Tag Archives: Mobile Services

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – January AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Robin Park original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-january-aws-online-tech-talks/

AWS Tech Talks

Happy New Year! Join us this January to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

Containers

January 22, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive Into AWS Cloud Map: Service Discovery for All Your Cloud Resources – Learn how to increase your application availability with AWS Cloud Map, a new service that lets you discover all your cloud resources.

Data Lakes & Analytics

January 22, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT– Increase Your Data Engineering Productivity Using Amazon EMR Notebooks – Learn how to develop analytics and data processing applications faster with Amazon EMR Notebooks.

Enterprise & Hybrid

January 29, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTBuild Better Workloads with the AWS Well-Architected Framework and Tool – Learn how to apply architectural best practices to guide your cloud migration.

IoT

January 29, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTHow To Visually Develop IoT Applications with AWS IoT Things Graph – See how easy it is to build IoT applications by visually connecting devices & web services.

Mobile

January 21, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Secure, Offline, and Real Time Enabled Mobile Apps Using AWS AppSync and AWS Amplify – Learn how to easily build secure, cloud-connected data-driven mobile apps using AWS Amplify, GraphQL, and mobile-optimized AWS services.

Networking

January 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTImprove Your Application’s Availability and Performance with AWS Global Accelerator – Learn how to accelerate your global latency-sensitive applications by routing traffic across AWS Regions.

Robotics

January 29, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing AWS RoboMaker Simulation for Real World Applications – Learn how AWS RoboMaker simulation works and how you can get started with your own projects.

Security, Identity & Compliance

January 23, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTCustomer Showcase: How Dow Jones Uses AWS to Create a Secure Perimeter Around Its Web Properties – Learn tips and tricks from a real-life example on how to be in control of your cloud security and automate it on AWS.

January 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTIntroducing AWS Key Management Service Custom Key Store – Learn how you can generate, store, and use your KMS keys in hardware security modules (HSMs) that you control.

Serverless

January 31, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT Nested Applications: Accelerate Serverless Development Using AWS SAM and the AWS Serverless Application Repository – Learn how to compose nested applications using the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), SAM CLI, and the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

January 31, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDeep Dive Into Lambda Layers and the Lambda Runtime API – Learn how to use Lambda Layers to enable re-use and sharing of code, and how you can build and test Layers locally using the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM).

Storage

January 28, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTThe Amazon S3 Storage Classes – Learn about the Amazon S3 Storage Classes and how to use them to optimize your storage resources.

January 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon FSx for Windows File Server: Running Windows on AWS – Learn how to deploy Amazon FSx for Windows File Server in some of the most common use cases.

Learn about AWS – November AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Robin Park original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-november-aws-online-tech-talks/

AWS Tech Talks

AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. Join us this month to learn about AWS services and solutions. We’ll have experts online to help answer any questions you may have.

Featured this month! Check out the tech talks: Virtual Hands-On Workshop: Amazon Elasticsearch Service – Analyze Your CloudTrail Logs, AWS re:Invent: Know Before You Go and AWS Office Hours: Amazon GuardDuty Tips and Tricks.

Register today!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

AR/VR

November 13, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTHow to Create a Chatbot Using Amazon Sumerian and Sumerian Hosts – Learn how to quickly and easily create a chatbot using Amazon Sumerian & Sumerian Hosts.

Compute

November 19, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing Amazon Lightsail to Create a Database – Learn how to set up a database on your Amazon Lightsail instance for your applications or stand-alone websites.

November 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTSave up to 90% on CI/CD Workloads with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances – Learn how to automatically scale a fleet of Spot Instances with Jenkins and EC2 Spot Plug-In.

Containers

November 13, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTCustomer Showcase: How Portal Finance Scaled Their Containerized Application Seamlessly with AWS Fargate – Learn how to scale your containerized applications without managing servers and cluster, using AWS Fargate.

November 14, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTCustomer Showcase: How 99designs Used AWS Fargate and Datadog to Manage their Containerized Application – Learn how 99designs scales their containerized applications using AWS Fargate.

November 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTMonitor the World: Meaningful Metrics for Containerized Apps and Clusters – Learn about metrics and tools you need to monitor your Kubernetes applications on AWS.

Data Lakes & Analytics

November 12, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTSearch Your DynamoDB Data with Amazon Elasticsearch Service – Learn the joint power of Amazon Elasticsearch Service and DynamoDB and how to set up your DynamoDB tables and streams to replicate your data to Amazon Elasticsearch Service.

