Tag Archives: Kodi

Continued: the answers to your questions for Eben Upton

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/eben-q-a-2/

Last week, we shared the first half of our Q&A with Raspberry Pi Trading CEO and Raspberry Pi creator Eben Upton. Today we follow up with all your other questions, including your expectations for a Raspberry Pi 4, Eben’s dream add-ons, and whether we really could go smaller than the Zero.

Live Q&A with Eben Upton, creator of the Raspberry Pi

Get your questions to us now using #AskRaspberryPi on Twitter

With internet security becoming more necessary, will there be automated versions of VPN on an SD card?

There are already third-party tools which turn your Raspberry Pi into a VPN endpoint. Would we do it ourselves? Like the power button, it’s one of those cases where there are a million things we could do and so it’s more efficient to let the community get on with it.

Just to give a counterexample, while we don’t generally invest in optimising for particular use cases, we did invest a bunch of money into optimising Kodi to run well on Raspberry Pi, because we found that very large numbers of people were using it. So, if we find that we get half a million people a year using a Raspberry Pi as a VPN endpoint, then we’ll probably invest money into optimising it and feature it on the website as we’ve done with Kodi. But I don’t think we’re there today.

Have you ever seen any Pis running and doing important jobs in the wild, and if so, how does it feel?

It’s amazing how often you see them driving displays, for example in radio and TV studios. Of course, it feels great. There’s something wonderful about the geographic spread as well. The Raspberry Pi desktop is quite distinctive, both in its previous incarnation with the grey background and logo, and the current one where we have Greg Annandale’s road picture.

The PIXEL desktop on Raspberry Pi

And so it’s funny when you see it in places. Somebody sent me a video of them teaching in a classroom in rural Pakistan and in the background was Greg’s picture.

Raspberry Pi 4!?!

There will be a Raspberry Pi 4, obviously. We get asked about it a lot. I’m sticking to the guidance that I gave people that they shouldn’t expect to see a Raspberry Pi 4 this year. To some extent, the opportunity to do the 3B+ was a surprise: we were surprised that we’ve been able to get 200MHz more clock speed, triple the wireless and wired throughput, and better thermals, and still stick to the $35 price point.

We’re up against the wall from a silicon perspective; we’re at the end of what you can do with the 40nm process. It’s not that you couldn’t clock the processor faster, or put a larger processor which can execute more instructions per clock in there, it’s simply about the energy consumption and the fact that you can’t dissipate the heat. So we’ve got to go to a smaller process node and that’s an order of magnitude more challenging from an engineering perspective. There’s more effort, more risk, more cost, and all of those things are challenging.

With 3B+ out of the way, we’re going to start looking at this now. For the first six months or so we’re going to be figuring out exactly what people want from a Raspberry Pi 4. We’re listening to people’s comments about what they’d like to see in a new Raspberry Pi, and I’m hoping by early autumn we should have an idea of what we want to put in it and a strategy for how we might achieve that.

Could you go smaller than the Zero?

The challenge with Zero as that we’re periphery-limited. If you run your hand around the unit, there is no edge of that board that doesn’t have something there. So the question is: “If you want to go smaller than Zero, what feature are you willing to throw out?”

It’s a single-sided board, so you could certainly halve the PCB area if you fold the circuitry and use both sides, though you’d have to lose something. You could give up some GPIO and go back to 26 pins like the first Raspberry Pi. You could give up the camera connector, you could go to micro HDMI from mini HDMI. You could remove the SD card and just do USB boot. I’m inventing a product live on air! But really, you could get down to two thirds and lose a bunch of GPIO – it’s hard to imagine you could get to half the size.

What’s the one feature that you wish you could outfit on the Raspberry Pi that isn’t cost effective at this time? Your dream feature.

Well, more memory. There are obviously technical reasons why we don’t have more memory on there, but there are also market reasons. People ask “why doesn’t the Raspberry Pi have more memory?”, and my response is typically “go and Google ‘DRAM price’”. We’re used to the price of memory going down. And currently, we’re going through a phase where this has turned around and memory is getting more expensive again.

Machine learning would be interesting. There are machine learning accelerators which would be interesting to put on a piece of hardware. But again, they are not going to be used by everyone, so according to our method of pricing what we might add to a board, machine learning gets treated like a $50 chip. But that would be lovely to do.

