Tag Archives: Monty

Foundation report for 2015

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2016/02/foundation-report-for-2015.html

This is a repost of Otto Kekäläinen’s blog of the MariaDB foundations work in 2015.The mariadb.org website had over one million page views in 2015, a growth of about 9% since 2014. Good growth has been visible all over the MariaDB ecosystem and we can conclude that 2015 was a successful year for MariaDB. Increased adoptionMariaDB was included for the first time in an official Debian release (version 8.0 “Jessie”) and there has been strong adoption of MariaDB 10.0 in Linux distributions that already shipped 5.5. MariaDB is now available from all major Linux distributions including SUSE, RedHat, Debian and Ubuntu. Adoption of MariaDB in other platforms also increased, and MariaDB is now available as a database option on, among others, Amazon RDS, 1&1, Azure and Juju Charm Store (Ubuntu). Active maintenance and active developmentIn 2015 there were 6 releases of the 5.5 series, 8 releases of the 10.0 series and 8 releases of the 10.1 series. The 10.1 series was announced for general availability in October 2015 with the release of 10.1.8. In addition, there were also multiple releases of MariaDB Galera Cluster, and the C, Java and OBDC connectors as well as many other MariaDB tools. The announcements for each release can be read on the Mariadb.org blog archives with further details in the Knowledge Base. Some of the notable new features in 10.1 include: Galera clustering is now built-in instead of a separate server version, and can be activated with a simple configuration change.Traditional replication was also improved and is much faster in certain scenarios.Table, tablespace and log encryption were introduced.New security hardening features by default and authentication improvements.Improved support for the Spatial Reference systems for GIS data.We are also proud that the release remains backwards compatible and it is easy to upgrade to 10.1 from any previous MariaDB or MySQL release. 10.1 was also a success in terms of collaboration and included major contributions from multiple companies and developers. MariaDB events and talksThe main event organized by the MariaDB Foundation in the year was the MariaDB Developer Meetup in Amsterdam in October, at the Booking.com offices. It was a success with over 60 attendees In addition there were about a dozen events in 2015 at which MariaDB Foundation staff spoke.We are planning a new MariaDB developer event in early April 2016 in Berlin. We will make a proper announcement of this as soon as we have the date and place fixed.Staff, board and membersIn 2015 the staff included: Otto Kekäläinen, CEOMichael “Monty” Widenius, Founder and core developerAndrea Spåre-Strachan, personal assistant to Mr WideniusSergey Vojtovich, core developerAlexander Barkov, core developerVicențiu Ciorbaru, developerIan Gilfillan, documentation writer and webmasterOur staffing will slightly increase as Vicențiu will start working full time in 2016 for the Foundation. Our developers worked a lot on performance and scalability issues, ported the best features from new MySQL releases, improved MariaDB portability for platforms like ARM, AIX, IBM s390 and Power8, fixed security issues and other bugs. A lot of time was also invested in cleaning up the code base as the current 2,2 million lines of code includes quite a lot of legacy code in it. Version control and issue tracker statistics shows that the foundation staff made 528 commits, reported 373 bugs or issues and closed 424 bugs or other issues. In total there were 2400 commits made by 91 contributors in 2015.The Board of Directors in 2015 consisted of: Chairman Rasmus Johansson, VP Engineering at MariaDB CorporationMichael “Monty” Widenius, Founder and CTO of MariaDB CorporationJeremy Zawodny, Software Engineer at CraigslistSergei Golubchik, Chief Architect at MariaDB CorporationEspen Håkonsen, CIO of Visma and Managing Director of Visma IT & CommunicationsEric Herman, Principal Developer at Booking.comMariaDB Foundation CEO Otto Kekäläinen served as the secretary of the board. In 2015 we welcomed as new major sponsors Booking.com, Visma, Verkkokauppa.com. Acronis just joined to be a member for 2016. Please check out the full list of supporters. If you want to help the MariaDB Foundation in the mission to guarantee continuity and open collaboration, please support us as with individual or corporate sponsorship. What will 2016 bring?We expect steady growth in the adoption of MariaDB in 2016. There are many migrations from legacy database solutions underway, and as the world becomes increasingly digital, there are a ton of new software projects starting that use MariaDB to for their SQL and no-SQL data needs. In 2016 many will upgrade to 10.1 and the quickest ones will start using MariaDB 10.2 which is scheduled to be released some time during 2016. MariaDB also has a lot of plugins and storage engines that are getting more and more attention, and we expect more buzz around them when software developers figure out new ways to manage data in fast, secure and scalable ways.

Foundation report for 2015

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2016/02/foundation-report-for-2015.html

This is a repost of Otto Kekäläinen’s blog of the MariaDB foundations work in 2015.The mariadb.org website had over one million page views in 2015, a growth of about 9% since 2014. Good growth has been visible all over the MariaDB ecosystem and we can conclude that 2015 was a successful year for MariaDB. Increased adoptionMariaDB was included for the first time in an official Debian release (version 8.0 “Jessie”) and there has been strong adoption of MariaDB 10.0 in Linux distributions that already shipped 5.5. MariaDB is now available from all major Linux distributions including SUSE, RedHat, Debian and Ubuntu. Adoption of MariaDB in other platforms also increased, and MariaDB is now available as a database option on, among others, Amazon RDS, 1&1, Azure and Juju Charm Store (Ubuntu). Active maintenance and active developmentIn 2015 there were 6 releases of the 5.5 series, 8 releases of the 10.0 series and 8 releases of the 10.1 series. The 10.1 series was announced for general availability in October 2015 with the release of 10.1.8. In addition, there were also multiple releases of MariaDB Galera Cluster, and the C, Java and OBDC connectors as well as many other MariaDB tools. The announcements for each release can be read on the Mariadb.org blog archives with further details in the Knowledge Base. Some of the notable new features in 10.1 include: Galera clustering is now built-in instead of a separate server version, and can be activated with a simple configuration change.Traditional replication was also improved and is much faster in certain scenarios.Table, tablespace and log encryption were introduced.New security hardening features by default and authentication improvements.Improved support for the Spatial Reference systems for GIS data.We are also proud that the release remains backwards compatible and it is easy to upgrade to 10.1 from any previous MariaDB or MySQL release. 10.1 was also a success in terms of collaboration and included major contributions from multiple companies and developers. MariaDB events and talksThe main event organized by the MariaDB Foundation in the year was the MariaDB Developer Meetup in Amsterdam in October, at the Booking.com offices. It was a success with over 60 attendees In addition there were about a dozen events in 2015 at which MariaDB Foundation staff spoke.We are planning a new MariaDB developer event in early April 2016 in Berlin. We will make a proper announcement of this as soon as we have the date and place fixed.Staff, board and membersIn 2015 the staff included: Otto Kekäläinen, CEOMichael “Monty” Widenius, Founder and core developerAndrea Spåre-Strachan, personal assistant to Mr WideniusSergey Vojtovich, core developerAlexander Barkov, core developerVicențiu Ciorbaru, developerIan Gilfillan, documentation writer and webmasterOur staffing will slightly increase as Vicențiu will start working full time in 2016 for the Foundation. Our developers worked a lot on performance and scalability issues, ported the best features from new MySQL releases, improved MariaDB portability for platforms like ARM, AIX, IBM s390 and Power8, fixed security issues and other bugs. A lot of time was also invested in cleaning up the code base as the current 2,2 million lines of code includes quite a lot of legacy code in it. Version control and issue tracker statistics shows that the foundation staff made 528 commits, reported 373 bugs or issues and closed 424 bugs or other issues. In total there were 2400 commits made by 91 contributors in 2015.The Board of Directors in 2015 consisted of: Chairman Rasmus Johansson, VP Engineering at MariaDB CorporationMichael “Monty” Widenius, Founder and CTO of MariaDB CorporationJeremy Zawodny, Software Engineer at CraigslistSergei Golubchik, Chief Architect at MariaDB CorporationEspen Håkonsen, CIO of Visma and Managing Director of Visma IT & CommunicationsEric Herman, Principal Developer at Booking.comMariaDB Foundation CEO Otto Kekäläinen served as the secretary of the board. In 2015 we welcomed as new major sponsors Booking.com, Visma, Verkkokauppa.com. Acronis just joined to be a member for 2016. Please check out the full list of supporters. If you want to help the MariaDB Foundation in the mission to guarantee continuity and open collaboration, please support us as with individual or corporate sponsorship. What will 2016 bring?We expect steady growth in the adoption of MariaDB in 2016. There are many migrations from legacy database solutions underway, and as the world becomes increasingly digital, there are a ton of new software projects starting that use MariaDB to for their SQL and no-SQL data needs. In 2016 many will upgrade to 10.1 and the quickest ones will start using MariaDB 10.2 which is scheduled to be released some time during 2016. MariaDB also has a lot of plugins and storage engines that are getting more and more attention, and we expect more buzz around them when software developers figure out new ways to manage data in fast, secure and scalable ways.