November 13, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTVirtual Hands-On Workshop: Amazon Elasticsearch Service – Analyze Your CloudTrail Logs – Get hands-on experience and learn how to ingest and analyze CloudTrail logs using Amazon Elasticsearch Service.

November 14, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBest Practices for Migrating Big Data Workloads to AWS – Learn how to migrate analytics, data processing (ETL), and data science workloads running on Apache Hadoop, Spark, and data warehouse appliances from on-premises deployments to AWS.

November 15, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBest Practices for Scaling Amazon Redshift – Learn about the most common scalability pain points with analytics platforms and see how Amazon Redshift can quickly scale to fulfill growing analytical needs and data volume.

Databases

November 12, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTModernize your SQL Server 2008/R2 Databases with AWS Database Services – As end of extended Support for SQL Server 2008/ R2 nears, learn how AWS’s portfolio of fully managed, cost effective databases, and easy-to-use migration tools can help.

DevOps

November 16, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTBuild and Orchestrate Serverless Applications on AWS with PowerShell – Learn how to build and orchestrate serverless applications on AWS with AWS Lambda and PowerShell.

End-User Computing

November 19, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 02:00 PM PTWork Without Workstations with AppStream 2.0 – Learn how to work without workstations and accelerate your engineering workflows using AppStream 2.0.

Enterprise & Hybrid

November 19, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTEnterprise DevOps: New Patterns of Efficiency – Learn how to implement “Enterprise DevOps” in your organization through building a culture of inclusion, common sense, and continuous improvement.

November 20, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAre Your Workloads Well-Architected? – Learn how to measure and improve your workloads with AWS Well-Architected best practices.

IoT

November 16, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 02:00 PM PTPushing Intelligence to the Edge in Industrial Applications – Learn how GE uses AWS IoT for industrial use cases, including 3D printing and aviation.

Machine Learning

November 12, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAutomate for Efficiency with Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Translate – Learn how you can increase efficiency and reach of your operations with Amazon Translate and Amazon Transcribe.

Mobile

November 20, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 02:00 PM PTGraphQL Deep Dive – Designing Schemas and Automating Deployment – Get an overview of the basics of how GraphQL works and dive into different schema designs, best practices, and considerations for providing data to your applications in production.

re:Invent

November 9, 2018 | 08:00 AM – 08:30 AM PTEpisode 7: Getting Around the re:Invent Campus – Learn how to efficiently get around the re:Invent campus using our new mobile app technology. Make sure you arrive on time and never miss a session.

November 14, 2018 | 08:00 AM – 08:30 AM PTEpisode 8: Know Before You Go – Learn about all final details you need to know before you arrive in Las Vegas for AWS re:Invent!

Security, Identity & Compliance

November 16, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTAWS Office Hours: Amazon GuardDuty Tips and Tricks – Join us for office hours and get the latest tips and tricks for Amazon GuardDuty from AWS Security experts.

Serverless

November 14, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTServerless Workflows for the Enterprise – Learn how to seamlessly build and deploy serverless applications across multiple teams in large organizations.

Storage

November 15, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTMove From Tape Backups to AWS in 30 Minutes – Learn how to switch to cloud backups easily with AWS Storage Gateway.

November 20, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive on Amazon S3 Security and Management – Amazon S3 provides some of the most enhanced data security features available in the cloud today, including access controls, encryption, security monitoring, remediation, and security standards and compliance certifications.

Introducing AWS AppSync – Build data-driven apps with real-time and off-line capabilities

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-amazon-appsync/

In this day and age, it is almost impossible to do without our mobile devices and the applications that help make our lives easier. As our dependency on our mobile phone grows, the mobile application market has exploded with millions of apps vying for our attention. For mobile developers, this means that we must ensure that we build applications that provide the quality, real-time experiences that app users desire.  Therefore, it has become essential that mobile applications are developed to include features such as multi-user data synchronization, offline network support, and data discovery, just to name a few.  According to several articles, I read recently about mobile development trends on publications like InfoQ, DZone, and the mobile development blog AlleviateTech, one of the key elements in of delivering the aforementioned capabilities is with cloud-driven mobile applications.  It seems that this is especially true, as it related to mobile data synchronization and data storage.

That being the case, it is a perfect time for me to announce a new service for building innovative mobile applications that are driven by data-intensive services in the cloud; AWS AppSync. AWS AppSync is a fully managed serverless GraphQL service for real-time data queries, synchronization, communications and offline programming features. For those not familiar, let me briefly share some information about the open GraphQL specification. GraphQL is a responsive data query language and server-side runtime for querying data sources that allow for real-time data retrieval and dynamic query execution. You can use GraphQL to build a responsive API for use in when building client applications. GraphQL works at the application layer and provides a type system for defining schemas. These schemas serve as specifications to define how operations should be performed on the data and how the data should be structured when retrieved. Additionally, GraphQL has a declarative coding model which is supported by many client libraries and frameworks including React, React Native, iOS, and Android.

