Tag Archives: Mac

A big bear hugged one and then there were two

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/howl.html

Scott Herscher decided to cease development of HOWL.
That means only Avahi and Bonjour are left as
widely known mDNS/DNS-SD implementations.

Scott, your work on HOWL has not been in vain. Many Linux/Free Software
people (including me) learned to know Zeroconf with your software. Without the
troubles surrounding the licensing, I would never have started what is now
known as Avahi, and HOWL would still be the number one of the Linux mDNS/DNS-SD
implementations.

The HOWL legacy will live on, since Avahi includes a HOWL compatibility layer which will be kept around for a while.

A year and a few weeks ago Trent and I decided to merge our efforts and
form Avahi from our seperate works. I wonder how much time it will take us
until we see a similar R.I.P. note from the Bonjour camp, on our route to
AVAHI WORLD DOMINATION. 😉

In contrast to what Scott wrote in his announcement, Avahi is far from being
strictly Linux. Avahi has been ported to FreeBSD, OpenBSD, MacOSX and recently
(not yet official) Solaris. (However, he’s right with what he writes
about me.)

A big bear hugged one and then there were two

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/howl.html

Scott Herscher decided to cease development of HOWL.
That means only Avahi and Bonjour are left as
widely known mDNS/DNS-SD implementations.

Scott, your work on HOWL has not been in vain. Many Linux/Free Software
people (including me) learned to know Zeroconf with your software. Without the
troubles surrounding the licensing, I would never have started what is now
known as Avahi, and HOWL would still be the number one of the Linux mDNS/DNS-SD
implementations.

The HOWL legacy will live on, since Avahi includes a HOWL compatibility layer which will be kept around for a while.

A year and a few weeks ago Trent and I decided to merge our efforts and
form Avahi from our seperate works. I wonder how much time it will take us
until we see a similar R.I.P. note from the Bonjour camp, on our route to
AVAHI WORLD DOMINATION. 😉

In contrast to what Scott wrote in his announcement, Avahi is far from being
strictly Linux. Avahi has been ported to FreeBSD, OpenBSD, MacOSX and recently
(not yet official) Solaris. (However, he’s right with what he writes
about me.)

Avahi Support for Apache

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/mod_dnssd.html

The first release of mod_dnssd is now available. It adds DNS-SD based Zeroconf support to Apache 2.0 using Avahi.

This work has been inspired by Sander Temme’s and Sebastien Estienne’s mod_zeroconf module, but supersedes it in every way. MacOSX ships with mod_rendezvous/mod_bonjour, but mod_dnssd is much more powerful than this piece of software as well. In short: mod_dnssd is definitely the greatest way to add Zeroconf support to Apache available today.

A few examples just to show how great mod_dnssd is:

DNSSDEnable On

This is everything you need to enable DNS-SD support in Apache after loading the module. It will publish all virtual hosts and all existing mod_userdir directories (i.e. ~/public_html) as services of type _http._tcp.

In case you want to publish some subdirectory of the web server as service, just place DNSSDServiceName inside a <Location> section for that path:

<Location /foobar>
DNSSDServiceName “A special service called foobar”
</Location>

You can even use it to publish WebDAV shares using Apache’s mod_dav module:

<Location /webdav>
Dav On
DNSSDServiceName “A WebDAV folder”
DNSSDServiceTypes _webdav._tcp
</Location>

This especially cool since we now have a free software server counterpart for Gnome’s and KDE’s WebDAV client functionality.

Or to publish your blog as RSS service:

<Location /blog.cgi?rss>
DNSSDServiceName “The blog”
DNSSDServiceTypes _rss._tcp
</Location>

Get it while it is hot!

Avahi Support for Apache

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/mod_dnssd.html

The first release of mod_dnssd is now available. It adds DNS-SD based Zeroconf support to Apache 2.0 using Avahi.

This work has been inspired by Sander Temme’s and Sebastien Estienne’s mod_zeroconf module, but supersedes it in every way. MacOSX ships with mod_rendezvous/mod_bonjour, but mod_dnssd is much more powerful than this piece of software as well. In short: mod_dnssd is definitely the greatest way to add Zeroconf support to Apache available today.

