Tag Archives: internet explorer

How to Prepare for AWS’s Move to Its Own Certificate Authority

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Kozolchyk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-prepare-for-aws-move-to-its-own-certificate-authority/

AWS Certificate Manager image

 

Update from March 28, 2018: We updated the Amazon Trust Services table by replacing an out-of-date value with a new value.


Transport Layer Security (TLS, formerly called Secure Sockets Layer [SSL]) is essential for encrypting information that is exchanged on the internet. For example, Amazon.com uses TLS for all traffic on its website, and AWS uses it to secure calls to AWS services.

An electronic document called a certificate verifies the identity of the server when creating such an encrypted connection. The certificate helps establish proof that your web browser is communicating securely with the website that you typed in your browser’s address field. Certificate Authorities, also known as CAs, issue certificates to specific domains. When a domain presents a certificate that is issued by a trusted CA, your browser or application knows it’s safe to make the connection.

In January 2016, AWS launched AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), a service that lets you easily provision, manage, and deploy SSL/TLS certificates for use with AWS services. These certificates are available for no additional charge through Amazon’s own CA: Amazon Trust Services. For browsers and other applications to trust a certificate, the certificate’s issuer must be included in the browser’s trust store, which is a list of trusted CAs. If the issuing CA is not in the trust store, the browser will display an error message (see an example) and applications will show an application-specific error. To ensure the ubiquity of the Amazon Trust Services CA, AWS purchased the Starfield Services CA, a root found in most browsers and which has been valid since 2005. This means you shouldn’t have to take any action to use the certificates issued by Amazon Trust Services.

AWS has been offering free certificates to AWS customers from the Amazon Trust Services CA. Now, AWS is in the process of moving certificates for services such as Amazon EC2 and Amazon DynamoDB to use certificates from Amazon Trust Services as well. Most software doesn’t need to be changed to handle this transition, but there are exceptions. In this blog post, I show you how to verify that you are prepared to use the Amazon Trust Services CA.

How to tell if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are in your trust store

The following table lists the Amazon Trust Services certificates. To verify that these certificates are in your browser’s trust store, click each Test URL in the following table to verify that it works for you. When a Test URL does not work, it displays an error similar to this example.

Distinguished nameSHA-256 hash of subject public key informationTest URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 1,O=Amazon,C=USfbe3018031f9586bcbf41727e417b7d1c45c2f47f93be372a17b96b50757d5a2Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 2,O=Amazon,C=US7f4296fc5b6a4e3b35d3c369623e364ab1af381d8fa7121533c9d6c633ea2461Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 3,O=Amazon,C=US36abc32656acfc645c61b71613c4bf21c787f5cabbee48348d58597803d7abc9Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 4,O=Amazon,C=USf7ecded5c66047d28ed6466b543c40e0743abe81d109254dcf845d4c2c7853c5Test URL
CN=Starfield Services Root Certificate Authority – G2,O=Starfield Technologies\, Inc.,L=Scottsdale,ST=Arizona,C=US2b071c59a0a0ae76b0eadb2bad23bad4580b69c3601b630c2eaf0613afa83f92Test URL
Starfield Class 2 Certification Authority15f14ac45c9c7da233d3479164e8137fe35ee0f38ae858183f08410ea82ac4b4Not available*

* Note: Amazon doesn’t own this root and doesn’t have a test URL for it. The certificate can be downloaded from here.

You can calculate the SHA-256 hash of Subject Public Key Information as follows. With the PEM-encoded certificate stored in certificate.pem, run the following openssl commands:

openssl x509 -in certificate.pem -noout -pubkey | openssl asn1parse -noout -inform pem -out certificate.key
openssl dgst -sha256 certificate.key

As an example, with the Starfield Class 2 Certification Authority self-signed cert in a PEM encoded file sf-class2-root.crt, you can use the following openssl commands:

openssl x509 -in sf-class2-root.crt -noout -pubkey | openssl asn1parse -noout -inform pem -out sf-class2-root.key
openssl dgst -sha256 sf-class2-root.key ~
SHA256(sf-class2-root.key)= 15f14ac45c9c7da233d3479164e8137fe35ee0f38ae858183f08410ea82ac4b4

What to do if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are not in your trust store

If your tests of any of the Test URLs failed, you must update your trust store. The easiest way to update your trust store is to upgrade the operating system or browser that you are using.

You will find the Amazon Trust Services CAs in the following operating systems (release dates are in parentheses):

  • Microsoft Windows versions that have January 2005 or later updates installed, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and newer versions
  • Mac OS X 10.4 with Java for Mac OS X 10.4 Release 5, Mac OS X 10.5 and newer versions
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (March 2007), Linux 6, and Linux 7 and CentOS 5, CentOS 6, and CentOS 7
  • Ubuntu 8.10
  • Debian 5.0
  • Amazon Linux (all versions)
  • Java 1.4.2_12, Java 5 update 2, and all newer versions, including Java 6, Java 7, and Java 8

All modern browsers trust Amazon’s CAs. You can update the certificate bundle in your browser simply by updating your browser. You can find instructions for updating the following browsers on their respective websites:

If your application is using a custom trust store, you must add the Amazon root CAs to your application’s trust store. The instructions for doing this vary based on the application or platform. Please refer to the documentation for the application or platform you are using.

AWS SDKs and CLIs

Most AWS SDKs and CLIs are not impacted by the transition to the Amazon Trust Services CA. If you are using a version of the Python AWS SDK or CLI released before October 29, 2013, you must upgrade. The .NET, Java, PHP, Go, JavaScript, and C++ SDKs and CLIs do not bundle any certificates, so their certificates come from the underlying operating system. The Ruby SDK has included at least one of the required CAs since June 10, 2015. Before that date, the Ruby V2 SDK did not bundle certificates.

Certificate pinning

If you are using a technique called certificate pinning to lock down the CAs you trust on a domain-by-domain basis, you must adjust your pinning to include the Amazon Trust Services CAs. Certificate pinning helps defend you from an attacker using misissued certificates to fool an application into creating a connection to a spoofed host (an illegitimate host masquerading as a legitimate host). The restriction to a specific, pinned certificate is made by checking that the certificate issued is the expected certificate. This is done by checking that the hash of the certificate public key received from the server matches the expected hash stored in the application. If the hashes do not match, the code stops the connection.

AWS recommends against using certificate pinning because it introduces a potential availability risk. If the certificate to which you pin is replaced, your application will fail to connect. If your use case requires pinning, we recommend that you pin to a CA rather than to an individual certificate. If you are pinning to an Amazon Trust Services CA, you should pin to all CAs shown in the table earlier in this post.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the ACM forum.

– Jonathan

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 16

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/10/06/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-16/

Welcome to another issue of TimeShift. In addition to the roundup of articles and plugin updates, we had a big announcement this week – Early Bird tickets to GrafanaCon EU are now available! We’re also accepting CFPs through the end of October, so if you have a topic in mind, don’t wait until the last minute, please send it our way. Speakers who are selected will receive a comped ticket to the conference.


Early Bird Tickets Now Available

We’ve released a limited number of Early Bird tickets before General Admission tickets are available. Take advantage of this discount before they’re sold out!

Get Your Early Bird Ticket Now

Interested in speaking at GrafanaCon? We’re looking for technical and non-tecnical talks of all sizes. Submit a CFP Now.


From the Blogosphere

Get insights into your Azure Cosmos DB: partition heatmaps, OMS, and More: Microsoft recently announced the ability to access a subset of Azure Cosmos DB metrics via Azure Monitor API. Grafana Labs built an Azure Monitor Plugin for Grafana 4.5 to visualize the data.

How to monitor Docker for Mac/Windows: Brian was tired of guessing about the performance of his development machines and test environment. Here, he shows how to monitor Docker with Prometheus to get a better understanding of a dev environment in his quest to monitor all the things.

Prometheus and Grafana to Monitor 10,000 servers: This article covers enokido’s process of choosing a monitoring platform. He identifies three possible solutions, outlines the pros and cons of each, and discusses why he chose Prometheus.

GitLab Monitoring: It’s fascinating to see Grafana dashboards with production data from companies around the world. For instance, we’ve previously highlighted the huge number of dashboards Wikimedia publicly shares. This week, we found that GitLab also has public dashboards to explore.

Monitoring a Docker Swarm Cluster with cAdvisor, InfluxDB and Grafana | The Laboratory: It’s important to know the state of your applications in a scalable environment such as Docker Swarm. This video covers an overview of Docker, VM’s vs. containers, orchestration and how to monitor Docker Swarm.

