Tag Archives: imagemagick

Eevee mugshot set for Doom

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/release/2017/11/23/eevee-mugshot-set-for-doom/

Screenshot of Industrial Zone from Doom II, with an Eevee face replacing the usual Doom marine in the status bar

A full replacement of Doomguy’s vast array of 42 expressions.

You can get it yourself if you want to play Doom as me, for some reason? It does nothing but replace a few sprites, so it works with any Doom flavor (including vanilla) on 1, 2, or Final. Just run Doom with -file eeveemug.wad. With GZDoom, you can load it automatically.


I don’t entirely know why I did this. I drew the first one on a whim, then realized there was nothing really stopping me from making a full set, so I spent a day doing that.

The funny thing is that I usually play Doom with ZDoom’s “alternate” HUD. It’s a full-screen overlay rather than a huge bar, and — crucially — it does not show the mugshot. It can’t even be configured to show the mugshot. As far as I’m aware, it can’t even be modded to show the mugshot. So I have to play with the OG status bar if I want to actually use the thing I made.

Preview of the Eevee mugshot sprites arranged in a grid, where the Eevee becomes more beaten up in each subsequent column

I’m pretty happy with the results overall! I think I did a decent job emulating the Doom “surreal grit” style. I did the shading with Aseprite‘s shading mode — instead of laying down a solid color, it shifts pixels along a ramp of colors you select every time you draw over them. Doom’s palette has a lot of browns, so I made a ramp out of all of them and kept going over furry areas, nudging pixels into being lighter or darker, until I liked the texture. It was a lot like making a texture in a sketch with a lot of scratchy pencil strokes.

I also gleaned some interesting things about smoothness and how the eye interprets contours? I tried to explain this on Twitter and had a hell of a time putting it into words, but the short version is that it’s amazing to see the difference a single misplaced pixel can make, especially as you slide that pixel between dark and light.


Doom's palette of 256 colors, many of which are very long gradients of reds and browns

Speaking of which, Doom’s palette is incredibly weird to work with. Thank goodness Eevees are brown! The game does have to draw arbitrary levels of darkness all with the same palette, which partly explains the number of dark colors and gradients — but I believe a number of the colors are exact duplicates, so close they might as well be duplicates, or completely unused in stock Doom assets. I guess they had no reason to optimize for people trying to add arbitrary art to the game 25 years later, though. (And nowadays, GZDoom includes a truecolor software renderer, so the palette is becoming less and less important.)

I originally wanted the god mode sprite to be a Sylveon, but Sylveon is made of pink and azure and blurple, and I don’t think I could’ve pulled it off with this set of colors. I even struggled with the color of the mane a bit — I usually color it with pretty pale colors, but Doom only has a couple of those, and they’re very saturated. I ended up using a lot more dark yellows than I would normally, and thankfully it worked out pretty well.

The most significant change I made between the original sprite and the final set was the eye color:

A comparison between an original Doom mugshot sprite, the first sprite I drew, and how it ended up

(This is STFST20, a frame from the default three-frame “glacing around” animation that plays when the player has between 40 and 59 health. Doom Wiki has a whole article on the mugshot if you’re interested.)

The blue eyes in my original just do not work at all. The Doom palette doesn’t have a lot of subtle colors, and its blues in particular are incredibly bad. In the end, I made the eyes basically black, though with a couple pixels of very dark blue in them.

After I decided to make the full set, I started by making a neutral and completely healthy front pose, then derived the others from that (with a very complicated system of layers). You can see some of the side effects of that here: the face doesn’t actually turn when glancing around, because hoo boy that would’ve been a lot of work, and so the cheek fluff is visible on both sides.

I also notice that there are two columns of identical pixels in each eye! I fixed that in the glance to the right, but must’ve forgotten about it here. Oh, well; I didn’t even notice until I zoomed in just now.

