Tag Archives: Pi 3

Game Boy Zero

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/game-boy-zero/

We see a lot of Pi Zero retro gaming mods, but I think this one might just take the biscuit.

Gameboy-Zero_3

This rather beautiful mod from Wermy (leave your real name in the comments if you’d like us to use it, Wermy!) has a few details that really make it stand out. Pi Zero in a controller or hand-held device isn’t new: we’ve seen it before. But this one’s got a couple of special features. First up, there’s this glorious cartridge hack:

Gameboy-Zero_2

What you’re seeing here is a customised Game Boy cartridge which has been re-soldered and gently Dremeled to house a micro SD adapter, which will accept any micro SD you pop in there, and enable the Pi Zero inside the Game Boy itself to read from it. (Wurmy’s running Emulation Station on the Game Boy Zero.)

People with sharp eyes will have noticed that the Game Boy Zero has one big cosmetic difference (aside from that display) from the original Game Boy. It has two extra buttons, so you can play SNES, NES, and later Game Boy model games on there. There are also a couple of shoulder triggers. (The buttons Wurmy has used are from a SNES, and he says they’re very similar in look and feel to what you’ll find on the original Game Boy.)

The screen’s a little composite display from Adafruit, which was a little larger than the original display, and required some careful removing of struts inside the case. Wurmy’s added three buttons inside the case to control brightness, colour and contrast, along with a USB Bluetooth adaptor – it’s a tight fit to get everything inside the case, but he’s done a stand-up job.

final layout

Here it is in action.

Game Boy Zero with custom SD card reader game cartridge

UPDATE: I set up a blog where I’ll be posting how-to guides for this project. You can also enter there for a chance to win the one I’ll be building! http://www.sudomod.com I made a RetroPie handheld using a Raspberry Pi Zero and an original DMG-01 Game Boy.

Wurmy’s documenting the build here (and running a giveaway so you can win one of these gorgeous little things): head over to read more!

Oh – and to preempt Pi Zero stock woe in the comments, we’ve got some news from Eben:

Raspberry Pi Zero production is restarting in Wales next Monday after a hiatus to allow us to focus on Raspberry Pi 3 (a million units built and counting :D). We have placed 250ku of new orders, and are aiming to produce at least 50ku/month for the rest of this year. Distribution will continue to be via Pimoroni, Pi Hut, Adafruit and Micro Center for now.

To thank you for your patience, we’ve taken advantage of the hiatus to add a (much requested) new feature. I’ll leave you all to guess what it is (it’s not WiFi).

We expect the new Raspberry Pi Zero units (with the new feature) to be available in two to three weeks’ time. They’ll be stocked exclusively in the usual Pi Zero stores: The Pi Hut, Adafruit, Pimoroni and Micro Center.

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No, Internet should be capitalized

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2016/04/no-internet-should-be-capitalized.html

The AP Stylebook and others are now declaring that “Internet” should no longer be capitalized, that you should just say “internet” instead. This is wrong, because the Internet is just an internet.Internet is short for internetwork. This was a term developed in the 1970s to describe interconnecting networks together.There were many internetworks back then. Each major computer manufacturer had its own, incompatible internetworking “protocol”. IBM with it’s SNA, DEC with it’s DECnet, Xerox with XNS, and later Apple with its AppleTalk.Since it would be nice to interconnect all computers, and not be locked into a single manufacturer, many efforts were taken to standardize internetworking protocols, so that all computers could be placed on the same network. Most people put their support behind GOSIP, the “Government Open Systems Interconnect Profile”, a standard created by the biggest corporations and the biggest governments.However, in 1982, the DoD paid a consulting company to added Xerox’s XNS and a research project called “TCP/IP” into an early form of Unix. This form of Unix, called “BSD”, was popular among universities. The DoD’s goal was to make it easier for researchers who it funded to talk to each other. After this point, universities rapidly started interconnecting themselves together with this “TCP/IP” research project.They did so for three reasons. The first reason was the way TCP/IP was government, in a libertarian manner, whereby everyone was free to experiment, add new capability first, then officially give working projects the official “standard” seal of approval later. In contrast, the competing GOSIP standard worked the opposite way, where committees debated how things should work for years before a standard was created, before people started working on the features. Everyone today learns the GOSIP standard 7-layer model, but nobody knows what layers 5 and 6 are, because they were never implemented on the real Internet.The second reason was the source was open. Long before GNU came around and took credit for the idea of open-source, the BSD community had made source openly available to everybody. People could see how TCP/IP worked, and improve it.Thirdly was the practicalities of TCP/IP’s design, namely the “end-to-end” principle. Routers were simple devices, based on simple computers. Thus, adding the necessary routers to connect your university to the Internet was trivially easy. The explosion in commodity computers, the “personal computer” revolution, likewise meant an explosion in commodity routers, since with simple software, every computer could also be a router. It’s like how every $35 Raspberry Pi 3 computer is also a WiFi access-point router.Back in the early 1980s, when all this was going down, there were many globe-spanning internetworks. Even up through the early 1990s, only die hard activists (such as myself) believed the TCP/IP internetwork was the only correct choice. Most business, most government, and most everyone else believed some “real” standard would eventually take over, such as GOSIP.Then the web happened, and sudden a TCP/IP internetwork became known as the one-and-only Internet that we see today. Those other networks persisted for a time, then withered. There are still die-hard GOSIP loyalists who bitterly defend their crappy alternative as being superior, even though none of them really can explain layers 5 and 6 properly.But today, we now have a new TCP/IPv6 internetwork which is actually incompatible with the original TCP/IP internetwork. These two internetworks run side by side, on the same wires at the same time, which is my laptop in this coffee shop is connected to both simultaneously, but they are still disjoint networks. Sometimes my laptop can get to Google via the original TCP/IP, sometimes it can only get to Google via TCP/IPv6.Likewise, corporations and governments still maintain their own private internetworks, like the DoD’s SIPERNET, which is based on TCP/IP, but not internconnected directly to the rest of the Internet.The point is: the Internet is an internet. This history is important. Getting rid of the capitalization gets rid of this history.

