environment” section) and configure in the SQL Workbench Connection Profile:

plugin_name=com.amazon.redshift.plugin.AdfsCredentialsProvider 
idp_host=demo.examplecorp.com (The name of the corporate identity provider host)
idp_port=443  (The port of the corporate identity provider host)
user=examplecorp\nancy(corporate user name)
password=***(corporate user password)

The SQL workbench configuration looks similar to the following screenshot:

Now, “nancy” can connect to examplecorp-dw by authenticating using the corporate Active Directory. Because the SAML attributes elements are already configured for nancy, she logs in as database user nancy and is assigned the sales_grp. Similarly, other Sales and Data Science users can connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster. A custom Amazon Redshift ODBC driver can also be used to connect using a SQL client. For more information, see Configure an ODBC Connection.

Step 5: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using JDBC SQL Client and IAM Credentials

This optional step is necessary only when you want to enable users that are not authenticated with Active Directory. Partners are provided with IAM credentials that they can use to connect to the examplecorp-dw Amazon Redshift clusters. These IAM users are attached to Partner_DW_IAM_Policy that assigns them to be assigned to the public database group in Amazon Redshift. The following JDBC URLs enable them to connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster:

jdbc:redshift:iam//examplecorp-dw/analytics?AccessKeyID=XXX&SecretAccessKey=YYY&DbUser=examplecorpsalespartner&DbGroup= partner_grp&AutoCreate=true

The AutoCreate option automatically creates a new database user the first time the partner logs in. There are several other options available to conveniently specify the IAM user credentials. For more information, see Options for providing IAM credentials.

Step 6: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using an ODBC client for Microsoft Windows

Assume that another sales user “uma” is using an ODBC-based client to log in to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse using Example Corp Active Directory. The following steps help set up the ODBC client and establish the Amazon Redshift connection in a Microsoft Windows operating system connected to your corporate network:

  1. Download and install the latest Amazon Redshift ODBC driver.
  2. Create a system DSN entry.
    1. In the Start menu, locate the driver folder or folders:
      • Amazon Redshift ODBC Driver (32-bit)
      • Amazon Redshift ODBC Driver (64-bit)
      • If you installed both drivers, you have a folder for each driver.
    2. Choose ODBC Administrator, and then type your administrator credentials.
    3. To configure the driver for all users on the computer, choose System DSN. To configure the driver for your user account only, choose User DSN.
    4. Choose Add.
  3. Select the Amazon Redshift ODBC driver, and choose Finish. Configure the following attributes:
    Data Source Name =any friendly name to identify the ODBC connection 
    Database=analytics
    user=uma(corporate user name)
    Auth Type-Identity Provider: AD FS
    password=leave blank (Windows automatically authenticates)
    Cluster ID: examplecorp-dw
    idp_host=demo.examplecorp.com (The name of the corporate IdP host)

This configuration looks like the following:

  1. Choose OK to save the ODBC connection.
  2. Verify that uma is set up with the SAML attributes, as described in the “Set up IdPs and federation” section.

The user uma can now use this ODBC connection to establish the connection to the Amazon Redshift cluster using any ODBC-based tools or reporting tools such as Tableau. Internally, uma authenticates using the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy  IAM role and is assigned the sales_grp database group.

Step 7: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using Python and IAM credentials

To enable partners, connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster programmatically, using Python on a computer such as Amazon EC2 instance. Reuse the IAM users that are attached to the Partner_DW_IAM_Policy policy defined in Step 2.

The following steps show this set up on an EC2 instance:

  1. Launch a new EC2 instance with the Partner_DW_IAM_Policy role, as described in Using an IAM Role to Grant Permissions to Applications Running on Amazon EC2 Instances. Alternatively, you can attach an existing IAM role to an EC2 instance.
  2. This example uses Python PostgreSQL Driver (PyGreSQL) to connect to your Amazon Redshift clusters. To install PyGreSQL on Amazon Linux, use the following command as the ec2-user:
    sudo easy_install pip
    sudo yum install postgresql postgresql-devel gcc python-devel
    sudo pip install PyGreSQL

  1. The following code snippet demonstrates programmatic access to Amazon Redshift for partner users:
    #!/usr/bin/env python
    """
    Usage:
    python redshift-unload-copy.py <config file> <region>
    
