Tag Archives: Newcastle

Echoing the Newcastle of yesteryear with Pi-powered whistles

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/steve-messam-whistle/

Artist Steve Messam is celebrating the North of England’s historic role in railway innovation with 16 Raspberry Pi–controlled steam engine whistles around the city of Newcastle.

Steve Messam Raspberry Pi Whistle The Great Exhibition of the North

The Great Exhibition of the North

The Great Exhibition of the North is a summer-long celebration of the pioneering spirit of the North of England. Running over 80 days, the event will feature live performances, exhibitions, artworks, and displays of innovation from 22 June – 9 September 2018.

As part of the celebration, artist Steve Messam is introducing his Whistle project in Newcastle in honour of the North’s part in the innovation of the railway. “Listen out for the evocative sound of steam engine whistles once again echoing across the city of Newcastle,” states the project page of The Great Exhibition of the North. “The sound installation is designed to recall the role of the North in engineering and the invention of the railway, sparking memories and forging links between past and present.”

Whistle

Steve first developed the idea for Whistle as a pitch to the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park back in 2014. He originally wanted to install a line of whistles along the 22-mile course of the old railway line between Callander and Glen Dochart, with whistles sounding off in one-second intervals, recreating the sound of the old line.

Below is a very nice roundup of the initial 2-mile test run, including the original whistle designs.

Steve Messam | Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

The Artistic Reflections publication will be available from June 2017 For more information, or to order a copy, please contact: [email protected] Designed by Marco Scerri, edited by Susan Christie and supported by Creative Scotland Steve Messam Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park 186,340 hectares Project website: www.mistandmountains.wordpress.com Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park was designated in 2002 and covers 720 square miles of outstanding landscape adjacent to the central belt of Scotland.

Fast forward to 2018 and The Great Exhibition of the North, where Steve is surrounding the city of Newcastle with 16 newly casted brass whistles. The new installation follows the old city wall of Newcastle, with each whistle sounding at exactly 1pm on every day of the exhibition.

Steve Messam Raspberry Pi Whistle The Great Exhibition of the North

Original plans for the whistle

The William Lane Foundry cast the 16 whistles to match a design by William Armstrong based on measurements of an original whistle held by the North East Locomotive Preservation Group.

Steve Messam Raspberry Pi Whistle The Great Exhibition of the North

Whistle casting at the William Lane Foundry

Each whistle is equipped with a Raspberry Pi that controls the release of compressed air through the brass to replicate the sound of a steam whistle.

Steve Messam on Twitter

Another roof, another day of testing #whistle for #getnorth2018 https://t.co/j5Yszx1Crl

Each unit is powered by solar panels and registers the time from the National Physical Laboratory’s atomic clock in London to ensure accurate timings. As a fallback in case of WiFi issues, the whistles are also linked to the clock set on the Raspberry Pi itself.

Steve Messam on Twitter

The more I think about it the more I really like that ‘Whistle’ only really exists for about 20 seconds each day.

For more information on Whistle, check out this wonderful article by the Teesdale Mercury. You can also find out more about Steve Messam projects, such as his paper bridge that can support the weight of a Land Rover, on his website or by following his Twitter account.

Steve Messam Raspberry Pi Whistle The Great Exhibition of the North

A Whistle-stop tour of Newcastle

And if you’re in Newcastle while The Great Exhibition of the North is running and you spot one of the 16 whistles, be sure to tag us in your pics and videos on social media so we can see it in action.

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The Heart of Maker Faire

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/heart-maker-faire/

We at the Raspberry Pi Foundation find it incredibly rewarding to help people make and share things they love. It’s amazing to be part of an incredibly creative community of makers. And we’re not the only ones who feel this way: for this year’s Maker Faire UK, the team over at NUSTEM created the Heart of Maker Faire, a Pi-powered art installation that is a symbol of this unique community. And to be perfectly frank, it’s bloody gorgeous.

The Heart of Maker Faire

NUSTEM’s new installation for Maker Faire UK 2017, held on 1st & 2nd April at the Centre for Life, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Visitors wrote notes about things they love, and sealed them in jars. They then read their heart rates, and used the control boxes to associate their jar and heart rate with a space on the shelves.

