Tag Archives: Orange

The devil wears Pravda

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original https://blog.erratasec.com/2018/05/the-devil-wears-pravda.html

Classic Bond villain, Elon Musk, has a new plan to create a website dedicated to measuring the credibility and adherence to “core truth” of journalists. He is, without any sense of irony, going to call this “Pravda”. This is not simply wrong but evil.

Musk has a point. Journalists do suck, and many suck consistently. I see this in my own industry, cybersecurity, and I frequently criticize them for their suckage.

But what he’s doing here is not correcting them when they make mistakes (or what Musk sees as mistakes), but questioning their legitimacy. This legitimacy isn’t measured by whether they follow established journalism ethics, but whether their “core truths” agree with Musk’s “core truths”.

An example of the problem is how the press fixates on Tesla car crashes due to its “autopilot” feature. Pretty much every autopilot crash makes national headlines, while the press ignores the other 40,000 car crashes that happen in the United States each year. Musk spies on Tesla drivers (hello, classic Bond villain everyone) so he can see the dip in autopilot usage every time such a news story breaks. He’s got good reason to be concerned about this.

He argues that autopilot is safer than humans driving, and he’s got the statistics and government studies to back this up. Therefore, the press’s fixation on Tesla crashes is illegitimate “fake news”, titillating the audience with distorted truth.

But here’s the thing: that’s still only Musk’s version of the truth. Yes, on a mile-per-mile basis, autopilot is safer, but there’s nuance here. Autopilot is used primarily on freeways, which already have a low mile-per-mile accident rate. People choose autopilot only when conditions are incredibly safe and drivers are unlikely to have an accident anyway. Musk is therefore being intentionally deceptive comparing apples to oranges. Autopilot may still be safer, it’s just that the numbers Musk uses don’t demonstrate this.

And then there is the truth calling it “autopilot” to begin with, because it isn’t. The public is overrating the capabilities of the feature. It’s little different than “lane keeping” and “adaptive cruise control” you can now find in other cars. In many ways, the technology is behind — my Tesla doesn’t beep at me when a pedestrian walks behind my car while backing up, but virtually every new car on the market does.

Yes, the press unduly covers Tesla autopilot crashes, but Musk has only himself to blame by unduly exaggerating his car’s capabilities by calling it “autopilot”.

What’s “core truth” is thus rather difficult to obtain. What the press satisfies itself with instead is smaller truths, what they can document. The facts are in such cases that the accident happened, and they try to get Tesla or Musk to comment on it.

What you can criticize a journalist for is therefore not “core truth” but whether they did journalism correctly. When such stories criticize “autopilot”, but don’t do their diligence in getting Tesla’s side of the story, then that’s a violation of journalistic practice. When I criticize journalists for their poor handling of stories in my industry, I try to focus on which journalistic principles they get wrong. For example, the NYTimes reporters do a lot of stories quoting anonymous government sources in clear violation of journalistic principles.

If “credibility” is the concern, then it’s the classic Bond villain here that’s the problem: Musk himself. His track record on business statements is abysmal. For example, when he announced the Model 3 he claimed production targets that every Wall Street analyst claimed were absurd. He didn’t make those targets, he didn’t come close. Model 3 production is still lagging behind Musk’s twice adjusted targets.

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2018-tesla-tracker/

So who has a credibility gap here, the press, or Musk himself?

Not only is Musk’s credibility problem ironic, so is the name he chose, “Pravada”, the Russian word for truth that was the name of the Soviet Union Communist Party’s official newspaper. This is so absurd this has to be a joke, yet Musk claims to be serious about all this.

Yes, the press has a lot of problems, and if Musk were some journalism professor concerned about journalists meeting the objective standards of their industry (e.g. abusing anonymous sources), then this would be a fine thing. But it’s not. It’s Musk who is upset the press’s version of “core truth” does not agree with his version — a version that he’s proven time and time again differs from “real truth”.

Just in case Musk is serious, I’ve already registered “www.antipravda.com” to start measuring the credibility of statements by billionaire playboy CEOs. Let’s see who blinks first.


I stole the title, with permission, from this tweet:

Police Arrest Suspected Member of TheDarkOverlord Hacking Group

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/police-arrest-suspected-member-of-the-dark-overlord-hacking-group-180517/

In April 2017, the first episode of the brand new season of Netflix’s Orange is the New Black was uploaded to The Pirate Bay, months ahead of its official release date.