A general comparison between the Doom mugshots and my Eevee ones, showing each pose in its healthy state plus the neutral pose in every state of deterioration

The original sprites might not be quite aligned correctly in the above image. The available space in the status bar is 35×31, of which a couple pixels go to an inset border, leaving 33×30. I drew all of my sprites at that size, but the originals are all cropped and have varying offsets (part of the Doom sprite format). I extremely can’t be assed to check all of those offsets for over a dozen sprites, so I just told ImageMagick to center them. (I only notice right now that some of the original sprites are even a full 31 pixels tall and draw over the top border that I was so careful to stay out of!)

Anyway, this is a representative sample of the Doom mugshot poses.

The top row shows all eight frames at full health. The first three are the “idle” state, drawn when nothing else is going on; the sprite usually faces forwards, but glances around every so often at random. The forward-facing sprite is the one I finalized first.

I tried to take a lot of cues from the original sprite, seeing as I wanted to match the style. I’d never tried drawing a sprite with a large palette and a small resolution before, and the first thing that struck me was Doomguy’s lips — the upper lip, lips themselves, and shadow under the lower lip are all created with only one row of pixels each. I thought that was amazing. Now I even kinda wish I’d exaggerated that effect a bit more, but I was wary of going too dark when there’s a shadow only a couple pixels away. I suppose Doomguy has the advantage of having, ah, a chin.

I did much the same for the eyebrows, which was especially necessary because Doomguy has more of a forehead than my Eevee does. I probably could’ve exaggerated those a bit more, as well! Still, I love how they came out — especially in the simple looking-around frames, where even a two-pixel eyebrow raise is almost comically smug.

The fourth frame is a wild-ass grin (even named STFEVL0), which shows for a short time after picking up a new weapon. Come to think of it, that’s a pretty rare occurrence when playing straight through one of the Doom games; you keep your weapons between levels.

The fifth through seventh are also a set. If the player takes damage, the status bar will briefly show one of these frames to indicate where the damage is coming from. You may notice that where Doomguy bravely faces the source of the pain, I drew myself wincing and recoiling away from it.

The middle frame of that set also appears while the player is firing continuously (regardless of damage), so I couldn’t really make it match the left and right ones. I like the result anyway. It was also great fun figuring out the expressions with the mouth — that’s another place where individual pixels make a huge difference.

Finally, the eighth column is the legendary “ouch” face, which appears when the player takes more than 20 damage at once. It may look completely alien to you, because vanilla Doom has a bug that only shows this face when the player gains 20 or more health while taking damage. This is vanishingly rare (though possible!), so the frame virtually never appears in vanilla Doom. Lots of source ports have fixed this bug, making the ouch face it a bit better known, but I usually play without the mugshot visible so it still looks super weird to me. I think my own spin on it is a bit less, ah, body horror?

The second row shows deterioration. It is pretty weird drawing yourself getting beaten up.

A lot of Doomguy’s deterioration is in the form of blood dripping from under his hair, which I didn’t think would translate terribly well to a character without hair. Instead, I went a little cartoony with it, adding bandages here and there. I had a little bit of a hard time with the bloodshot eyes at this resolution, which I realize as I type it is a very poor excuse when I had eyes three times bigger than Doomguy’s. I do love the drooping ears, with the possible exception of the fifth state, which I’m not sure is how that would actually look…? Oh well. I also like the bow becoming gradually unravelled, eventually falling off entirely when you die.

Oh, yes, the sixth frame there (before the gap) is actually for a dead player. Doomguy’s bleeding becomes markedly more extreme here, but again that didn’t really work for me, so I went a little sillier with it. A little. It’s still pretty weird drawing yourself dead.

That leaves only god mode, which is incredible. I love that glow. I love the faux whisker shapes it makes. I love how it fades into the background. I love that 100% pure “oh this is pretty good” smile. It all makes me want to just play Doom in god mode forever.

Now that I’ve looked closely at these sprites again, I spy a good half dozen little inconsistencies and nitpicks, which I’m going to refrain from spelling out. I did do this in only a day, and I think it came out pretty dang well considering.

Maybe I’ll try something else like this in the future. Not quite sure what, though; there aren’t many small and self-contained sets of sprites like this in Doom. Monsters are several times bigger and have a zillion different angles. Maybe some pickups, which only have one frame?