    * Copyright 2014, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.
    *
    * Licensed under the Amazon Software License (the "License").
    * You may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
    * A copy of the License is located at
    *
    * http://aws.amazon.com/asl/
    *
    * or in the "license" file accompanying this file. This file is distributed
    * on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either
    * express or implied. See the License for the specific language governing
    * permissions and limitations under the License.
    """
    
    import sys
    import pg
    import boto3
    
    REGION = 'us-west-2'
    CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER = 'examplecorp-dw'
    DB_NAME = 'sales_db'
    DB_USER = 'examplecorpsalespartner'
    
    options = """keepalives=1 keepalives_idle=200 keepalives_interval=200
                 keepalives_count=6"""
    
    set_timeout_stmt = "set statement_timeout = 1200000"
    
    def conn_to_rs(host, port, db, usr, pwd, opt=options, timeout=set_timeout_stmt):
        rs_conn_string = """host=%s port=%s dbname=%s user=%s password=%s
                             %s""" % (host, port, db, usr, pwd, opt)
        print "Connecting to %s:%s:%s as %s" % (host, port, db, usr)
        rs_conn = pg.connect(dbname=rs_conn_string)
        rs_conn.query(timeout)
        return rs_conn
    
    def main():
        # describe the cluster and fetch the IAM temporary credentials
        global redshift_client
        redshift_client = boto3.client('redshift', region_name=REGION)
        response_cluster_details = redshift_client.describe_clusters(ClusterIdentifier=CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER)
        response_credentials = redshift_client.get_cluster_credentials(DbUser=DB_USER,DbName=DB_NAME,ClusterIdentifier=CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER,DurationSeconds=3600)
        rs_host = response_cluster_details['Clusters'][0]['Endpoint']['Address']
        rs_port = response_cluster_details['Clusters'][0]['Endpoint']['Port']
        rs_db = DB_NAME
        rs_iam_user = response_credentials['DbUser']
        rs_iam_pwd = response_credentials['DbPassword']
        # connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster
        conn = conn_to_rs(rs_host, rs_port, rs_db, rs_iam_user,rs_iam_pwd)
        # execute a query
        result = conn.query("SELECT sysdate as dt")
        # fetch results from the query
        for dt_val in result.getresult() :
            print dt_val
        # close the Amazon Redshift connection
        conn.close()
    
    if __name__ == "__main__":
        main()

You can save this Python program in a file (redshiftscript.py) and execute it at the command line as ec2-user:

python redshiftscript.py

Now partners can connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster using the Python script, and authentication is federated through the IAM user.

Summary

In this post, I demonstrated how to use federated access using Active Directory and IAM roles to enable single sign-on to an Amazon Redshift cluster. I also showed how partners outside an organization can be managed easily using IAM credentials.  Using the GetClusterCredentials API action, now supported by Amazon Redshift, lets you manage a large number of database users and have them use corporate credentials to log in. You don’t have to maintain separate database user accounts.

Although this post demonstrated the integration of IAM with AD FS and Active Directory, you can replicate this solution across with your choice of SAML 2.0 third-party identity providers (IdP), such as PingFederate or Okta. For the different supported federation options, see Configure SAML Assertions for Your IdP.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.


Additional Reading

Learn how to establish federated access to your AWS resources by using Active Directory user attributes.


About the Author

Thiyagarajan Arumugam is a Big Data Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services and designs customer architectures to process data at scale. Prior to AWS, he built data warehouse solutions at Amazon.com. In his free time, he enjoys all outdoor sports and practices the Indian classical drum mridangam.

 

Newly Updated: Example AWS IAM Policies for You to Use and Customize

Post Syndicated from Deren Smith original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-example-policies-for-you-to-use-and-customize/

To help you grant access to specific resources and conditions, the Example Policies page in the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation now includes more than thirty policies for you to use or customize to meet your permissions requirements. The AWS Support team developed these policies from their experiences working with AWS customers over the years. The example policies cover common permissions use cases you might encounter across services such as Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon EC2, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, and IAM.

In this blog post, I introduce the updated Example Policies page and explain how to use and customize these policies for your needs.

The new Example Policies page

The Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide now provides an overview of the example policies and includes a link to view each policy on a separate page. Note that each of these policies has been reviewed and approved by AWS Support. If you would like to submit a policy that you have found to be particularly useful, post it on the IAM forum.

To give you an idea of the policies we have included on this page, the following are a few of the EC2 policies on the page:

To see the full list of available policies, see the Example Polices page.

In the following section, I demonstrate how to use a policy from the Example Policies page and customize it for your needs.

How to customize an example policy for your needs

Suppose you want to allow an IAM user, Bob, to start and stop EC2 instances with a specific resource tag. After looking through the Example Policies page, you see the policy, Allows Starting or Stopping EC2 Instances a User Has Tagged, Programmatically and in the Console.