The leak was the work of a hacking entity calling itself TheDarkOverlord (TDO). One of its members had contacted TorrentFreak months earlier claiming that the content was in its hands but until the public upload, nothing could be confirmed.

TDO told us it had obtained the episodes after hacking the systems of Hollywood-based Larson Studios, an ADR (additional dialogue recorded) studio, back in 2016. TDO had attempted to blackmail the company into paying a bitcoin ransom but when it wasn’t forthcoming, TDO pressed the nuclear button.

Netflix responded by issuing a wave of takedown notices but soon TDO moved onto a new target. In June 2017, TDO followed up on an earlier threat to leak content owned by ABC.

But while TDO was perhaps best known for its video-leaking exploits, the group’s core ‘business’ was hacking what many perceived to be softer targets. TDO ruthlessly slurped confidential data from weakly protected computer systems at medical facilities, private practices, and businesses large and small.

In each case, the group demanded ransoms in exchange for silence and leaked sensitive data to the public if none were paid. With dozens of known targets, TDO found itself at the center of an international investigation, led by the FBI. That now appears to have borne some fruit, with the arrest of an individual in Serbia.

Serbian police say that members of its Ministry of Internal Affairs, Criminal Police Directorate (UCC), in coordination with the Special Prosecution for High-Tech Crime, have taken action against a suspected member of TheDarkOverlord group.

Police say they tracked down a Belgrade resident, who was arrested and taken into custody. Identified only by the initials “S.S”, police say the individual was born in 1980 but have released no further personal details. A search of his apartment and other locations led to the seizure of items of digital equipment.

“According to the order of the Special Prosecutor’s Office for High-Tech Crime, criminal charges will be brought against him because of the suspicion that he committed the criminal offense of unauthorized access to a protected computer, computer networks and electronic processing, and the criminal offense of extortion,” a police statement reads.

In earlier correspondence with TF, the TDO member always gave the impression of working as part of a team but we only had a single contact point which appeared to be the same person. However, Serbian authorities say the larger investigation is aimed at uncovering “a large number of people” who operate under the banner of “TheDarkOverlord”.

Since June 2016, the group is said to have targeted at least 50 victims while demanding bitcoin ransoms to avoid disclosure of their content. Serbian authorities say that on the basis of available data, TDO received payments of more than $275,000.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Announcing Coolest Projects North America

Post Syndicated from Courtney Lentz original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/coolest-projects-north-america/

The Raspberry Pi Foundation loves to celebrate people who use technology to solve problems and express themselves creatively, so we’re proud to expand the incredibly successful event Coolest Projects to North America. This free event will be held on Sunday 23 September 2018 at the Discovery Cube Orange County in Santa Ana, California.

Coolest Projects North America logo Raspberry Pi CoderDojo

What is Coolest Projects?

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that empowers and inspires the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs. The event is both a competition and an exhibition to give young digital makers aged 7 to 17 a platform to celebrate their successes, creativity, and ingenuity.

showcase crowd — Coolest Projects North America

In 2012, Coolest Projects was conceived as an opportunity for CoderDojo Ninjas to showcase their work and for supporters to acknowledge these achievements. Week after week, Ninjas would meet up to work diligently on their projects, hacks, and code; however, it can be difficult for them to see their long-term progress on a project when they’re concentrating on its details on a weekly basis. Coolest Projects became a dedicated time each year for Ninjas and supporters to reflect, celebrate, and share both the achievements and challenges of the maker’s journey.

three female coolest projects attendees — Coolest Projects North America

Coolest Projects North America

Not only is Coolest Projects expanding to North America, it’s also expanding its participant pool! Members of our team have met so many amazing young people creating in all areas of the world, that it simply made sense to widen our outreach to include Code Clubs, students of Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, and members of the Raspberry Jam community at large as well as CoderDojo attendees.

 a boy showing a technology project to an old man, with a girl playing on a laptop on the floor — Coolest Projects North America

Exhibit and attend Coolest Projects

Coolest Projects is a free, family- and educator-friendly event. Young people can apply to exhibit their projects, and the general public can register to attend this one-day event. Be sure to register today, because you make Coolest Projects what it is: the coolest.

The post Announcing Coolest Projects North America appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Conundrum

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/blog/2018/03/20/conundrum/

Here’s a problem I’m having. Or, rather, a problem I’m solving, but so slowly that I wonder if I’m going about it very inefficiently.

I intended to just make a huge image out of this and tweet it, but it takes so much text to explain that I might as well put it on my internet website.