Foundation report for 2014

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2015/01/foundation-report-for-2014.html

2014 was a productive year for the MariaDB Foundation.Here is a list of some of the things MariaDB Foundation employees haveaccomplished during 2014:The 3 full-time MariaDB Foundation developers have worked hard to make MariaDB better:Some 260 commitsSome 25 reviews of code from the MariaDB community.Fixed some 170 bugs and new features. For a full list, please check Jira.Reported some 160 bugs.Some of the main new features Foundation developers have worked on in 2014 are:Porting and improving MariaDB on IBM Power8.Porting Galera to MariaDB 10.1 as a standard feature.Query timeouts (MDEV-4427)Some coding and reviews of Parallel replication in MariaDB 10.1.Working with code from Google and Eperi to get table space and table level encryption for InnoDB and XtraDB.Allowing storage engines to shortcut group by queries (for ScaleDB) (MDEV-6080).Moronga storage engine (reviews and porting help)Connect storage engine (reviews and porting help)Spider storage engine (merging code with MariaDB)Query timeouts (MDEV-4427)Merge INET6_ATON() and INET6_NTOA() from MySQL-5.6 (MDEV-4051)Make “CAST(time_expr AS DATETIME)” compatible…SQL Standard) (MDEV-5372)Command line variable to choose MariaDB-5.3 vs MySQL-5.6 temporal data formats (MDEV-5528)Added syntax CREATE OR REPLACE to tables, databases, stored procedures, UDF:s and Views (MDEV-5491. The original TABLE code was done by Monty, other parts was done as a Google Summer Of Code project by Sriram Patil with Alexander Barkov as a mentor.Upgraded the bundled Perl Compatible Regular Expression library (PCRE) to 8.34 (MDEV-5304)Reduced usage of LOCK_open (MDEV-5403) (MDEV-5492) (MDEV-5587)Ported patches from WebScaleSQL to MariaDB (MDEV-6039)Better preallocation of memory (MDEV-7004)Lock-free hash for table definition cache (MDEV-7324)A lot of speed optimizations (changing mutex usage, better memory allocations, optimized bottlenecks, memory barriers etc).The MariaDB documentation/knowledgebase:has now 3685 articles about MariaDB and MySQL. Foundation employees added during 2014 223 new ones and did 6045 edits.Some of the main new articles from us are:All the system and status variables for all storage engines and plugins should be documented, including variable differences between MariaDB 5.5 versus MariaDB 10.0 and also MariaDB 10.0 versus MySQL 5.6.Updated documentation to changes related to MariaDB 10.1Upgrading from MariaDB 5.5 to MariaDB 10.0SpiderOQGRAPHGaleraSphinxMroongaInformation Schema TablesCommon MariaDB QueriesC APImysql database tablesOverview of MariaDB logsOLD_MODEEncryption of tables and table spaces in MariaDB 10.1Some 10 blog posts (This we need to do better..)We also have a lot of outside contributors and translators. Thanks a lot to all of you!We also visited and talked about MariaDB at a lot of conferences:February: Community events in Japan & Korea.April: The first MariaDB Foundation conference. This was a free for all event and we made videos of all presentations!April: Talk and booth at Percona live in Santa Clara.April: Talks at Linux Fest BellinghamJuly: Booth and BoF at Oscon PortlandOctober: Talk at All your Base at Oxford.October Talk about MySQL and MariaDB for China entrepreneurs in Beijing as part of China Finland Golden Bridge.November: Talk at Codemesh in London.November: Talks at PHP Buenos AiresNovember: Talk about open source business models at Build stuff” in Vilnius.November: Keynote and talk at CodeMotion Milan.In addition I had several talks at different companies who were moving big installations to MariaDB and needed advice.We where also able to finalize the MariaDB trademark agreement between the MariaDB corporation and the MariaDB Foundation. This ensures that that anyone can be part of MariaDB development on equal terms. The actual trademark agreement can be found here.On the personnel side, we were sad to see Simon Phipps leave the position as CEO of the Foundation.One the plus side, we just had 2 new persons join the MariaDB foundation this week:We are happy to have Otto Kekäläinen join us as the new CEO for the MariaDB foundation! Otto has in the past done a great work to get MariaDB into Debian and I am looking forward to his work on improving everything we do in the MariaDB foundation.Vicențiu Ciorbaru has joined the MariaDB foundation as a developer. In the past Vicențiu added ROLES to MariaDB, as part of a Google Summer of Code project and he is now interested to start working on the MariaDB optimizer. A special thanks to Jean-Paul Smets at Nexedi for sponsoring his work at the foundation!Last, I want to give my thanks to the MariaDB foundation members who made all the foundation work possible for 2014:AutomatticMariaDB corporation (former SkySQL Ab)ParallelsZeinmaxFor 2015 we welcome a new member, Visma. Visma will be part of the foundation board and will help push MariaDB development forwards.As the above shows, the MariaDB Foundation is not only a guarantee that MariaDB will always be an actively developed open source project, we also do a lot of development and practical work. This is however only possible if we have active members who sponsor our work!If you are interested in helping us, either as a member, sponsor, or by giving development resources to the MariaDB foundation, please email us at foundation at mariadb.org !