A heart for the community

NUSTEM is a STEM outreach organisation from Northumbria University, and the makers there are always keen to build interactive projects that get people excited about technology. So at this year’s Faire, attendees passing their installation were invited to write down something close to their heart, put that note in a jar, and measure their heart rate. Then they could connect their heart rate, via a QR code, to a space on a shelf lined with LEDs. Once they placed the jar in their space, the LEDs started blinking to imitate their heart beat. With this art piece, the NUSTEM team wants to say something about “how we’re all individuals, but about our similarities too”.

NUSTEM on Twitter

Still beating. Heart of #MakerFaireUK

Making the heart beat

This is no small build – it uses more than 2,000 NeoPixel LEDs, as well as five Raspberry Pis, among other components. Two Pi 3s are in charge of registering people’s contributions and keeping track of their jars. A Pi Zero W acts as a central hub, connecting its bigger siblings via WiFi, and storing a MySQL database of the jars’ data. Finally, two more Pi 3s control the LEDs of the Heart via a script written in Processing. The NUSTEM team has made the code available here for you “to laugh at” (their words, not mine!)

Heart of Maker Faire shelf

The heart, ready to be filled with love

A heart for art

Processing is an open-source programming language used to create images, graphs, and animations. It can respond to keyboard and mouse input, so you can write games with it as well. Moreover, it runs on the Pi, and you can use it to talk to the Pi’s GPIO pins, as the Heart of Maker Faire team did. Hook up buttons, sensors, and LEDs, and get ready to create amazing interactive pieces of art! If you’d like to learn more, read Matt’s blog post, or watch the talk he gave about Processing at our fifth birthday party earlier this year.

Matt Richardson: Art with Processing on the Raspberry Pi – Raspberry Pi Birthday Event 2017 – Talks

Matt Richardson: Art with Processing on the Raspberry Pi Sunday 5th March 2017 Raspberry Pi Birthday Event 2017 Filmed and edited by David and Andrew Ferguson. This video is not an official video published by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. No copyright infringement intended.

To help you get started, we’re providing a free learning resource introducing you to the basics of Processing. We’d love to see what you create, so do share a link to your masterworks in the comments!

World Maker Faire

We’ll be attending World Maker Faire in New York on the 23rd and 24th of September. Will you be there?

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Our Creative Technologists have graduated!

Post Syndicated from Rachel Rayns original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/creative-technologists-have-graduated/

Hello, Rachel here, with a story that’s best told through images – warning, LOTS of photos ahead!

Happy Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists celebrate by dancing

When I explain how I started working at Raspberry Pi, it ends up being a pretty long story, with lots of interests that became jobs, unexpected opportunities and chance meetings. At the time it didn’t seem very connected – I just followed what I was interested in at the time, found like-minded people, and tried to share what I love with new people too. Before I joined Raspberry Pi as Artist in Residence in 2013, I ran a small arts venue focused on celluloid film with a darkroom and film lab – I wanted everyone to try shooting and developing their own photos!

I’ve now been at the Raspberry Pi Foundation for three years and I’ve had the chance to meet loads of people involved in digital making, from lots of different backgrounds: computer science professionals, teachers, engineers, design agencies, musicians, artists, tinkerers, makers. The thing that every one of them has in common: they follow what they are interested in, don’t worry too much about what label they have, and just concentrate on doing interesting things they enjoy and sharing them with others.

I had an opportunity last year to run an ambitious programme for a small group of young people. Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists was a one-off project to see how a (mostly) online digital-making mentor programme might work. I wanted to make sure people from lots of different backgrounds were involved.

We had loads of fantastic applications – although almost everyone left it until a minute before the deadline to submit, leaving my nerves in shreds!

We picked a great group of young people:

Andrew
Connor
Bawar
A cartoon sketch of Hannah Burdett, Raspberry Pi Creative Technologist
Maddy
Milton
Owen
Yasmin

They all wanted to explore how digital technology could enhance their creative pursuits, and their enthusiasms spanned everything from storytelling to animation to circus skills.

