Tag Archives: organizational units

Use CloudFormation StackSets to Provision Resources Across Multiple AWS Accounts and Regions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/use-cloudformation-stacksets-to-provision-resources-across-multiple-aws-accounts-and-regions/

AWS CloudFormation helps AWS customers implement an Infrastructure as Code model. Instead of setting up their environments and applications by hand, they build a template and use it to create all of the necessary resources, collectively known as a CloudFormation stack. This model removes opportunities for manual error, increases efficiency, and ensures consistent configurations over time.

Today I would like to tell you about a new feature that makes CloudFormation even more useful. This feature is designed to help you to address the challenges that you face when you use Infrastructure as Code in situations that include multiple AWS accounts and/or AWS Regions. As a quick review:

Accounts – As I have told you in the past, many organizations use a multitude of AWS accounts, often using AWS Organizations to arrange the accounts into a hierarchy and to group them into Organizational Units, or OUs (read AWS Organizations – Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts to learn more). Our customers use multiple accounts for business units, applications, and developers. They often create separate accounts for development, testing, staging, and production on a per-application basis.

Regions – Customers also make great use of the large (and ever-growing) set of AWS Regions. They build global applications that span two or more regions, implement sophisticated multi-region disaster recovery models, replicate S3, Aurora, PostgreSQL, and MySQL data in real time, and choose locations for storage and processing of sensitive data in accord with national and regional regulations.

This expansion into multiple accounts and regions comes with some new challenges with respect to governance and consistency. Our customers tell us that they want to make sure that each new account is set up in accord with their internal standards. Among other things, they want to set up IAM users and roles, VPCs and VPC subnets, security groups, Config Rules, logging, and AWS Lambda functions in a consistent and reliable way.

Introducing StackSet
In order to address these important customer needs, we are launching CloudFormation StackSet today. You can now define an AWS resource configuration in a CloudFormation template and then roll it out across multiple AWS accounts and/or Regions with a couple of clicks. You can use this to set up a baseline level of AWS functionality that addresses the cross-account and cross-region scenarios that I listed above. Once you have set this up, you can easily expand coverage to additional accounts and regions.

This feature always works on a cross-account basis. The master account owns one or more StackSets and controls deployment to one or more target accounts. The master account must include an assumable IAM role and the target accounts must delegate trust to this role. To learn how to do this, read Prerequisites in the StackSet Documentation.

Each StackSet references a CloudFormation template and contains lists of accounts and regions. All operations apply to the cross-product of the accounts and regions in the StackSet. If the StackSet references three accounts (A1, A2, and A3) and four regions (R1, R2, R3, and R4), there are twelve targets:

  • Region R1: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R2: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R3: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R4: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.

Deploying a template initiates creation of a CloudFormation stack in an account/region pair. Templates are deployed sequentially to regions (you control the order) to multiple accounts within the region (you control the amount of parallelism). You can also set an error threshold that will terminate deployments if stack creation fails.

You can use your existing CloudFormation templates (taking care to make sure that they are ready to work across accounts and regions), create new ones, or use one of our sample templates. We are launching with support for the AWS partition (all public regions except those in China), and expect to expand it to to the others before too long.

Using StackSets
You can create and deploy StackSets from the CloudFormation Console, via the CloudFormation APIs, or from the command line.

Using the Console, I start by clicking on Create StackSet. I can use my own template or one of the samples. I’ll use the last sample (Add config rule encrypted volumes):

I click on View template to learn more about the template and the rule:

I give my StackSet a name. The template that I selected accepts an optional parameter, and I can enter it at this time:

Next, I choose the accounts and regions. I can enter account numbers directly, reference an AWS organizational unit, or upload a list of account numbers:

I can set up the regions and control the deployment order:

I can also set the deployment options. Once I am done I click on Next to proceed:

I can add tags to my StackSet. They will be applied to the AWS resources created during the deployment:

The deployment begins, and I can track the status from the Console:

I can open up the Stacks section to see each stack. Initially, the status of each stack is OUTDATED, indicating that the template has yet to be deployed to the stack; this will change to CURRENT after a successful deployment. If a stack cannot be deleted, the status will change to INOPERABLE.