Foundation report for 2014

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2015/01/foundation-report-for-2014.html

2014 was a productive year for the MariaDB Foundation.Here is a list of some of the things MariaDB Foundation employees haveaccomplished during 2014:The 3 full-time MariaDB Foundation developers have worked hard to make MariaDB better:Some 260 commitsSome 25 reviews of code from the MariaDB community.Fixed some 170 bugs and new features. For a full list, please check Jira.Reported some 160 bugs.Some of the main new features Foundation developers have worked on in 2014 are:Porting and improving MariaDB on IBM Power8.Porting Galera to MariaDB 10.1 as a standard feature.Query timeouts (MDEV-4427)Some coding and reviews of Parallel replication in MariaDB 10.1.Working with code from Google and Eperi to get table space and table level encryption for InnoDB and XtraDB.Allowing storage engines to shortcut group by queries (for ScaleDB) (MDEV-6080).Moronga storage engine (reviews and porting help)Connect storage engine (reviews and porting help)Spider storage engine (merging code with MariaDB)Query timeouts (MDEV-4427)Merge INET6_ATON() and INET6_NTOA() from MySQL-5.6 (MDEV-4051)Make “CAST(time_expr AS DATETIME)” compatible…SQL Standard) (MDEV-5372)Command line variable to choose MariaDB-5.3 vs MySQL-5.6 temporal data formats (MDEV-5528)Added syntax CREATE OR REPLACE to tables, databases, stored procedures, UDF:s and Views (MDEV-5491. The original TABLE code was done by Monty, other parts was done as a Google Summer Of Code project by Sriram Patil with Alexander Barkov as a mentor.Upgraded the bundled Perl Compatible Regular Expression library (PCRE) to 8.34 (MDEV-5304)Reduced usage of LOCK_open (MDEV-5403) (MDEV-5492) (MDEV-5587)Ported patches from WebScaleSQL to MariaDB (MDEV-6039)Better preallocation of memory (MDEV-7004)Lock-free hash for table definition cache (MDEV-7324)A lot of speed optimizations (changing mutex usage, better memory allocations, optimized bottlenecks, memory barriers etc).The MariaDB documentation/knowledgebase:has now 3685 articles about MariaDB and MySQL. Foundation employees added during 2014 223 new ones and did 6045 edits.Some of the main new articles from us are:All the system and status variables for all storage engines and plugins should be documented, including variable differences between MariaDB 5.5 versus MariaDB 10.0 and also MariaDB 10.0 versus MySQL 5.6.Updated documentation to changes related to MariaDB 10.1Upgrading from MariaDB 5.5 to MariaDB 10.0SpiderOQGRAPHGaleraSphinxMroongaInformation Schema TablesCommon MariaDB QueriesC APImysql database tablesOverview of MariaDB logsOLD_MODEEncryption of tables and table spaces in MariaDB 10.1Some 10 blog posts (This we need to do better..)We also have a lot of outside contributors and translators. Thanks a lot to all of you!We also visited and talked about MariaDB at a lot of conferences:February: Community events in Japan & Korea.April: The first MariaDB Foundation conference. This was a free for all event and we made videos of all presentations!April: Talk and booth at Percona live in Santa Clara.April: Talks at Linux Fest BellinghamJuly: Booth and BoF at Oscon PortlandOctober: Talk at All your Base at Oxford.October Talk about MySQL and MariaDB for China entrepreneurs in Beijing as part of China Finland Golden Bridge.November: Talk at Codemesh in London.November: Talks at PHP Buenos AiresNovember: Talk about open source business models at Build stuff” in Vilnius.November: Keynote and talk at CodeMotion Milan.In addition I had several talks at different companies who were moving big installations to MariaDB and needed advice.We where also able to finalize the MariaDB trademark agreement between the MariaDB corporation and the MariaDB Foundation. This ensures that that anyone can be part of MariaDB development on equal terms. The actual trademark agreement can be found here.On the personnel side, we were sad to see Simon Phipps leave the position as CEO of the Foundation.One the plus side, we just had 2 new persons join the MariaDB foundation this week:We are happy to have Otto Kekäläinen join us as the new CEO for the MariaDB foundation! Otto has in the past done a great work to get MariaDB into Debian and I am looking forward to his work on improving everything we do in the MariaDB foundation.Vicențiu Ciorbaru has joined the MariaDB foundation as a developer. In the past Vicențiu added ROLES to MariaDB, as part of a Google Summer of Code project and he is now interested to start working on the MariaDB optimizer. A special thanks to Jean-Paul Smets at Nexedi for sponsoring his work at the foundation!Last, I want to give my thanks to the MariaDB foundation members who made all the foundation work possible for 2014:AutomatticMariaDB corporation (former SkySQL Ab)ParallelsZeinmaxFor 2015 we welcome a new member, Visma. Visma will be part of the foundation board and will help push MariaDB development forwards.As the above shows, the MariaDB Foundation is not only a guarantee that MariaDB will always be an actively developed open source project, we also do a lot of development and practical work. This is however only possible if we have active members who sponsor our work!If you are interested in helping us, either as a member, sponsor, or by giving development resources to the MariaDB foundation, please email us at foundation at mariadb.org !

MariaDB foundation trademark agreement

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2014/10/mariadb-foundation-trademark-agreement.html