. on Twitter

First feature in new @TheMagP1 is our amazing Creative Technologists. Well done folks! #RPCT https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/issues/36/ …pic.twitter.com/C0TJ1M986d

Over the next 12 months, they developed their interests and skills through mentoring and field trips, starting in Cambridge at Raspberry Pi HQ:

Andrew Mulholland on Twitter

Been great weekend meeting fellow Creative Technologists! Big thanks to @RachelRayns, @ben_nuttall and @Raspberry_Pi!pic.twitter.com/Wz3lOyhkEO

Then in Newcastle for Makerfaire UK:

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Creative Technologists soldering their @makerfaire_uk badges #rpctpic.twitter.com/DtJ9RfE3tB

Helen Lynn on Twitter

Fantastic series of texts from @RachelRayns to the @Raspberry_Pi Creative Technologists at #makerfaireuk today #RPCTpic.twitter.com/VyNPL3Ocgk

In Sheffield with the Pimoroni crew:

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

Our Creative Technologists start their first workshop at @pimoroni: Intro to using the Camera Module with APIs #RPCTpic.twitter.com/wNK34QUg2n

In London at Hellicar & Lewis for an openFrameworks masterclass and Tim Hunkin’s Novelty Automation:

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

It’s only half ten and this is what we’ve become. @Raspberry_Pi #RPCT @connorbanonapic.twitter.com/VsZRXB9Jsp

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

Our Creative Technologists had an amazing time at Tim Hunkin’s @NovAutomation yesterday.Thanks for having us! #RPCTpic.twitter.com/08NMDyNAxO

Back in Cambridge again for Raspberry Pi’s fourth birthday party, where they ran and supported workshops and gave talks:

RPiCreativeTech 2016 on Twitter

Come and find us at the dots board table and make an airplane or rocket! Bundles of Painting Pi fun! #RPCTpic.twitter.com/2yH7d8P6oV

In Manchester at the FutureEverything festival, where they ran more workshops:

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

About to head off for the first day of @FuturEverything 😀 Ready to be INSPIRED.

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

Chatting to Ruby at Manchester Art Gallery #TheImitationGamepic.twitter.com/o4WDY9i5i5

As the creative technologists began to dig into the programme, some found that it challenged their perceptions of their own interests and strengths, and drew on this experience in making decisions to change direction, both within the programme and in their lives outside it:

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Proud of #rpct programme for what @radicxl has written! http://catchaneye.tumblr.com/post/125082608175/a-more-personal-post#125082608175 … /cc @RachelRaynspic.twitter.com/DrwKn8Fbrt

The programme culminated with the group’s New Works exhibition, where they revealed the varied and accomplished works that they have developed. They announced it at the Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Bash!

RPiCreativeTech 2016 on Twitter

It’s official: #RPCT Exhibition to be held at @Raspberry_Pi HQ on the 23rd of April! Stay tuned for a free ticket!pic.twitter.com/MKxbj0Knf2

The exhibition was hosted at the new Raspberry Pi HQ:

Joel Gethin Lewis on Twitter

Wonderfully effective capacitance based rope interaction from @OwenDaughtery @RasPiCTpic.twitter.com/zJCLvZzsgQ

Emily Jayne Bowers on Twitter

This was addictive! @connorbanona @iamrobharvey #RPCTpic.twitter.com/V3ARkIVh0s

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

Wrapping up the exhibition. It’s been an amazing day! Thanks to all for coming. #ThaliasQuest #rpctpic.twitter.com/FPakC13idC

Yasmin Curren on Twitter

My interactive video is set up at the #RPCT exhibition. Follow @WhoIsTerror to see the true identity of Terror!pic.twitter.com/YcjhZzBHsM

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

And @radicxl has made this RIDONCULOUS projection-mapped popup book. One of many pages – we’re speechless w…https://vine.co/v/iUBLlg605hg

Joel Gethin Lewis on Twitter

3D printed light clock from @miltonio94 @RasPiCTpic.twitter.com/hha0cRfviL

One of the best parts of the programme for me was seeing the creative technologists share their work and their new skills with others. They ran workshops at MozFest, FutureEverything and our Big Birthday Bash, as well as meeting with school groups.