After my initial deployment, I can click on Manage StackSet to add additional accounts, regions, or both, to create additional stacks:

Now Available
This new feature is available now and you can start using it today at no extra charge (you pay only for the AWS resources created on your behalf).

Jeff;

PS – If you create some useful templates and would like to share them with other AWS users, please send a pull request to our AWS Labs GitHub repo.

The New AWS Organizations User Interface Makes Managing Your AWS Accounts Easier

Post Syndicated from Anders Samuelsson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-new-aws-organizations-user-interface-makes-managing-your-aws-accounts-easier/

With AWS Organizations—launched on February 27, 2017—you can easily organize accounts centrally and set organizational policies across a set of accounts. Starting today, the Organizations console includes a tree view that allows you to manage accounts and organizational units (OUs) easily. The new view also makes it simple to attach service control policies (SCPs) to individual accounts or a group of accounts in an OU. In this post, I demonstrate some of the benefits of the new user interface.

The new tree view

The following screenshot shows an example of how an organization is displayed in the tree view on the Organize accounts tab. I have chosen the Frontend OU, and it shows that two OUs—Application 1 and Application 2—are child OUs of the Frontend OU. In the tree view, I can choose any OU and immediately view and take action on the contents of that OU. This new view makes it easier to quickly view OUs and navigate the relationships between OUs in your organization.

Screenshot of the new tree view

If you would prefer not to use the tree view, you can hide it by choosing the Tree view toggle in the upper left corner of the main pane. The following screenshot shows the console with the tree view turned off.

Screenshot of the console with the tree view hidden

You can toggle between the old view and the new tree view at any time. For the rest of this post, though, I will show the tree view.

Additional Organizations console improvements

In addition, we made a few other console improvements. First, we added more detail to the right pane when you choose an account or an OU. In the following screenshot, I have chosen the Application 1 OU in the main pane of the console and then the new Accounts heading in the right pane. As a result, I now can view the accounts that are in the OU without having to navigate into the OU. I can also remove an account from the OU by choosing Remove next to the account I want to remove.

Screenshot showing the accounts in the OU

Secondly, we have made it easier for you to attach SCPs to entities such as individual accounts and OUs. For example, to attach to the Application 1 OU an SCP that blocks access to Amazon Redshift, I choose Service Control Policies in the right pane. I now see a list of SCPs from which I can choose, as shown in the following screenshot.

Screenshot showing SCPs that are attached and available

The Blacklist Redshift policy is an SCP I created previously, and by choosing Attach, I attach it to the Application 1 OU.

The third console enhancement is in the Accounts tab. The right pane displays additional information when you choose an account. In the following screenshot, I choose the Accounts tab and then the DB backend account. In the right pane, I now see a new option: Organizational units.

Screenshot showing the new "Organizational units" choice in the right pane

When I choose Organizational units in the right pane, I see the OUs of which the chosen account is a member—in this case, Application 1. If the account should not be in that OU, I can remove it by choosing Remove next to the OU name, as shown in the following screenshot.

Screenshot showing the OUs of which the account is a member

We have also made it possible to attach SCPs to accounts in this view. When I choose Service Control Policies in the right pane, I see a list of all SCPs in my organization. The list is organized such that all the policies that are directly attached to the account are at the top of the list. You can detach any of these policies by choosing Detach next to the policy.

At the bottom of the list, I see the SCPs that I can attach to accounts. To do this, I choose Attach next to a policy. In the following screenshot, the Blacklist Redshift SCP can be attached directly to the account. However, when I look at the policies that are indirectly attached to the account via OUs, I see that the Blacklist Redshift SCP is already attached via the Application 1 OU. This means it is not necessary for me to attach this SCP directly to the DB backend account.

Screenshot showing that the Blacklist Redshift SCP is already attached via the Application 1 OU

Summary

The new Organizations user interface makes it easier for you to manage your accounts and OUs as well as attach SCPs to accounts. To get started, sign in to the Organizations console.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the Organizations forum.

– Anders