A few examples just to show how great mod_dnssd is:

DNSSDEnable On

This is everything you need to enable DNS-SD support in Apache after loading the module. It will publish all virtual hosts and all existing mod_userdir directories (i.e. ~/public_html) as services of type _http._tcp.

In case you want to publish some subdirectory of the web server as service, just place DNSSDServiceName inside a <Location> section for that path:

<Location /foobar>
	DNSSDServiceName "A special service called foobar"
</Location>

You can even use it to publish WebDAV shares using Apache’s mod_dav module:

<Location /webdav>
	Dav On
	DNSSDServiceName "A WebDAV folder"
	DNSSDServiceTypes _webdav._tcp
</Location>

This especially cool since we now have a free software server counterpart for Gnome’s and KDE’s WebDAV client functionality.

Or to publish your blog as RSS service:

<Location /blog.cgi?rss>
	DNSSDServiceName "The blog"
	DNSSDServiceTypes _rss._tcp
</Location>

Get it while it is hot!

Introducing nss-myhostname

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/nss-myhostname.html

I am doing a lot of embedded Linux work lately. The machines we use configure their hostname depending on some external configuration options. They boot from a CF card, which is mostly mounted read-only. Since the hostname changes often but we wanted to use sudo we had a problem: sudo requires the local host name to be resolvable using gethostbyname(). On Debian this is usually done by patching /etc/hosts correctly. Unfortunately that file resides on a read-only partition. Instead of hacking some ugly symlink based solution I decided to fix it the right way and wrote a tiny NSS module which does nothing more than mapping the hostname to the IP address 127.0.0.2 (and back). (That IP address is on the loopback device, but is not identical to localhost.)

Get nss-myhostname while it is hot!

BTW: This tool I wrote is pretty useful on embedded machines too, and certainly easier to use than setterm -dump 1 -file /dev/stdout | fold -w 80. And it does color too. And looping. And is much cooler anyway.

Introducing nss-myhostname

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/nss-myhostname.html

I am doing a lot of embedded Linux work lately. The machines we use configure their hostname depending on some external configuration options. They boot from a CF card, which is mostly mounted read-only. Since the hostname changes often but we wanted to use sudo we had a problem: sudo requires the local host name to be resolvable using gethostbyname(). On Debian this is usually done by patching /etc/hosts correctly. Unfortunately that file resides on a read-only partition. Instead of hacking some ugly symlink based solution I decided to fix it the right way and wrote a tiny NSS module which does nothing more than mapping the hostname to the IP address 127.0.0.2 (and back). (That IP address is on the loopback device, but is not identical to localhost.)

Get nss-myhostname while it is hot!

BTW: This tool I wrote is pretty useful on embedded machines too, and certainly easier to use than setterm -dump 1 -file /dev/stdout | fold -w 80. And it does color too. And looping. And is much cooler anyway.

Avahi 0.6 in Beta

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/avahi-0.6-pre.html

Unless we find any major bugs Avahi 0.6 will be released on friday. We ask everyone to do some testing for us:

Current Avahi SVN snapshort
Current libdaemon SVN snapshot

There have been a bunch of API changes. However, the API is now frozen, so feel free to start porting your application to the new API now.

A rough overview about the many improvements in Avahi 0.6.

Support for (read-only) wide area support. (i.e. DNS-SD over unicast DNS)
Ported to FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin/MacOSX and to some extent OpenBSD
Compatibility layers for HOWL and Bonjour
Support for registering/browsing abritrary records
Proper support for DNS-SD service subtypes
Native C implementations of the client utilities
Now passes the Bonjour conformance test suite without any exceptions
“Passive observation of failures”
chroot() support
Many traffic reduction improvements
Bugfixes, cleanups

Avahi 0.6 in Beta

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/avahi-0.6-pre.html

Unless we find any major bugs Avahi 0.6 will be released on friday. We ask everyone to do some testing for us:

There have been a bunch of API changes. However, the API is now frozen, so feel free to start porting your application to the new API now.

A rough overview about the many improvements in Avahi 0.6.