Connor on Twitter

Day one of #mozfest was awesome! Bring on tomorrow!pic.twitter.com/job7F1Puxn

Heather Paprika on Twitter

RaspberryPi & #Scratch workshop at @WhitworthArt with @radamar @AmyMediaUK & @RasPiCT guys #Futr16 @FuturEverythingpic.twitter.com/GJoUyIRhYv

Philip Colligan on Twitter

Lovely vibe in the @Raspberry_Pi office today thanks to visits from @MaryMagsPiClub and our #creative technologistspic.twitter.com/AzcHZT173N

And, as if that weren’t enough, four of the group also completed an Arts Award Gold qualification as part of the programme!

. on Twitter

@radicxl <3pic.twitter.com/TZveypqZKx

maddy on Twitter

little message from the @Raspberry_Pi creative technologistspic.twitter.com/GvN3yPBRKX

I’m incredibly proud of our newly graduated creative technologists and I can’t wait to see what they do next. We’ve gained a great deal from the understanding the programme has given us of working with young people, introducing digital making to an audience from diverse backgrounds, and delivering online mentoring and support. It’s been a hugely valuable experience, and it’s one that will help to shape the work we do in future.

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Your Picademy questions answered

Post Syndicated from Carrie Anne Philbin original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/picademy-questions-answered/

In April 2014 we ran our first ever training event for teachers. We called it ‘Picademy‘, and we selected 24 fabulous teachers to attend and gave them a qualification and a very special badge at the end.

Our aim was to give teachers the skills and knowledge they need to get creative with computing, no matter what their level of experience.

Raspberry Pi Robot built at Picademy

Educators teach, learn and make with us at Picademy

Two years on, there are now over 700 Raspberry Pi Certified Educators around the world working with tens of thousands of young people. We know that many of our Certified Educators have gone on to become leaders in the field, helping to train other educators and build a movement around computing and digital making in the classroom.

Based on the huge volume of questions and enquiries we get from people who want to get involved in Picademy, we think we’re onto something, and we’re developing some exciting plans for the future. For now, I wanted to answer some of the most commonly asked questions about Picademy.

What is Picademy?

Picademy

Picademy offers teachers two full days of hands-on Continued Professional Development (CPD) workshops, and attendees become Raspberry Pi Certified Educators. It’s free, and our friends at Google are supporting us to offer it at their Digital Garage venues around the UK. Watch the experiences of attendees at [email protected] in Leeds, then find out more and apply at rpf.io/train.

Picademy is a two-day course that allows educators to experience what can be achieved with a little help and lots of imagination. Through a series of workshops we introduce a range of engaging ways to deliver computing in classrooms all over the world. Highlights include using physical computing to control electronic components like LEDs and buttons; coding music with Sonic Pi; and terraforming the world of Minecraft. On day two, attendees have the opportunity to apply their learning by developing their own project ideas, learning from each other and our experts.

Each cohort that attends contains a mix of primary, secondary and Post-16 educators representing many different subject areas. One of our aims is to create leaders in education who are equipped with skills to train others in their community. Attending our training is the first step in that journey.

Pasted image at 2016_03_18 02_33 PM

When are you bringing Picademy to [insert name of place here]?

This is by far the most common question. There is clearly a huge demand for the kind of professional development that Picademy offers.

So far, we’ve been mainly focused on the UK. The first wave of events were held at Pi Towers in Cambridge. Over the past year, thanks to the generous support of our friends at Google, we have been able to bring Picademy to cities across the UK, with events in Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester. In the next few months, we will be running events in Newcastle, Liverpool and London. The venues are part of the Google Digital Garage initiative, and we’ll be running Picademy sessions with them until at least April 2017, so we hope to pop up in a city near you soon!

This year, we launched a pilot programme in the USA, with our first ever Picademy training events outside the UK taking place in California in February and April before heading to Baltimore in August.