Introducing Telemetry: Actionable Time Series Data from Counters: Learn how to use counters from mulitple disparate sources, devices, operating systems, and applications to generate actionable time series data.

ofp_sniffer Branch 1.2 (docker/influxdb/grafana) Upcoming Features: This video demo shows off some of the upcoming features for OFP_Sniffer, an OpenFlow sniffer to help network troubleshooting in production networks.


Grafana Plugins

Plugin authors add new features and bugfixes all the time, so it’s important to always keep your plugins up to date. To update plugins from on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, if you are using Hosted Grafana, you can update with 1 click! If you have questions or need help, hit up our community site, where the Grafana team and members of the community are happy to help.

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP for Nagios Data Source – The latest release for the PNP data source has some fixes and adds a mathematical factor option.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Data Source – This week, there was a small bug fix for the Google Calendar annotations data source.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

BT Plugins – Our friends at BT have been busy. All of the BT plugins in our catalog received and update this week. The plugins are the Status Dot Panel, the Peak Report Panel, the Trend Box Panel and the Alarm Box Panel.

Changes include:

  • Custom dashboard links now work in Internet Explorer.
  • The Peak Report panel no longer supports click-to-sort.
  • The Status Dot panel tooltips now look like Grafana tooltips.


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we highlight some of the important contributions from our amazing open source community. This week, we’d like to recognize a contributor who did a lot of work to improve Prometheus support.

pdoan017
Thanks to Alin Sinpaleanfor his Prometheus PR – that aligns the step and interval parameters. Alin got a lot of feedback from the Prometheus community and spent a lot of time and energy explaining, debating and iterating before the PR was ready.
Thank you!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Wow – Excited to be a part of exploring data to find out how Mexico City is evolving.

We Need Your Help!

Do you have a graph that you love because the data is beautiful or because the graph provides interesting information? Please get in touch. Tweet or send us an email with a screenshot, and we’ll tell you about this fun experiment.

Tell Me More


What do you think?

That’s a wrap! How are we doing? Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

New Internet Explorer Bug

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/09/new_internet_ex.html

There’s a newly discovered bug in Internet Explorer that allows any currently visited website to learn the contents of the address bar when the user hits enter. This feels important; the site I am at now has no business knowing where I go next.

Is Continuing to Patch Windows XP a Mistake?

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/is_continuing_t.html

Last week, Microsoft issued a security patch for Windows XP, a 16-year-old operating system that Microsoft officially no longer supports. Last month, Microsoft issued a Windows XP patch for the vulnerability used in WannaCry.

Is this a good idea? This 2014 essay argues that it’s not:

The zero-day flaw and its exploitation is unfortunate, and Microsoft is likely smarting from government calls for people to stop using Internet Explorer. The company had three ways it could respond. It could have done nothing­ — stuck to its guns, maintained that the end of support means the end of support, and encouraged people to move to a different platform. It could also have relented entirely, extended Windows XP’s support life cycle for another few years and waited for attrition to shrink Windows XP’s userbase to irrelevant levels. Or it could have claimed that this case is somehow “special,” releasing a patch while still claiming that Windows XP isn’t supported.

None of these options is perfect. A hard-line approach to the end-of-life means that there are people being exploited that Microsoft refuses to help. A complete about-turn means that Windows XP will take even longer to flush out of the market, making it a continued headache for developers and administrators alike.

But the option Microsoft took is the worst of all worlds. It undermines efforts by IT staff to ditch the ancient operating system and undermines Microsoft’s assertion that Windows XP isn’t supported, while doing nothing to meaningfully improve the security of Windows XP users. The upside? It buys those users at best a few extra days of improved security. It’s hard to say how that was possibly worth it.

This is a hard trade-off, and it’s going to get much worse with the Internet of Things. Here’s me:

The security of our computers and phones also comes from the fact that we replace them regularly. We buy new laptops every few years. We get new phones even more frequently. This isn’t true for all of the embedded IoT systems. They last for years, even decades. We might buy a new DVR every five or ten years. We replace our refrigerator every 25 years. We replace our thermostat approximately never. Already the banking industry is dealing with the security problems of Windows 95 embedded in ATMs. This same problem is going to occur all over the Internet of Things.

At least Microsoft has security engineers on staff that can write a patch for Windows XP. There will be no one able to write patches for your 16-year-old thermostat and refrigerator, even assuming those devices can accept security patches.

Electronic Signature Using The WebCrypto API

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/electronic-signature-using-webcrypto-api/

Sometimes we need to let users sign something electronically. Often people understand that as placing your handwritten signature on the screen somehow. Depending on the jurisdiction, that may be fine, or it may not be sufficient to just store the image. In Europe, for example, there’s the Regulation 910/2014 which defines what electronic signature are. As it can be expected from a legal text, the definition is rather vague:

‘electronic signature’ means data in electronic form which is attached to or logically associated with other data in electronic form and which is used by the signatory to sign;

Yes, read it a few more times, say “wat” a few more times, and let’s discuss what that means. And it can mean basically anything. It is technically acceptable to just attach an image of the drawn signature (e.g. using an html canvas) to the data and that may still count.

But when we get to the more specific types of electronic signature – the advanced and qualified electronic signatures, things get a little better:

An advanced electronic signature shall meet the following requirements:
(a) it is uniquely linked to the signatory;
(b) it is capable of identifying the signatory;
(c) it is created using electronic signature creation data that the signatory can, with a high level of confidence, use under his sole control; and
(d) it is linked to the data signed therewith in such a way that any subsequent change in the data is detectable.

That looks like a proper “digital signature” in the technical sense – e.g. using a private key to sign and a public key to verify the signature. The “qualified” signatures need to be issued by qualified provider that is basically a trusted Certificate Authority. The keys for placing qualified signatures have to be issued on secure devices (smart cards and HSMs) so that nobody but the owner can have access to the private key.

But the legal distinction between advanced and qualified signatures isn’t entirely clear – the Regulation explicitly states that non-qualified signatures also have legal value. Working with qualified signatures (with smartcards) in browsers is a horrifying user experience – in most cases it goes through a Java Applet, which works basically just on Internet Explorer and a special build of Firefox nowadays. Alternatives include desktop software and local service JWS applications that handles the signing, but smartcards are a big issue and offtopic at the moment.

So, how do we allow users to “place” an electronic signature? I had an idea that this could be done entirely using the WebCrypto API that’s more or less supported in browsers these days. The idea is as follows:

  • Let the user type in a password for the purpose of sining
  • Derive a key from the password (e.g. using PBKDF2)
  • Sign the contents of the form that the user is submitting with the derived key
  • Store the signature alongside the rest of the form data
  • Optionally, store the derived key for verification purposes

Here’s a javascript gist with implementation of that flow.

Many of the pieces are taken from the very helpful webcrypto examples repo. The hex2buf, buf2hex and str2ab functions are utilities (that sadly are not standard in js).

What the code does is straightforward, even though it’s a bit verbose. All the operations are chained using promises and “then”, which to be honest is a big tedious to write and read (but inevitable I guess):

  • The password is loaded as a raw key (after transforming to an array buffer)
  • A secret key is derived using PBKDF2 (with 100 iterations)
  • The secret key is used to do an HMAC “signature” on the content filled in by the user
  • The signature and the key are stored (in the UI in this example)
  • Then the signature can be verified using: the data, the signature and the key

You can test it here:

Having the signature stored should be enough to fulfill the definition of “electronic signature”. The fact that it’s a secret password known only to the user may even mean this is an “advanced electronic signature”. Storing the derived secret key is questionable – if you store it, it means you can “forge” signatures on behalf of the user. But not storing it means you can’t verify the signature – only the user can. Depending on the use-case, you can choose one or the other.

Now, I have to admit I tried deriving an asymmetric keypair from the password (both RSA and ECDSA). The WebCrypto API doesn’t allow that out of the box. So I tried “generating” the keys using deriveBits(), e.g. setting the “n” and “d” values for RSA, and the x, y and d values for ECDSA (which can be found here, after a bit of searching). But I failed – you can’t specify just any values as importKey parameters, and the constraints are not documented anywhere, except for the low-level algorithm details, and that was a bit out of the scope of my experiment.

The goal was that if we only derive the private key from the password, we can easily derive the public key from the private key (but not vice-versa) – then we store the public key for verification, and the private key remains really private, so that we can’t forge signatures.

I have to add a disclaimer here that I realize this isn’t very secure. To begin with, deriving a key from a password is questionable in many contexts. However, in this context (placing a signature), it’s fine.