The setup

I want to do pathfinding through a Doom map. The ultimate goal is to be able to automatically determine the path the player needs to take to reach the exit — what switches to hit in what order, what keys to get, etc.

Doom maps are 2D planes cut into arbitrary shapes. Everything outside a shape is the void, which we don’t care about. Here are some shapes.

The shapes are defined implicitly by their edges. All of the edges touching the red area, for example, say that they’re red on one side.

That’s very nice, because it means I don’t have to do any geometry to detect which areas touch each other. I can tell at a glance that the red and blue areas touch, because the line between them says it’s red on one side and blue on the other.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t seem to be all that useful. The player can’t necessarily move from the red area to the blue area, because there’s a skinny bottleneck. If the yellow area were a raised platform, the player couldn’t fit through the gap. Worse, if there’s a switch somewhere that lowers that platform, then the gap is conditionally passable.

I thought this would be uncommon enough that I could get started only looking at neighbors and do actual geometry later, but that “conditionally passable” pattern shows up all the time in the form of locked “bars” that let you peek between or around them. So I might as well just do the dang geometry.


The player is a 32×32 square and always axis-aligned (i.e., the hitbox doesn’t actually rotate). That’s very convenient, because it means I can “dilate the world” — expand all the walls by 16 units in both directions, while shrinking the player to a single point. That expansion eliminates narrow gaps and leaves a map of everywhere the player’s center is allowed to be. Allegedly this is how Quake did collision detection — but in 3D! How hard can it be in 2D?

The plan, then, is to do this:

This creates a bit of an unholy mess. (I could avoid some of the overlap by being clever at points where exactly two lines touch, but I have to deal with a ton of overlap anyway so I’m not sure if that buys anything.)

The gray outlines are dilations of inner walls, where both sides touch a shape. The black outlines are dilations of outer walls, touching the void on one side. This map tells me that the player’s center can never go within 16 units of an outer wall, which checks out — their hitbox would get in the way! So I can delete all that stuff completely.

Consider that bottom-left outline, where red and yellow touch horizontally. If the player is in the red area, they can only enter that outlined part if they’re also allowed to be in the yellow area. Once they’re inside it, though, they can move around freely. I’ll color that piece orange, and similarly blend colors for the other outlines. (A small sliver at the top requires access to all three areas, so I colored it gray, because I can’t be bothered to figure out how to do a stripe pattern in Inkscape.)

This is the final map, and it’s easy to traverse because it works like a graph! Each contiguous region is a node, and each border is an edge. Some of the edges are one-way (falling off a ledge) or conditional (walking through a door), but the player can move freely within a region, so I don’t need to care about world geometry any more.

The problem

I’m having a hell of a time doing this mass-intersection of a big pile of shapes.

I’m writing this in Rust, and I would very very very strongly prefer not to wrap a C library (or, god forbid, a C++ library), because that will considerably complicate actually releasing this dang software. Unfortunately, that also limits my options rather a lot.

I was referred to a paper (A simple algorithm for Boolean operations on polygons, Martínez et al, 2013) that describes doing a Boolean operation (union, intersection, difference, xor) on two shapes, and works even with self-intersections and holes and whatnot.

I spent an inordinate amount of time porting its reference implementation from very bad C++ to moderately bad Rust, and I extended it to work with an arbitrary number of polygons and to spit out all resulting shapes. It has been a very bumpy ride, and I keep hitting walls — the latest is that it panics when intersecting everything results in two distinct but exactly coincident edges, which obviously happens a lot with this approach.

So the question is: is there some better way to do this that I’m overlooking, or should I just keep fiddling with this algorithm and hope I come out the other side with something that works?


Bear in mind, the input shapes are not necessarily convex, and quite frequently aren’t. Also, they can have holes, and quite frequently do. That rules out most common algorithms. It’s probably possible to triangulate everything, but I’m a little wary of cutting the map into even more microscopic shards; feel free to convince me otherwise.

Also, the map format technically allows absolutely any arbitrary combination of lines, so all of these are possible:

It would be nice to handle these gracefully somehow, or at least not crash on them. But they’re usually total nonsense as far as the game is concerned. But also that middle one does show up in the original stock maps a couple times.

Another common trick is that lines might be part of the same shape on both sides:

The left example suggests that such a line is redundant and can simply be ignored without changing anything. The right example shows why this is a problem.

