Tag Archives: moon

Weekly roundup: Descent

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/dev/2016/12/11/weekly-roundup-descent/

  • art: I did a little pixel animation and a lot of doodling trying to remember how to draw. Almost a bit of character design, too.

    My pixel art keeps getting compliments, which is really cool, but at the same time I’ve been frustrated with how lackluster my non-pixely art is. I tried repainting an idea from last year on a whim, but used the DB32 palette (which I’ve used for pixel art before), and it came out kind of_amazing_. So that confirms my problem is color, and it’s given me a few ideas for how to think about color differently.

  • isaac: Level transitions now work, though the spawn point is still ignored, so it’s pretty common to get stuck in a wall. Isaac grew a simple jump animation and a… sleepytime sequence. The appearing platforms now look much better, and the resurrection rune is now animated.

    The cave texture I had was kind of underwhelming, so I tried drawing a new one at a higher resolution. That stood out way too much, but after a few attempts and refinements, I ended up with something very nice that also lets me draw edge tiles fairly easily. I also wrote a shader from scratch for the very first time and was reminded of what a pain GLSL is!

    Between using a textured blending brush for a Bob Ross style background in the above painting, and a whole lot of studying Cave Story art (and actual cave walls) before finally landing on the tiles above, I feel like I’ve finally started to grasp some deeper idea about how the illusion of depth and form works.

  • music: Finally, finally tried my hand at this for real. I even made a whole song, which is not very good, but is better than having made zero songs. I’ve sketched out a bunch of simple melodies, but none of them are particularly great yet; it’s going to take a lot of experimentation before I can really make any music worthy of putting in Isaac HD.

    I also worked on recreating sound effects, with some modest success. I’m not satisfied with what I have yet, but I’ve learned a lot about combining waveforms and how to use a bunch of knobs in LMMS. (I must’ve spent four to six hours just trying to make a satisfying grinding-rock sound.)

  • veekun: I tracked down where most of the remaining Sun/Moon data is. I’m still, er, trying to finish the game, but I’m getting close to the end, I think!

I’m having to teach myself half a dozen new things at once for the sake of Isaac HD, which feels like slow going but is ultimately kind of great. I think I’m on a good pace to have the original levels playable by the end of the month. (I don’t intend to stop there by any means, but it’s a great milestone.)

Not having four lengthy posts looming all month is a huge weight off my shoulders, by the way. I’ve barely even thought about writing tons of prose in a week and a half, and now I have enough prose juice saved up that working on a book for a while is sounding appealing! This is great. Thanks, y’all. ♥

Weekly roundup: Freedom

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/dev/2016/12/06/weekly-roundup-freedom/

  • zdoom: On a total whim, I resurrected half of an old branch that puts sloped 3D floors in the software renderer. It kinda draws them, but with no textures.

  • blog: I wrote a thing about not copying C which was surprisingly popular.

  • sylph: I accidentally spent 45 minutes writing a microscopic parser for a language that can only print string literals.

  • patreon: I finished up some revamping of my Patreon — the wall of text is now a short and straightforward stack of images, and I dropped the blogging milestones. I’m no longer obliged to write X posts per month, huzzah.

  • art: I pixel-drew some new veekun version icons, which may or may not go live. Also drew a December avatar.

  • veekun: I got started on adapting my ORAS dumping code for Sun and Moon, and have box and dex sprites 90% dumped. Text is mostly done as well.

  • art: I did a few pixels, which you may or not be seeing in the near future.

veekun effort continues (as I scramble to actually finish the game so I don’t spoil myself). Also trying to, uh, remember how to draw?

Weekly roundup: Freedom

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/dev/2016/12/06/weekly-roundup-freedom/

  • zdoom: On a total whim, I resurrected half of an old branch that puts sloped 3D floors in the software renderer. It kinda draws them, but with no textures.

  • blog: I wrote a thing about not copying C which was surprisingly popular.

  • sylph: I accidentally spent 45 minutes writing a microscopic parser for a language that can only print string literals.

  • patreon: I finished up some revamping of my Patreon — the wall of text is now a short and straightforward stack of images, and I dropped the blogging milestones. I’m no longer obliged to write X posts per month, huzzah.

  • art: I pixel-drew some new veekun version icons, which may or may not go live. Also drew a December avatar.

  • veekun: I got started on adapting my ORAS dumping code for Sun and Moon, and have box and dex sprites 90% dumped. Text is mostly done as well.

  • art: I did a few pixels, which you may or not be seeing in the near future.

veekun effort continues (as I scramble to actually finish the game so I don’t spoil myself). Also trying to, uh, remember how to draw?

Raspberry Pi astrophotography

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-astrophotography/

Tonight marks the appearance of the brightest supermoon to grace the sky since 1948, appearing 30% brighter and 14% bigger than the usual glowing orb. The moon will not be this close again until November 2034.

Given this, and assuming the sky remains clear enough tonight to catch a glimpse, here’s one of several Raspberry Pi-powered astrophotography projects to get your creative senses tingling.

Having already created a similar project with a Nokia Lumia, TJ “Lifetime tinkerer” Emsley decided to try attaching a Raspberry Pi and Camera Module to a newly adopted Tesco 45X refractor telescope. They added a $10 USB shield, wireless NIC, and the usual setup components, and the project was underway.

TJ EMSLEY Moon Photography

TJ designed and 3D-printed a mount and bracket; the files are available on Thingiverse for those interested in building their own. The two-part design allows for use with various telescopes, thanks to an adjustable eyepiece adapter.

A Pi Zero fits onto the bracket, the Pi camera snug to the eyepiece, and the build is ready.

TJ EMSLEY Moon Photography

The Pi runs code written by TJ, allowing for image preview and exposure adjustments. You can choose between video and still images, and you can trigger the camera via a keyboard; this way, you don’t unsettle the camera to capture an image by having to touch the adapter in any way.

TJ will eventually be uploading the project to GitHub, but a short search will help you to build your own camera code (start here), so why not share your astrophotography with us in the comments below?

Enjoy the supermoon!

The post Raspberry Pi astrophotography appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Case 234: Ozymandias

Post Syndicated from The Codeless Code original http://thecodelesscode.com/case/234

The nun Hwídah has composed this uncharacteristically
somber sonnet for your contemplation:

I chanced upon an ancient cache of code:
a stack of printouts, tall as any man,
that in decaying boxes had been stowed.
Ten thousand crumbling pages long it ran.
Abandoned in the blackness to erode,
what steered a ship through blackness to the moon.
The language is unused in this late year.
The target hardware, likewise, lies in ruin.
Entombed within one lone procedure’s scope,
a line of code and then these words appear:

# TEMPORARY, I HOPE HOPE HOPE

The code beside persisting to the last—
as permanent as aught upon this sphere—
while overhead, a vacant moon flies past.

Editor’s note

Inspired by this story of the Apollo Guidance Computer code for Apollo 11,
and
this code within,
and Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Ozymandias of course.

I tried to keep to Shelley’s unusual (and non-standard)
rhyme scheme for the sonnet, but I departed from it in the
second-to-last line for poetic reasons. For a language
which excels in stealing words from other cultures, English
has an appalling lack of rhymes.

* Special thanks to Dan Sutton for pointing out a most embarrassing typo.