No, Internet should be capitalized

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2016/04/no-internet-should-be-capitalized.html

The AP Stylebook and others are now declaring that “Internet” should no longer be capitalized, that you should just say “internet” instead. This is wrong, because the Internet is just an internet.Internet is short for internetwork. This was a term developed in the 1970s to describe interconnecting networks together.There were many internetworks back then. Each major computer manufacturer had its own, incompatible internetworking “protocol”. IBM with it’s SNA, DEC with it’s DECnet, Xerox with XNS, and later Apple with its AppleTalk.Since it would be nice to interconnect all computers, and not be locked into a single manufacturer, many efforts were taken to standardize internetworking protocols, so that all computers could be placed on the same network. Most people put their support behind GOSIP, the “Government Open Systems Interconnect Profile”, a standard created by the biggest corporations and the biggest governments.However, in 1982, the DoD paid a consulting company to added Xerox’s XNS and a research project called “TCP/IP” into an early form of Unix. This form of Unix, called “BSD”, was popular among universities. The DoD’s goal was to make it easier for researchers who it funded to talk to each other. After this point, universities rapidly started interconnecting themselves together with this “TCP/IP” research project.They did so for three reasons. The first reason was the way TCP/IP was government, in a libertarian manner, whereby everyone was free to experiment, add new capability first, then officially give working projects the official “standard” seal of approval later. In contrast, the competing GOSIP standard worked the opposite way, where committees debated how things should work for years before a standard was created, before people started working on the features. Everyone today learns the GOSIP standard 7-layer model, but nobody knows what layers 5 and 6 are, because they were never implemented on the real Internet.The second reason was the source was open. Long before GNU came around and took credit for the idea of open-source, the BSD community had made source openly available to everybody. People could see how TCP/IP worked, and improve it.Thirdly was the practicalities of TCP/IP’s design, namely the “end-to-end” principle. Routers were simple devices, based on simple computers. Thus, adding the necessary routers to connect your university to the Internet was trivially easy. The explosion in commodity computers, the “personal computer” revolution, likewise meant an explosion in commodity routers, since with simple software, every computer could also be a router. It’s like how every $35 Raspberry Pi 3 computer is also a WiFi access-point router.Back in the early 1980s, when all this was going down, there were many globe-spanning internetworks. Even up through the early 1990s, only die hard activists (such as myself) believed the TCP/IP internetwork was the only correct choice. Most business, most government, and most everyone else believed some “real” standard would eventually take over, such as GOSIP.Then the web happened, and sudden a TCP/IP internetwork became known as the one-and-only Internet that we see today. Those other networks persisted for a time, then withered. There are still die-hard GOSIP loyalists who bitterly defend their crappy alternative as being superior, even though none of them really can explain layers 5 and 6 properly.But today, we now have a new TCP/IPv6 internetwork which is actually incompatible with the original TCP/IP internetwork. These two internetworks run side by side, on the same wires at the same time, which is my laptop in this coffee shop is connected to both simultaneously, but they are still disjoint networks. Sometimes my laptop can get to Google via the original TCP/IP, sometimes it can only get to Google via TCP/IPv6.Likewise, corporations and governments still maintain their own private internetworks, like the DoD’s SIPERNET, which is based on TCP/IP, but not internconnected directly to the rest of the Internet.The point is: the Internet is an internet. This history is important. Getting rid of the capitalization gets rid of this history.