As a side note – working with the WebCrypto API is tedious. Maybe because nobody has actually used it yet, so googling for errors basically gives you the source code of Chromium and nothing else. It feels like uncharted territory (although the documentation and examples are good enough to get you started).

Whether it will be useful to do electronic signatures in this way, I don’t know. I implemented it for a use-case that it actually made sense (party membership declaration signature). Whether it’s better than hand-drawn signature on a canvas – I think it is (unless you derive the key from the image, in which case the handwritten one is better due to a higher entropy).

The post Electronic Signature Using The WebCrypto API appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Try Amazon WorkSpaces at No Charge for Up To 2 Months

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/try-amazon-workspaces-at-no-charge-for-up-to-2-months/

I am a big believer in hands-on experience. Except under very rare circumstances, the posts in my blog are written only after I have used the service in question. If you happened to read I Love My Amazon WorkSpace, you know that Amazon WorkSpaces is one of my most important productivity tools.

I would like to tell you about an opportunity for you to try WorkSpaces on your own at no charge. The new Amazon WorkSpaces Free Tier allows you to launch two Standard bundle WorkSpaces and use them for a total of 40 hours per month, for up to two calendar months. You can choose either the Windows 7 or the Windows 10 Desktop Experience, both powered by Windows Server. Both options include Internet Explorer 11, Mozilla Firefox, 7-Zip, and Amazon WorkDocs with 50 GB of storage.

In order to take advantage of the free tier you must run the WorkSpaces in AutoStop mode, which is selected for you by default. Unused hours expire at the end of the first calendar month and the free tier offer expires at the end of the second calendar month. After that you will be billed at the hourly rate listed on the Amazon WorkSpaces Pricing page.

To get started, follow the steps in the Quick Setup and choose a bundle that is eligible for the free tier:

This offer is available in all AWS Regions where WorkSpaces is available.

Jeff;

How to Control TLS Ciphers in Your AWS Elastic Beanstalk Application by Using AWS CloudFormation

Post Syndicated from Paco Hope original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-control-tls-ciphers-in-your-aws-elastic-beanstalk-application-by-using-aws-cloudformation/

Securing data in transit is critical to the integrity of transactions on the Internet. Whether you log in to an account with your user name and password or give your credit card details to a retailer, you want your data protected as it travels across the Internet from place to place. One of the protocols in widespread use to protect data in transit is Transport Layer Security (TLS). Every time you access a URL that begins with “https” instead of just “http”, you are using a TLS-secured connection to a website.

To demonstrate that your application has a strong TLS configuration, you can use services like the one provided by SSL Labs. There are also open source, command-line-oriented TLS testing programs such as testssl.sh (which I do not cover in this post) and sslscan (which I cover later in this post). The goal of testing your TLS configuration is to provide evidence that weak cryptographic ciphers are disabled in your TLS configuration and only strong ciphers are enabled. In this blog post, I show you how to control the TLS security options for your secure load balancer in AWS CloudFormation, pass the TLS certificate and host name for your secure AWS Elastic Beanstalk application to the CloudFormation script as parameters, and then confirm that only strong TLS ciphers are enabled on the launched application by testing it with SSLLabs.

Background

In some situations, it’s not enough to simply turn on TLS with its default settings and call it done. Over the years, a number of vulnerabilities have been discovered in the TLS protocol itself with codenames such as CRIME, POODLE, and Logjam. Though some vulnerabilities were in specific implementations, such as OpenSSL, others were vulnerabilities in the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or TLS protocol itself.

The only way to avoid some TLS vulnerabilities is to ensure your web server uses only the latest version of TLS. Some organizations want to limit their TLS configuration to the highest possible security levels to satisfy company policies, regulatory requirements, or other information security requirements. In practice, such limitations usually mean using TLS version 1.2 (at the time of this writing, TLS 1.3 is in the works) and using only strong cryptographic ciphers. Note that forcing a high-security TLS connection in this manner limits which types of devices can connect to your web server. I address this point at the end of this post.

The default TLS configuration in most web servers is compatible with the broadest set of clients (such as web browsers, mobile devices, and point-of-sale systems). As a result, older ciphers and protocol versions are usually enabled. This is true for the Elastic Load Balancing load balancer that is created in your Elastic Beanstalk application as well as for web server software such as Apache and nginx.  For example, TLS versions 1.0 and 1.1 are enabled in addition to 1.2. The RC4 cipher is permitted, even though that cipher is too weak for the most demanding security requirements. If your application needs to prioritize the security of connections over compatibility with legacy devices, you must adjust the TLS encryption settings on your application. The solution in this post helps you make those adjustments.

Prerequisites for the solution

Before you implement this solution, you must have a few prerequisites in place:

  1. You must have a hosted zone in Amazon Route 53 where the name of the secure application will be created. I use example.com as my domain name in this post and assume that I host example.com publicly in Route 53. To learn more about creating and hosting a zone publicly in Route 53, see Working with Public Hosted Zones.
  2. You must choose a name to be associated with the secure app. In this case, I use secure.example.com as the DNS name to be associated with the secure app. This means that I’m trying to create an Elastic Beanstalk application whose URL will be https://secure.example.com/.
  3. You must have a TLS certificate hosted in AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). This certificate must be issued with the name you decided in Step 2. If you are new to ACM, see Getting Started. If you are already familiar with ACM, request a certificate and get its Amazon Resource Name (ARN).Look up the ARN for the certificate that you created by opening the ACM console. The ARN looks something like: arn:aws:acm:eu-west-1:111122223333:certificate/12345678-abcd-1234-abcd-1234abcd1234.

Implementing the solution

You can use two approaches to control the TLS ciphers used by your load balancer: one is to use a predefined protocol policy from AWS, and the other is to write your own protocol policy that lists exactly which ciphers should be enabled. There are many ciphers and options that can be set, so the appropriate AWS predefined policy is often the simplest policy to use. If you have to comply with an information security policy that requires enabling or disabling specific ciphers, you will probably find it easiest to write a custom policy listing only the ciphers that are acceptable to your requirements.

AWS released two predefined TLS policies on March 10, 2017: ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-1-2017-01 and ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01. These policies restrict TLS negotiations to TLS 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. You can find a good comparison of the ciphers that these policies enable and disable in the HTTPS listener documentation for Elastic Load Balancing. If your requirements are simply “support TLS 1.1 and later” or “support TLS 1.2 and later,” those AWS predefined cipher policies are the best place to start. If you need to control your cipher choice with a custom policy, I show you in this post which lines of the CloudFormation template to change.

Download the predefined policy CloudFormation template

Many AWS customers rely on CloudFormation to launch their AWS resources, including their Elastic Beanstalk applications. To change the ciphers and protocol versions supported on your load balancer, you must put those options in a CloudFormation template. You can store your site’s TLS certificate in ACM and create the corresponding DNS alias record in the correct zone in Route 53.

To start, download the CloudFormation template that I have provided for this blog post, or deploy the template directly in your environment. This template creates a CloudFormation stack in your default VPC that contains two resources: an Elastic Beanstalk application that deploys a standard sample PHP application, and a Route 53 record in a hosted zone. This CloudFormation template selects the AWS predefined policy called ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 and deploys it.

Launching the sample application from the CloudFormation console

In the CloudFormation console, choose Create Stack. You can either upload the template through your browser, or load the template into an Amazon S3 bucket and type the S3 URL in the Specify an Amazon S3 template URL box.

After you click Next, you will see that there are three parameters defined: CertificateARN, ELBHostName, and HostedDomainName. Set the CertificateARN parameter to the ARN of the certificate you want to use for your application. Set the ELBHostName parameter to the hostname part of the URL. For example, if your URL were https://secure.example.com/, the HostedDomainName parameter would be example.com and the ELBHostName parameter would be secure.

For the sample application, choose Next and then choose Create, and the CloudFormation stack will be created. For your own applications, you might need to set other options such as a database, VPC options, or Amazon SNS notifications. For more details, see AWS Elastic Beanstalk Environment Configuration. To deploy an application other than our sample PHP application, create your own application source bundle.

Launching the sample application from the command line

In addition to launching the sample application from the console, you can specify the parameters from the command line. Because the template uses parameters, you can launch multiple copies of the application, specifying different parameters for each copy. To launch the application from a Linux command line with the AWS CLI, insert the correct values for your application, as shown in the following command.

aws cloudformation create-stack --stack-name "SecureSampleApplication" \
--template-url https://<URL of your CloudFormation template in S3> \
--parameters ParameterKey=CertificateARN,ParameterValue=<Your ARN> \
ParameterKey=ELBHostName,ParameterValue=<Your Host Name> \
ParameterKey=HostedDomainName,ParameterValue=<Your Domain Name>

When that command exits, it prints the StackID of the stack it created. Save that StackID for later so that you can fetch the stack’s outputs from the command line.