Which citizen science projects using the Pi have most caught your attention?

I like the wildlife camera projects. We live out in the countryside in a little village, and we’re conscious of being surrounded by nature but we don’t see a lot of it on a day-to-day basis. So I like the nature cam projects, though, to my everlasting shame, I haven’t set one up yet. There’s a range of them, from very professional products to people taking a Raspberry Pi and a camera and putting them in a plastic box. So those are good fun.

Raspberry Shake seismometer

The Raspberry Shake seismometer

And there’s Meteor Pi from the Cambridge Science Centre, that’s a lot of fun. And the seismometer Raspberry Shake – that sort of thing is really nice. We missed the recent South Wales earthquake; perhaps we should set one up at our Californian office.

How does it feel to go to bed every day knowing you’ve changed the world for the better in such a massive way?

What feels really good is that when we started this in 2006 nobody else was talking about it, but now we’re part of a very broad movement.

We were in a really bad way: we’d seen a collapse in the number of applicants applying to study Computer Science at Cambridge and elsewhere. In our view, this reflected a move away from seeing technology as ‘a thing you do’ to seeing it as a ‘thing that you have done to you’. It is problematic from the point of view of the economy, industry, and academia, but most importantly it damages the life prospects of individual children, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The great thing about STEM subjects is that you can’t fake being good at them. There are a lot of industries where your Dad can get you a job based on who he knows and then you can kind of muddle along. But if your dad gets you a job building bridges and you suck at it, after the first or second bridge falls down, then you probably aren’t going to be building bridges anymore. So access to STEM education can be a great driver of social mobility.

By the time we were launching the Raspberry Pi in 2012, there was this wonderful movement going on. Code Club, for example, and CoderDojo came along. Lots of different ways of trying to solve the same problem. What feels really, really good is that we’ve been able to do this as part of an enormous community. And some parts of that community became part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation – we merged with Code Club, we merged with CoderDojo, and we continue to work alongside a lot of these other organisations. So in the two seconds it takes me to fall asleep after my face hits the pillow, that’s what I think about.

We’re currently advertising a Programme Manager role in New Delhi, India. Did you ever think that Raspberry Pi would be advertising a role like this when you were bringing together the Foundation?

No, I didn’t.

But if you told me we were going to be hiring somewhere, India probably would have been top of my list because there’s a massive IT industry in India. When we think about our interaction with emerging markets, India, in a lot of ways, is the poster child for how we would like it to work. There have already been some wonderful deployments of Raspberry Pi, for example in Kerala, without our direct involvement. And we think we’ve got something that’s useful for the Indian market. We have a product, we have clubs, we have teacher training. And we have a body of experience in how to teach people, so we have a physical commercial product as well as a charitable offering that we think are a good fit.

It’s going to be massive.

What is your favourite BBC type-in listing?

There was a game called Codename: Druid. There is a famous game called Codename: Droid which was the sequel to Stryker’s Run, which was an awesome, awesome game. And there was a type-in game called Codename: Druid, which was at the bottom end of what you would consider a commercial game.

codename druid

And I remember typing that in. And what was really cool about it was that the next month, the guy who wrote it did another article that talks about the memory map and which operating system functions used which bits of memory. So if you weren’t going to do disc access, which bits of memory could you trample on and know the operating system would survive.

babbage versus bugs Raspberry Pi annual

See the full listing for Babbage versus Bugs in the Raspberry Pi 2018 Annual

I still like type-in listings. The Raspberry Pi 2018 Annual has a type-in listing that I wrote for a Babbage versus Bugs game. I will say that’s not the last type-in listing you will see from me in the next twelve months. And if you download the PDF, you could probably copy and paste it into your favourite text editor to save yourself some time.

The post Continued: the answers to your questions for Eben Upton appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

MagPi 66: Raspberry Pi media projects for your home

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-66-media-pi/

Hey folks, Rob from The MagPi here! Issue 66 of The MagPi is out right now, with the ultimate guide to powering your home media with Raspberry Pi. We think the Pi is the perfect replacement or upgrade for many media devices, so in this issue we show you how to build a range of Raspberry Pi media projects.

MagPi 66

Yes, it does say Pac-Man robotics on the cover. They’re very cool.