Now the power of the GraphQL open standard query language is being brought to you in a rich managed service with AWS AppSync.  With AppSync developers can simplify the retrieval and manipulation of data across multiple data sources with ease, allowing them to quickly prototype, build and create robust, collaborative, multi-user applications. AppSync keeps data updated when devices are connected, but enables developers to build solutions that work offline by caching data locally and synchronizing local data when connections become available.

Let’s discuss some key concepts of AWS AppSync and how the service works.

AppSync Concepts

  • AWS AppSync Client: service client that defines operations, wraps authorization details of requests, and manage offline logic.
  • Data Source: the data storage system or a trigger housing data
  • Identity: a set of credentials with permissions and identification context provided with requests to GraphQL proxy
  • GraphQL Proxy: the GraphQL engine component for processing and mapping requests, handling conflict resolution, and managing Fine Grained Access Control
  • Operation: one of three GraphQL operations supported in AppSync
    • Query: a read-only fetch call to the data
    • Mutation: a write of the data followed by a fetch,
    • Subscription: long-lived connections that receive data in response to events.
  • Action: a notification to connected subscribers from a GraphQL subscription.
  • Resolver: function using request and response mapping templates that converts and executes payload against data source

How It Works

A schema is created to define types and capabilities of the desired GraphQL API and tied to a Resolver function.  The schema can be created to mirror existing data sources or AWS AppSync can create tables automatically based the schema definition. Developers can also use GraphQL features for data discovery without having knowledge of the backend data sources. After a schema definition is established, an AWS AppSync client can be configured with an operation request, like a Query operation. The client submits the operation request to GraphQL Proxy along with an identity context and credentials. The GraphQL Proxy passes this request to the Resolver which maps and executes the request payload against pre-configured AWS data services like an Amazon DynamoDB table, an AWS Lambda function, or a search capability using Amazon Elasticsearch. The Resolver executes calls to one or all of these services within a single network call minimizing CPU cycles and bandwidth needs and returns the response to the client. Additionally, the client application can change data requirements in code on demand and the AppSync GraphQL API will dynamically map requests for data accordingly, allowing prototyping and faster development.

In order to take a quick peek at the service, I’ll go to the AWS AppSync console. I’ll click the Create API button to get started.

 

When the Create new API screen opens, I’ll give my new API a name, TarasTestApp, and since I am just exploring the new service I will select the Sample schema option.  You may notice from the informational dialog box on the screen that in using the sample schema, AWS AppSync will automatically create the DynamoDB tables and the IAM roles for me.It will also deploy the TarasTestApp API on my behalf.  After review of the sample schema provided by the console, I’ll click the Create button to create my test API.

After the TaraTestApp API has been created and the associated AWS resources provisioned on my behalf, I can make updates to the schema, data source, or connect my data source(s) to a resolver. I also can integrate my GraphQL API into an iOS, Android, Web, or React Native application by cloning the sample repo from GitHub and downloading the accompanying GraphQL schema.  These application samples are great to help get you started and they are pre-configured to function in offline scenarios.

If I select the Schema menu option on the console, I can update and view the TarasTestApp GraphQL API schema.


Additionally, if I select the Data Sources menu option in the console, I can see the existing data sources.  Within this screen, I can update, delete, or add data sources if I so desire.

Next, I will select the Query menu option which takes me to the console tool for writing and testing queries. Since I chose the sample schema and the AWS AppSync service did most of the heavy lifting for me, I’ll try a query against my new GraphQL API.

I’ll use a mutation to add data for the event type in my schema. Since this is a mutation and it first writes data and then does a read of the data, I want the query to return values for name and where.

If I go to the DynamoDB table created for the event type in the schema, I will see that the values from my query have been successfully written into the table. Now that was a pretty simple task to write and retrieve data based on a GraphQL API schema from a data source, don’t you think.


 Summary

AWS AppSync is currently in AWS AppSync is in Public Preview and you can sign up today. It supports development for iOS, Android, and JavaScript applications. You can take advantage of this managed GraphQL service by going to the AWS AppSync console or learn more by reviewing more details about the service by reading a tutorial in the AWS documentation for the service or checking out our AWS AppSync Developer Guide.

