Tag Archives: kittens

Can you survive our free zombie resources?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/free-zombie-resources/

Looking for something more exciting than pumpkin carving this Halloween weekend? Try your hand at our free new creepy, zombie-themed resources — perfect for both digital makers both living and undead!

Pride and Prejudice for zombies

Sketch of a G eorgian zombie couple - Raspberry Pi free resources zombie survival

If you’ve always imagined Lady Catherine de Bourgh as resembling one of the undead, you’re not alone. And if you don’t know who Lady Catherine de Bourgh is, now is the perfect time to read Pride and Prejudice, before using our resource to translate the text for your favourite zombies.

This resource will show you how to apply abstraction and decomposition to solve more complex programming problems, in line with the Raspberry Pi digital curriculum.*

*Zombie translation: Grrrrr arrrrggg braaaaains aaaaaah graaaaarg urrrrrg Raaaarghsberry Pi gurriculum.

Zombie apocalypse survival map

Sketch of two children inspecting a zombie survial map - Raspberry Pi free resources zombie survival

Are you ready to take on the zombie infestation and survive the apocalypse brought about by the undead? This resource shows you how to create a map of a specific area and mark the locations of supplies, secret bases, and enemies, and thus ensure the best chances of survival for you and your team.

In line with our digital curriculum, this resource shows you how to combine programming constructs to solve a problem, and how to design 2D and 3D assets.

Where’s Zombie?

Sketch of two people hiding behind a wall from two zombies - Raspberry Pi free resources zombie survival

Our ‘Where’s Zombie?’ resource is a step-by-step guide to turning your apocalypse survival map into a zombie-tracking game. Use the GPS on your phone to collect supplies while avoiding the undead.

By the way, if you’re not into zombies, don’t worry: these resources are easily modifiable to fit any genre or franchise! Jane Eyre for kittens, anyone? Or an ‘Hide from the stormtroopers’ map?

Pioneers

If you’re a person between the age of 11 and 16 and based in the UK or Ireland, or if you know one who enjoys making, make sure to check out our newest Pioneers challenge, Only you can save us.

Pioneers 'Only you can save us' logo - Raspberry Pi free resources zombie survival

We’re tasking our Pioneers to build something to help humankind survive a calamity of epic proportions. Are you up for the challenge?

Transferable skills

The Raspberry Pi digital curriculum was created to support our goal of putting the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world.

Sketch of four people holding a toy robot, a sledge hammer, sitting at a destop with a PC, and with four arms holding various tools - Raspberry Pi free resources zombie survival

As Carrie Anne Philbin, Director of Education for the Raspberry Pi Foundation, explains:

We have a large and diverse community of people who are interested in digital making. Some might use the curriculum to help guide and inform their own learning, or perhaps their children’s learning. People who run digital making clubs at schools, community centres, and Raspberry Jams may draw on it for extra guidance on activities that will engage their learners. Some teachers may wish to use the curriculum as inspiration for what to teach their students.

By working through resources such as the ones above, you’re not only learning new skills, but also building on pre-existing ones. You’ll expand both your understanding of digital making and your imagination, and you’ll be able to use what you’ve gained when you create your own exciting projects.

All of our resources are available for free on our website, and we continually update them to offer you more ways to work on your abilities, whatever your age and experience may be.

Have you built anything using our resources? Let us know in the comments!

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Mira, tiny robot of joyful delight

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/mira-robot-alonso-martinez/

The staff of Pi Towers are currently melting into puddles while making ‘Aaaawwwwwww’ noises as Mira, the adorable little Pi-controlled robot made by Pixar 3D artist Alonso Martinez, steals their hearts.

Mira the robot playing peek-a-boo

If you want to get updates on Mira’s progress, sign up for the mailing list! http://eepurl.com/bteigD Mira is a desk companion that makes your life better one smile at a time. This project explores human robot interactivity and emotional intelligence. Currently Mira uses face tracking to interact with the users and loves playing the game “peek-a-boo”.

Introducing Mira

Honestly, I can’t type words – I am but a puddle! If I could type at all, I would only produce a stream of affectionate fragments. Imagine walking into a room full of kittens. What you would sound like is what I’d type.

No! I can do this. I’m a professional. I write for a living! I can…

SHE BLINKS OHMYAAAARGH!!!

Mira Alonso Martinez Raspberry Pi

Weebl & Bob meets South Park’s Ike Broflovski in an adorable 3D-printed bundle of ‘Aaawwwww’

Introducing Mira (I promise I can do this)

Right. I’ve had a nap and a drink. I’ve composed myself. I am up for this challenge. As long as I don’t look directly at her, I’ll be fine!