The article covers file servers for sharing media across your network, music streaming boxes that connect to Spotify, a home theatre PC to make your TV-watching more relaxing, a futuristic Pi-powered moving photoframe, and even an Alexa voice assistant to control all these devices!

More to see

That’s not all though — The MagPi 66 also shows you how to build a Raspberry Pi cluster computer, how to control LEGO robots using the GPIO, and why your Raspberry Pi isn’t affected by Spectre and Meltdown.




In addition, you’ll also find our usual selection of product reviews and excellent project showcases.

Get The MagPi 66

Issue 66 is available today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, head over to your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center in the next few days. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android and iOS apps. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

Subscribe for free goodies

Want to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation and the magazine, and get some cool free stuff? If you take out a twelve-month print subscription to The MagPi, you’ll get a Pi Zero W, Pi Zero case, and adapter cables absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

I hope you enjoy this issue! See you next month.

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Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/737204/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (irssi, musl, and xorg-server), CentOS (httpd and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (libav, ming, and openjfx), Fedora (ImageMagick, libwpd, rubygem-rmagick, and sssd), Gentoo (adobe-flash, chromium, dnsmasq, go, kodi, libpcre, and openjpeg), openSUSE (bluez, exiv2, python3-PyJWT, salt, xen, xerces-j2, and xorg-x11-server), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk and kernel), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-oracle and rh-nodejs4-nodejs), and Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk).

EFF: The War on General-Purpose Computing Turns on the Streaming Media Box Community

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/735166/rss

The EFF highlights
a number of attacks
against distributors of add-ons for the Kodi streaming media system.
These lawsuits by big TV incumbents seem to have a few goals: to
expand the scope of secondary copyright infringement yet again, to force
major Kodi add-on distributors off of the Internet, and to smear and
discourage open source, freely configurable media players by focusing on
the few bad actors in that ecosystem. The courts should reject these
expansions of copyright liability, and TV networks should not target
neutral platforms and technologies for abusive lawsuits.

pgmproxy

Post Syndicated from Vasil Kolev original https://vasil.ludost.net/blog/?p=3364

На FOSDEM 2016 видео потоците в локалната мрежа бяха носени през UDP, което при загуби по мрежата водеше до разни неприятни прекъсвания и обърквания на ffmpeg-а.

След разговори по темата за мрежа без загуби, пакети, пренасяни от еднорози и изграждане на infiniband мрежа в ULB, бях стигнал до идеята да търся или нещо с forward error correction, или някакъв reliable multicast. За FEC се оказа, че има някаква реализация от едно време за ffmpeg за PRO-MPEG, която не е била приета по някакви причини, за reliable multicast открих два протокола – PGM и NORM.

За PGM се оказа, че има хубава реализация, която 1) я има в Debian, 2) има прилични примери и 3) може да има средно ужасна документация, но source е сравнително четим и става за дебъгване. Измъкнах си старото ttee, разчистих кода от разни ненужни неща и си направих едно тривиално proxy, което да разнася пакети между UDP и PGM (и stdin/stdout за дебъгване). Може да се намери на https://github.com/krokodilerian/pgmproxy, като в момента е в proof-of-concept състояние и единственото, което мога да кажа е, че успявам да прекарам през него един FLAC през мрежата и да го слушам 🙂 Следват тестове в мрежа със загуби (щото в моя локален wifi са доста малко) и доизчистване, че да го ползваме на FOSDEM.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/725822/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, and thunderbird), Debian (exim4, expat, firefox-esr, glibc, gnutls28, irssi, jython, and kernel), Fedora (dolphin-emu, firefox, golang, mariadb, perl-File-Path, redis, and yara), Mageia (firefox, kodi, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium and lynis), and SUSE (mercurial).

Check Point: Hacked in Translation

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/723696/rss

Check Point has issued an
advisory
that a number of video-player applications can be compromised
via specially crafted subtitles. “By crafting malicious subtitle
files, which are then downloaded by a victim’s media player, attackers can
take complete control over any type of device via vulnerabilities found in
many popular streaming platforms, including VLC, Kodi (XBMC), Popcorn-Time
and strem.io. We estimate there are approximately 200 million video players
and streamers that currently run the vulnerable software, making this one
of the most widespread, easily accessed and zero-resistance vulnerability
reported in recent years.