We have now published the trademark agreement between the MariaDB Corporation (formerly SkySQL) and the MariaDB Foundation. This agreement guarantees that MariaDB Foundation has the rights needed to protect the MariaDB server project!With this protection, I mean to ensure that the MariaDB Foundation in turn ensures that anyone can be part of MariaDB development on equal terms (like with any other open source project).I have received some emails and read some blog posts from people who are confusing trademarks with the rights and possibilities for community developers to be part of an open source project.The MariaDB foundation was never created to protect the MariaDB trademark. It was created to ensure that what happened to MySQL would never happen to MariaDB: That people from the community could not be part of driving and developing MySQL on equal terms as other companies.I have personally never seen a conflict with having one company own the trademark of an open source product, as long as anyone can participate in the development of the product! Having a strong driver for an open source project usually ensures that there are more full-time developers working on a project than would otherwise be possible. This makes the product better and makes it useful for more people. In most cases, people are participating in an open source project because they are using it, not because they directly make money on the project.This is certainly the case with MySQL and MariaDB, but also with other projects. If the MySQL or the MariaDB trademark would have been fully owned by a foundation from a start, I think that neither project would have been as successful as they are! More about this later.Some examples of open source projects that have the trademark used or owned by a commercial parent company are WordPress (wordpress.com and WordPress.org) and Mozilla.Even when it comes to projects like Linux that are developed by many companies, the trademark is not owned by the Linux Foundation.There has been some concern that MariaDB Corporation has more developers and Maria captains (people with write access to the MariaDB repositories) on the MariaDB project than anyone else. This means that the MariaDB Corporation has more say about the MariaDB roadmap than anyone else.This is right and actually how things should be; the biggest contributors to a project are usually the ones that drive the project forward.This doesn’t, however, mean that no one else can join the development of the MariaDB project and be part of driving the road map.The MariaDB Foundation was created exactly to guarantee this.It’s the MariaDB Foundation that governs the rules of how the project is developed, under what criteria one can become a Maria captain, the rights of the Maria captains, and how conflicts in the project are resolved.Those rules are not yet fully defined, as we have had very few conflicts when it comes to accepting patches. The work on these rules have been initiated and I hope that we’ll have nice and equal rules in place soon. In all cases the rules will be what you would expect from an open source project. Any company that wants to ensure that MariaDB will continue to be a free project and wants to be part of defining the rules of the project can join the MariaDB Foundation and be part of this process!Some of the things that I think went wrong with MySQL and would not have happened if we had created a foundation similar to the MariaDB Foundation for MySQL early on:Claims that companies like Google and Ebay can’t get their patches into MySQL if they don’t pay (this was before MySQL was bought by Sun).Closed source components in MySQL, developed by the company that owns the trademark to MySQL (almost happened to MySQL in Sun and has happened in MySQL Enterprise from Oracle).Not giving community access to the roadmap.Not giving community developers write access to the official repositories of MySQL.Hiding code and critical test cases from the community.No guarantee that a patch will ever be reviewed.The MariaDB Foundation guarantees that the above things will never happen to MariaDB. In addition, the MariaDB Foundation employs people to perform reviews, provide documentation, and work actively to incorporate external contributions into the MariaDB project.This doesn’t mean that anyone can push anything into MariaDB. Any changes need to follow project guidelines and need to be reviewed and approved by at least one Maria captain. Also no MariaDB captain can object to the inclusion of a given patch except on technical merits. If things can’t be resolved among the captains and/or the user community, the MariaDB Foundation has the final word.I claimed earlier that MariaDB would never have been successful if the trademark had been fully owned by a foundation. The reason I can claim this is that we tried to do it this way and it failed! If we would have continued on this route MariaDB would probably be a dead project today!To be able to understand this, you will need a little background in MariaDB history. The main points are:Some parts of the MariaDB team and I left Sun in February 2009 to work on the Maria storage engine (now renamed to Aria).Oracle started to acquire Sun in April 2009.Monty Program Ab then hired the rest of the MariaDB engineers and started to focus on MariaDB.I was part of founding SkySQL in July 2010, as a home for MySQL support, consultants, trainers, and sales people.The MariaDB Foundation was announced in November 2012.Monty Program Ab and SkySQL Ab joined forces in April 2013.SkySQL Ab renamed itself to MariaDB Corporation in October 2014During the 4 years before the MariaDB foundation was formed, I had contacted most of the big companies that had MySQL to thank them for their success and to ask them to be part of MariaDB development. The answers were almost all the same:”We are very interested in you succeeding, but we can’t help you with money or resources until we are using MariaDB ourselves. This is only going to happen when you have proved that MariaDB will take over MySQL.”It didn’t help that most of the companies that used to pay for MySQL support had gotten scared of MySQL being sold to Oracle and had purchased 2-4 year support contracts to protect themselves against sudden price increases in MySQL support.In May 2012, after 4 years and spending close to 4 million Euros of my own money, to make MariaDB possible, I realized that something would have to change.I contacted some of the big technology companies in Silicon Valley and asked if they would be interested in being part of creating a MariaDB Foundation, where they could play bigger roles. The idea was that all the MariaDB developers from Monty Program Ab, the MariaDB trademark and other resources would move to the foundation. For this to happen, I need guarantees that the foundation would have resources to pay salaries to the MariaDB developers for at least the next 5 years.In the end two companies showed interest in doing this, but after months of discussions they both said that “now was not yet the right time to do this”.In the end I created the MariaDB Foundation with a smaller role, just to protect the MariaDB server, and got some great companies to support our work:Booking.comSkySQL (2 years!)Parallels (2 years!)AutomatticZenimaxThere was also some smaller donations from a variety of companies.See the whole list at https://mariadb.org/en/supporters.During this time, SkySQL had become the biggest supporter of MariaDB and also the biggest customer of Monty Program Ab. SkySQL provided front line support for MySQL and MariaDB and Monty Program Ab did the “level 3” support (bug fixes and enhancements for MariaDB).In the end there were only two ways to go forward to secure the financing of the MariaDB project:a) Get investors for Monty Program Abb) Sell Monty Program Ab.Note that neither of the above options would have been possible if Monty Program Ab had not owned the MariaDB trademark!Selling to SkySQL was in the end the right and logical thing to do:They have good investors who are committed to SkySQL and MariaDB.Most of the people in the two companies already know each other as most come from the old MySQL team.The MariaDB trademark was much more known than SkySQL and by owning it would make it much easier for SkySQL to expand their business.As SkySQL was the biggest supporter of the MariaDB project this felt like the right thing to do.However, to ensure the future of the MariaDB project, SkySQL and Monty Program Ab both agreed that the MariaDB Foundation was critically needed and we had to put a formal trademark agreement in place. Until now there was just a verbal promise for the MariaDB trademarks to the foundation and we had to do this legally right.This took, because of a lot of reasons too boring to bring up here, much longer time than expected. You can find the trademark agreement publicly available here. However, now this is finally done and I am happy to say that the future of MariaDB, as an open source project, is protected and there will never again be a reason for me to fork it!So feel free to join the MariaDB project, either as a developer or community contributor or as a member of the MariaDB Foundation!

MariaDB foundation trademark agreement

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2014/10/mariadb-foundation-trademark-agreement.html

