Tag Archives: Orlando

Join AWS Security on October 4 for a Night of Trivia at Grace Hopper Celebration 2017

Post Syndicated from Sara Duffer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/join-aws-security-for-a-night-of-trivia-at-grace-hopper-2017/

AWS Security Jam image

If you’re attending this year’s Grace Hopper Celebration in Orlando, AWS is inviting all attendees to join us for a free evening of learning and networking. This AWS Security Jam will feature an opportunity to learn more about the AWS Security team (and about AWS security), socialize with peers, and engage in a night of trivia with your fellow conference friends. We will provide light appetizers and drinks. RSVP today.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 4, 2017
  • Time: 5:30–8:00 P.M. Eastern Time
  • Location: Rosen Centre Hotel Executive Ballroom, 9840 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819 (next to the Orange County Convention Center)

The first 150 attendees will win a door prize, and we will give additional prizes as part of a raffle at the end of the event. Follow us on Twitter @AWSSecurityInfo for more information and updates about all things AWS Security and Compliance.

– Sara

Month in Review: February 2017

Post Syndicated from Derek Young original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/month-in-review-february-2017/

Another month of big data solutions on the Big Data Blog!

Take a look at our summaries below and learn, comment, and share. Thank you for reading!

NEW POSTS

Implement Serverless Log Analytics Using Amazon Kinesis Analytics
In this post, learn how how to implement a solution that analyzes streaming Apache access log data from an EC2 instance aggregated over 5 minutes.

Migrate External Table Definitions from a Hive Metastore to Amazon Athena
For customers who use Hive external tables on Amazon EMR, or any flavor of Hadoop, a key challenge is how to effectively migrate an existing Hive metastore to Amazon Athena, an interactive query service that directly analyzes data stored in Amazon S3. In this post, learn an approach to migrate an existing Hive metastore to Athena, as well as how to use the Athena JDBC driver to run scripts.

AWS Big Data is Coming to HIMSS!
This year’s HIMSS conference was held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida from February 20 – 23. This blog post lists past AWS Big Data Blog posts to show how AWS technologies are being used to improve healthcare.

Create Tables in Amazon Athena from Nested JSON and Mappings Using JSONSerDe
In this post, you will use the tightly coupled integration of Amazon Kinesis Firehose for log delivery, Amazon S3 for log storage, and Amazon Athena with JSONSerDe to run SQL queries against these logs without the need for data transformation or insertion into a database.

Scheduled Refresh for SPICE Data Sets on Amazon QuickSight
QuickSight uses SPICE (Super-fast, Parallel, In-Memory Calculation Engine), a fully managed data store that enables blazing fast visualizations and can ingest data from AWS, on-premises, and cloud sources. Data in SPICE could be refreshed at any time with the click of a button within QuickSight. This post announced the ability to schedule these refreshes!

Harmonize, Search, and Analyze Loosely Coupled Datasets on AWS
You have come up with an exciting hypothesis, and now you are keen to find and analyze as much data as possible to prove (or refute) it. There are many datasets that might be applicable, but they have been created at different times by different people and don’t conform to any common standard. In this blog post, we will describe a sample application that illustrates how to solve these problems. You can install our sample app, which will harmonize and index three disparate datasets to make them searchable, present a data-driven, customizable UI for searching the datasets to do preliminary analysis and to locate relevant datasets, and integrate with Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight for custom analysis and visualization.

FROM THE ARCHIVE

Building Event-Driven Batch Analytics on AWS
Modern businesses typically collect data from internal and external sources at various frequencies throughout the day. In this post, you learn an elastic and modular approach for how to collect, process, and analyze data for event-driven applications in AWS.


Want to learn more about Big Data or Streaming Data? Check out our Big Data and Streaming data educational pages.

Leave a comment below to let us know what big data topics you’d like to see next on the AWS Big Data Blog.

AWS Big Data is Coming to HIMSS!