The MagPi 55 is out, with plenty about the Pi Zero W

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-55-pi-zero-w/

Rob from The MagPi here! We’re still incredibly excited about the brand-new, wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi Zero W, and it’s in our latest issue, out now. Here’s a video of me talking about it.

Introducing Raspberry Pi Zero W

The Raspberry Pi Zero W, the new wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi, is out now! Rob from The MagPi, the official Raspberry Pi magazine, reveals the specifications, price, and more. Get a free Pi Zero W with a twelve-month print sub to The MagPi – http://magpi.cc/SubsNew The subscription offer includes a free Raspberry Pi Zero W, an official case with three covers, and a cable bundle.

We have not just one, but two, big articles about the Raspberry Pi Zero W in issue 55 of The MagPi. Our Big Build feature teaches you how to make a modified PiGRRL handheld retro console, and you’ll also find a full ten-page breakdown of everything that’s cool and new with the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

As usual we have loads of other excellent articles in the magazine, from tutorials on how to create an Amazon Alexa-powered robot to reviews of the brand new version of Kodi.

Pi Zero W, back-ups, advanced GPIO, 3D modelling, and more. We think issue 55 is fabulous!

Get your copy
You can grab a copy of The MagPi 55 in stores now at WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can order your copy online, or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

We also have a new subscription offer to celebrate the new Raspberry Pi Zero W: grab a twelve-month subscription and you’ll get a Raspberry Pi Zero W absolutely free, along with a free official case and a bundle of adapter cables. Get yours online right now!

New Subs Banner_new

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 55.

Don’t forget, though, that as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

Lastly, here’s a full zip of the code from this issue, to help you get off to a flying start with your projects. We hope you enjoy it!

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I Like To Make Stuff – Raspberry Pi Builds

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/i-like-to-make-stuff-raspberry-pi-builds/

If you follow us on Facebook or Google+, you’ll probably be aware of my maker crush on Bob Clagett. And if you work in the Pi Towers office, you’ll have noticed the I Like To Make Stuff merchandise that covers my desk.

Subscribers to the I Like To Make Stuff channel will be aware of Bob’s easy-to-follow style of building. I first discovered him when he was building a hidden room behind a bookcase and was instantly hooked…because who wouldn’t want a hidden room behind a bookcase?

More recently, Bob has started to incorporate tech into his builds. Last February, Bob built a gorgeous arcade cabinet for his home, complete with RetroPie innards and a decal of his family as superheroes.

He then moved on to a Pi-powered display sign for his workspace, a micro version of his arcade cabinet running Kodi, and a bar-top gaming cabinet for those with less space.

For anyone wanting to make a RetroPie build, it’s worth watching this playlist. And for anyone wanting a clear tutorial for using Raspberry Pi for signage, you can’t go wrong by checking out his walkthrough.

While we’re talking about subscribing and the internet, make sure to follow our accounts at YouTubeFacebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, and Snapchat as we continue to share great projects such as this from makers across the globe. And if you find any that you like the look of, share it with us using the #RaspberryPi hashtag. We get LOADS of mentions daily, so feel free to increase my workload!

The post I Like To Make Stuff – Raspberry Pi Builds appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Data Storage Disasters SMBs Should Avoid

Post Syndicated from Peter Cohen original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/data-storage-disasters-smbs-avoid/

Avoid Data Disasters

No one wants to get caught off guard when disaster strikes. And disasters are kind of inevitable, typically when you least expect them. Forewarned is forearmed. Here are five data storage disasters just waiting to happen to small to medium-sized businesses. We also offer some practical advice for how to avoid them.

Not Knowing Where Your Data Is

Data scatter is a big problem even in small organizations. Some data may be stored in the cloud, some may be on local machines, some may be on servers. Two-thirds of all corporate data exists outside the traditional data center. Make sure you know where your data is and how to protect it.

Conduct a data assessment to find out where your data lives. That includes customer records, financial and compliance data, application and server software, anything else necessary to keep your doors open. Know how data is used. Identify high-priority and high-value data to your organization.

Also understand that not everything is necessary to keep on-hand. Having redundancy and systems in place to retrieve every single bit of data is costly. Be wary of implementation issues that can create headaches, like time to restore. Separate out what’s absolutely necessary from that which would be nice to have, and that which is redundant and rebuildable.