Hmm. Parting thought: I’m not quite sure where I should host this sort of one-off thing. It arguably belongs on Itch, but seems really out of place alongside entire released games. It also arguably belongs on the idgames archive, but I’m hesitant to put it there because it’s such an obscure thing of little interest to a general audience. At the moment it’s just a file I’ve uploaded to wherever on my own space, but I now have three little Doom experiments with no real permanent home.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/739648/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (icu and lib32-icu), CentOS (firefox), Debian (imagemagick, konversation, libspring-ldap-java, libxml-libxml-perl, lynx-cur, ming, opensaml2, poppler, procmail, shibboleth-sp2, and xen), Fedora (firefox, java-9-openjdk, jbig2dec, kernel, knot, knot-resolver, qt5-qtwebengine, and roundcubemail), Gentoo (adobe-flash, couchdb, icedtea-bin, and phpunit), Mageia (apr, bluez, firefox, jq, konversation, libextractor, and quagga), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (firefox), and Scientific Linux (firefox).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/739318/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, flashplugin, lib32-flashplugin, and mediawiki), CentOS (kernel and php), Debian (firefox-esr, jackson-databind, and mediawiki), Fedora (apr, apr-util, chromium, compat-openssl10, firefox, ghostscript, hostapd, icu, ImageMagick, jackson-databind, krb5, lame, liblouis, nagios, nodejs, perl-Catalyst-Plugin-Static-Simple, php, php-PHPMailer, poppler, poppler-data, rubygem-ox, systemd, webkitgtk4, wget, wordpress, and xen), Mageia (flash-player-plugin, icu, jackson-databind, php, and roundcubemail), Oracle (kernel and php), Red Hat (openstack-aodh), SUSE (wget and xen), and Ubuntu (apport and webkit2gtk).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/738995/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (konversation), Debian (graphicsmagick and konversation), Fedora (git-annex, ImageMagick, kernel, and libgcrypt), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (httpd), SUSE (firefox, nss), and Ubuntu (perl and postgresql-9.3, postgresql-9.5, postgresql-9.6).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/738890/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (graphicsmagick, imagemagick, mupdf, postgresql-common, ruby2.3, and wordpress), Fedora (tomcat), Gentoo (cacti, chromium, eGroupWare, hostapd, imagemagick, libXfont2, lxc, mariadb, vde, wget, and xorg-server), Mageia (flash-player-plugin and libjpeg), openSUSE (ansible, ImageMagick, java-1_8_0-openjdk, krb5, redis, shadow, virtualbox, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (rh-eclipse46-jackson-databind and rh-eclipse47-jackson-databind), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, mysql, openssl, and storm, storm-kit), and Ubuntu (perl).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/738264/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, libcurl-gnutls, libmupdf, mupdf, mupdf-gl, mupdf-tools, and zathura-pdf-mupdf), CentOS (liblouis), Debian (graphicsmagick, imagemagick, irssi, openssl, openssl1.0, redis, and wordpress), Mageia (lucene, poppler, and x11-server), SUSE (libwpd and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (liblouis).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/737204/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (irssi, musl, and xorg-server), CentOS (httpd and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (libav, ming, and openjfx), Fedora (ImageMagick, libwpd, rubygem-rmagick, and sssd), Gentoo (adobe-flash, chromium, dnsmasq, go, kodi, libpcre, and openjpeg), openSUSE (bluez, exiv2, python3-PyJWT, salt, xen, xerces-j2, and xorg-x11-server), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk and kernel), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-oracle and rh-nodejs4-nodejs), and Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/736892/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (wpa_supplicant), Debian (db, db4.7, db4.8, graphicsmagick, imagemagick, nss, and yadifa), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and upx), Mageia (flash-player-plugin, libxfont, openvpn, ruby, webmin, and wireshark), openSUSE (cacti, git, and upx), Oracle (wpa_supplicant), Red Hat (kernel-rt, rh-nodejs4-nodejs-tough-cookie, rh-nodejs6-nodejs-tough-cookie, and wpa_supplicant), Scientific Linux (wpa_supplicant), and Slackware (libXres, wpa_supplicant, and xorg).