Tara

 

AWS Developer Tools Expands Integration to Include GitHub

Post Syndicated from Balaji Iyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/aws-developer-tools-expands-integration-to-include-github/

AWS Developer Tools is a set of services that include AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy. Together, these services help you securely store and maintain version control of your application’s source code and automatically build, test, and deploy your application to AWS or your on-premises environment. These services are designed to enable developers and IT professionals to rapidly and safely deliver software.

As part of our continued commitment to extend the AWS Developer Tools ecosystem to third-party tools and services, we’re pleased to announce AWS CodeStar and AWS CodeBuild now integrate with GitHub. This will make it easier for GitHub users to set up a continuous integration and continuous delivery toolchain as part of their release process using AWS Developer Tools.

In this post, I will walk through the following:

Prerequisites:

You’ll need an AWS account, a GitHub account, an Amazon EC2 key pair, and administrator-level permissions for AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, Amazon EC2, Amazon S3.

 

Integrating GitHub with AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar enables you to quickly develop, build, and deploy applications on AWS. Its unified user interface helps you easily manage your software development activities in one place. With AWS CodeStar, you can set up your entire continuous delivery toolchain in minutes, so you can start releasing code faster.

When AWS CodeStar launched in April of this year, it used AWS CodeCommit as the hosted source repository. You can now choose between AWS CodeCommit or GitHub as the source control service for your CodeStar projects. In addition, your CodeStar project dashboard lets you centrally track GitHub activities, including commits, issues, and pull requests. This makes it easy to manage project activity across the components of your CI/CD toolchain. Adding the GitHub dashboard view will simplify development of your AWS applications.

In this section, I will show you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects. I’ll also show you how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard.

Sign in to the AWS Management Console and from the Services menu, choose CodeStar. In the CodeStar console, choose Create a new project. You should see the Choose a project template page.

CodeStar Project

Choose an option by programming language, application category, or AWS service. I am going to choose the Ruby on Rails web application that will be running on Amazon EC2.

On the Project details page, you’ll now see the GitHub option. Type a name for your project, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Project details

You’ll see a message requesting authorization to connect to your GitHub repository. When prompted, choose Authorize, and then type your GitHub account password.

Authorize

This connects your GitHub identity to AWS CodeStar through OAuth. You can always review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

Installed GitHub Apps

You’ll see AWS CodeStar is now connected to GitHub:

Create project

You can choose a public or private repository. GitHub offers free accounts for users and organizations working on public and open source projects and paid accounts that offer unlimited private repositories and optional user management and security features.

In this example, I am going to choose the public repository option. Edit the repository description, if you like, and then choose Next.

Review your CodeStar project details, and then choose Create Project. On Choose an Amazon EC2 Key Pair, choose Create Project.

Key Pair

On the Review project details page, you’ll see Edit Amazon EC2 configuration. Choose this link to configure instance type, VPC, and subnet options. AWS CodeStar requires a service role to create and manage AWS resources and IAM permissions. This role will be created for you when you select the AWS CodeStar would like permission to administer AWS resources on your behalf check box.

Choose Create Project. It might take a few minutes to create your project and resources.

Review project details

When you create a CodeStar project, you’re added to the project team as an owner. If this is the first time you’ve used AWS CodeStar, you’ll be asked to provide the following information, which will be shown to others:

  • Your display name.
  • Your email address.

This information is used in your AWS CodeStar user profile. User profiles are not project-specific, but they are limited to a single AWS region. If you are a team member in projects in more than one region, you’ll have to create a user profile in each region.

User settings

User settings

Choose Next. AWS CodeStar will create a GitHub repository with your configuration settings (for example, https://github.com/biyer/ruby-on-rails-service).

When you integrate your integrated development environment (IDE) with AWS CodeStar, you can continue to write and develop code in your preferred environment. The changes you make will be included in the AWS CodeStar project each time you commit and push your code.

IDE

After setting up your IDE, choose Next to go to the CodeStar dashboard. Take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the dashboard. You can easily track progress across your entire software development process, from your backlog of work items to recent code deployments.

Dashboard

After the application deployment is complete, choose the endpoint that will display the application.

Pipeline

This is what you’ll see when you open the application endpoint:

The Commit history section of the dashboard lists the commits made to the Git repository. If you choose the commit ID or the Open in GitHub option, you can use a hotlink to your GitHub repository.

Commit history

Your AWS CodeStar project dashboard is where you and your team view the status of your project resources, including the latest commits to your project, the state of your continuous delivery pipeline, and the performance of your instances. This information is displayed on tiles that are dedicated to a particular resource. To see more information about any of these resources, choose the details link on the tile. The console for that AWS service will open on the details page for that resource.