Using a custom cipher specification

If you want to specify your own cipher choices, you can use the same CloudFormation template and change two lines. Let’s assume your information security policies require you to disable any ciphers that use Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) mode encryption. These ciphers are enabled in the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 managed policy, so to satisfy that security requirement, you have to modify the CloudFormation template to use your own protocol policy.

In the template, locate the three lines that define the TLSHighPolicy.

- Namespace:  aws:elb:policies:TLSHighPolicy
OptionName: SSLReferencePolicy
Value:      ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01

Change the OptionName and Value for the TLSHighPolicy. Instead of referring to the AWS predefined policy by name, explicitly list all the ciphers you want to use. Change those three lines so they look like the following.

- Namespace: aws:elb:policies:TLSHighPolicy
OptionName: SSLProtocols
Value:  Protocol-TLSv1.2,Server-Defined-Cipher-Order,ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384,ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256,ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384,ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256

This protocol policy stipulates that the load balancer should:

  • Negotiate connections using only TLS 1.2.
  • Ignore any attempts by the client (for example, the web browser or mobile device) to negotiate a weaker cipher.
  • Accept four specific, strong combinations of cipher and key exchange—and nothing else.

The protocol policy enables only TLS 1.2, strong ciphers that do not use CBC mode encryption, and strong key exchange.

Connect to the secure application

When your CloudFormation stack is in the CREATE_COMPLETED state, you will find three outputs:

  1. The public DNS name of the load balancer
  2. The secure URL that was created
  3. TestOnSSLLabs output that contains a direct link for testing your configuration

You can either enter the secure URL in a web browser (for example, https://secure.example.com/), or click the link in the Outputs to open your sample application and see the demo page. Note that you must use HTTPS—this template has disabled HTTP on port 80 and only listens with HTTPS on port 443.

If you launched your application through the command line, you can view the CloudFormation outputs using the command line as well. You need to know the StackId of the stack you launched and insert it in the following stack-name parameter.

aws cloudformation describe-stacks --stack-name "<ARN of Your Stack>" \
--query 'Stacks[0].Outputs'

Test your application over the Internet with SSLLabs

The easiest way to confirm that the load balancer is using the secure ciphers that we chose is to enter the URL of the load balancer in the form on SSL Labs’ SSL Server Test page. If you do not want the name of your load balancer to be shared publicly on SSLLabs.com, select the Do not show the results on the boards check box. After a minute or two of testing, SSLLabs gives you a detailed report of every cipher it tried and how your load balancer responded. This test simulates many devices that might connect to your website, including mobile phones, desktop web browsers, and software libraries such as Java and OpenSSL. The report tells you whether these clients would be able to connect to your application successfully.

Assuming all went well, you should receive an A grade for the sample application. The biggest contributors to the A grade are:

  • Supporting only TLS 1.2, and not TLS 1.1, TLS 1.0, or SSL 3.0
  • Supporting only strong ciphers such as AES, and not weaker ciphers such as RC4
  • Having an X.509 public key certificate issued correctly by ACM

How to test your application privately with sslscan

You might not be able to reach your Elastic Beanstalk application from the Internet because it might be in a private subnet that is only accessible internally. If you want to test the security of your load balancer’s configuration privately, you can use one of the open source command-line tools such as sslscan. You can install and run the sslscan command on any Amazon EC2 Linux instance or even from your own laptop. Be sure that the Elastic Beanstalk application you want to test will accept an HTTPS connection from your Amazon Linux EC2 instance or from your laptop.

The easiest way to get sslscan on an Amazon Linux EC2 instance is to:

  1. Enable the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) repository.
  2. Run sudo yum install sslscan.
  3. After the command runs successfully, run sslscan secure.example.com to scan your application for supported ciphers.

The results are similar to Qualys’ results at SSLLabs.com, but the sslscan tool does not summarize and evaluate the results to assign a grade. It just reports whether your application accepted a connection using the cipher that it tried. You must decide for yourself whether that set of accepted connections represents the right level of security for your application. If you have been asked to build a secure load balancer that meets specific security requirements, the output from sslscan helps to show how the security of your application is configured.

The following sample output shows a small subset of the total output of the sslscan tool.

AcceptedTLS12256 bitsAES256-GCM-SHA384
AcceptedTLS12256 bitsAES256-SHA256
AcceptedTLS12256 bitsAES256-SHA
RejectedTLS12256 bitsCAMELLIA256-SHA
FailedTLS12256 bitsPSK-AES256-CBC-SHA
RejectedTLS12128 bitsECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
RejectedTLS12128 bitsECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
RejectedTLS12128 bitsECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256

An Accepted connection is one that was successful: the load balancer and the client were both able to use the indicated cipher. Failed and Rejected connections are connections whose load balancer would not accept the level of security that the client was requesting. As a result, the load balancer closed the connection instead of communicating insecurely. The difference between Failed and Rejected is based one whether the TLS connection was closed cleanly.

Comparing the two policies

The main difference between our custom policy and the AWS predefined policy is whether or not CBC ciphers are accepted. The test results with both policies are identical except for the results shown in the following table. The only change in the policy, and therefore the only change in the results, is that the cipher suites using CBC ciphers have been disabled.

Cipher Suite NameEncryption AlgorithmKey Size (bits)ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01Custom Policy
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384AESGCM256EnabledEnabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384AES256EnabledDisabled
AES256-GCM-SHA384AESGCM256EnabledDisabled
AES256-SHA256AES256EnabledDisabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256AESGCM128EnabledEnabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256AES128EnabledDisabled
AES128-GCM-SHA256AESGCM128EnabledDisabled
AES128-SHA256AES128EnabledDisabled

Strong ciphers and compatibility

The custom policy described in the previous section prevents legacy devices and older versions of software and web browsers from connecting. The output at SSLLabs provides a list of devices and applications (such as Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 7) that cannot connect to an application that uses the TLS policy. By design, the load balancer will refuse to connect to a device that is unable to negotiate a connection at the required levels of security. Users who use legacy software and devices will see different errors, depending on which device or software they use (for example, Internet Explorer on Windows, Chrome on Android, or a legacy mobile application). The error messages will be some variation of “connection failed” because the Elastic Load Balancer closes the connection without responding to the user’s request. This behavior can be problematic for websites that must be accessible to older desktop operating systems or older mobile devices.

If you need to support legacy devices, adjust the TLSHighPolicy in the CloudFormation template. For example, if you need to support web browsers on Windows 7 systems (and you cannot enable TLS 1.2 support on those systems), you can change the policy to enable TLS 1.1. To do this, change the value of SSLReferencePolicy to ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-1-2017-01.

Enabling legacy protocol versions such as TLS version 1.1 will allow older devices to connect, but then the application may not be compliant with the information security policies or business requirements that require strong ciphers.

Conclusion

Using Elastic Beanstalk, Route 53, and ACM can help you launch secure applications that are designed to not only protect data but also meet regulatory compliance requirements and your information security policies. The TLS policy, either custom or predefined, allows you to control exactly which cryptographic ciphers are enabled on your Elastic Load Balancer. The TLS test results provide you with clear evidence you can use to demonstrate compliance with security policies or requirements. The parameters in this post’s CloudFormation template also make it adaptable and reusable for multiple applications. You can use the same template to launch different applications on different secure URLs by simply changing the parameters that you pass to the template.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the CloudFormation forum.

– Paco

Рецепта за бисквитки

Не става дума за захарни изделия, а за информационни технологии. Терминът е заимстван с директен превод от английския език, където се използва думата cookies (въпреки, че буквалният превод е курабийки, а не бисквитки).