We have now published the trademark agreement between the MariaDB Corporation (formerly SkySQL) and the MariaDB Foundation. This agreement guarantees that MariaDB Foundation has the rights needed to protect the MariaDB server project!With this protection, I mean to ensure that the MariaDB Foundation in turn ensures that anyone can be part of MariaDB development on equal terms (like with any other open source project).I have received some emails and read some blog posts from people who are confusing trademarks with the rights and possibilities for community developers to be part of an open source project.The MariaDB foundation was never created to protect the MariaDB trademark. It was created to ensure that what happened to MySQL would never happen to MariaDB: That people from the community could not be part of driving and developing MySQL on equal terms as other companies.I have personally never seen a conflict with having one company own the trademark of an open source product, as long as anyone can participate in the development of the product! Having a strong driver for an open source project usually ensures that there are more full-time developers working on a project than would otherwise be possible. This makes the product better and makes it useful for more people. In most cases, people are participating in an open source project because they are using it, not because they directly make money on the project.This is certainly the case with MySQL and MariaDB, but also with other projects. If the MySQL or the MariaDB trademark would have been fully owned by a foundation from a start, I think that neither project would have been as successful as they are! More about this later.Some examples of open source projects that have the trademark used or owned by a commercial parent company are WordPress (wordpress.com and WordPress.org) and Mozilla.Even when it comes to projects like Linux that are developed by many companies, the trademark is not owned by the Linux Foundation.There has been some concern that MariaDB Corporation has more developers and Maria captains (people with write access to the MariaDB repositories) on the MariaDB project than anyone else. This means that the MariaDB Corporation has more say about the MariaDB roadmap than anyone else.This is right and actually how things should be; the biggest contributors to a project are usually the ones that drive the project forward.This doesn’t, however, mean that no one else can join the development of the MariaDB project and be part of driving the road map.The MariaDB Foundation was created exactly to guarantee this.It’s the MariaDB Foundation that governs the rules of how the project is developed, under what criteria one can become a Maria captain, the rights of the Maria captains, and how conflicts in the project are resolved.Those rules are not yet fully defined, as we have had very few conflicts when it comes to accepting patches. The work on these rules have been initiated and I hope that we’ll have nice and equal rules in place soon. In all cases the rules will be what you would expect from an open source project. Any company that wants to ensure that MariaDB will continue to be a free project and wants to be part of defining the rules of the project can join the MariaDB Foundation and be part of this process!Some of the things that I think went wrong with MySQL and would not have happened if we had created a foundation similar to the MariaDB Foundation for MySQL early on:Claims that companies like Google and Ebay can’t get their patches into MySQL if they don’t pay (this was before MySQL was bought by Sun).Closed source components in MySQL, developed by the company that owns the trademark to MySQL (almost happened to MySQL in Sun and has happened in MySQL Enterprise from Oracle).Not giving community access to the roadmap.Not giving community developers write access to the official repositories of MySQL.Hiding code and critical test cases from the community.No guarantee that a patch will ever be reviewed.The MariaDB Foundation guarantees that the above things will never happen to MariaDB. In addition, the MariaDB Foundation employs people to perform reviews, provide documentation, and work actively to incorporate external contributions into the MariaDB project.This doesn’t mean that anyone can push anything into MariaDB. Any changes need to follow project guidelines and need to be reviewed and approved by at least one Maria captain. Also no MariaDB captain can object to the inclusion of a given patch except on technical merits. If things can’t be resolved among the captains and/or the user community, the MariaDB Foundation has the final word.I claimed earlier that MariaDB would never have been successful if the trademark had been fully owned by a foundation. The reason I can claim this is that we tried to do it this way and it failed! If we would have continued on this route MariaDB would probably be a dead project today!To be able to understand this, you will need a little background in MariaDB history. The main points are:Some parts of the MariaDB team and I left Sun in February 2009 to work on the Maria storage engine (now renamed to Aria).Oracle started to acquire Sun in April 2009.Monty Program Ab then hired the rest of the MariaDB engineers and started to focus on MariaDB.I was part of founding SkySQL in July 2010, as a home for MySQL support, consultants, trainers, and sales people.The MariaDB Foundation was announced in November 2012.Monty Program Ab and SkySQL Ab joined forces in April 2013.SkySQL Ab renamed itself to MariaDB Corporation in October 2014During the 4 years before the MariaDB foundation was formed, I had contacted most of the big companies that had MySQL to thank them for their success and to ask them to be part of MariaDB development. The answers were almost all the same:”We are very interested in you succeeding, but we can’t help you with money or resources until we are using MariaDB ourselves. This is only going to happen when you have proved that MariaDB will take over MySQL.”It didn’t help that most of the companies that used to pay for MySQL support had gotten scared of MySQL being sold to Oracle and had purchased 2-4 year support contracts to protect themselves against sudden price increases in MySQL support.In May 2012, after 4 years and spending close to 4 million Euros of my own money, to make MariaDB possible, I realized that something would have to change.I contacted some of the big technology companies in Silicon Valley and asked if they would be interested in being part of creating a MariaDB Foundation, where they could play bigger roles. The idea was that all the MariaDB developers from Monty Program Ab, the MariaDB trademark and other resources would move to the foundation. For this to happen, I need guarantees that the foundation would have resources to pay salaries to the MariaDB developers for at least the next 5 years.In the end two companies showed interest in doing this, but after months of discussions they both said that “now was not yet the right time to do this”.In the end I created the MariaDB Foundation with a smaller role, just to protect the MariaDB server, and got some great companies to support our work:Booking.comSkySQL (2 years!)Parallels (2 years!)AutomatticZenimaxThere was also some smaller donations from a variety of companies.See the whole list at https://mariadb.org/en/supporters.During this time, SkySQL had become the biggest supporter of MariaDB and also the biggest customer of Monty Program Ab. SkySQL provided front line support for MySQL and MariaDB and Monty Program Ab did the “level 3” support (bug fixes and enhancements for MariaDB).In the end there were only two ways to go forward to secure the financing of the MariaDB project:a) Get investors for Monty Program Abb) Sell Monty Program Ab.Note that neither of the above options would have been possible if Monty Program Ab had not owned the MariaDB trademark!Selling to SkySQL was in the end the right and logical thing to do:They have good investors who are committed to SkySQL and MariaDB.Most of the people in the two companies already know each other as most come from the old MySQL team.The MariaDB trademark was much more known than SkySQL and by owning it would make it much easier for SkySQL to expand their business.As SkySQL was the biggest supporter of the MariaDB project this felt like the right thing to do.However, to ensure the future of the MariaDB project, SkySQL and Monty Program Ab both agreed that the MariaDB Foundation was critically needed and we had to put a formal trademark agreement in place. Until now there was just a verbal promise for the MariaDB trademarks to the foundation and we had to do this legally right.This took, because of a lot of reasons too boring to bring up here, much longer time than expected. You can find the trademark agreement publicly available here. However, now this is finally done and I am happy to say that the future of MariaDB, as an open source project, is protected and there will never again be a reason for me to fork it!So feel free to join the MariaDB project, either as a developer or community contributor or as a member of the MariaDB Foundation!

Why SkySQL becoming MariaDB Corporation will be good for the MariaDB Foundation

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2014/10/why-skysql-becoming-mariadb-corporation.html