Here I go.

As one of the many über-talented 3D artists at Pixar, Alonso Martinez knows a thing or two about bringing adorable-looking characters to life on screen. However, his work left him wondering:

In movies you see really amazing things happening but you actually can’t interact with them – what would it be like if you could interact with characters?

So with the help of his friends Aaron Nathan and Vijay Sundaram, Alonso set out to bring the concept of animation to the physical world by building a “character” that reacts to her environment. His experiments with robotics started with Gertie, a ball-like robot reminiscent of his time spent animating bouncing balls when he was learning his trade. From there, he moved on to Mira.

Mira Alonso Martinez

Many, many of the views of this Tested YouTube video have come from me. So many.

Mira swivels to follow a person’s face, plays games such as peekaboo, shows surprise when you finger-shoot her, and giggles when you give her a kiss.

Mira’s inner workings

To get Mira to turn her head in three dimensions, Alonso took inspiration from the Microsoft Sidewinder Pro joystick he had as a kid. He purchased one on eBay, took it apart to understand how it works, and replicated its mechanism for Mira’s Raspberry Pi-powered innards.

Mira Alonso Martinez

Alonso used the smallest components he could find so that they would fit inside Mira’s tiny body.

Mira’s axis of 3D-printed parts moves via tiny Power HD DSM44 servos, while a camera and OpenCV handle face-tracking, and a single NeoPixel provides a range of colours to indicate her emotions. As for the blinking eyes? Two OLED screens boasting acrylic domes fit within the few millimeters between all the other moving parts.

More on Mira, including her history and how she works, can be found in this wonderful video released by Tested this week.

Pixar Artist’s 3D-Printed Animated Robots!

We’re gushing with grins and delight at the sight of these adorable animated robots created by artist Alonso Martinez. Sean chats with Alonso to learn how he designed and engineered his family of robots, using processes like 3D printing, mold-making, and silicone casting. They’re amazing!

You can also sign up for Alonso’s newsletter here to stay up-to-date about this little robot. Hopefully one of these newsletters will explain how to buy or build your own Mira, as I for one am desperate to see her adorable little face on my desk every day for the rest of my life.

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I can haz pet-themed resources?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/pet-themed-resources/

A friend of mine’s cat had kittens this week. So, in honour of their fluffy, cute little gorgeous fuzz-faces, here are some pet-themed resources for you to build for your furry (or feathery) best friend.

Cat Meme Generator

Raspberry Pi pet-themed resources

Everybody loves a good meme. With the right combination of image and text, they can be both relatable and hilarious. There may be many meme-generating apps online, but why bother with them when you can build your own?

Our Cat Meme Generator teaches you how to write functions in JavaScript, how to use JavaScript to manipulate input by a user, and how to use oninput and onchange to make things happen live on a web page in response to user actions.

So grab your camera, take some photos of your favourite pet, and share their exploits with friends and family.

Hamster Party Cam

Hamster Party Cam Raspberry Pi pet-themed resources

The Hamster Party Cam shows you how to turn a hamster wheel into a trigger switch to activate a program, how to write a Python program to take pictures and store them, and how to write a function that makes LED lights flash and play a song. In other words, it teaches you how to pimp your hamster’s cage into THE place to be!

Disclaimer: adding lights and music to the party can be fun, but remember that this may scare hamsters of a shy disposition. As a hamster owner, you have a duty to consider the wellbeing of your pet. Check out the RSPCA Hamster Guide to learn more.

Infrared Bird Box

Infrared Bird Box Raspberry Pi pet-themed resources

We see a lot of infrared nature cams online, and we love to check out the photos and videos that makers share. From wild animals in the garden to chicks hatching in bird boxes, we’ve enjoyed them all.

Building an infrared bird box using the Raspberry Pi NOIR Camera Module and infrared LEDs will allow you and your family to spy on the wonders of nature without disturbing the feathered visitors to your garden.

Expanding on our pet-themed resources

Once you’ve built our fun pet-themed projects, it’s time to take the skills you’ve learned and build on them.

How about using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module to take a photo of your pet from which to create a meme image? You can learn more about getting started with the Camera Module here.

Why not try setting up your bird box to stream footage directly to the internet, so you can keep up to date when you are away from home?

Even if you don’t own a hamster, you can still use the skills in the Hamster Party Cam resource to create switches around the home. So try finding other things that move or spin, like doors and paper windmills, and see what you can hack!

Here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we take great pride in the wonderful free resources we produce for you to use in classes, at home, and in coding clubs. We publish them under a Creative Commons licence, and they’re an excellent way to develop your digital-making skills.

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