И все пак, каква е целта на бисквитките? Бисквитките представляват порции структурирана информация, която съдържа различни параметри. Те се създават от сървърите, които предоставят достъп до уеб страници. Предава се чрез служебните части на HTTP протокола (т. нар. HTTP headers) – това е трансферен протокол, който се използва от браузърите за обмен на информация със сървърите. Бисквитките са добавени в спецификацията на HTTP протокола във версия 1.0 в началото на 90те години. По това време Интернет не беше толкова развит, колкото е в момента и затова HTTP протоколът има някои специфични особености. Протоколът е базиран на заявки (от клиента) и отговори (от сървъра), като всяка двойка заявка и отговор се правят в отделна връзка (socket) към между клиента и сървъра. Тази схема на работа е изключително удобна, тъй като не изисква постоянна и стабилна връзка с Интернет, тъй като всъщност връзката се използва само за кратък момент. За съжаление, заради тази особеност често HTTP протоколът е наричан state less протокол (протокол без запазване на състоянието). А именно – сървърът няма как да знае, че редица от последователни заявки са изпратени от един и същи клиент. За разлика от IRC, SMTP, FTP и други протоколи създадени през същите години, които отварят една връзка и предават и приемат данни двупосочно. При такива протоколи комуникацията започва с hand shake или аутентикация между участниците в комуникацията, след което и за двете страни е ясно, че докато връзката остава отворена, комуникацията тече с конкретен участник.

За да бъде преодолян този недостатък на протокола, след версия 0.9 (първата версия навлязла в реална експлоатация), във версия 1.0 създават механизма на бисквитките. Кръщават технологията cookies заради приказката на братя Грим за Хенцел и Гретел, които маркират пътя, по който са минали пре тъмната гора, като поръсват трохи. В повечето български преводи в приказката се използват трохи от хляб (bread crumbs) термин, който намира друго място в IT сферата и уеб, но в действителност приказката е германска народна приказка с много различни версии през годините. Сравнението е очевидно – cookies позволяват да се проследи пътя на потребителя в тъмната гора на state less протокола HTTP.

Как работят бисквитките? Бисквитките се създават от сървърите и се изпращат на потребителите. При всяка следваща заявка от потребителя към същия сървър, той трябва да изпраща обратно копие на получените от сървъра бисквитки. По този начин, сървърът получава механизъм по който да проследи потребителя по пътя му, т.е. да знае, когато един и същи потребител е направил поредица от множество, иначе несвързани, заявки.

Представете си, че изпращате първа заявка към сървъра и той ви връща отговор, че иска да се аутентикирате – да посочите потребителско име и парола. Вие ги изпращате и сървърът верифицира, че това наистина сте вие. Но заради особеностите на HTTP протокола, след като изпратите името и паролата, връзката между вас и сървъра се прекъсва. По-късно изпращате нова заявка. Сървърът няма как да знае, че това отново сте вие, тъй като за новата заявка е направена нова връзка.

Сега си представете същата схема, но с добавена технологията на бисквитите. Изпращате заявката към сървъра, той ви връща отговор, че иска име и парола. Изпращате име и парола и сървърът ви връща бисквитка в която записва че собственикът на тази бисквитка вече е дал име и парола. Връзката прекъсва. По-късно изпращате нова заявка и тъй като тя е към същия сървър, клиентът трябва да върне обратно копие на получените от сървъра бисквитки. Тогава новата заявка съдържа и бисквитката, в която пише, че по-рано сте предоставили име и парола, които са били валидни.

И така, бисквитките се създават от сървърите, като данните се изпращат от уеб сървъра заедно с отговора на заявка за достъп до ресурс (например отделна уеб страница, текст, картинка или друг файл). Бисквитката се връща като част от служебната информация на протокола. Когато клиент (клиентският софтуер – браузър) получи отговор от сървър, който съдържа бисквитка, той следва да я обработи. Ако клиентът вече разполага с подобна бисквитка – следва да си обнови информацията за нея, ако не разполага с нея, следва да я създаде. Ако срокът на бисквитката е изтекъл – следва да я унищожи и т.н.

Често се споменава, че бисквитките са малки текстови файлове, които се съхраняват на компютъра на потребителя. Това не винаги е вярно – бисквитките представляваха отделни текстови файлове в ранните версии на някои браузъри (например в Internet Explorer и Netscape Navigator), повечето съвременни браузъри съхраняват бисквитките по различен начин. Например съвременните версии на браузърите Mozilla Firefox и Google Chrome съхранява всички бисквитки в един файл, който представлява sqlite база данни. Подходът с база данни е доста подходящ, тъй като бисквитките представляват структурирана информация, която е удобно да се съхранява в база, а достъпът до информацията е доста по ефективен. Въпреки това, браузърът Microsoft Edge продължава да съхранява бисквитките във вид на текстови файлове в AppData директорията.

Какви параметри съдържат бисквитките, които сървърите изпращат? Всяка бисквитка може да съдържа: име, стойност, домейн, адрес (път), срок на варидност и някои параметри за сигурност (да важат само по https и да бъдат достъпни само от трансфертия протокол, т.е. на не бъдат достъпни за javascript и други приложни слоеве при клиента). Името и стойността са задължителни за всяка бисквитка – те задават името на променливата, в която ще се съхранява информацията и съответната стойност – съхранената информация.

Домейнът е основната част от адреса на интернет сайта, който изпраща бисквитката – частта, която идентифицира машината (сървъра) в мрежата. Според техническите спецификации домейнът на бисквитката задължително трябва да съвпада с домейна на сървъра, който ги изпраща, но има някои изключения. Първото изключение е, чекогато се използват няколко нива домейни, те могат да създават бисквитки за различни части от нивата. Например отговорът на заявка към домейна example.com може да създаде бисквитка само за домейна example.com, както и бисквитка валидна за същия домейн и всички негови поддомейни. Ако бисквитката е валидна за всички поддомейни, изписването става с точка пред името на домейна или .example.com. Второто изключение е валидно, когато бисквитката не се създава от сървъра, а от приложен слой при клиента (например от javascript). Тогава е възможно js файлът да е зареден от един домейн, но в html страница от друг домейн – сървърът, който изпраща бисквитка може да я изпрати от името на домейна където е js файлът, но самият js, докато е зареден в страница от друг домейн може да създаде (и прочете) бисквитка от домейна на html страницата.

Адресът (или пътят) е останалата част от URL адреса. По подризбиране бисквитките са валидни за път / (т.е. за корена на уеб сайта). Това означава, че бисквитката е валидна за всички възможни адреси на сървъра. Въпреки това, има възможност изрично да се укаже конкретен адрес, за който да бъдат валидни бисквитките.По идея, адресите са репрезентация на път в йерархична файлова структура върху сървъра (въпреки, че не е задължително). Затова и адресите на бисквитките представят мястото на тяхното създаване в йерархична файлова система. Например ако пътят на бисквитката е /dir/ – това означава, че тя е валидна в директорията с име dir, включително и всички нейни поддиректории.

Да дадем малко по-реалистичен пример, ако имаме бисквитки, които използваме за съпраняване на информация за аутентикацията на потребителите в администраторски панел на уеб сайт, който е разположен в директория /admin/ – можем да посочим, че дадената бисквитка е валидна само за адрес /admin/, по този начин бисквитките създадени от сървъра за нуждите на администраторския панел няма да се използват при заявки за други ресурси от същия сървър.

Срокът на валидност определя колко време потребителят трябва да пази бисквитката при себе си и да я връща с всяка следваща заявка към същия сървър и адрес (път). Когато сървърът иска да изтрие бисквитка при потребителя, той трябва да я изпрати със срок на валидност в миналото, по този начин предизвиква изтичане и автоматично изтриване на бисквитката при потребителя.

Бисквитките имат и параметри, които имат грижата да осигурят сигурността на предаваните данни. Това включва два булеви параметъра – единият определя, дали бисквитката да бъде достъпна (както за четене, така и за писане) само от http протокола или да бъде достъпна и за приложния слой при клиента (например за javascript). Вторият параметър определя, дали бисквитката да се предава по всички протоколи или само по https (защитен http).

Както се досещате, в рамките на една и съща комуникация може да има повече от една бисквитка. Както сървърът може да създаде повече от една бисквитка едновременно, така и клиентът може да върне повече от една бисквитка обратно към сървъра. Именно затова освен домейни и адреси, бисквитките имат и имена.

В допълнение бисквитките имат и редица ограничения. Повечето браузъри не позволяват да има повече от 20 едновременно валидни бисквитки за един и същи домейн. Във Mozilla Firefox това ограничение е 50 броя, а в Opera 30 броя. Също така е ограничен и размерът на всяка отделна бисквитка – не повече от 4KB (4096 Bytes). В спецификациите за бисквитки RFC2109 от 1997 г. е посочено че клиентът може да съхранява до 300 бисквитки по 20 за един и същи домейн и всяка с размер до 4KB. В по-късната спецификация Rfc6265 от 2011 г. лимитите са увеличение до 3000 броя общо и 50 броя за един домейн. Все пак, не трябва да се забравя, че всяка бисквитка се изпраща от клиента при всяка следваща заявка към сървъра, ако чукнем тавана на лимитите и имаме 50 бисквитки по 4KB, това означава, че с всяка заявка ще пътуват близо 200KB само под формата на бисквитки, което може да се окаже сериозен товар за трафика, дори и при техническите възможности на съвременния достъп до Интернет.