Today SkySQL is changing its name to MariaDB Corporation. This is something that I had both anticipated and I think it’s a great step for MariaDB.I wanted here to to share my thoughts on how this change affects the MariaDB community.The short version: As the MariaDB Corporation is the main driving force behind the development of the MariaDB server and the biggest support provider for it, it makes sense to give it a name that clearly communicates this fact.  The name change doesn’t of course stop the company to continue it’s excellent support for MySQL.For MariaDB users and customers, the name change should not affect them in any way, except that it will make it easier for them to find more information about MariaDB as there is fewer names involved.For the MariaDB Foundation, there is no big change either. After all, the MariaDB foundation was created to protect the MariaDB server, not the MariaDB trademark as such.The longer version, for those who want more context, starts with some history.After the Sun acquisition of MySQL AB, I started Monty Program to work on a branch of the MySQL code base named MariaDB after my youngest daughter. In 2010, I was one of the founders behind SkySQL as an alternative service provider for Oracle MySQL customers. Last year SkySQL merged with Monty Program to increase the support behind MariaDB. As the adoption of MariaDB has grown, SkySQL’s business has evolved to provide products and services to over 2 million MariaDB users.Talking about a company called SkySQL, that provides subscription services for MariaDB while also supporting MySQL, was becoming too complicated and confusing. To make things simpler, and reinforce the company’s focus, I both agreed and recommended that a name change was due.Having the company using the MariaDB name will also help ensure that the company will focus on MariaDB and put even more development resources on MariaDB.I assume that some people will wonder if the MariaDB Foundation is needed anymore?  I think it’s needed now more than ever to ensure that the MariaDB server is always guaranteed to be open for development by the community! The Foundation will continue in its role at the center of the open, independent and dynamic community that drives the adoption of MariaDB.  The Foundation will also need more paying members to be able to continue interacting with the ever growing external MariaDB developer community.We’ve been working with the team at MariaDB Corporation (formerly SkySQL!) and have come to agreement on how the trademark will be used. Details of this will be published soon on http://www.mariadb.org.I continue to believe passionately that the world needs an open, actively developed relational database platform that is adopting to your needs and is better suited for modern web scale application development than other alternatives. MariaDB is that platform. We, the MariaDB developers and all other people at the MariaDB foundation and MariaDB Corporation, are all excited that so many of you are choosing MariaDB. We are all committed to making this choice a success.MariaDB would not be what it is today without your support!  Thank you for this!

Why SkySQL becoming MariaDB Corporation will be good for the MariaDB Foundation

Post Syndicated from Michael "Monty" Widenius original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2014/10/why-skysql-becoming-mariadb-corporation.html

Today SkySQL is changing its name to MariaDB Corporation. This is something that I had both anticipated and I think it’s a great step for MariaDB.I wanted here to to share my thoughts on how this change affects the MariaDB community.The short version: As the MariaDB Corporation is the main driving force behind the development of the MariaDB server and the biggest support provider for it, it makes sense to give it a name that clearly communicates this fact.  The name change doesn’t of course stop the company to continue it’s excellent support for MySQL.For MariaDB users and customers, the name change should not affect them in any way, except that it will make it easier for them to find more information about MariaDB as there is fewer names involved.For the MariaDB Foundation, there is no big change either. After all, the MariaDB foundation was created to protect the MariaDB server, not the MariaDB trademark as such.The longer version, for those who want more context, starts with some history.After the Sun acquisition of MySQL AB, I started Monty Program to work on a branch of the MySQL code base named MariaDB after my youngest daughter. In 2010, I was one of the founders behind SkySQL as an alternative service provider for Oracle MySQL customers. Last year SkySQL merged with Monty Program to increase the support behind MariaDB. As the adoption of MariaDB has grown, SkySQL’s business has evolved to provide products and services to over 2 million MariaDB users.Talking about a company called SkySQL, that provides subscription services for MariaDB while also supporting MySQL, was becoming too complicated and confusing. To make things simpler, and reinforce the company’s focus, I both agreed and recommended that a name change was due.Having the company using the MariaDB name will also help ensure that the company will focus on MariaDB and put even more development resources on MariaDB.I assume that some people will wonder if the MariaDB Foundation is needed anymore?  I think it’s needed now more than ever to ensure that the MariaDB server is always guaranteed to be open for development by the community! The Foundation will continue in its role at the center of the open, independent and dynamic community that drives the adoption of MariaDB.  The Foundation will also need more paying members to be able to continue interacting with the ever growing external MariaDB developer community.We’ve been working with the team at MariaDB Corporation (formerly SkySQL!) and have come to agreement on how the trademark will be used. Details of this will be published soon on http://www.mariadb.org.I continue to believe passionately that the world needs an open, actively developed relational database platform that is adopting to your needs and is better suited for modern web scale application development than other alternatives. MariaDB is that platform. We, the MariaDB developers and all other people at the MariaDB foundation and MariaDB Corporation, are all excited that so many of you are choosing MariaDB. We are all committed to making this choice a success.MariaDB would not be what it is today without your support!  Thank you for this!

MariaDB Foundation at the Percona conference

Post Syndicated from Monty original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2013/04/mariadb-foundation-at-percona-conference.html

The MariaDB Foundation have just issued press release about the new Governance in the Foundation.  A lot of the new things that is happening in the MariaDB adoption comes thanks to the work we have done in the Foundation.The Foundation is also happy to announce that is has now 2 senior MySQL (now MariaDB) developers on board, Alexander Barkov and Sergey Vojtovich and a documentation writer, Ian Gilfillan.The foundation is also helping founding the new Connect engine, which allows you to use MariaDB with a lot of different formats (XML, CVS, DBF,…), and connections, including ODBC. (Documentation will appear shortly here).If you want to know more about the MariaDB Foundation, you can find me and a lot of MariaDB developers in the MariaDB foundation boot at Percona conference in Santa Clara.Monty Program Ab, SkySQL and Antony Curtis has also a lot of talks at Percona live about MariaDB and related things: MariaDB 10.0 & what’s new with the project MariaDB Cassandra Interoperability. Replication changes in MariaDB. Engine-independent persistent statistics with histograms in MariaDB. Spatial functions in MySQL 5.6, MariaDB 5.5, PostGIS 2.0 and others. Perl Stored Procedures for MariaDB. Deploying a highly available database solution in the Amazon EC2 Cloud using MariaDB. MHA: Getting started and moving past the quirks. Storage Engines and other Plugins: What’s New?.We have also a MariaDB BOF at 6:00 pm on the 23’th of April in Ballroom F. Anyone who ever been on one of the MySQL/MariaDB BOF’s with me knows what to expect. This time there will be even more surprises…Hope to see a lot of you next week!

MariaDB Foundation at the Percona conference

Post Syndicated from Monty original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2013/04/mariadb-foundation-at-percona-conference.html

The MariaDB Foundation have just issued press release about the new Governance in the Foundation.  A lot of the new things that is happening in the MariaDB adoption comes thanks to the work we have done in the Foundation.The Foundation is also happy to announce that is has now 2 senior MySQL (now MariaDB) developers on board, Alexander Barkov and Sergey Vojtovich and a documentation writer, Ian Gilfillan.The foundation is also helping founding the new Connect engine, which allows you to use MariaDB with a lot of different formats (XML, CVS, DBF,…), and connections, including ODBC. (Documentation will appear shortly here).If you want to know more about the MariaDB Foundation, you can find me and a lot of MariaDB developers in the MariaDB foundation boot at Percona conference in Santa Clara.Monty Program Ab, SkySQL and Antony Curtis has also a lot of talks at Percona live about MariaDB and related things: MariaDB 10.0 & what’s new with the project MariaDB Cassandra Interoperability. Replication changes in MariaDB. Engine-independent persistent statistics with histograms in MariaDB. Spatial functions in MySQL 5.6, MariaDB 5.5, PostGIS 2.0 and others. Perl Stored Procedures for MariaDB. Deploying a highly available database solution in the Amazon EC2 Cloud using MariaDB. MHA: Getting started and moving past the quirks. Storage Engines and other Plugins: What’s New?.We have also a MariaDB BOF at 6:00 pm on the 23’th of April in Ballroom F. Anyone who ever been on one of the MySQL/MariaDB BOF’s with me knows what to expect. This time there will be even more surprises…Hope to see a lot of you next week!