Issues

You can also filter issues based on their status and the assigned user.

Filter

AWS CodeBuild Now Supports Building GitHub Pull Requests

CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. With CodeBuild, you don’t need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. CodeBuild scales continuously and processes multiple builds concurrently, so your builds are not left waiting in a queue. You can use prepackaged build environments to get started quickly or you can create custom build environments that use your own build tools.

We recently announced support for GitHub pull requests in AWS CodeBuild. This functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild. You can use the AWS CodeBuild or AWS CodePipeline consoles to run AWS CodeBuild. You can also automate the running of AWS CodeBuild by using the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), the AWS SDKs, or the AWS CodeBuild Plugin for Jenkins.

AWS CodeBuild

In this section, I will show you how to trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild with a pull request from GitHub through webhooks.

Open the AWS CodeBuild console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/codebuild/. Choose Create project. If you already have a CodeBuild project, you can choose Edit project, and then follow along. CodeBuild can connect to AWS CodeCommit, S3, BitBucket, and GitHub to pull source code for builds. For Source provider, choose GitHub, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Configure

After you’ve successfully linked GitHub and your CodeBuild project, you can choose a repository in your GitHub account. CodeBuild also supports connections to any public repository. You can review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

GitHub Apps

On Source: What to Build, for Webhook, select the Rebuild every time a code change is pushed to this repository check box.

Note: You can select this option only if, under Repository, you chose Use a repository in my account.

Source

In Environment: How to build, for Environment image, select Use an image managed by AWS CodeBuild. For Operating system, choose Ubuntu. For Runtime, choose Base. For Version, choose the latest available version. For Build specification, you can provide a collection of build commands and related settings, in YAML format (buildspec.yml) or you can override the build spec by inserting build commands directly in the console. AWS CodeBuild uses these commands to run a build. In this example, the output is the string “hello.”

Environment

On Artifacts: Where to put the artifacts from this build project, for Type, choose No artifacts. (This is also the type to choose if you are just running tests or pushing a Docker image to Amazon ECR.) You also need an AWS CodeBuild service role so that AWS CodeBuild can interact with dependent AWS services on your behalf. Unless you already have a role, choose Create a role, and for Role name, type a name for your role.

Artifacts

In this example, leave the advanced settings at their defaults.

If you expand Show advanced settings, you’ll see options for customizing your build, including:

  • A build timeout.
  • A KMS key to encrypt all the artifacts that the builds for this project will use.
  • Options for building a Docker image.
  • Elevated permissions during your build action (for example, accessing Docker inside your build container to build a Dockerfile).
  • Resource options for the build compute type.
  • Environment variables (built-in or custom). For more information, see Create a Build Project in the AWS CodeBuild User Guide.

Advanced settings

You can use the AWS CodeBuild console to create a parameter in Amazon EC2 Systems Manager. Choose Create a parameter, and then follow the instructions in the dialog box. (In that dialog box, for KMS key, you can optionally specify the ARN of an AWS KMS key in your account. Amazon EC2 Systems Manager uses this key to encrypt the parameter’s value during storage and decrypt during retrieval.)

Create parameter

Choose Continue. On the Review page, either choose Save and build or choose Save to run the build later.

Choose Start build. When the build is complete, the Build logs section should display detailed information about the build.

Logs

To demonstrate a pull request, I will fork the repository as a different GitHub user, make commits to the forked repo, check in the changes to a newly created branch, and then open a pull request.

Pull request

As soon as the pull request is submitted, you’ll see CodeBuild start executing the build.

Build

GitHub sends an HTTP POST payload to the webhook’s configured URL (highlighted here), which CodeBuild uses to download the latest source code and execute the build phases.

Build project

If you expand the Show all checks option for the GitHub pull request, you’ll see that CodeBuild has completed the build, all checks have passed, and a deep link is provided in Details, which opens the build history in the CodeBuild console.

Pull request

Summary:

In this post, I showed you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects and how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard. I also showed you how you can use GitHub pull requests to automatically trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild — specifically, how this functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild.


About the author:

Balaji Iyer is an Enterprise Consultant for the Professional Services Team at Amazon Web Services. In this role, he has helped several customers successfully navigate their journey to AWS. His specialties include architecting and implementing highly scalable distributed systems, serverless architectures, large scale migrations, operational security, and leading strategic AWS initiatives. Before he joined Amazon, Balaji spent more than a decade building operating systems, big data analytics solutions, mobile services, and web applications. In his spare time, he enjoys experiencing the great outdoors and spending time with his family.