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/736063/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (lame, salt, and xorg-server), Debian (ffmpeg, imagemagick, libxfont, wordpress, and xen), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and tor), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (kernel, SLES 12 Docker image, SLES 12-SP1 Docker image, and SLES 12-SP2 Docker image), and Ubuntu (curl, glance, horizon, kernel, keystone, libxfont, libxfont1, libxfont2, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-gcp, linux-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, nova, openvswitch, swift, and thunderbird).

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/734318/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (emacs), Debian (apache2, gdk-pixbuf, and pyjwt), Fedora (autotrace, converseen, dmtx-utils, drawtiming, emacs, gtatool, imageinfo, ImageMagick, inkscape, jasper, k3d, kxstitch, libwpd, mingw-libzip, perl-Image-SubImageFind, pfstools, php-pecl-imagick, psiconv, q, rawtherapee, ripright, rss-glx, rubygem-rmagick, synfig, synfigstudio, techne, vdr-scraper2vdr, vips, and WindowMaker), Oracle (emacs and kernel), Red Hat (emacs and kernel), Scientific Linux (emacs), SUSE (emacs), and Ubuntu (apache2).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/732530/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (connman, faad2, gnupg, imagemagick, libdbd-mysql-perl, mercurial, and php5), openSUSE (postgresql93 and samba and resource-agents), Oracle (poppler), Scientific Linux (poppler), SUSE (firefox and php7), and Ubuntu (pyjwt).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/732179/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (augeas, connman, fontforge, freeradius, git, mariadb-10.1, openjdk-7, php5, qemu, qemu-kvm, and tenshi), Fedora (augeas, libsndfile, thunderbird, and xen), Gentoo (AutoTrace and jbig2dec), Mageia (dbus, flash-player-plugin, groovy, groovy18, heimdal, kernel-linus, kmail(kdepimlibs4), libice, libmodplug, miniupnpc, and postgresql9.3/4/6), openSUSE (freeradius-server, gnome-shell, ImageMagick, and openvswitch), and SUSE (java-1_8_0-ibm, libzypp, and postgresql94).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731309/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (git), Debian (firefox-esr and mariadb-10.0), Gentoo (bind and tnef), Mageia (kauth, kdelibs4, poppler, subversion, and vim), openSUSE (fossil, git, libheimdal, libxml2, minicom, nodejs4, nodejs6, openjpeg2, openldap2, potrace, subversion, and taglib), Oracle (git and kernel), Red Hat (git, groovy, httpd24-httpd, and mercurial), Scientific Linux (git), and SUSE (freeradius-server, ImageMagick, and subversion).

Growing up alongside tech

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/blog/2017/08/09/growing-up-alongside-tech/

IndustrialRobot asks… or, uh, asked last month:

industrialrobot: How has your views on tech changed as you’ve got older?

This is so open-ended that it’s actually stumped me for a solid month. I’ve had a surprisingly hard time figuring out where to even start.


It’s not that my views of tech have changed too much — it’s that they’ve changed very gradually. Teasing out and explaining any one particular change is tricky when it happened invisibly over the course of 10+ years.

I think a better framework for this is to consider how my relationship to tech has changed. It’s gone through three pretty distinct phases, each of which has strongly colored how I feel and talk about technology.

Act I

In which I start from nothing.

Nothing is an interesting starting point. You only really get to start there once.

Learning something on my own as a kid was something of a magical experience, in a way that I don’t think I could replicate as an adult. I liked computers; I liked toying with computers; so I did that.

I don’t know how universal this is, but when I was a kid, I couldn’t even conceive of how incredible things were made. Buildings? Cars? Paintings? Operating systems? Where does any of that come from? Obviously someone made them, but it’s not the sort of philosophical point I lingered on when I was 10, so in the back of my head they basically just appeared fully-formed from the æther.