To apply this policy to your specific use case:

  1. Navigate to the Policies section of the IAM console.
  2. Choose Create policy.
    Screenshot of choosing "Create policy"
  3. Choose the Select button next to Create Your Own Policy. You will see an empty policy document with boxes for Policy Name, Description, and Policy Document, as shown in the following screenshot.
  4. Type a name for the policy, copy the policy from the Example Policies page, and paste the policy in the Policy Document box. In this example, I use “start-stop-instances-for-owner-tag” as the policy name and “Allows users to start or stop instances if the instance tag Owner has the value of their user name” as the description.
  5. Update the placeholder text in the policy (see the full policy that follows this step). For example, replace <REGION> with a region from AWS Regions and Endpoints and <ACCOUNTNUMBER> with your 12-digit account number. The IAM policy variable, ${aws:username}, is a dynamic property in the policy that automatically applies to the user to which it is attached. For example, when the policy is attached to Bob, the policy replaces ${aws:username} with Bob. If you do not want to use the key value pair of Owner and ${aws:username}, you can edit the policy to include your desired key value pair. For example, if you want to use the key value pair, CostCenter:1234, you can modify “ec2:ResourceTag/Owner”: “${aws:username}” to “ec2:ResourceTag/CostCenter”: “1234”.
    {
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
           {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": [
              "ec2:StartInstances",
              "ec2:StopInstances"
          ],
                 "Resource": "arn:aws:ec2:<REGION>:<ACCOUNTNUMBER>:instance/*",
                 "Condition": {
              "StringEquals": {
                  "ec2:ResourceTag/Owner": "${aws:username}"
              }
          }
            },
            {
                 "Effect": "Allow",
                 "Action": "ec2:DescribeInstances",
                 "Resource": "*"
            }
        ]
    }

  6. After you have edited the policy, choose Create policy.

You have created a policy that allows an IAM user to stop and start EC2 instances in your account, as long as these instances have the correct resource tag and the policy is attached to your IAM users. You also can attach this policy to an IAM group and apply the policy to users by adding them to that group.

Summary

We updated the Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide so that you have a central location where you can find examples of the most commonly requested and used IAM policies. In addition to these example policies, we recommend that you review the list of AWS managed policies, including the AWS managed policies for job functions. You can choose these predefined policies from the IAM console and associate them with your IAM users, groups, and roles.

We will add more IAM policies to the Example Policies page over time. If you have a useful policy you would like to share with others, post it on the IAM forum. If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below.

– Deren

Use CloudFormation StackSets to Provision Resources Across Multiple AWS Accounts and Regions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/use-cloudformation-stacksets-to-provision-resources-across-multiple-aws-accounts-and-regions/

AWS CloudFormation helps AWS customers implement an Infrastructure as Code model. Instead of setting up their environments and applications by hand, they build a template and use it to create all of the necessary resources, collectively known as a CloudFormation stack. This model removes opportunities for manual error, increases efficiency, and ensures consistent configurations over time.

Today I would like to tell you about a new feature that makes CloudFormation even more useful. This feature is designed to help you to address the challenges that you face when you use Infrastructure as Code in situations that include multiple AWS accounts and/or AWS Regions. As a quick review:

Accounts – As I have told you in the past, many organizations use a multitude of AWS accounts, often using AWS Organizations to arrange the accounts into a hierarchy and to group them into Organizational Units, or OUs (read AWS Organizations – Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts to learn more). Our customers use multiple accounts for business units, applications, and developers. They often create separate accounts for development, testing, staging, and production on a per-application basis.

Regions – Customers also make great use of the large (and ever-growing) set of AWS Regions. They build global applications that span two or more regions, implement sophisticated multi-region disaster recovery models, replicate S3, Aurora, PostgreSQL, and MySQL data in real time, and choose locations for storage and processing of sensitive data in accord with national and regional regulations.

This expansion into multiple accounts and regions comes with some new challenges with respect to governance and consistency. Our customers tell us that they want to make sure that each new account is set up in accord with their internal standards. Among other things, they want to set up IAM users and roles, VPCs and VPC subnets, security groups, Config Rules, logging, and AWS Lambda functions in a consistent and reliable way.

Introducing StackSet
In order to address these important customer needs, we are launching CloudFormation StackSet today. You can now define an AWS resource configuration in a CloudFormation template and then roll it out across multiple AWS accounts and/or Regions with a couple of clicks. You can use this to set up a baseline level of AWS functionality that addresses the cross-account and cross-region scenarios that I listed above. Once you have set this up, you can easily expand coverage to additional accounts and regions.

This feature always works on a cross-account basis. The master account owns one or more StackSets and controls deployment to one or more target accounts. The master account must include an assumable IAM role and the target accounts must delegate trust to this role. To learn how to do this, read Prerequisites in the StackSet Documentation.

Each StackSet references a CloudFormation template and contains lists of accounts and regions. All operations apply to the cross-product of the accounts and regions in the StackSet. If the StackSet references three accounts (A1, A2, and A3) and four regions (R1, R2, R3, and R4), there are twelve targets:

  • Region R1: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R2: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R3: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R4: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.

Deploying a template initiates creation of a CloudFormation stack in an account/region pair. Templates are deployed sequentially to regions (you control the order) to multiple accounts within the region (you control the amount of parallelism). You can also set an error threshold that will terminate deployments if stack creation fails.

You can use your existing CloudFormation templates (taking care to make sure that they are ready to work across accounts and regions), create new ones, or use one of our sample templates. We are launching with support for the AWS partition (all public regions except those in China), and expect to expand it to to the others before too long.