MariaDB-Galera 5.5 released as stable

Post Syndicated from Monty original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2013/03/mariadb-galera-55-released-as-stable.html

It’s now about one year ago since we released MariaDB 5.5. That proved to be an important release for MariaDB as it became popular with the users and ultimately also has been adopted by several important Linux distributions. But we have not stopped working since then, and now the MariaDB project is happy to announce something new again: the immediate availability of MariaDB Galera Cluster 5.5.29 stable release (GA). As soon as we had released MariaDB 5.5 stable, we started planning with Codership Oy how to integrate their Galera replication technology with MariaDB 5.5. We have then worked together to merge their Write Set REPlication API into MariaDB, and gone through a rigorous testing program with beta and RC releases leading to today’s a stable release. Elena from Monty Program and people from the MariaDB user community have tested those releases and provided feedback if they have found any bugs. Seppo Jaakola from the Galera team is a MariaDB Captain, which means he not only has commit rights to the MariaDB trunk, he also can participate in the MariaDB decision making together with other core contributors. (Note that MariaDB Galera Cluster currently still has it’s own branch in the MariaDB project on Launchpad. But I think it is likely that in the future this will become part of the main MariaDB branch and releases.) This is one reason today’s release makes me very happy, because this is a great example of what we always wanted the MariaDB project to become. It also shows how we operate with many other companies and individuals. We want to be open and inclusive to anyone who can contribute great code, so that MariaDB can continue its MySQL heritage of being the most popular open source database. We want MariaDB to always include all the great innovation happening in the MySQL ecosystem. About synchronous multi-master clusteringIn the past weeks I have traveled in Germany, Korea and Sweden to speak about MariaDB, and it is clear to me that a lot of people have already heard of Galera and are already trying it out. But if you didn’t yet know about this technology, let me tell you why it is important. MariaDB Galera Cluster provides synchronous multi-master replication. A simple way to explain what this means is to compare it with other alternatives that we have used for MariaDB high availability until today: If you compare it to the traditional master-slave replication, it means that your data is safer in a Galera cluster because it is replicated immediately as part of the commit, without any delay. (This is why it is synchronous.) Also, in traditional master-slave replication you can do read-only scale-out, but with Galera you can read and write to any node. This makes life easier for application developers, because you don’t need to separate read-only transactions and write transactions. (This is why it is called multi-master.) You can also compare it with DRBD, which is another popular High Availability solution for MariaDB and MySQL. The reason people use DRBD is usually because it is also synchronous replication, only it happens on the disk driver level. So it is used by people who want to be 100% sure they don’t lose a single transaction if they do a failover. But DRBD doesn’t give you any scale-out, since the spare node is so called cold standby, so you cannot use it for anything else but disaster recovery. With MariaDB Galera Cluster we now provide “best of both worlds”: it is both synchronous, and you can use it for scale-out. And not just read-only scale out but multi-master scale-out. Automatic node provisioningThere are many other benefits to Galera too, and you will be able to read more about them on the MariaDB blog. One nice little feature I think is also worth mentioning is the automatic node provisioning. One reason MySQL master-slave replication has become so popular is that it is quite easy to setup and understand. But Galera takes this even further, they completely automate the node provisioning process. My philosophy when I created MySQL was always to make everything very easy to the user, and I’m happy to see Galera shares this philosophy. But it is not only nice, it is actually an important feature especially if you run MariaDB in the cloud. In the cloud you can save money by adding nodes to a cluster (scale out) when needed and then removing them (scale in) when you need less performance. You might do this every day, or every week depending on what kind of traffic your website gets. But to add and remove MariaDB nodes every day, you of course cannot do it manually every time. For example many NoSQL systems talk about automatic node provisioning in their marketing so that they will sound “cloud compatible”. But MariaDB Galera Cluster does it too, so there is no reason to abandon SQL just to have automatic node provisioning. Commercial supportWhen you have tested MariaDB Galera Cluster and decided that you like it, and want to run it in production, you of course want to make sure you have proper support in place. This is also important so that the developers can continue to work on the project and make it even better. Codership operates with a similar model like my company Monty Program, they develop the technology and do bug fixes, and they partner with SkySQL and other companies that support MariaDB in order to provide a complete and seamless support experience. You can contact SkySQL to discuss commercial support for both MariaDB and MariaDB-Galera. You can also support MariaDB Galera Cluster development directly by donating via the MariaDB Foundation. If you specifically want to support Galera development, you should target your donation to “MariaDB Galera Cluster”.

MariaDB-Galera 5.5 released as stable

Post Syndicated from Monty original http://monty-says.blogspot.com/2013/03/mariadb-galera-55-released-as-stable.html