Post Syndicated from Christopher Crosbie original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/aws-big-data-is-coming-to-himss/

The AWS Big Data team is coming to HIMSS, the industry-leading conference for professionals in the field of healthcare technology. The conference brings together more than 40,000 health IT professionals, clinicians, administrators, and vendors to talk about the latest innovations in health technology. Because transitioning healthcare to the cloud is at the forefront of this year’s conversations, for the first time, HIMSS is hosting a conference pre-day on February 19 that is focused on the use of cloud in healthcare.

explore_aws_healthcare

This year’s conference will be held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida from February 20 – 23. You can visit us at booth 6969 to learn about how AWS healthcare customers like Cambia and Cleveland Clinic are leveraging cloud-based analytics to support healthcare’s digital transformation. The booth will be staffed by AWS certified solution architects who can answer questions about transitioning existing health applications into the cloud or creating new big data solutions to meet the evolving needs of healthcare.

If you’re interested in understanding how your health data skills fit in at AWS, there will be recruiters and hiring manages onsite to discuss AWS career opportunities. Just send e-mail to [email protected] to set up an informal chat.

Thousands of healthcare customers are using AWS to change the way they deliver care, engage with patients, or incorporate new technology into their organization by using HIPAA-eligible big data services such as:

  • Amazon EMR, a managed Hadoop framework.
  • Amazon DynamoDB, a fast and flexible NoSQL database service.
  • Amazon Aurora [MySQL-compatible edition only], a relational database engine that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases.
  • Amazon Redshift, a fast, simple, cost-effective data warehouse.
  • Amazon S3, a durable, massively scalable object store.

Check out some past AWS Big Data Blog posts to see how these technologies are being used to improve healthcare:

For more information about how healthcare customers are using AWS, visit aws.amazon.com/health.

Beyond the bookcase

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/beyond-the-bookcase/

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha'Eri)

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha’Eri)

Before I became a part of the maker movement, my impression of a library was mostly formed by my childhood experiences there. Both my school and local public library were places for books, magazines, newspapers, and research. In short, it was a place for quiet reading. Libraries today look and sound a lot different than I remember. Many now include makerspaces, tools for connected learning, and spaces for community gathering.

But if you take a closer look at what these institutions set out to accomplish in the first place, then the reason they’ve transformed becomes clear. Take, for instance, the mission of the Seattle Public Library, which is to “[bring] people, information, and ideas together to enrich lives and build community.” The mission of the library isn’t directly related to reading, even though reading can be a big part of achieving that mission.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to visit the central branch of the Seattle Public Library. The fifth floor is called ‘The Mixing Chamber’ and is a designated location where people, information, and ideas can come together. Of course, there’s plenty of material to read at the main branch of the Seattle Public Library, but this building in particular makes it very clear that they’re about more than just reading.

As another indication of this, we see a lot of interest in Raspberry Pi from librarians. A group of us recently visited the annual conference of the American Library Association in Orlando, and the reaction to our presence there was incredibly positive. Not only have many librarians heard of Raspberry Pi, but they also use it in so many ways.

Of course, library makerspaces use Raspberry Pi just like any other makerspace would: as a platform for DIY projects. There are even many libraries that create Raspberry Pi checkout kits so that their patrons can experiment with Raspberry Pi in their own time, either in the library or at home.

And just as Raspberry Pi is used in the classroom to learn about computing, it’s also being used in the library for the very same reason. We’ve had many librarians come to our Picademy educator professional development programme to learn about teaching people with digital making and computing. These librarians have gone on to share their knowledge and our learning resources with their patrons. Librarians especially love that our content, including The MagPi, is available online entirely for free, and is Creative Commons licensed.

Multitasking

What I particularly like about the librarians I’ve encountered is that they don’t just put Raspberry Pi in the hands of their patrons, but they use our computers as a tool for their own work. For instance, I recently met Richard Loomis from the Somerset County Library System in New Jersey. He uses Raspberry Pis for networked digital signage across a few different branches. And John Jakobsen from the Palos Verdes Library District recently shared how he set up Raspberry Pis as terminals for their public access catalogue, replacing old and expensive computers. So librarians don’t just talk the talk: they also walk the walk.

I’m optimistic that libraries will continue to thrive as technology changes. At the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we’re delighted to see that libraries all over the world use our computers for digital making, education, and utility. Our organisation’s connection with libraries will always be rich and meaningful, not only because of the way they use Raspberry Pi, but because we have something critical in common with them: we deeply value accessibility and community.

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