That meant that when I started trying out programming, I had no aspirations. I couldn’t imagine how far I would go, because all the examples of how far I would go were completely disconnected from any idea of human achievement. I started out with BASIC on a toy computer; how could I possibly envision a connection between that and something like a mainstream video game? Every new thing felt like a new form of magic, so I couldn’t conceive that I was even in the same ballpark as whatever process produced real software. (Even seeing the source code for GORILLAS.BAS, it didn’t quite click. I didn’t think to try reading any of it until years after I’d first encountered the game.)

This isn’t to say I didn’t have goals. I invented goals constantly, as I’ve always done; as soon as I learned about a new thing, I’d imagine some ways to use it, then try to build them. I produced a lot of little weird goofy toys, some of which entertained my tiny friend group for a couple days, some of which never saw the light of day. But none of it felt like steps along the way to some mountain peak of mastery, because I didn’t realize the mountain peak was even a place that could be gone to. It was pure, unadulterated (!) playing.

I contrast this to my art career, which started only a couple years ago. I was already in my late 20s, so I’d already spend decades seeing a very broad spectrum of art: everything from quick sketches up to painted masterpieces. And I’d seen the people who create that art, sometimes seen them create it in real-time. I’m even in a relationship with one of them! And of course I’d already had the experience of advancing through tech stuff and discovering first-hand that even the most amazing software is still just code someone wrote.

So from the very beginning, from the moment I touched pencil to paper, I knew the possibilities. I knew that the goddamn Sistine Chapel was something I could learn to do, if I were willing to put enough time in — and I knew that I’m not, so I’d have to settle somewhere a ways before that. I knew that I’d have to put an awful lot of work in before I’d be producing anything very impressive.

I did it anyway (though perhaps waited longer than necessary to start), but those aren’t things I can un-know, and so I can never truly explore art from a place of pure ignorance. On the other hand, I’ve probably learned to draw much more quickly and efficiently than if I’d done it as a kid, precisely because I know those things. Now I can decide I want to do something far beyond my current abilities, then go figure out how to do it. When I was just playing, that kind of ambition was impossible.


So, I played.

How did this affect my views on tech? Well, I didn’t… have any. Learning by playing tends to teach you things in an outward sprawl without many abrupt jumps to new areas, so you don’t tend to run up against conflicting information. The whole point of opinions is that they’re your own resolution to a conflict; without conflict, I can’t meaningfully say I had any opinions. I just accepted whatever I encountered at face value, because I didn’t even know enough to suspect there could be alternatives yet.

Act II

That started to seriously change around, I suppose, the end of high school and beginning of college. I was becoming aware of this whole “open source” concept. I took classes that used languages I wouldn’t otherwise have given a second thought. (One of them was Python!) I started to contribute to other people’s projects. Eventually I even got a job, where I had to work with other people. It probably also helped that I’d had to maintain my own old code a few times.

Now I was faced with conflicting subjective ideas, and I had to form opinions about them! And so I did. With gusto. Over time, I developed an idea of what was Right based on experience I’d accrued. And then I set out to always do things Right.

That’s served me decently well with some individual problems, but it also led me to inflict a lot of unnecessary pain on myself. Several endeavors languished for no other reason than my dissatisfaction with the architecture, long before the basic functionality was done. I started a number of “pure” projects around this time, generic tools like imaging libraries that I had no direct need for. I built them for the sake of them, I guess because I felt like I was improving some niche… but of course I never finished any. It was always in areas I didn’t know that well in the first place, which is a fine way to learn if you have a specific concrete goal in mind — but it turns out that building a generic library for editing images means you have to know everything about images. Perhaps that ambition went a little haywire.

I’ve said before that this sort of (self-inflicted!) work was unfulfilling, in part because the best outcome would be that a few distant programmers’ lives are slightly easier. I do still think that, but I think there’s a deeper point here too.

In forgetting how to play, I’d stopped putting any of myself in most of the work I was doing. Yes, building an imaging library is kind of a slog that someone has to do, but… I assume the people who work on software like PIL and ImageMagick are actually interested in it. The few domains I tried to enter and revolutionize weren’t passions of mine; I just happened to walk through the neighborhood one day and decided I could obviously do it better.