It’s now about one year ago since we released MariaDB 5.5. That proved to be an important release for MariaDB as it became popular with the users and ultimately also has been adopted by several important Linux distributions. But we have not stopped working since then, and now the MariaDB project is happy to announce something new again: the immediate availability of MariaDB Galera Cluster 5.5.29 stable release (GA). As soon as we had released MariaDB 5.5 stable, we started planning with Codership Oy how to integrate their Galera replication technology with MariaDB 5.5. We have then worked together to merge their Write Set REPlication API into MariaDB, and gone through a rigorous testing program with beta and RC releases leading to today’s a stable release. Elena from Monty Program and people from the MariaDB user community have tested those releases and provided feedback if they have found any bugs. Seppo Jaakola from the Galera team is a MariaDB Captain, which means he not only has commit rights to the MariaDB trunk, he also can participate in the MariaDB decision making together with other core contributors. (Note that MariaDB Galera Cluster currently still has it’s own branch in the MariaDB project on Launchpad. But I think it is likely that in the future this will become part of the main MariaDB branch and releases.) This is one reason today’s release makes me very happy, because this is a great example of what we always wanted the MariaDB project to become. It also shows how we operate with many other companies and individuals. We want to be open and inclusive to anyone who can contribute great code, so that MariaDB can continue its MySQL heritage of being the most popular open source database. We want MariaDB to always include all the great innovation happening in the MySQL ecosystem. About synchronous multi-master clusteringIn the past weeks I have traveled in Germany, Korea and Sweden to speak about MariaDB, and it is clear to me that a lot of people have already heard of Galera and are already trying it out. But if you didn’t yet know about this technology, let me tell you why it is important. MariaDB Galera Cluster provides synchronous multi-master replication. A simple way to explain what this means is to compare it with other alternatives that we have used for MariaDB high availability until today: If you compare it to the traditional master-slave replication, it means that your data is safer in a Galera cluster because it is replicated immediately as part of the commit, without any delay. (This is why it is synchronous.) Also, in traditional master-slave replication you can do read-only scale-out, but with Galera you can read and write to any node. This makes life easier for application developers, because you don’t need to separate read-only transactions and write transactions. (This is why it is called multi-master.) You can also compare it with DRBD, which is another popular High Availability solution for MariaDB and MySQL. The reason people use DRBD is usually because it is also synchronous replication, only it happens on the disk driver level. So it is used by people who want to be 100% sure they don’t lose a single transaction if they do a failover. But DRBD doesn’t give you any scale-out, since the spare node is so called cold standby, so you cannot use it for anything else but disaster recovery. With MariaDB Galera Cluster we now provide “best of both worlds”: it is both synchronous, and you can use it for scale-out. And not just read-only scale out but multi-master scale-out. Automatic node provisioningThere are many other benefits to Galera too, and you will be able to read more about them on the MariaDB blog. One nice little feature I think is also worth mentioning is the automatic node provisioning. One reason MySQL master-slave replication has become so popular is that it is quite easy to setup and understand. But Galera takes this even further, they completely automate the node provisioning process. My philosophy when I created MySQL was always to make everything very easy to the user, and I’m happy to see Galera shares this philosophy. But it is not only nice, it is actually an important feature especially if you run MariaDB in the cloud. In the cloud you can save money by adding nodes to a cluster (scale out) when needed and then removing them (scale in) when you need less performance. You might do this every day, or every week depending on what kind of traffic your website gets. But to add and remove MariaDB nodes every day, you of course cannot do it manually every time. For example many NoSQL systems talk about automatic node provisioning in their marketing so that they will sound “cloud compatible”. But MariaDB Galera Cluster does it too, so there is no reason to abandon SQL just to have automatic node provisioning. Commercial supportWhen you have tested MariaDB Galera Cluster and decided that you like it, and want to run it in production, you of course want to make sure you have proper support in place. This is also important so that the developers can continue to work on the project and make it even better. Codership operates with a similar model like my company Monty Program, they develop the technology and do bug fixes, and they partner with SkySQL and other companies that support MariaDB in order to provide a complete and seamless support experience. You can contact SkySQL to discuss commercial support for both MariaDB and MariaDB-Galera. You can also support MariaDB Galera Cluster development directly by donating via the MariaDB Foundation. If you specifically want to support Galera development, you should target your donation to “MariaDB Galera Cluster”.

Fork Well: It Could Be The Last, Best Hope for Community

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2009/04/24/fork-well.html

I have faced with much trepidation the news of Oracle’s looming purchase
of Sun. Oracle has never shown any interest in community development,
particularly in the database area. They are the largest proprietary
database vendor on the planet, and they probably have very simple plans
for MySQL: kill it.

That’s why I read with relief
this
post by Monty (co-founder of the MySQL project) this week
, wherein
Monty plans (and encourages others, too) to put their full force behind
a MySQL “fork” that will be centered outside of Oracle.

Monty is undoubtedly correct when he says I don’t think that anyone
can own an open source project; the projects are defined by the de-facto
project leaders and the developers that are working on the project.
and that [w]ith Oracle now owning MySQL, I think that the need for an
independent true Open Source entity for MySQL is even bigger than ever
before.

I don’t find the root of this problem in that one company has sold
itself to another, pursuant to the the greater glory of the
Ferengi
Rules of Acquisition
. Instead, I think the error is that projects
inside Sun did not have a non-profit entity to shepherd them. When a
single for-profit company is in control of a project’s copyrights, its
trademarks, and employs nearly all its core developers, there is a gross
imbalance. The community around the project isn’t healthy, and can
easily be disrupted by the winds of corporate change, which blow in
service of the only goal of for-profit existence: higher profits.

I encourage Monty, as well as core developers of VirtualBox,
OpenOffice, OpenSolaris, Sun’s Java, and any other project that is
currently under the full control of Sun (or indeed any other for-profit
corporation) to think about this idea. Non-profits, particularly
501(c)(3)’s, are fundamentally different than for-profits. They exist
to serve a community or a constituency and the public good, never
profit. Therefore, the health of the codebase, the diversity of the
developer and user community, and the advancement of software freedom
can be the clear mission of a non-profit that houses a FLOSS project. A
non-profit ensures that while corporate funding comes and goes, the
mission of the project and its institutional embodiment stay stable.
For example, just like shareholders have a duty to fire a CEO when he
fails to make enough profit (i.e., the for-profit company is not
reaching its maximal goal), boards of directors and/or memberships of
non-profits must fire the President and/or Executive Director when they
fail to serve the community well. Instead of the “profit
motive”, 501(c)(3)’s have the “community motive”.

Yet, the challenge of focusing on such goals remains difficult for
projects that did not spawn from a community to start. GNU and Linux
were both started by individual developers that built strong communities
before there was any for-profit corporate interest in the software.
When a project started inside a company with profit in mind, shoehorning
community principles into the project can rarely succeed. I believe
that a community must usually evolve from the ashes of some incident
that wakes everyone up to realize the project will come to harm due to
strict adherence to the profit motive.

I should probably remind everyone that I’m not opposed to capitalism
per se. Indeed, I’ve often fought on the other side of this equation
when licenses (such as MySQL’s own very early pre-GPL license) permit
noncommercial use but prohibit commercial use. I believe that
commercial and non-commercial activity with the code should be
equally permitted in a non-discriminatory way. However, the center of
gravity for developers, where the copyrights and trademarks live, and
how core work on the codebase is funded are all orthogonal questions to
the question of the software’s license.

My experience has anecdotally taught me that FLOSS communities function
best when the following two things are true: (a) the codebase is held
neutrally, either in the hands of the individual developers who wrote
the code, or in a 501(c)(3) non-profit, and (b) not too many core
developers share the same employer. I believe that reaching that state
should be Job One of any for-profit seeking to build a FLOSS community.
Sadly, this type of community health is often at direct odds with
the traditional capitalist thinking of for-profit shareholders.
I’m thus not surprised when FLOSS community managers in for-profit
companies can only do so much. The rest is really up to the community
of developers to fork and demand that a non-profit or other neutral and
diverse developer-controlled management team exist. Attempts at this,
sadly, fail much more often than they succeed.

Monty’s post likely had more hope in it than this one. Monty didn’t
jump to my conclusion that Oracle will kill MySQL; Monty considers it
also possible that Oracle might sell MySQL or (and here’s the
possibility I really doubt) that Oracle will change into a
community-driven FLOSS company. I love Monty’s optimism in even
considering this possible. I honestly hope my pragmatism about this is
shown to be sheer pessimism. In the meantime, focusing on the MySQL
forks and pressuring Oracle to engage the FLOSS community in a genuine
way is the best strategy no matter what outcome you think is most
likely.

Update (on 17 May 2009):
Monty announced
an industry consortium
that will seek to be a neutral space for
MySQL development. I tend to prefer charitable non-profits to trade
associations, but better the latter than hoping for Oracle to do the
right thing.