Разбира се, по-рано приведеният пример, при който запазваме успешната аутентикация на потребителя в бисквитка има множество особености свързани с гарантиране на сигурността. На първо място – не е добра идея да запазим потребителското име и паролата на потребителя в бисквитка, тъй като тя се запазва на неговия компютър. Това означава, че по всяко време, ако злонамерено лице получи достъп до компютъра на потребителя, може да прочете потребителското име и паролата от записаните там бисквитки. От друга страна, ако в бисквитката съхраним само името на потребителя, без неговата парола – няма как да се предпазим от фалшиви бисквитки – всяко злонамерено лице може да създаде фалшива бисквитка, в която да посочи произволно (чуждо) потребителско име и да се представи пред сървъра от чуждо име.

Затова най-често използваният механизъм е, че при всяка аутентикация с име и парола пред сървъра, след като той ги верифицира, създава някакъв временно валиден идентификатор, който изпраща като бисквитка. В различните технологии този идентификатор може да се намери с различни имена, one time password (OTP), token, session или по друг начин. При тази схема сървърът съхранява за ограничено време (живот на сесията) информация за потребителя. Всяка такава информация (често наричана сесия) получава идентификационен номер, който се изпраща като бисквитка на потребителя. Тъй като той ще връща този идентификатор с всяка следваща заявка, сървърът ще може да възстановява съхранената информация за потребителя и тя да бъде достъпна при всяка следваща заявка. В същото време, информацията е съхранена на сървъра, а не при клиента, което не позволява на злонамерен потребител да я модифицира или фалшифицира. Освен това, идентификаторът е валиден за ограничен период от време (например за 30 минути). Дори и бисквитката с идентификатора да остане на компютъра на потребителя, заисаният в нея идентификатор няма да върши работа след половин час. Не на последно място, при натискане на бутона за изход съхранените на сървъра данни за потребителя се изтриват дори и да не е изтекъл срокът от 30 минути. Именно затова е важно винаги да се използват бутоните за изход при излизане от онлайн системи.

Какво друго се съхранява в бисквитки? На практика всичко! Много често бисквитките се използват за съхраняване на информация за индивидуални настройки на потребителя. Когато потребителят промени някоя настройка сървърът му изпраща бисквитка със съответната настройка и дълъг срок на валидност. При всяко следващо посещение на същия потребител на същия сайт, той ще изпраща запазената в бисквитка настройка, заедно със заявката към сървъра. Сървърът ще знае за желаната настройка и ще я приложи при връщането на отговор на изпратената заявка. Пример за такава настройка е броят на записите които се показват на страница. Ако веднъж промените този брой, избраната стойност може да се запази в бисквитка и при всяка следваща заявка сървърът винаги ще знае за настройката и ще връща правилен отговор.

В бисквитки се съхранява и друга информация, например поръчани стоки в пазарската кошница на онлайн магазин, статистическа информация кога сте посетили даден сайт за последно, колко пъти сте го посетили, кои страници сте посещавали, колко време сте се задържали на всяка от страниците и т.н.

Забранява ли Европейският съюз бисквитките? Бисквитеното чудовище от улица Сезам би било доста разстроено, ако разбере, че ЕС иска да ограничи използването на бисквитки. В действителност истината е доста по-различна, но информацията е масово грешно интепретирана. Да излезем от технологичната сфера и да навлезем малко в юридическата. На първо място, кои са нормативните документи в тази връзка? Масово се цитира европейската Директива 2009/136/ЕО от 25 ноември 2009 г. Истината е, че тази директива не засяга директно бисквитките. Директивата внася изменения в друга Директива 2002/22/ЕО от 7 март 2002 г. относно универсалната услуга (час от която е и достъпът до Интернет) и правата на потребителите. Изменението от директивата от 2009 г. гласи следното (чл. 5, стр. 30):

5. Член 5, параграф 3 се заменя със следния текст:

„3. Държавите-членки гарантират, че съхраняването на информация или получаването на достъп до информация, вече съхранявана в крайното оборудване на абоната или ползвателя, е позволено само при условие, че съответният абонат или ползвател е дал своето съгласие след получаване на предоставена ясна и изчерпателна информация в съответствие с Директива 95/46/ЕО, inter alia, относно целите на обработката. Това не пречи на всякакво техническо съхранение или достъп с единствена цел осъществяване на предаването на съобщение по електронна съобщителна мрежа или доколкото е строго необходимо, за да може доставчикът да предостави услуга на информационното общество, изрично поискана от абоната или ползвателя.“

Също така, в увода на същата директива се споменава още:

(66) Трети страни може да желаят да съхраняват информация върху оборудване на даден ползвател или да получат достъп до вече съхраняваната информация за различни цели, които варират от легитимни (някои видове „бисквитки“ (cookies) до такива, включващи непозволено навлизане в личната сфера (като шпионски софтуер или вируси). Следователно е от първостепенно значение ползвателите да получат ясна и всеобхватна информация при извършване на дейност, която би могла да доведе до подобно съхраняване или получаване на достъп. Методите на предоставяне на информация и на предоставяне на правото на отказ следва да се направят колкото може по-удобни за ползване. Изключенията от задължението за предоставяне на информация и на право на отказ следва да се ограничават до такива ситуации, в които техническото съхранение или достъп е стриктно необходимо за легитимната цел на даване възможност за ползване на специфична услуга, изрично поискана от абоната или ползвателя. Когато е технически възможно и ефективно, съгласно приложимите разпоредби на Директива 95/46/ЕО, съгласието на ползвателя с обработката може да бъде изразено чрез използване на съответните настройки на браузер или друго приложение. Прилагането на тези изисквания следва да се направи по-ефективно чрез разширените правомощия, дадени на съответните национални органи.

От двете цитирания следва да обърнем внамание и на още нещо – цитира се и Директива 95/46/ЕО от 24 октомври 1995 г, която пък третира защитата на физическите лица при обработването на лични данни. Разбира се, трудно е да се каже, че директивата от средата на 90те години засяга директно функционирането на Интернет, който по това време е доста слабо разпространен, а технологията на бисквитките – появила се само преди няколко години, все още изключително нова и рядко използвана.

Преди да продължим с анализа нататък, трябва да отбележим, че и трите цитирани директиви, по отношение на защитата на потребителите от бисквитки, засега не са транспонирани в националното законодателство (поне не в Закона за електронното управление, Закона за електронните съобщения и Закона за защита на личните данни). Слава богу, механизмът на директивите в Европейския съюз е така създаден, че ги прави задължителни за спазване от всички държави-членки, независимо дали има национално законодателство за съответната сфера или не.

И все пак – защо ЕС иска да ограничи използването на бисквитките? Сред изброените множество приложения на технологията – за съхраняване на аутентикация, за съхраняване на настройки, за следене на поведението на потребителя, за следене на статистика за потребителя, за маркетингови анализи, за съхраняване на данни за пазарски колички и др. (някои от изброените се припокриват или допълват), бисквитките още може да се използват и за сериозно навлизане в личното пространство на потребителите, като се извършват различни форми на следене и анализ на потреблението и поведението на потребителите в Интернет с цел предоставяне на таргетирана реклама или с други, дори и незаконни, цели.

Да разгледаме един по-реалистичен пример на базата на вече разгледаната по-рано технология. Имаме прост информационен сайт с автомобилна тематика, който няма никакви специфични функции, не предоставя услуги или нещо друго. Сайтът обаче използва Google Analytics (безплатен инструмент за събиране на статистика за посетителите, предоставят от Google), също така, собственикът на сайта, с цел да монетизира поне в някаква минимална степен събраната на сайта си информация е пуснал и Google Adwords (услуга за публикуване на рекламни банери предоставяна от Google). Също така имаме и потребител, който търси в Google информация за ремонт на спукана автомобилна гума. Потребителят открива цитирания по-горе сайт в Google, където кликва линк и отива на сайта. Същият потребител има и email в Gmail (безплатна email услуга предоставяна от Google). Както забелязвате, до момента имаме един неизменно преследващ ни по целия път общ знаменател – Google. В случая това далеч не е единствения голям играч на този пазар, просто примерът с него е най-достъпен за широката публика. Всъщност Google едновременно има достъп до писмата, които потребителят е изпращал и получавал, до това какво е търсил, до това в кой сайт е влязъл, какво е чел там (точно кои страници), колко време е прекарал на този сайт, също така и информация за всеки друг сайт, който същият потребител е посещавал в миналото, независимо дали ги е посещавал от същия компютър или от друг, достатъчно е всички сайтове да използват Google Analytics за статистиката си. Ако потребителят има служебен и домашен компютър и е влизал в Gmail пощата си и от двата компютъра, тогава Google Analytics е в състояние да направи връзка, че сайтовете, които сапосещавани на двата компютъра, които иначе нямат никаква друга връзка помежду си, са посещавани от един и същи потребител. Тогава, потребителят не трябва да се учудва, ако отиде на трето място, несвързано по никакъв начин с предишните две (домашния и служебния компютър), влезе си в пощата и по-късно посети произволен сайт, на който види реклама за продажба на нови автомобилни гуми.