Using StackSets
You can create and deploy StackSets from the CloudFormation Console, via the CloudFormation APIs, or from the command line.

Using the Console, I start by clicking on Create StackSet. I can use my own template or one of the samples. I’ll use the last sample (Add config rule encrypted volumes):

I click on View template to learn more about the template and the rule:

I give my StackSet a name. The template that I selected accepts an optional parameter, and I can enter it at this time:

Next, I choose the accounts and regions. I can enter account numbers directly, reference an AWS organizational unit, or upload a list of account numbers:

I can set up the regions and control the deployment order:

I can also set the deployment options. Once I am done I click on Next to proceed:

I can add tags to my StackSet. They will be applied to the AWS resources created during the deployment:

The deployment begins, and I can track the status from the Console:

I can open up the Stacks section to see each stack. Initially, the status of each stack is OUTDATED, indicating that the template has yet to be deployed to the stack; this will change to CURRENT after a successful deployment. If a stack cannot be deleted, the status will change to INOPERABLE.

After my initial deployment, I can click on Manage StackSet to add additional accounts, regions, or both, to create additional stacks:

Now Available
This new feature is available now and you can start using it today at no extra charge (you pay only for the AWS resources created on your behalf).

Jeff;

PS – If you create some useful templates and would like to share them with other AWS users, please send a pull request to our AWS Labs GitHub repo.

Manage Kubernetes Clusters on AWS Using Kops

Post Syndicated from Arun Gupta original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/kubernetes-clusters-aws-kops/

Any containerized application typically consists of multiple containers. There is a container for the application itself, one for database, possibly another for web server, and so on. During development, its normal to build and test this multi-container application on a single host. This approach works fine during early dev and test cycles but becomes a single point of failure for production where the availability of the application is critical. In such cases, this multi-container application is deployed on multiple hosts. There is a need for an external tool to manage such a multi-container multi-host deployment. Container orchestration frameworks provides the capability of cluster management, scheduling containers on different hosts, service discovery and load balancing, crash recovery and other related functionalities. There are multiple options for container orchestration on Amazon Web Services: Amazon ECS, Docker for AWS, and DC/OS.

Another popular option for container orchestration on AWS is Kubernetes. There are multiple ways to run a Kubernetes cluster on AWS. This multi-part blog series provides a brief overview and explains some of these approaches in detail. This first post explains how to create a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops.

Kubernetes and Kops overview

Kubernetes is an open source, container orchestration platform. Applications packaged as Docker images can be easily deployed, scaled, and managed in a Kubernetes cluster. Some of the key features of Kubernetes are:

  • Self-healing
    Failed containers are restarted to ensure that the desired state of the application is maintained. If a node in the cluster dies, then the containers are rescheduled on a different node. Containers that do not respond to application-defined health check are terminated, and thus rescheduled.
  • Horizontal scaling
    Number of containers can be easily scaled up and down automatically based upon CPU utilization, or manually using a command.
  • Service discovery and load balancing
    Multiple containers can be grouped together discoverable using a DNS name. The service can be load balanced with integration to the native LB provided by the cloud provider.
  • Application upgrades and rollbacks
    Applications can be upgraded to a newer version without an impact to the existing one. If something goes wrong, Kubernetes rolls back the change.

Kops, short for Kubernetes Operations, is a set of tools for installing, operating, and deleting Kubernetes clusters in the cloud. A rolling upgrade of an older version of Kubernetes to a new version can also be performed. It also manages the cluster add-ons. After the cluster is created, the usual kubectl CLI can be used to manage resources in the cluster.

Download Kops and Kubectl

There is no need to download the Kubernetes binary distribution for creating a cluster using kops. However, you do need to download the kops CLI. It then takes care of downloading the right Kubernetes binary in the cloud, and provisions the cluster.

The different download options for kops are explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops#installing. On MacOS, the easiest way to install kops is using the brew package manager.

brew update && brew install kops

The version of kops can be verified using the kops version command, which shows:

Version 1.6.1

In addition, download kubectl. This is required to manage the Kubernetes cluster. The latest version of kubectl can be downloaded using the following command:

curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/darwin/amd64/kubectl

Make sure to include the directory where kubectl is downloaded in your PATH.

IAM user permission

The IAM user to create the Kubernetes cluster must have the following permissions:

  • AmazonEC2FullAccess
  • AmazonRoute53FullAccess
  • AmazonS3FullAccess
  • IAMFullAccess
  • AmazonVPCFullAccess

Alternatively, a new IAM user may be created and the policies attached as explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/docs/aws.md#setup-iam-user.

Create an Amazon S3 bucket for the Kubernetes state store

Kops needs a “state store” to store configuration information of the cluster.  For example, how many nodes, instance type of each node, and Kubernetes version. The state is stored during the initial cluster creation. Any subsequent changes to the cluster are also persisted to this store as well. As of publication, Amazon S3 is the only supported storage mechanism. Create a S3 bucket and pass that to the kops CLI during cluster creation.