The little computer that could

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-little-computer-that-could/

Liz: Today we’ve got a guest post from the terrifyingly hirsute Pete Stevens. Pete’s from Mythic Beasts, our web hosts; and he’s the reason this website stands up to the absurd amounts of traffic you throw at it. (Yesterday we saw about a quarter of a million sessions – that goes up WAY above a million on some days.) Have at it, Pete!
After our successful test of using the Raspberry Pi 3 for hosting 5% of the traffic on Pi 3 launch day we celebrated by going to the pub. The conversation went something like this:
Eben: Is it possible to host the whole site on Pi 3s?
Pete: How would you do it?
Philip: Wouldn’t it be awesome to do it?
Liz: Dare you to try it!
The first part of the answer is quite easy: not on one Pi 3, it’s not fast enough. A better question is how many Pi 3s are required to host a typical day’s traffic. Extrapolating from some graphs and making up some numbers with the handy pub beermat service, we estimated between 4 and 6 should handle all the PHP code and file delivery. Unfortunately, the database server still looks out of scope: not enough RAM and not enough I/O.
Of course, only an idiot would replace thousands of pounds of highly specified hardware with a handful of £30 computers and expect it to still work.
A few weeks later we have this:
A mini rack of Raspberry Pi 3sA mini rack of Raspberry Pi 3s
We’ve designed a custom plastic enclosure for holding Pi 3s securely, added power over ethernet HATs so we can power them directly from the switch, and a cheap 100Mbps PoE switch. We’ve put all the storage over the network and put a small storage server in the rack with the Pi 3 rack. We’ve used virtual LANs to have two effective network cards on each Pi 3: one just containing it and the storage server, the other with an IPv6 address that talks to the public internet and the load balancers. Ifconfig looks like this:
storage : eth0 : 10.46.189.X
public : eth0.131 : 2a00:1098:0:84:1000:1:0:X

As with all Pi servers, there is no public IPv4 connectivity to each server. To get out to legacy IPv4-only services such as Twitter / Akismet etc. they go through our NAT64 DNS proxy service. Inbound traffic lands on the front end load balancers and is shared between the Raspberry Pi 3s over IPv6.
 iftop, our network monitoring software showing traffic shuttling between the fileserver and the load balancers iftop, our network monitoring software showing traffic shuttling between the fileserver and the load balancers
If you do:
HEAD -E https://www.raspberrypi.org/

you’ll see a header which gives you the final octet of the address of the Pi that served you:
X-Served-By: Raspberry Pi 1e

The first person to tweet all the hex identifiers to Mythic Beasts wins absolutely nothing other than the respect of the Raspberry Pi community.
Is this a commercial hosted Pi service?
It’s not yet a commercially viable service. Scaled up we can fit 96 Pi3s in 4U of rack space including the switches, which is an impressive density. However, the Pis aren’t individually replaceable once in service. That means if a customer botches the SD card the Pi is dead until we can arrange downtime of all 96 Pis in the unit. Kernel upgrades involve a change on the SD card which carries a risk of bricking the Pi if the user gets it wrong. Not having access to the SD card other than via booting the Pi from it means that an enterprising user could compromise the kernel on the SD card and root-kit the machine, before cancelling the service and letting us sell it to another user.
But it’s close. Add in netboot with PXE and most of the above concerns go away, as we can remotely provision, remotely re-provision and remotely recover a broken Pi.
The Pi Rack under construction and testingThe Pi Rack under construction and testing
The Pi rack operational and waiting for your HTTP requestsThe Pi rack operational and waiting for your HTTP requests
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Power up your life with issue #44 of The MagPi

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-magpi-44/

Another month – so that means another issue of the official Raspberry Pi magazine! We’ve got a whole host of treats in store for you in our April 2016 edition including your chance to win one of three U:Create Astro Pi kits worth £100/$145.
Magpi_Cover_44_PhysicalClick the pic to be whisked into a world of Raspberry Pi ideas and inspiration
The theme for this issue (and wonderfully realised by Raspberry Pi’s resident illustrator-extraordinaire Sam Alder) is ways to improve and automate your life with Raspberry Pi. We’ve put together five fun projects to help you power up your life including an automatic pet feeder, a magic mirror and a temperature-sensing kettle so your tea (Earl Grey) is always served hot.
TheMagPi#44-SAMPLE-002
Other highlights from issue 44:

007 gadgets
Pi-powered gadgets that are licensed to thrill
Bluetooth audio guide
Turn your Raspberry Pi 3 into a music streamer
What is pressure?
Find out by doing science with the Sense HAT
Retro vision with Pi Zero
Use any old TV with your brand new Pi Zero in easy steps
And much, much more!