Not Protecting Against Malware

Data breaches caused by malware infestations – especially ransomware – are on the rise. Ransomware encrypts an infected computer’s hard drive, locking you out. Unless you pay up using a cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, you’re locked out of your data with no way to restore it (with a backup).

Some organizations have paid hackers tens of thousands of dollars to unlock systems that have been taken down by ransomware. Even we at Backblaze have been affected by ransomware (having a recent backup got us out of that pickle). Even plain old malware which hijacks web browser search fields or injects advertisements causes problems that cost you time and money to fix.

Sure, you can disinfect individually affected machines, but when it happens to an entire organization it can be crippling. What’s more, any way you slice it, it wastes employee productivity, time and resources.

Use a multi-point strategy to combat malware that combines user education with best security practices. Help users discriminate between legitimate inbound emails and phishing attempts, for example. Make them wary of connecting Wi-Fi enabled devices on unsecured networks (or disable that capability altogether). Force periodic password changes. Use Mobile Device Management (MDM) tools to update remote machines and disable them if they’re stolen or lost.

Installing good anti-malware software is crucial, but endpoint security on user computers shouldn’t be the only proactive defense. If you take care of more than a handful of computers, save time and resources by using apps that centralize anti-malware software updates and malware definition file distribution.

Besides users, servers also need to be protected from malware. Also, update network gear with firmware updates to help maintain security. Make sure that passwords on those devices are changed periodically, as well.

Not Having A Disaster Recovery Plan

As we said at the outset, forewarned is forearmed. Create a written disaster recovery plan (stored safely if you need to retrieve it) that covers all possible contingencies. Think through the threats your business faces: Human error, malfeasance, natural disasters, theft, fire, device or component failure may be some of the things you should be thinking about.

Once you’ve assessed the threats, try to evaluate the actual risks. Being attacked by an angry grizzly bear is certainly a threat, but unless you’re in the Kodiak wilderness, it’s not a plausible risk. Conversely, if your business is located on a floodplain, it might be good to have a contingency in place for the next time the river nearby crests its banks.

Is your IT disaster recovery plan focused just specifically on one part of your business operations, like your server room or data center? What’s your plan for the laptop and desktop computers, handheld devices and other gear used by your employees? Do you have system images in place to quickly restore computers? Can you run some systems as virtual machines in a pinch?

Once you have plans in place, the important thing is to test them periodically. It’ll help you work out implementation problems beforehand, so when disaster strikes, your organization can still move like a well-oiled machine.

Not Using Encryption

Data theft is such a pernicious problem these days, you need to use every safeguard you can manage to protect the integrity of your data and its safety.

Someone could hack into your systems and steal information, or a careless employee can leave an unguarded laptop on the table at Starbucks. Any time your data is exposed or could be exposed to outside threats, there should be some inherent safeguard to protect it. Encryption can help.

macOS, Windows, and modern Linux distributions support full-disk encryption. It’s FileVault on the Mac, and BitLocker in Windows. Traveling executives, salespeople with laptops, field technicians or anyone else who takes sensitive data offsite are good encryption candidates. Anyone in-house who handles customer records or sensitive business intelligence should also use encryption wherever practical. Make sure that you keep a (secure) record of the encryption keys needed to decrypt any protected systems to avoid data recovery problems down the road.

Encrypting endpoint data is important, but so is encrypting data in transit. If you’re regularly backing up to the cloud or using online file sync services, make sure they support encryption to protect your data (all Backblaze backup products support encryption).

Not Having A Recent Backup

Having a good backup strategy in place is crucial to being able to keep your business running. Develop a backup strategy that protects all of your critical data, and automates it as much as possible to run on a schedule.

The 3-2-1 Backup Strategy is a good place to start: Three copies of data – live, backup and offsite. User systems with important data should be backed up, as should servers and any other computers needed to run the business. One backup should be stored locally for easy recovery, and one copy of the backup should be stored offsite. This is where a cloud service (like Backblaze for Business, or for server and NAS systems, B2 Cloud Storage) can come in really handy. Just make sure to observe safe data handling procedures (like encryption, as mentioned above) to keep everything in your control.

This is a good starting point for a discussion within your organization about how to protect yourselves from data loss. If you have questions or comments, please let us know!

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