This post uses the bucket name kubernetes-aws-io. Bucket names must be unique; you have to use a different name. Create an S3 bucket:

aws s3api create-bucket --bucket kubernetes-aws-io

I strongly recommend versioning this bucket in case you ever need to revert or recover a previous version of the cluster. This can be enabled using the AWS CLI as well:

aws s3api put-bucket-versioning --bucket kubernetes-aws-io --versioning-configuration Status=Enabled

For convenience, you can also define KOPS_STATE_STORE environment variable pointing to the S3 bucket. For example:

export KOPS_STATE_STORE=s3://kubernetes-aws-io

This environment variable is then used by the kops CLI.

DNS configuration

As of Kops 1.6.1, a top-level domain or a subdomain is required to create the cluster. This domain allows the worker nodes to discover the master and the master to discover all the etcd servers. This is also needed for kubectl to be able to talk directly with the master.

This domain may be registered with AWS, in which case a Route 53 hosted zone is created for you. Alternatively, this domain may be at a different registrar. In this case, create a Route 53 hosted zone. Specify the name server (NS) records from the created zone as NS records with the domain registrar.

This post uses a kubernetes-aws.io domain registered at a third-party registrar.

Generate a Route 53 hosted zone using the AWS CLI. Download jq to run this command:

ID=$(uuidgen) && \
aws route53 create-hosted-zone \
--name cluster.kubernetes-aws.io \
--caller-reference $ID \
| jq .DelegationSet.NameServers

This shows an output such as the following:

[
"ns-94.awsdns-11.com",
"ns-1962.awsdns-53.co.uk",
"ns-838.awsdns-40.net",
"ns-1107.awsdns-10.org"
]

Create NS records for the domain with your registrar. Different options on how to configure DNS for the cluster are explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/docs/aws.md#configure-dns.

Experimental support to create a gossip-based cluster was added in Kops 1.6.2. This post uses a DNS-based approach, as that is more mature and well tested.

Create the Kubernetes cluster

The Kops CLI can be used to create a highly available cluster, with multiple master nodes spread across multiple Availability Zones. Workers can be spread across multiple zones as well. Some of the tasks that happen behind the scene during cluster creation are:

  • Provisioning EC2 instances
  • Setting up AWS resources such as networks, Auto Scaling groups, IAM users, and security groups
  • Installing Kubernetes.

Start the Kubernetes cluster using the following command:

kops create cluster \
--name cluster.kubernetes-aws.io \
--zones us-west-2a \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

In this command:

  • --zones
    Defines the zones in which the cluster is going to be created. Multiple comma-separated zones can be specified to span the cluster across multiple zones.
  • --name
    Defines the cluster’s name.
  • --state
    Points to the S3 bucket that is the state store.
  • --yes
    Immediately creates the cluster. Otherwise, only the cloud resources are created and the cluster needs to be started explicitly using the command kops update --yes. If the cluster needs to be edited, then the kops edit cluster command can be used.

This starts a single master and two worker node Kubernetes cluster. The master is in an Auto Scaling group and the worker nodes are in a separate group. By default, the master node is m3.medium and the worker node is t2.medium. Master and worker nodes are assigned separate IAM roles as well.

Wait for a few minutes for the cluster to be created. The cluster can be verified using the command kops validate cluster --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io. It shows the following output:

Using cluster from kubectl context: cluster.kubernetes-aws.io

Validating cluster cluster.kubernetes-aws.io

INSTANCE GROUPS
NAME                 ROLE      MACHINETYPE    MIN    MAX    SUBNETS
master-us-west-2a    Master    m3.medium      1      1      us-west-2a
nodes                Node      t2.medium      2      2      us-west-2a

NODE STATUS
NAME                                           ROLE      READY
ip-172-20-38-133.us-west-2.compute.internal    node      True
ip-172-20-38-177.us-west-2.compute.internal    master    True
ip-172-20-46-33.us-west-2.compute.internal     node      True

Your cluster cluster.kubernetes-aws.io is ready

It shows the different instances started for the cluster, and their roles. If multiple cluster states are stored in the same bucket, then --name <NAME> can be used to specify the exact cluster name.

Check all nodes in the cluster using the command kubectl get nodes:

NAME                                          STATUS         AGE       VERSION
ip-172-20-38-133.us-west-2.compute.internal   Ready,node     14m       v1.6.2
ip-172-20-38-177.us-west-2.compute.internal   Ready,master   15m       v1.6.2
ip-172-20-46-33.us-west-2.compute.internal    Ready,node     14m       v1.6.2

Again, the internal IP address of each node, their current status (master or node), and uptime are shown. The key information here is the Kubernetes version for each node in the cluster, 1.6.2 in this case.