TheMagPi#44-SAMPLE-004
TheMagPi#44-SAMPLE-003

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the front page of The MagPi’s website.
Don’t forget that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Buy the magazine and help democratise computing!
Buy in-store
If you want something more tangible to play with, you’ll be glad to hear you can get the print edition in more stores than ever:
WHSmith
Tesco
Sainsbury’s
Asda
And all good newsagents
Order online
Rather shop online? You can grab every available issue from The Pi Hut and have it delivered practically anywhere in the world.
Subscribe today!
Want to have every issue delivered free to your door the moment it’s available? Subscribe today and save up to 25% on the cover price.
I hope you enjoy the issue – see you next month!
 
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Amazon Echo – the homebrew version

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/amazon-echo-homebrew-version/

Amazon’s Echo isn’t available here in the UK yet. This is very aggravating for those of us who pride ourselves on early adoption. For the uninitiated, Echo’s an all-in-one speaker and voice-command device that works with Amazon’s Alexa voice service. Using an Echo, Alexa can answer verbal questions and integrate with a bunch of the connected objects you might have in your house, like lights, music, thermostats and all that good smart-home stuff. It can also provide you with weather forecasts, interact with your calendar and plumb the cold, cold depths of Wikipedia.
51XeN2UYoyL._SL1000_Amazon’s official Echo device
_88948671_b49cb625-c213-43c3-88ac-a58bd9200900The Raspberry Pi version (our tip – hide the Pi in a box!)
Happily for those of us outside the US wanting to sink our teeth into the bold new world of virtual assistants, Amazon’s made a guide to setting up Alexa on your Raspberry Pi which will work wherever you are. You’ll need a Pi 2 or a Pi 3. The Raspberry Pi version differs in one important way from the Echo: the Echo is always on, and always listening for a vocal cue (usually “Alexa”, although users can change that – useful if your name is Alexa), which raises privacy concerns for some. The Raspberry Pi version is not an always-on listening device; instead, you have to press a button on your system to activate it. More work for your index finger, more privacy for your living-room conversations.
Want to build your own? Here’s a video guide to setting the beast up from Novaspirit Tech. You can also find everything you need on Amazon’s GitHub.
Installing Alexa Voice Service to Raspberry Pi
This is a quick tutorial on install Alexa Voice Service to your Raspberry Pi creating your very own Amazon ECHO!! Thanks for the view! **You can also download the Amazon Alexa App for your phone to configure / interface with your raspberry echo!. it will be listed as a new device!!

Let us know if you end up building your own Echo; it’s much less expensive than the official version, and 100% more available outside the USA as well.
 
 
 
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SX Create 2016

Post Syndicated from Courtney Lentz original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/sx-create-2016/

The last few weeks have turned out to be a big (and busy) time for us at Raspberry Pi! We celebrated our fourth birthday and the release of Raspberry Pi 3 in Cambridge, and wrapped up the month in Austin, Texas during SXSW Interactive, the event that draws techie geeks and enthusiasts.
Raspberry Pi on Twitter
Day two of #SXCreate begins NOW! @pcsforme has a fresh batch of Pi 3s for sale. And come try out the Sense HAT! pic.twitter.com/ac2sRHuTBf

So what did we do all day at SXSW (other than find some of the best BBQ this country has to offer)? Some of us on the The Raspberry Pi team set up a hands-on Sense HAT activity for participants at SX Create, a family-friendly event with some of our favorite maker companies as well as local projects from some of Austin’s up-and-coming entrepreneurs. Our activity introduced basic point-and-click control of the HAT’s on-board LEDs and included a programming challenge to get data from its sensors and display it as text on the LED matrix.
Even the Raspberry Pi team couldn’t resist sitting down to have a go.
Raspberry Pi SX Team 1000
Ethan, the founder of PCs for Me, joined us in the booth for the weekend. Ethan creates Raspberry Pi kits that include all the components you need to jump-start your own projects at home; some are based on our own educational resources. He helped get Raspberry Pi 3s into the hands of eager buyers. His stock of Pi 3s didn’t last long, once the word got out to the tech-savvy crowd of SXSW.
Lucie deLaBruere on Twitter
I just got my hands on my first @Raspberry_Pi 3 from young entrepreneurs at #sxsw http://www.pcsforme.com pic.twitter.com/Qc46iiwMp7