Проследяването на всичко описано до момента е възможно именно чрез механизмите на бисквитките. Неслучайно те се наричат механизъм за запазване на състоянието и са създадени за „следене на потребителите на протокола”. Разбира се – следене в позитивния и чисто технологичен смисъл на термина, но все пак следене, което в ръцете на недобронамерени лица може да придобие съвсем различни мащаби и да се извършва със съвсем различни цели.

Всичко това може (и се) комбинира и с други данни, които се събират за потребителите – IP гео локация, информация за интернет връзката, използваното устройство, размер на дисплея, операционна система, използван софтуер и много други данни, които се предоставят автоматизирано, докато браузваме в мрежата.

Отново, сама по себе си, технологията на функциониране на бисквитките има предвидени защитни механизми. Например бисквитките от един уеб сайт не могат да бъдат прочетени от друг сайт. Но тук цялата схема се чупи поради факта, че бисквитките са достъпни за приложния слой на клиента (javascript), като в същото време милиони сайтове по света се възползват от иначе безплатната услуга за събиране на статистика за посещенията от един и същи доставчик. Именно този доставчик е свързващото звено в цялата схема. Всеки от сайтовете и всеки от потребителите поотделно не разполагат с особено полезна информация, но свързващото звено разполага с цялата информация и при добро желание, а повярвайте ми, за да бъдат безплатни всички тези услуги, желанието е преминало в нужда, тази натрупана информация може да бъде анализирана, обработена и използвана за всякакви нужди.

И тъй като често тези действия могат да навлязат доста надълбоко в личния живот на хората, Европейският съюз е предприел необходимите мерки, да задължи доставчиците на услуги в Интернет (собствениците на уеб сайтове), да информират потребителите за това какви данни се съхраняват за тях на крайните устройства (т.е. на самите компютри на клиентите) и за какви цели се използват тези данни.

Тук е много важно да уточним няколко аспекта. На първо място – използването на бисквитки, както и проследяването като процес не са забранени, просто се изисква потребителите да бъдат информирани какво се прави и с каква цел, както и потребителят изрично да е дал съгласието си за това. Другата важна подробност е, че бисквитките не са единственят механизъм за съхраняване на информация на крайните устройства и европейското законодателство не се ограничава до използването именно на бисквитки. Local Storage е съвременна алтернатива на бисквитките и въпреки, че функционира по различен начин и предоставя съвсем различни възможности, но също съхранява информация на крайните устройства и реално може да бъде използвана за следене на потребителите и може да засегне правата им по отношение на обработка на личните им данни. В този смисъл европейските директиви засягат всяка форма на съхраняване на информация на устройствата на потребителите, а не само бисквитките. Също така – директивите разглеждат съхраняването на данни за проследяване на потребителите отделно от бисквитките необходими за технологичното функциониране на системите в Интернет. Също така се прави и разлика между бисквитки от трети страни и бисквитки от собствениците на сайтовете, като в примера с бисквитките оставяни от Google Analytics, Google е трета страна.

Когато съхраняването на данните (били те бисквитки или други) се извършва от трети страни (различни от доставчика на услугата и крайния потребител), това не отменя ангажиментите на доставчика на услугата да информира потребителите, както и да им иска съгласието. Казано накратко, ако имам сайт, който използва Google Analytics, ангажиментът да информирам потребителите на сайта, както и да поискам тяхното съгласие, си остава мой (т.е. на собственика на сайта – лицето, което предоставя услугата), а не на третата страна (т.е. не е ангажимент на Google.

Също интересен факт е, че директивата разглежда като допустимо, съгласието на потребителя да бъде получено и чрез настройка на браузъра или друго приложение. Тук можем обратно да се върнем към технологиите. Преди време имаше P3P (пи три пи като Platform for Privacy Preferences, не ръ зъ ръ)– технология, която започна обещаващо, но в последствие беше имплементирана единствено от Internet Explorer и в крайна сметка разработката на спецификацията беше прекратена от W3C. Една от сочените причини е, че планираната технология беше относително сложна за имплементиране. Към днешна дата повечето браузъри поддържат Do Not Track (DNT), което представлява един HTTP header с име DNT, който ако присъства в заявката на клиента със стойност 1, посочва, че потребителят не е съгласен да бъде проследяван. Разбира се, проследяването, което се визира от DNT и запазването и достъпването на информация на крайните устройства на потребителите, което се визира в европейските директиви на се едно и също. Може да записваш и четеш информация на клиента, без да го проследяваш, което би нарушило европейските директиви, както и можеш да проследиш клиента, без да му записваш и четеш данни локално (например чрез Browser Fingerprint и с дънни съхранявани изцяло на сървъра).

Накрая, нека обобщим:

  1. Европейският съюз не забранява бисквитките;
  2. Европейският съюз предвижда мерки за защита на личните данни, като налага правила за искане на позволение от потребителите, когато се записват и достъпват данни на крайните им устройства, когато тези данни;
  3. Изискването за информирано съгласие не се ограничава единствено до бисквитките, а покрива всички съществуващи и евентуално бъдещи технологии позволяващи записване и достъпване на информация на крайните устройства на потребителите;
  4. Информиране на потребителите следва да има, както и трябва да им се поиска, независимо дали данните се записват или достъпват директно от доставчика на услугата или чрез услугите на трета страна. Или по-просто казано, ако използваме Google Analytics, ние трябва да предупредим потребителя и да му поискаме съгласието, а не Google. В този случай доставчикът на услугата (самият сайт) се явява като оператор на лични данни (не по смисъла на българския ЗЗЛД, но по смисъла на европейските директиви, а Google се явява трета страна оторизирана от администратора да управлява тези данни от негово име и за негова сметка – ерго отговорността е на администратора;
  5. Информиране на потребителя и искане на съгласие не е необходимо, когато записваните и четените данни се използват за технологични нужди и това е свързано с предоставянето на услугата, която потребителят изрично е поискал да използва. Бих казал, че когато случаят е такъв, лично аз бих избрал да информирам потребителя какво и защо се записва и чете, без обаче да му искам съгласието;
  6. Според Европейските директиви съгласието може да се изрази от потребителите и чрез специфични технологии създадени за тази цел, но използването на технологиите не отменя необходимостта от информиране на потребителя относно това какви данни се съхраняват и с каква цел се обработват;
  7. Европейската нормативна уредба в това отношение изглежда не е траспонирана в националното законодателство на България, което не означава, че може да не се спазва;

Another round of image bugs: PNG and JPEG XR

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2015/03/another-round-of-image-bugs-png-and.html

Today’s release of MS15-024 and
MS15-029 addresses two more image-related memory disclosure vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer – this time, affecting the little-known JPEG XR format supported by this browser, plus the far more familiar PNG. Similarly to the previously discussed bugs in MSIE TIFF and JPEG parsing, and to the BMP, ICO, and GIF and JPEG DHT & SOS flaws in Firefox and Chrome, these two were found with afl-fuzz. The earlier posts have more context – today, just enjoy some pretty pics, showing subsequent renderings of the same JPEG XR image:

Proof-of-concepts are here (JXR) and here (PNG). I am happy to report that Microsoft fixed them within roughly three months of the original report.

The total number of bugs squashed in this category is now ten. I have just one more multi-browser image parsing bug outstanding – but it should be an interesting one. Stay tuned.