  • Support for (read-only) wide area support. (i.e. DNS-SD over unicast DNS)
  • Ported to FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin/MacOSX and to some extent OpenBSD
  • Compatibility layers for HOWL and Bonjour
  • Support for registering/browsing abritrary records
  • Proper support for DNS-SD service subtypes
  • Native C implementations of the client utilities
  • Now passes the Bonjour conformance test suite without any exceptions
  • “Passive observation of failures”
  • chroot() support
  • Many traffic reduction improvements
  • Bugfixes, cleanups

IBM xSeries EZ Swap Hard Drive Trays

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2005/05/04/ibm-xseries.html

A few days ago, I acquired a number of IBM xSeries servers — namely x206
and x226 systems — for my work at the The Software Freedom Law
Center
. We bought bare-metal, with just CPU and memory, with
plans to install drives ourselves.

I did that for a few reasons. First, serial ATA (S-ATA or SATA)
support under Linux has just become ready for prime time, and
despite being a SCSI-die-hard for most of my life, I’ve given in
that ATA’s price/performance ratio can’t really be beat, especially
if you don’t need hot swap or hardware RAID.

When I got the machines, which each came with one 80 GB S-ATA drive, I
found them well constructed, including a very easy mounting system
for hard drives. Drives have a blue plastic tray that looks like
this (follow link of image for higher resolution shot).


Image of the IBM xSeries Easy Swap Tray

These so-called “EZ Swap” trays are not for hot-swap; the big IBM swap
trays with the lever are for that. This is just to mount and unmount
drives quickly. I was impressed, and was sad that, since IBM’s goal
is to resell you hard drives, they don’t make it easy to buy these
things outright. You have to look on IBM’s
parts and upgrade site for the x206
, you’ll find that they offer
to sell 26K-7344, which is listed as a “SATA tray”, and a 73P-8007,
which is listed as a “Tray, SATA simple swap”. However, there is no
photo, and that part number does not match the part number on the item
itself. On the machines I got, the tray is numbered 73P-9591 (or
rather, P73P9591, but I think the “P” in the front is superfluous and
stands for “Part”).

I spoke to IBM tech support (at +1-800-426-7378), who told me the
replacement part number he had for that tray I had was 73P-8007.
Indeed, if you look at third
party sites, such as Spare Parts Warehouse
, you find that number
and a price of US$28 or so. Spare Parts Warehouse doesn’t even sell
the 26K-7344.

It seemed to me strange that we had two things described as SATA tray
could be that different. And the difference in price was
substantial. It costs about US$28 for the 73P-8007 and around US$7
for the 26K-7344.

So, I called IBM spare parts division at +1-800-388-7080, and ordered
one of each. They arrived by DHL this morning. Lo and behold, they
are the very same item. I cannot tell the difference
between them upon close study. The only cosmetic difference is that
they are labeled with different part numbers. The cheaper one is
labeled 26K-7343 (one number less than what I ordered) and the other
is labeled 73P-9591 (the same number that my original SATA drives
came with).

So, if you need an EZ Swap tray from IBM for the xSeries server, I
suggest you order the 26K-7344. If you do so, and find any difference
from the 73P-8007, please do let me know. Update: on 2005-06-22, a
reader told me they now charge US$12 for the 26K-7344 tray. Further
Update: The prices seem to keep rising! Another reader reported to me
on 2005-08-08 that the 26K-7344 is now US$84 (!) and the 73P-8007 is now
only US$15. So, it costs twice as much as it did a few months
ago to get these units, and the cheaper unit apperas to be the 73P-8007.
It’ll be fun to watch and see if the prices change big again in the months
to come.

When you call IBM’s spare parts division, they may give you some
trouble about ordering the part. When you call +1-800-388-7080,
they are expecting you to be an out-of-warranty customer, and make
it difficult for you to order. It depends on who you get, but you
can place an order with a credit card even without an “IBM
Out-of-Warranty Customer Number”. If you have a customer number you
got with your original IBM equipment order, that’s your warranty
customer number and is in a different database than the one used by
the IBM Spare Parts Division.

You can just tell them that you want to make a new order with a credit
card. After some trouble, they’ll do that.