We don’t currently have plans to launch Picademy in other parts of the world. We’d love to, but we just don’t have the capacity. We are brainstorming ideas for how the Foundation can better support educators globally and as those ideas develop, we’ll be looking for your input to help shape them.

We often get asked whether we will partner with organisations in other parts of the world who want to run Picademy on our behalf. We aren’t currently considering those kind of partnerships, but it is one of the options that we will be looking at for the long-term.

I’m not a teacher, but I want to learn about Raspberry Pi. Can I attend?

Picademy is designed for teachers.  The aim is to equip them with the best possible pedagogy, strategies, tools and ideas to bring digital making into the classroom. It’s also about building a community of educators who can support each other and grow the movement.

It’s not a “How to use Raspberry Pi” course. There are lots of websites and video channels that are already doing a fantastic job in that space (see our Community page for a small selection of these).

We know that there are lots of people who aren’t formal teachers who help young people learn about computing and digital making, and we are working hard to support them. For example, we have a huge programme of training for Code Club volunteers.

For Picademy, our priority is to support the people at the chalkface, where access to professional development is problematic and where up-skilling in digital making is needed most.

The first Picademy USA Cohort! © Douglas Fairbairn Photography / Courtesy of the Computer History Museum

The first Picademy USA Cohort – our largest ever, totalling 40! © Douglas Fairbairn Photography / Courtesy of the Computer History Museum

We have accepted applications from people in other roles, like teaching assistants and librarians, who work with children every day in schools or other community settings, but the vast majority of participants have been qualified, serving teachers.

If you want to learn about Raspberry Pi, one of the best places to start is a Raspberry Jam. There are now hundreds of Jams happening regularly around the world. These are community events, run by brilliantly talented volunteers, that bring together people of all ages to learn about digital making.

Can I have access to the course materials?

All our Picademy sessions are based on resources that are available for free on our website. Some of the most common sessions are based on:

Our focus is on collaboration, making, project-based learning, and computing – similar to most Raspberry Jams, in fact. If you are super-interested in STEAM, project-based learning, and digital making (the pillars of Picademy), then I’d recommend the following reading as a starting point:

The materials and reading is part of the recipe of a successful Picademy. What’s harder to share is the energy and atmosphere that is created.

Miss Grady on Twitter

Using code we have created a funfair! All components triggered by #Python codes we have written ourselves #picademypic.twitter.com/J5spWvoQom

Our trainers all have experience of teaching in formal contexts, have good subject knowledge and a super-supportive manner. They share their expertise and passion with others which is inspiring and infectious. The educators that attend are open-minded, imaginative and curious. Together we have a lot of fun.

Who can I speak to about Picademy?

The teacher training team at the Foundation consists of three full time people: Picademy Manager James Robinson, Code Club Teacher Training Manager Lauren Hyams, and Education Team Co-ordinator Dan Fisher. Do reach out to us via the forum or social media.

We’re supported from across the Foundation and our wider community by an awesome team that helps us design and deliver the events.

Without the support of all these people, we would not be able to run the volume of events that we do – a huge thank you with bells on to all our helpers from me!

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European Maker Week

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/european-maker-week/

A large part of the Raspberry Pi community identify as makers. We all love to make things – from robots to yarn to pottery to art – and share our creations with others. European Maker Week is a celebration of this rapidly growing community, and it takes place between 30 May and 5 June in 28 countries.

European Maker Week banner: "a celebration of makers and innovators all over Europe"

EMW is an initiative promoted by European Commission and implemented by Maker Faire Rome in collaboration with Startup Europe. Over 80 events are scheduled for the week so there’s plenty to get involved with. And if you’re running a Raspberry Jam that week, you can submit it to the EMW website to be included on the map.

Map showing European Maker Week events in countries across Europe

European Maker Week events

This weekend, Maker Faire UK takes place in Newcastle. Maker Faire Rome, the largest in Europe, takes place in October, and their call for makers opens on 26 April – it’s a great opportunity to show off your latest Raspberry Pi project, or to attend and observe the great hacks on display in the city of Rome. This year a prize of €100,000 is available for the best maker project with the highest social impact.