PCs for Me on Twitter
And the last Pi 3 (for real this time) goes to Anuhar! pic.twitter.com/IasUPFw3T7

Fun fact: We met Ethan a year ago at SXSW, and we were so thrilled he decided to be a part of the Raspberry Pi team for the weekend.
In an event that’s as big as SXSW, we still managed to be among some of our friends – long-standing forum contributors, our newest Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, and librarians we’ve been in touch with – in addition to kids jumping in on the HAT activity and parents looking at projects they could do at home. We also met some new friends: Pi users who were just coming into the fold, and longtime community members who shared some brilliant projects created with three different models of Raspberry Pi!
Sense HAT SX Create
Although we were excited to show off Raspberry Pi 3, we were especially looking forward to meeting members of our community. It’s exactly what we love about events like this. If you get the chance, join us at our upcoming events – you can find us at the at the following shows across the US:

USA Science and Engineering Festival, April 15-17 in Washington, DC
Maker Faire Bay Area, May 20-22 in San Mateo, California
American Library Association Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 23-28 in Orlando, Florida
ISTE 2016, June 26-29 in Denver, Colorado
World Maker Faire New York, Oct 1-2 in New York City, NY

We would love to meet you!
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Astro Pi cases!

Post Syndicated from Rachel Rayns original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/astro-pi-cases/

Last month we published a guide on how to 3D print your own Astro Pi flight case. Since then we’ve seen some amazing examples pop up over on Twitter. My favorites have to be the two below.
@KaceyandKristi posted this amazing rainbow flight case – great way to make the most of the layered design!
Kacey-Kristi-Lance on Twitter
@astro_timpeake Tim, our rainbow @astro_pi is ready for coding challenge. #principia inspiring future generations. pic.twitter.com/pf7Xnd9liv

You’ll never lose Jonny Teague‘s case in the dark!
Jonny Teague on Twitter
The @astro_pi case in all its glory and luminescence pic.twitter.com/iP7YIlmEtF

Dave has found some other fantastic examples:
John Chinner‘s neon orange case was made by Ryanteck.
John Chinner on Twitter
Found an excellent 3D printing shop in Singapore. Spent an hour talking about @astro_pi and they gave me this! pic.twitter.com/lMoHv3ljum

Love the red buttons on this sleek black one:
Mac the Hat on Twitter
@astro_pi 90% complete,few more parts and will be clone of @astro_pi_ir that @astro_timpeake has on @ISS_Research pic.twitter.com/CfSBpB12GR

Patrick Wiatt made this classy silver and blue case:
Patrick Wiatt on Twitter
Completed the @astro_pi 3d printable case today, now we just need the Sense HAT! #newellfonda @Raspberry_Pi pic.twitter.com/Wv9d9Th15n

PLA (a material often used by 3D printers) comes in all kinds of different colours – LEFRANCOIS has printed his case using a metallic gold, making it a perfect partner for our original aluminium one.
LEFRANCOIS on Twitter
@astro_pi hi there , here is mine 😉 pic.twitter.com/mCXZyPZ9rT

Richard Hayler, a Code Club mentor from Surrey, went for classic silver filament for his case. He even used the same buttons as the real units up on the International Space Station.
Richard Hayler ☀ on Twitter
Some more pics of our operational 3D printed @astro_pi flight case. http://richardhayler.blogspot.com/2016/02/3d-printed-astro-pi-flight-case.html … pic.twitter.com/u2x5zUgecK

Our absolute favourite photo is of one of Richard’s Code Club students, Ozzy, posing as mini-Tim to recreate a photo of Tim Peake with an Astro Pi flight unit that’s become famous in the community…
Tim with Astro PiOzzy as mini-Tim
These are fantastic and we’d love to see more of them, but I also have an additional challenge for you – hack our design! Maybe you’d like to add your name to the front, or add an extra handle – surprise us!
I added the words “Raspberry Pi” to my top layer very quickly in Tinkercad, a simple and free in-browser 3D-modelling program.
Screenshot 2016-03-23 11.56.09
I also successfully installed FreeCad on my Pi3 today, and I’m going to see what I can do over the UK Bank Holiday weekend.
Get your printer on and warming up! Here’s a link to the Astro Pi flight case STL files: go go go!
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