Not coincidentally, this was the same era of my life that led me to write stuff like that PHP post, which you may notice I am conspicuously not even linking to. I don’t think I would write anything like it nowadays. I could see myself approaching the same subject, but purely from the point of view of language design, with more contrasts and tradeoffs and less going for volume. I certainly wouldn’t lead off with inflammatory puffery like “PHP is a community of amateurs”.

Act III

I think I’ve mellowed out a good bit in the last few years.

It turns out that being Right is much less important than being Not Wrong — i.e., rather than trying to make something perfect that can be adapted to any future case, just avoid as many pitfalls as possible. Code that does something useful has much more practical value than unfinished code with some pristine architecture.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in game development, where all code is doomed to be crap and the best you can hope for is to stem the tide. But there’s also a fixed goal that’s completely unrelated to how the code looks: does the game work, and is it fun to play? Yes? Ship the damn thing and forget about it.

Games are also nice because it’s very easy to pour my own feelings into them and evoke feelings in the people who play them. They’re mine, something with my fingerprints on them — even the games I’ve built with glip have plenty of my own hallmarks, little touches I added on a whim or attention to specific details that I care about.

Maybe a better example is the Doom map parser I started writing. It sounds like a “pure” problem again, except that I actually know an awful lot about the subject already! I also cleverly (accidentally) released some useful results of the work I’ve done thusfar — like statistics about Doom II maps and a few screenshots of flipped stock maps — even though I don’t think the parser itself is far enough along to release yet. The tool has served a purpose, one with my fingerprints on it, even without being released publicly. That keeps it fresh in my mind as something interesting I’d like to keep working on, eventually. (When I run into an architecture question, I step back for a while, or I do other work in the hopes that the solution will reveal itself.)

I also made two simple Pokémon ROM hacks this year, despite knowing nothing about Game Boy internals or assembly when I started. I just decided I wanted to do an open-ended thing beyond my reach, and I went to do it, not worrying about cleanliness and willing to accept a bumpy ride to get there. I played, but in a more experienced way, invoking the stuff I know (and the people I’ve met!) to help me get a running start in completely unfamiliar territory.


This feels like a really fine distinction that I’m not sure I’m doing justice. I don’t know if I could’ve appreciated it three or four years ago. But I missed making toys, and I’m glad I’m doing it again.

In short, I forgot how to have fun with programming for a little while, and I’ve finally started to figure it out again. And that’s far more important than whether you use PHP or not.

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/729456/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (freerdp and ghostscript), Fedora (freerdp, jackson-databind, moodle, remmina, and runc), Red Hat (authconfig, devtoolset-4-jackson-databind, gnutls, libreoffice, NetworkManager and libnl3, pki-core, rh-eclipse46-jackson-databind, samba, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (apache2, bash, imagemagick, openjdk-8, and rabbitmq-server).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/728776/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (catdoc, gsoap, and libtasn1-3), Fedora (GraphicsMagick, java-1.8.0-openjdk, krb5, librsvg2, nodejs, phpldapadmin, rubygem-rack-cors, and yara), Mageia (irssi), openSUSE (rubygem-puppet), Red Hat (kernel), Slackware (tcpdump), and Ubuntu (imagemagick, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-lts-xenial, mysql-5.5, samba, and xorg-server, xorg-server-hwe-16.04, xorg-server-lts-xenial).

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/728281/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (c-ares, freeradius, gvim, lib32-libtiff, libtiff, pcre, rkhunter, and vim), Debian (apache2, evince, imagemagick, unattended-upgrades, and vim), Fedora (openldap, php, and poppler), Oracle (freeradius), SUSE (evince and systemd, dracut), and Ubuntu (apport, icu, and libtasn1-3).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/726471/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (kernel, linux-zen, and tcpreplay), Debian (drupal7, exim4, expat, imagemagick, and smb4k), Fedora (chromium, firefox, glibc, kernel, openvpn, and wireshark), Mageia (mercurial and roundcubemail), openSUSE (kernel, libmicrohttpd, libqt5-qtbase, libqt5-qtdeclarative, openvpn, and python-tablib), Scientific Linux (sudo), and SUSE (firefox).