The kubectl value included in the PATH earlier is configured to manage this cluster. Resources such as pods, replica sets, and services can now be created in the usual way.

Some of the common options that can be used to override the default cluster creation are:

  • --kubernetes-version
    The version of Kubernetes cluster. The exact versions supported are defined at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/channels/stable.
  • --master-size and --node-size
    Define the instance of master and worker nodes.
  • --master-count and --node-count
    Define the number of master and worker nodes. By default, a master is created in each zone specified by --master-zones. Multiple master nodes can be created by a higher number using --master-count or specifying multiple Availability Zones in --master-zones.

A three-master and five-worker node cluster, with master nodes spread across different Availability Zones, can be created using the following command:

kops create cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--zones us-west-2a,us-west-2b,us-west-2c \
--node-count 5 \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Both the clusters are sharing the same state store but have different names. This also requires you to create an additional Amazon Route 53 hosted zone for the name.

By default, the resources required for the cluster are directly created in the cloud. The --target option can be used to generate the AWS CloudFormation scripts instead. These scripts can then be used by the AWS CLI to create resources at your convenience.

Get a complete list of options for cluster creation with kops create cluster --help.

More details about the cluster can be seen using the command kubectl cluster-info:

Kubernetes master is running at https://api.cluster.kubernetes-aws.io
KubeDNS is running at https://api.cluster.kubernetes-aws.io/api/v1/proxy/namespaces/kube-system/services/kube-dns

To further debug and diagnose cluster problems, use 'kubectl cluster-info dump'.

Check the client and server version using the command kubectl version:

Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"6", GitVersion:"v1.6.4", GitCommit:"d6f433224538d4f9ca2f7ae19b252e6fcb66a3ae", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2017-05-19T18:44:27Z", GoVersion:"go1.7.5", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"darwin/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"6", GitVersion:"v1.6.2", GitCommit:"477efc3cbe6a7effca06bd1452fa356e2201e1ee", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2017-04-19T20:22:08Z", GoVersion:"go1.7.5", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}

Both client and server version are 1.6 as shown by the Major and Minor attribute values.

Upgrade the Kubernetes cluster

Kops can be used to create a Kubernetes 1.4.x, 1.5.x, or an older version of the 1.6.x cluster using the --kubernetes-version option. The exact versions supported are defined at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/channels/stable.

Or, you may have used kops to create a cluster a while ago, and now want to upgrade to the latest recommended version of Kubernetes. Kops supports rolling cluster upgrades where the master and worker nodes are upgraded one by one.

As of kops 1.6.1, upgrading a cluster is a three-step process.

First, check and apply the latest recommended Kubernetes update.

kops upgrade cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

The --yes option immediately applies the changes. Not specifying the --yes option shows only the changes that are applied.

Second, update the state store to match the cluster state. This can be done using the following command:

kops update cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Lastly, perform a rolling update for all cluster nodes using the kops rolling-update command:

kops rolling-update cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Previewing the changes before updating the cluster can be done using the same command but without specifying the --yes option. This shows the following output:

NAME                 STATUS        NEEDUPDATE    READY    MIN    MAX    NODES
master-us-west-2a    NeedsUpdate   1             0        1      1      1
nodes                NeedsUpdate   2             0        2      2      2

Using --yes updates all nodes in the cluster, first master and then worker. There is a 5-minute delay between restarting master nodes, and a 2-minute delay between restarting nodes. These values can be altered using --master-interval and --node-interval options, respectively.

Only the worker nodes may be updated by using the --instance-group node option.

Delete the Kubernetes cluster

Typically, the Kubernetes cluster is a long-running cluster to serve your applications. After its purpose is served, you may delete it. It is important to delete the cluster using the kops command. This ensures that all resources created by the cluster are appropriately cleaned up.

The command to delete the Kubernetes cluster is:

kops delete cluster --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io --yes

If multiple clusters have been created, then specify the cluster name as in the following command:

kops delete cluster cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io --yes

Conclusion

This post explained how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops. Kubernetes on AWS users provides a self-published list of companies using Kubernetes on AWS.

Try starting a cluster, create a few Kubernetes resources, and then tear it down. Kops on AWS provides a more comprehensive tutorial for setting up Kubernetes clusters. Kops docs are also helpful for understanding the details.

In addition, the Kops team hosts office hours to help you get started, from guiding you with your first pull request. You can always join the #kops channel on Kubernetes slack to ask questions. If nothing works, then file an issue at github.com/kubernetes/kops/issues.

Future posts in this series will explain other ways of creating and running a Kubernetes cluster on AWS.

— Arun

New Information in the AWS IAM Console Helps You Follow IAM Best Practices

Post Syndicated from Rob Moncur original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-features-in-the-aws-iam-console-help-you-adhere-to-iam-best-practices/

Today, we added new information to the Users section of the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) console to make it easier for you to follow IAM best practices. With this new information, you can more easily monitor users’ activity in your AWS account and identify access keys and passwords that you should rotate regularly. You can also better audit users’ MFA device usage and keep track of their group memberships. In this post, I show how you can use this new information to help you follow IAM best practices.