Banners at the entrance to Maker Faire Rome: "16-18 Ottobre 2015" and "Scopri. Inventa. Crea."

20151018_132236

Maker Faire Rome

There are many ways of connecting with the wider maker community. We strongly encourage you to check out a Maker Faire if you get the chance, and if you’re near a hackspace, a maker space, a fab lab or a repair café, you’ll find people there who are happy to share skills and tools. And, of course, there are Raspberry Jams around the world for you to get involved with too, such Raspberry Jam Berlin, Pi and More in Trier, and Rhône Raspberry Jam. A jam doesn’t have to be a huge event, it can be a small gathering – why not think about setting one up? Head over to our Jam page to find out how to get started!

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Edinburgh Mini Maker Faire

Post Syndicated from Laura Clay original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/edinburgh-mini-maker-faire/

Not all the tech fun in the UK happens down near Pi Towers in Cambridge. Here in Scotland, the Mini Maker Faire has been the Edinburgh International Science Festival’s grand finale for four years now. This year’s was the biggest yet, so I headed over to see what was going on. There were plenty of projects using Raspberry Pis, loads of new maker spaces and Jams, and even a mildly terrifying giant robot stalking around the courtyard. I’m sure someone did a headcount of the children at the end, don’t worry.

rsz_wp_20160410_13_04_44_pro

The first person to spot my neon Pi T-shirt was Tony from Newcastle MakerSpace, promoting the MakerFaire coming up on 23 April and attracting over 10,000 attendees. His mini Pi-powered Pacman arcade cabinet drew a sizeable queue, and his dinky Pi Zero game controllers looked like the ultimate in portable gaming: just plug into a TV and play!

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MakLabs are also springing up across Scotland, with the largest meeting in Glasgow. Their showpiece was a Bigtrak-style toy tank with a webcam, controlled by REST and with a Pi acting as a server. While the internet was somewhat patchy in a hundred-year-old former veterinary school, it was still an impressive build.

Aberdeen boasts the 57North hacklab. It was hard to miss their amateur radio station tracker, with a PDP-8 minicomputer for added flashing light goodness. The hulking unit consisted of a Pi, two screens and the open-source XASTIR tracking software, showing the various stations.

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The newest Makerspace on the block is in Dundee, Scotland’s gaming capital, so it seemed fitting that a tiny minimalist Pi Zero platform game, using a Pimoroni pHAT, was pride of place. They’re running weekly meetups and hope to set up a Jam in the near future.

Finally, we spotted Robotical, a PhD project now seeking crowdfunding for its adorable walking robots. We watched a tense football match between two bots, controlled by Model B Pis in their back and with micro:bit remote controls to move them. (The red robot won, incidentally. My gaming reflexes aren’t what they used to be.)

rsz_wp_20160410_13_56_17_pro

It was great to see what the community up here is doing with their Pis, and I’m looking forward to the Edinburgh Raspberry Jam on the 30 April where there will no doubt be even more brilliant projects being demonstrated.

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Astro Pi: Coding Challenges Results!

Post Syndicated from David Honess original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/astro-pi-coding-challenges-results/

Astro_Pi_Logo_WEB-300px

Back in early February we announced a new opportunity for young programmers to send their code up the International Space Station to be used by British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake.

Two challenges were on offer. The first required you to write Python Sense HAT code to turn Ed and Izzy (the Astro Pi computers) into an MP3 player, so that Tim can plug in his headphones and listen to music. The second required you to code Sonic Pi music for Tim to listen to via the MP3 player.

The competition closed on March 31st and the judging took place at Pi Towers in Cambridge last week. With the assistance of Flat Tim!