A common trick in vanilla Doom is the so-called self-referencing sector. Here, the edges of the inner yellow square all claim to be yellow — on both sides. The outer edges all claim to be blue only on the inside, as normal. The yellow square therefore doesn’t neighbor the blue square at all, because no edges that are yellow on one side and blue on the other. The effect in-game is that the yellow area is invisible, but still solid, so it can be used as an invisible bridge or invisible pit for various effects.

This does raise the question of exactly how Doom itself handles all these edge cases. Vanilla maps are preprocessed by a node builder and split into subsectors, which are all convex polygons. So for any given weird trick or broken geometry, the answer to “how does this behave” is: however the node builder deals with it.

Subsectors are built right into vanilla maps, so I could use those. The drawback is that they’re optional for maps targeting ZDoom (and maybe other ports as well?), because ZDoom has its own internal node builder. Also, relying on built nodes in general would make this code less useful for map editing, or generating, or whatever.

ZDoom’s node builder is open source, so I could bake it in? Or port it to Rust? (It’s only, ah, ten times bigger than the shape algorithm I ported.) It’d be interesting to have a fairly-correct reflection of how the game sees broken geometry, which is something no map editor really tries to do. Is it fast enough? Running it on the largest map I know to exist (MAP14 of Sunder) takes 1.4 seconds, which seems like a long time, but also that’s from scratch, and maybe it could be adapted to work incrementally…? Christ.

I’m not sure I have the time to dedicate to flesh this out beyond a proof of concept anyway, so maybe this is all moot. But all the more reason to avoid spending a lot of time on dead ends.

Getting Ready for the AWS Quest Finale on Twitch

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/getting-ready-for-the-aws-quest-finale-on-twitch/

Whew! March has been one crazy month for me and it is only half over. After a week with my wife in the Caribbean, we hopped on a non-stop Seattle to Tokyo flight so that I could speak at JAWS Days, Startup Day, and some internal events. We arrived home last Wednesday and I am now sufficiently clear-headed and recovered from jet lag to do anything more intellectually demanding than respond to emails. The AWS Blogging Team and the great folks at Lone Shark Games have been working on AWS Quest for quite some time and it has been great to see all of the progress made toward solving the puzzles in order to find the orangeprints that I will use to rebuild Ozz.

The community effort has been impressive! There’s a shared spreadsheet with tabs for puzzles and clues, a busy Slack channel, and a leaderboard, all organized and built by a team that spans the globe.

I’ve been checking out the orangeprints as they are uncovered and have been doing a bit of planning and preparation to make sure that I am ready for the live-streamed rebuild on Twitch later this month. Yesterday I labeled a bunch of containers, one per puzzle, and stocked each one with the parts that I will use to rebuild the corresponding component of Ozz. Fortunately, I have at least (my last count may have skipped a few) 119,807 bricks and other parts at hand so this was easy. Here’s what I have set up so far:

The Twitch session will take place on Tuesday, March 27 at Noon PT. In the meantime, you should check out the #awsquest tweets and see what you can do to help me to rebuild Ozz.

Jeff;

Join the AWS Quest – Help me to Rebuild Ozz!

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/join-the-aws-quest-help-me-to-rebuild-ozz/

If you have been watching my weekly videos, you may have noticed an orange robot in the background from time to time. That’s Ozz, my robot friend and helper. Built from the ground up in my home laboratory, Ozz is an invaluable part of the AWS blogging process!

Sadly, when we announced we are adding the AWS Podcast to the blog, Ozz literally went to pieces and all I have left is a large pile of bricks and some great memories of our time together. From what I can tell, Ozz went haywire over this new development due to excessive enthusiasm!

Ozz, perhaps anticipating that this could happen at some point, buried a set of clues (each pointing to carefully protected plans) in this blog, in the AWS Podcast, and in other parts of the AWS site. If we can find and decode these plans, we can rebuild Ozz, better, stronger, and faster. Unfortunately, due to concerns about the ultra-competitive robot friend market, Ozz concealed each of the plans inside a set of devious, brain-twisting puzzles. You are going to need to look high, low, inside, outside, around, and through the clues in order to figure this one out. You may even need to phone a friend or two.

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to find these clues, decode the plans, and help me to rebuild Ozz. The information that I have is a bit fuzzy, but I think there are 20 or so puzzles, each one describing one part of Ozz. If we can solve them all, we’ll get together on Twitch later this month and put Ozz back together.

Are you with me on this? Let’s do it!

Jeff;