Monitor activity in your AWS account

The IAM best practice, monitor activity in your AWS account, encourages you to monitor user activity in your AWS account by using services such as AWS CloudTrail and AWS Config. In addition to monitoring usage in your AWS account, you should be aware of inactive users so that you can remove them from your account. By only retaining necessary users, you can help maintain the security of your AWS account.

To help you find users that are inactive, we added three new columns to the IAM user table: Last activity, Console last sign-in, and Access key last used.
Screenshot showing three new columns in the IAM user table

  1. Last activity – This column tells you how long it has been since the user has either signed in to the AWS Management Console or accessed AWS programmatically with their access keys. Use this column to find users who might be inactive, and consider removing them from your AWS account.
  2. Console last sign-in – This column displays the time since the user’s most recent console sign-in. Consider removing passwords from users who are not signing in to the console.
  3. Access key last used – This column displays the time since a user last used access keys. Use this column to find any access keys that are not being used, and deactivate or remove them.

Rotate credentials regularly

The IAM best practice, rotate credentials regularly, recommends that all users in your AWS account change passwords and access keys regularly. With this practice, if a password or access key is compromised without your knowledge, you can limit how long the credentials can be used to access your resources. To help your management efforts, we added three new columns to the IAM user table: Access key age, Password age, and Access key ID.

Screenshot showing three new columns in the IAM user table

  1. Access key age – This column shows how many days it has been since the oldest active access key was created for a user. With this information, you can audit access keys easily across all your users and identify the access keys that may need to be rotated.

Based on the number of days since the access key has been rotated, a green, yellow, or red icon is displayed. To see the corresponding time frame for each icon, pause your mouse pointer on the Access key age column heading to see the tooltip, as shown in the following screenshot.

Icons showing days since the oldest active access key was created

  1. Password age – This column shows the number of days since a user last changed their password. With this information, you can audit password rotation and identify users who have not changed their password recently. The easiest way to make sure that your users are rotating their password often is to establish an account password policy that requires users to change their password after a specified time period.
  2. Access key ID – This column displays the access key IDs for users and the current status (Active/Inactive) of those access key IDs. This column makes it easier for you to locate and see the state of access keys for each user, which is useful for auditing. To find a specific access key ID, use the search box above the table.

Enable MFA for privileged users

Another IAM best practice is to enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for privileged IAM users. With MFA, users have a device that generates a unique authentication code (a one-time password [OTP]). Users must provide both their normal credentials (such as their user name and password) and the OTP when signing in.

To help you see if MFA has been enabled for your users, we’ve improved the MFA column to show you if MFA is enabled and which type of MFA (hardware, virtual, or SMS) is enabled for each user, where applicable.

Screenshot showing the improved "MFA" column

Use groups to assign permissions to IAM users

Instead of defining permissions for individual IAM users, it’s usually more convenient to create groups that relate to job functions (such as administrators, developers, and accountants), define the relevant permissions for each group, and then assign IAM users to those groups. All the users in an IAM group inherit the permissions assigned to the group. This way, if you need to modify permissions, you can make the change once for everyone in a group instead of making the change one time for each user. As people move around in your company, you can change the group membership of the IAM user.

To better understand which groups your users belong to, we’ve made updates:

  1. Groups – This column now lists the groups of which a user is a member. This information makes it easier to understand and compare multiple users’ permissions at once.
  2. Group count – This column shows the number of groups to which each user belongs.Screenshot showing the updated "Groups" and "Group count" columns

Customize your view

Choosing which columns you see in the User table is easy to do. When you click the button with the gear icon in the upper right corner of the table, you can choose the columns you want to see, as shown in the following screenshots.

Screenshot showing gear icon  Screenshot of "Manage columns" dialog box

Conclusion

We made these improvements to the Users section of the IAM console to make it easier for you to follow IAM best practices in your AWS account. Following these best practices can help you improve the security of your AWS resources and make your account easier to manage.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions or suggestions, please start a new thread on the IAM forum.

– Rob

Validating AWS CloudFormation Templates

Post Syndicated from Remek Hetman original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/validating-aws-cloudformation-templates/

For their continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline path, many companies use tools like Jenkins, Chef, and AWS CloudFormation. Usually, the process is managed by two or more teams. One team is responsible for designing and developing an application, CloudFormation templates, and so on. The other team is generally responsible for integration and deployment.

One of the challenges that a CI/CD team has is to validate the CloudFormation templates provided by the development team. Validation provides early warning about any incorrect syntax and ensures that the development team follows company policies in terms of security and the resources created by CloudFormation templates.

In this post, I focus on the validation of AWS CloudFormation templates for syntax as well as in the context of business rules.