Another round of image bugs: PNG and JPEG XR

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2015/03/another-round-of-image-bugs-png-and.html

Today’s release of MS15-024 and
MS15-029 addresses two more image-related memory disclosure vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer – this time, affecting the little-known JPEG XR format supported by this browser, plus the far more familiar PNG. Similarly to the previously discussed bugs in MSIE TIFF and JPEG parsing, and to the BMP, ICO, and GIF and JPEG DHT & SOS flaws in Firefox and Chrome, these two were found with afl-fuzz. The earlier posts have more context – today, just enjoy some pretty pics, showing subsequent renderings of the same JPEG XR image:

Proof-of-concepts are here (JXR) and here (PNG). I am happy to report that Microsoft fixed them within roughly three months of the original report.

The total number of bugs squashed in this category is now ten. I have just one more multi-browser image parsing bug outstanding – but it should be an interesting one. Stay tuned.

Bi-level TIFFs and the tale of the unexpectedly early patch

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2015/02/bi-level-tiffs-and-tale-of-unexpectedly.html

Today’s release of MS15-016 (CVE-2015-0061) fixes another of the series of browser memory disclosure bugs found with afl-fuzz – this time, related to the handling of bi-level (1-bpp) TIFFs in Internet Explorer (yup, MSIE displays TIFFs!). You can check out a simple proof-of-concept here, or simply enjoy this screenshot of eight subsequent renderings of the same TIFF file:

The vulnerability is conceptually similar to other previously-identified problems with GIF and JPEG handling in popular browsers (example 1, example 2), with the SOS handling bug in libjpeg, or the DHT bug in libjpeg-turbo (details here) – so I will try not to repeat the same points in this post.

Instead, I wanted to take note of what really sets this bug apart: Microsoft has addressed it in precisely 60 days, counting form my initial e-mail to the availability of a patch! This struck me as a big deal: although vulnerability research is not my full-time job, I do have a decent sample size – and I don’t think I have seen this happen for any of the few dozen MSIE bugs that I reported to MSRC over the past few years. The average patch time always seemed to be closer to 6+ months – coupled with what the somewhat odd practice of withholding attribution in security bulletins and engaging in seemingly punitive PR outreach if the reporter ever went public before that.

I am very excited and hopeful that rapid patching is the new norm – and huge thanks to MSRC folks if so 🙂

Bi-level TIFFs and the tale of the unexpectedly early patch

Post Syndicated from Michal Zalewski original http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2015/02/bi-level-tiffs-and-tale-of-unexpectedly.html

Today’s release of MS15-016 (CVE-2015-0061) fixes another of the series of browser memory disclosure bugs found with afl-fuzz – this time, related to the handling of bi-level (1-bpp) TIFFs in Internet Explorer (yup, MSIE displays TIFFs!). You can check out a simple proof-of-concept here, or simply enjoy this screenshot of eight subsequent renderings of the same TIFF file:

The vulnerability is conceptually similar to other previously-identified problems with GIF and JPEG handling in popular browsers (example 1, example 2), with the SOS handling bug in libjpeg, or the DHT bug in libjpeg-turbo (details here) – so I will try not to repeat the same points in this post.

Instead, I wanted to take note of what really sets this bug apart: Microsoft has addressed it in precisely 60 days, counting form my initial e-mail to the availability of a patch! This struck me as a big deal: although vulnerability research is not my full-time job, I do have a decent sample size – and I don’t think I have seen this happen for any of the few dozen MSIE bugs that I reported to MSRC over the past few years. The average patch time always seemed to be closer to 6+ months – coupled with what the somewhat odd practice of withholding attribution in security bulletins and engaging in seemingly punitive PR outreach if the reporter ever went public before that.

I am very excited and hopeful that rapid patching is the new norm – and huge thanks to MSRC folks if so 🙂

No, You Won’t See Me on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Google Plus, Google Hangouts, nor Skype

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2011/11/24/google-plus.html

Most folks outside of technology fields and the software freedom
movement can’t grok why I’m not on Facebook. Facebook’s marketing has
reached most of the USA’s non-technical Internet users. On the upside,
Facebook gave the masses access to something akin to blogging. But, as
with most technology controlled by for-profit companies, Facebook is
proprietary software. Facebook, as a software application, is written
in a mix of server-side software that no one besides Facebook
employees can study, modify and share. On the client-side, Facebook is
an obfuscated, proprietary software Javascript application, which is
distributed to the user’s browser when they access facebook.com. Thus,
in my view, using Facebook is no different than installing a proprietary
binary program on my GNU/Linux desktop.

Most of the press critical of Facebook has focused on privacy, data
mining of users’ data on behalf of advertisers, and other types of data
autonomy concerns. Such concerns remain incredibly important too.
Nevertheless, since the advent of the software freedom community’s
concerns about network services a few years ago, I’ve maintained this
simple principle, that I still find correct: While I can agree that
merely liberating all software for an online application is not a
sufficient condition to treat the online users well, the
liberation of the software is certainly a necessary condition
for the freedom of the users. Releasing freely all code for the online
application the first step for freedom, autonomy, and privacy of the
users. Therefore, I certainly don’t give in myself to running
proprietary software on my
FaiF desktops. I simply
refuse to use Facebook.

Meanwhile, when Google Plus was announced, I didn’t see any fundamental
difference from Facebook. Of course, there are differences on the
subtle edges: for example, I do expect that Google will respect data
portability more than Facebook. However, I expect data mining for
advertisers’ behalf will be roughly the same, although Google will
likely be more subtle with advertising tie-in than Facebook, and thus
users will not notice it as much.

But, since I’m firstly a software freedom activist, on the primary
issue of my concern, there is absolutely no difference between Facebook
and Google Plus. Google Plus’ software is a mix of server-side
trade-secret software that only Google employees can study, share, and
modify, and a client-side proprietary Javascript application downloaded
into the users’ browsers when they access the website.

Yet, in a matter of just a few months, much of the online conversation
in the software freedom community has moved to Google Plus, and I’ve
heard very few people lament this situation. It’s not that I believe
we’ll succeed against proprietary software tomorrow, and I understand
fully that (unlike me) most people in the software freedom community
have important reasons to interact regularly with those outside of our
community. It’s not that I chastise software freedom developers and
activist for maintaining a minimal presence on these services to
interact with those who aren’t committed to our cause.

My actual complaint here is that Google Plus is becoming the default
location for discussion of software freedom issues. I’ve noticed
because I’ve recently discovered that I’ve missed a lot of community
conversations that are only occurring on Google Plus. (I’ve similarly
noticed that many of my Free Software contacts spam me to join Linkedin,
so I assume something similar is occurring there as well.)

What’s more, I’ve received more pressure than ever before to sign up
for not only Google Plus, but for Twitter, Linkedin, Google Hangout, Skype and other
socially-oriented online communication services. Indeed, just in the
last ten days, I’ve had three different software freedom development
projects and/or organizations request that I sign up for a proprietary
online communication service merely to attend a meeting or conference
call. (Update on 2013-02-16: I still get such requests on a monthly basis.) Of course, I refused, but I’ve not felt peer pressure this strong
since I was a teenager.

Indeed, the advent of proprietary social networking software adds a new
challenge to those of us who want to stand firm and resist proprietary
software. As adoption of services like Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus,
Skype, Linkedin and Google Hangouts increases, those of us who resist using proprietary
software will come under ever-increasing peer pressure. Disturbingly,
I’ve found that peer pressure comes not only from folks outside
our community, but also from those who have, for
years, otherwise been supporters of the software freedom
movement.

When I point out that I use only Free Software, some respond that
Skype, Facebook, and Google Plus are convenient and do things that can’t
be done easily with Free Software currently. I don’t argue that point.
It’s easy to resist Microsoft Windows, or Internet Explorer, or any
other proprietary software that is substandard and works poorly. But
proprietary software developers aren’t necessarily stupid, nor
untalented. In fact, proprietary software developers are highly paid to
write easy-to-use, beautiful and enticing software (cross-reference
Apple, BTW). The challenge the software freedom community faces is not
merely to provide alternatives to the worst proprietary software, but to
also replace the most enticing proprietary software available. Yet, if
FaiF Software developers settle into being users of that enticing
proprietary software, the key inspiration for development
disappears.

The best motivator to write great new software is to solve a problem
that’s not yet solved. To inspire ourselves as FaiF Software
developers, we can’t complacently settle into use of proprietary
software applications as part of our daily workflow. That’s why you
won’t find me on Google Plus, Google Hangout, Facebook, Skype, Linkedin, Twitter or
any other proprietary software network service. You can phone with me
with SIP, you can read my blog and identi.ca feed, and chat with me on
IRC and XMPP, and those are the only places that I’ll be until there’s
Free Software replacements for those other services. I sometimes kid
myself into believing that I’m leading by example, but sadly few in the
software freedom community seem to be following.