Tag Archives: mobile

Conferences

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/lpc-bluez-maemo-2009.html

Last week I’ve been at the Linux Plumbers Conference in
Portland. Like last year it kicked ass and proved again being one of the most
relevant Linux developer conferences (if not the most relevant one). I
ran the Audio MC at the conference which was very well attended. The slides
for our four talks in the
track are available online
. (My own slides are probably a bit too terse
for most readers, the interesting stuff was in the talking, not the
reading…) Personally, for me the most interesting part was to see to which
degree Nokia actually adopted PulseAudio
in the N900. While I was aware that Nokia was using it, I wasn’t aware that
their use is as comprehensive as it turned out it is. And the industry
support from other companies is really impressive too. After the main track we
had a BoF session, which notes I’ll post a bit later. Many thanks to Paul,
Jyri, Pierre for their great talks. Unfortunately, Palm, the only manufacturer
who is actually already shipping a phone with PulseAudio didn’t send anyone to
the conference who wanted to talk about that. Let’s hope they’ll eventually
learn that just throwing code over the wall is not how Open Source works.
Maybe they’ll send someone to next year’s LPC in Boston, where I hope to be
able to do the Audio MC again.

Right now I am at the BlueZ Summit in Stuttgart. Among other things we have
been discussing how to improve Bluetooth Audio support in PulseAudio. I guess
one could say thet the Bluetooth support in PulseAudio is already one of its
highlights, in fact working better then the support on other OSes (yay, that’s
an area where Linux Audio really shines!). So up next is better support for
allowing PA to receive A2DP audio, i.e. making PA act as if it was a Headset or
your hifi. Use case: send music from from your mobile to your desktop’s hifi
speakers. (Actually this is already support in current BlueZ/PA versions, but
not easily accessible). Also Bluetooth headsets tend to support AC3 or MP3
decoding natively these days so we should support that in PA too. Codec
handling has been on the TODO list for PA for quite some time, for the SPDIF or
HDMI cases, and Bluetooth Audio is another reason why we really should have
that.

Next week I’ll be at the Maemo Summit in Amsterdam.
Nokia kindly invited me. Unfortunately I was a bit too late to get a proper
talk accepted. That said, I am sure if enough folks are interested we could do
a little ad-hoc BoF and find some place at the venue for it. If you have any
questions regarding PA just talk to me. The N900 uses PulseAudio for all things
audio so I am quite sure we’ll have a lot to talk about.

See you in Amsterdam!

One last thing: Check out Colin’s
work to improve integration of PulseAudio and KDE
!

Conferences

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/lpc-bluez-maemo-2009.html

Last week I’ve been at the Linux Plumbers Conference in
Portland. Like last year it kicked ass and proved again being one of the most
relevant Linux developer conferences (if not the most relevant one). I
ran the Audio MC at the conference which was very well attended. The slides
for our four talks in the
track are available online
. (My own slides are probably a bit too terse
for most readers, the interesting stuff was in the talking, not the
reading…) Personally, for me the most interesting part was to see to which
degree Nokia actually adopted PulseAudio
in the N900. While I was aware that Nokia was using it, I wasn’t aware that
their use is as comprehensive as it turned out it is. And the industry
support from other companies is really impressive too. After the main track we
had a BoF session, which notes I’ll post a bit later. Many thanks to Paul,
Jyri, Pierre for their great talks. Unfortunately, Palm, the only manufacturer
who is actually already shipping a phone with PulseAudio didn’t send anyone to
the conference who wanted to talk about that. Let’s hope they’ll eventually
learn that just throwing code over the wall is not how Open Source works.
Maybe they’ll send someone to next year’s LPC in Boston, where I hope to be
able to do the Audio MC again.

Right now I am at the BlueZ Summit in Stuttgart. Among other things we have
been discussing how to improve Bluetooth Audio support in PulseAudio. I guess
one could say thet the Bluetooth support in PulseAudio is already one of its
highlights, in fact working better then the support on other OSes (yay, that’s
an area where Linux Audio really shines!). So up next is better support for
allowing PA to receive A2DP audio, i.e. making PA act as if it was a Headset or
your hifi. Use case: send music from from your mobile to your desktop’s hifi
speakers. (Actually this is already support in current BlueZ/PA versions, but
not easily accessible). Also Bluetooth headsets tend to support AC3 or MP3
decoding natively these days so we should support that in PA too. Codec
handling has been on the TODO list for PA for quite some time, for the SPDIF or
HDMI cases, and Bluetooth Audio is another reason why we really should have
that.

Next week I’ll be at the Maemo Summit in Amsterdam.
Nokia kindly invited me. Unfortunately I was a bit too late to get a proper
talk accepted. That said, I am sure if enough folks are interested we could do
a little ad-hoc BoF and find some place at the venue for it. If you have any
questions regarding PA just talk to me. The N900 uses PulseAudio for all things
audio so I am quite sure we’ll have a lot to talk about.

See you in Amsterdam!

One last thing: Check out Colin’s
work to improve integration of PulseAudio and KDE
!