The judges were selected from companies who have contributed to the Astro Pi mission so far. These were;

12omdfin_(live)-600x0

Orchestral Manoeuvres In the Dark (Andy McCluskey and Paul Humphreys)

We also wanted to have some judges to provide musical talent to balance the science and technology expertise from the aerospace people. Thanks to Carl Walker at ESA we were able to connect with synthpop giants OMD (Enola Gay, Electricity, Maid of Orleans) and British/French film composer Ilan Eshkeri (Stardust, Layer Cake, Shaun the Sheep).

ilanEshkeri_composing_Stardust

Ilan Eshkeri working on the Stardust soundtrack

We also secured Sam Aaron, the author of Sonic Pi and Overtone, a live coder who regularly performs in clubs across the UK.

sam-aaron

Sam Aaron at TEDx Newcastle

Entries were received from all over the UK and were judged across four age categories; 11 and under, 11 to 13, 14 to 16 and 17 to 18. So the outcome is that four MP3 players and four songs will be going up to the ISS for Tim to use. Note that the Sonic Pi tunes will be converted to MP3 so that the MP3 player programs can load and play the audio to Tim.

The judging took two days to complete: one full day for the MP3 players and one day for the Sonic Pi tunes. So without further ado, let’s see who the winners are!

MP3 Player Winners

11 and under

11 to 13

14 to 16

  • Winner: Joe Speers
  • School: n/a (Independent entry)
  • Teacher/Adult: Craig Speers
  • Code on Github

17 to 18

Sonic Pi Winners

11 and under

11 to 13

  • Winner: Isaac Ingram
  • School: Knox Academy
  • Teacher/Adult: Karl Ingram

14 to 16

17 to 18

Congratulations to you all. The judges had a lot of fun with your entries and they will very soon be uploaded to the International Space Station for Tim Peake. The Astro Pi Twitter account will post a tweet to indicate when Tim is listening to the music.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation would like to thank all the judges who contributed to this competition, and especially our special judges: Andy McCluskey and Paul Humphreys from OMD, Ilan Eshkeri and Sam Aaron.

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Picademy: New dates announced!

Post Syndicated from Dan Fisher original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/picademy-new-dates-announced/

Mad Fer It in Manchester

It’s been a while since we blogged on all things Picademy, so here’s a quick update…

For the uninitiated, Picademy is our free, two-day CPD event series for educators who want to use the Raspberry Pi for projects in the classroom. Over the past three months, we’ve been busy delivering four events in Manchester, creating over a hundred new Raspberry Pi Certified Educators in the process. The whole team was blown away by the passion of the people who attended. In fact, such was the rabid enthusiasm for Raspberry Pi in the area that we added two extra dates in April to cope with the demand – good job, Manchester!

A recent Picademy Manchester cohort.

A recent Picademy Manchester cohort

Picademy uses project-based learning to underpin its workshops, so that delegates can immediately see how the projects can be used in a classroom setting. This way of learning might be a little bit daunting for those who haven’t been in the classroom as a student for while, so we love it when people who might initially lack confidence using the Pi undergo a transformation and embrace the role reversal of teacher becoming student.

A willingness to embrace new ideas, being open to failure, and allowing yourself to make mistakes on the road to success are important messages to take away and think about from each event. One recent Picademy Manchester graduate has written a great blog post reflecting on her experiences at Picademy, and another praised the support she received:

“Thank you so much for a brilliant two days in Manchester. It’s one of the most supportive and inspiring events I have ever attended.”
Carol Macintosh, Picademy delegate

The Pi on the Tyne is all mine

With Picademy Manchester finishing in April, we can announce that our next location will be in Newcastle at Newcastle City Library, where we will be holding events in the spring and early summer.

To find out more and make an application, visit our Picademy Newcastle page.

Our condensed version of the Newcastle skyline

Our condensed version of the Newcastle skyline in all its glory

Code Club Teacher Training

If you want something more compact to fit into your busy schedule, Code Club Teacher Training will also be running in Newcastle alongside Picademy events. The training is only two hours long and provides teachers with practical activities and engaging resources to develop young people’s understanding. The sessions are delivered in school, as INSET or twilight sessions, and are mapped against the new computing curriculum. We offer three modules: Computational Thinking, Programming, and Internet and the Web.

Request a Teacher Training session in your school: www.codeclubpro.org/request_training

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