Scripted validation solution

For CloudFormation syntax validation, one option is to use the AWS CLI to call the validate-template command. For security and resource management, another approach is to run a Jenkins pipeline from an Amazon EC2 instance under an EC2 role that has been granted only the necessary permissions.

What if you need more control over your CloudFormation templates, such as managing parameters or attributes? What if you have many development teams where permissions to the AWS environment required by one team are either too open or not open enough for another team?

To have more control over the contents of your CloudFormation template, you can use the cf-validator Python script, which shows you how to validate different template aspects. With this script, you can validate:

  • JSON syntax
  • IAM capabilities
  • Root tags
  • Parameters
  • CloudFormation resources
  • Attributes
  • Reference resources

You can download this script from the cf-validator GitHub repo. Use the following command to run the script:

python cf-validator.py

The script takes the following parameters:

  • –cf_path [Required]

    The location of the CloudFormation template in JSON format. Supported location types:

    • File system – Path to the CloudFormation template on the file system
    • Web – URL, for example, https://my-file.com/my_cf.json
    • Amazon S3 – Amazon S3 bucket, for example, s3://my_bucket/my_cf.json
  • –cf_rules [Required]

    The location of the JSON file with the validation rules. This parameter supports the same locations as –cf_path. The next section of this post has more information about defining rules.

  • –cf_res [Optional]

    The location of the JSON file with the defined AWS resources, which need to be confirmed before launching the CloudFormation template. A later section of this post has more information about resource validation.

  • –allow_cap [Optional][yes/no]

    Controls whether you allow the creation of IAM resources by the CloudFormation template, such as policies, rules, or IAM users. The default value is no.

  • –region [Optional]

    The AWS region where the existing resources were created. The default value is us-east-1.

Defining rules

All rules are defined in the JSON format file. Rules consist of the following keys:

  • “allow_root_keys”

    Lists allowed root CloudFormation keys. Example of root keys are Parameters, Resources, Output, and so on. An empty list means that any key is allowed.

  • “allow_parameters”

    Lists allowed CloudFormation parameters. For instance, to force each CloudFormation template to use only the set of parameters defined in your pipeline, list them under this key. An empty list means that any parameter is allowed.

  • “allow_resources”

    Lists the AWS resources allowed for creation by a CloudFormation template. The format of the resource is the same as resource types in CloudFormation, but without the “AWS::” prefix. Examples:  EC2::Instance, EC2::Volume, and so on. If you allow the creation of all resources from the given group, you can use a wildcard. For instance, if you allow all resources related to CloudFormation, you can add CloudFormation::* to the list instead of typing CloudFormation::Init, CloudFormation:Stack, and so on. An empty list means that all resources are allowed.

  • “require_ref_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that have to be defined in CloudFormation. The value must be referenced and cannot be hardcoded. For instance, you can require that each EC2 instance must be created from a specific AMI where Image ID has to be a passed-in parameter. An empty list means that you are not requiring specific attributes to be present for a given resource.

  • “allow_additional_attributes”

    Lists additional attributes (per resource) that can be defined and have any value in the CloudFormation template. An empty list means that any additional attribute is allowed. If you specify additional attributes for this key, then any resource attribute defined in a CloudFormation template that is not listed in this key or in the require_ref_attributes key causes validation to fail.

  • “not_allow_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that are not allowed in the CloudFormation template. This key takes precedence over the require_ref_attributes and allow_additional_attributes keys.

Rule file example

The following is an example of a rule file:

{
  "allow_root_keys" : ["AWSTemplateFormatVersion", "Description", "Parameters", "Conditions", "Resources", "Outputs"],
  "allow_parameters" : [],
  "allow_resources" : [
    "CloudFormation::*",
    "CloudWatch::Alarm",
    "EC2::Instance",
    "EC2::Volume",
    "EC2::VolumeAttachment",
    "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer",
    "IAM::Role",
    "IAM::Policy",
    "IAM::InstanceProfile"
  ],
  "require_ref_attributes" :
    {
      "EC2::Instance" : [ "InstanceType", "ImageId", "SecurityGroupIds", "SubnetId", "KeyName", "IamInstanceProfile" ],
      "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer" : ["SecurityGroups", "Subnets"]
    },
  "allow_additional_attributes" : {},
  "not_allow_attributes" : {}
}

Validating resources

You can use the –cf_res parameter to validate that the resources you are planning to reference in the CloudFormation template exist and are available. As a value for this parameter, point to the JSON file with defined resources. The format should be as follows:

[
  { "Type" : "SG",
    "ID" : "sg-37c9b448A"
  },
  { "Type" : "AMI",
    "ID" : "ami-e7e523f1"
  },
  { "Type" : "Subnet",
    "ID" : "subnet-034e262e"
  }
]

Summary

At this moment, this CloudFormation template validation script supports only security groups, AMIs, and subnets. But anyone with some knowledge of Python and the boto3 package can add support for additional resources type, as needed.

For more tips please visit our AWS CloudFormation blog