LGPL’ing of Qt Will Encourage More Software Freedom

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2009/01/14/qt-lgpl.html

The decision between the GPL or LGPL for a library is a complex one,
particularly when that library solves a new problem or an old problem in
a new way. TrollTech faced this decision for the Qt library, and Nokia
(who acquired Trolltech last year) has now reconsidered the question and
come to a different conclusion. Having followed this situation since
even before Qt was GPL’d, I was glad that we have successfully
encouraged the reconsideration of this decision.

Years ago, RMS wrote what many consider the definitive essay on this
subject,
entitled Why
you shouldn’t use the Lesser GPL for your next library
. A
few times a year, I find myself rereading that essay because I believe
it puts forward some good points to think about when making this
decision.

Nevertheless, there is a strong case for the LGPL in many situations.
Sometimes, pure copyleft negatively impacts the goal of maximal software
freedom. The canonical example, of course, is the GNU C Library (which
was probably the first program ever LGPL’d).

Glibc was LGPL’d, in part, because it was unlikely at the time that
anyone would adopt a fully FaiF (Free as in Freedom) operating system
that didn’t allow any proprietary applications. Almost every program on
a Unix-like system combines with the C library, and if it were GPL’d,
all applications would be covered by the GPL. Users of the system
would have freedom, but encouraging the switch would be painful because
they’d have to give up all proprietary software all at once.

The GNU authors knew that there would be proprietary software for quite
some time, as our community slowly replaced each application with
freedom-respecting implementations. In the meantime, better that
proprietary software users have a FaiF C library and a FaiF operating
system to use (even with proprietary applications) while work
continued.

We now face a similar situation in the mobile device space. Most
mobile devices used today are locked down, top to bottom. It makes
sense to implement the approach we know works from our two decades of
experience — liberate the operating system first and the
applications will slowly follow.

This argument informs the decision about Qt’s licensing. Qt and its
derivatives are widely used as graphics toolkits in mobile devices.
Until now, Qt was licensed under GPL (and before that various semi-Free
licenses). Not only did the GPL create a “best is the enemy of
the good” situation, but those companies that rejected the GPL
could simply license a proprietary copy from TrollTech, which further
ghettoized the GPL’d versions. All that is now changing.

Beyond encouraging FaiF mobile operating systems, this change to LGPL
yields an important side benefit. While the proprietary relicensing
business is a common and legitimate business model to fund further
development, it also has some negative social side effects. The
codebase often lives in a silo, discouraging contributions from those
who don’t receive funding from the company who controls the canonical
upstream.

A change to LGPL sends a loud and clear message — the proprietary
relicensing business for Qt is over. Developers who have previously
rejected Qt because it was not community-developed might want to
reconsider that position in light of this news. We don’t know yet how
the new Qt community will be structured, but it’s now clear that Nokia,
Qt’s new copyright holder, no longer has a vested interest in
proprietary relicensing. The opportunity for a true software freedom
community around Qt’s code base has maximum potential at this moment. A
GUI programmer I am not; but I hope those who are will take a look and
see how to create the software freedom development community that Qt
needs.

IQ Light Mania

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-light-mania.html

As promised here’s a gallery of
better quality photos of a mobile made from mexican style IQ lights.

IQ Light Mobile

All these lights have been fabricated using this stencil and this material.

I hope this gallery shows a little bit how fascinating these lamps are and explain why I am so obsessed of them that I cannot stop blogging about them.

IQ Light Mania

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-light-mania.html

As promised here’s a gallery of
better quality photos of a mobile made from mexican style IQ lights.

IQ Light Mobile

All these lights have been fabricated using this stencil and this material.

I hope this gallery shows a little bit how fascinating these lamps are and explain why I am so obsessed of them that I cannot stop blogging about them.

IQ in the Movies

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-in-the-movies.html

The (original) IQ Light is featured in the stylish and funny Hollywood movie Lucky Number Slevin:

Lucky Number Slevin Still

Related to this, don’t miss this small but beautiful gallery of a mobile built entirely from (mexican style) IQ lights of various sizes. I hope to post better quality pictures of the same mobile shortly:

IQ Gallery

Oh, and I am finally back in .de after my trip to .au and
linux.conf.au 2007/FOMS 2007. I hope to post a
recap of the conferences and their outcome for PulseAudio and Avahi shortly.

Thanks to the impressing work of Silvia Pfeiffer and the LCA video team there’s now a video of my PulseAudio presentation at LCA available online. (Ogg Theora, Java Cortado). Don’t miss it!

IQ in the Movies

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/iq-in-the-movies.html

The (original) IQ Light is featured in the stylish and funny Hollywood movie Lucky Number Slevin:

Lucky Number Slevin Still

Related to this, don’t miss this small but beautiful gallery of a mobile built entirely from (mexican style) IQ lights of various sizes. I hope to post better quality pictures of the same mobile shortly:

IQ Gallery

Oh, and I am finally back in .de after my trip to .au and
linux.conf.au 2007/FOMS 2007. I hope to post a
recap of the conferences and their outcome for PulseAudio and Avahi shortly.

Thanks to the impressing work of Silvia Pfeiffer and the LCA video team there’s now a video of my PulseAudio presentation at LCA available online. (Ogg Theora, Java Cortado). Don’t miss it!