Tag Archives: Pimoroni

Making Waves: print out sound waves with the Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/printed-sound-wave/

For fun, Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, and Bomani McClendon have worked together to create Waves, an audiovisual project that records people’s spoken responses to personal questions and prints them in the form of a sound wave as a gift for being truthful.

Waves

Waves is a Raspberry Pi project centered around transforming the transience of the spoken word into something concrete and physical. In our setup, a user presses a button corresponding to an intimate question (ex: what’s your motto?) and answers it into a microphone while pressing down on the button.

What are you grateful for?

“I’m grateful for finishing this project,” admits maker Eunice Lee as she presses a button and speaks into the microphone that is part of the Waves project build. After a brief moment, her confession appears on receipt paper as a waveform, and she grins toward the camera, happy with the final piece.

Eunice testing Waves

Waves is a Raspberry Pi project centered around transforming the transience of the spoken word into something concrete and physical. In our setup, a user presses a button corresponding to an intimate question (ex: what’s your motto?) and answers it into a microphone while pressing down on the button.

Sound wave machine

Alongside a Raspberry Pi 3, the Waves device is comprised of four tactile buttons, a standard USB microphone, and a thermal receipt printer. This type of printer has become easily available for the maker movement from suppliers such as Adafruit and Pimoroni.

Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, Bomani McClendon - Sound Wave Raspberry Pi

Definitely more fun than a polygraph test

The trio designed four colour-coded cards that represent four questions, each of which has a matching button on the breadboard. Press the button that belongs to the question to be answered, and Python code directs the Pi to record audio via the microphone. Releasing the button stops the audio recording. “Once the recording has been saved, the script viz.py is launched,” explains Lee. “This script takes the audio file and, using Python matplotlib magic, turns it into a nice little waveform image.”

From there, the Raspberry Pi instructs the thermal printer to produce a printout of the sound wave image along with the question.

Making for fun

Eunice, Bomani, and Matt, students of design and computer science at Northwestern University in Illinois, built Waves as a side project. They wanted to make something at the intersection of art and technology and were motivated by the pure joy of creating.

Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, Bomani McClendon - Sound Wave Raspberry Pi

Making makes people happy

They have noted improvements that can be made to increase the scope of their sound wave project. We hope to see many more interesting builds from these three, and in the meantime we invite you all to look up their code on Eunice’s GitHub to create your own Waves at home.

The post Making Waves: print out sound waves with the Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Getting started with soldering

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/getting-started-soldering/

In our newest resource video, Content and Curriculum Manager Laura Sach introduces viewers to the basics of soldering.

Getting started with soldering

Learn the basics of how to solder components together, and the safety precautions you need to take. Find a transcript of this video in our accompanying learning resource: raspberrypi.org/learning/getting-started-with-soldering/

So sit down, grab your Raspberry Pi Zero, and prepare to be schooled in the best (and warned about the worst) practices in the realm of soldering.

Do I have to?!

Yes. Yes, you do.

If you are planning to use a Raspberry Pi Zero or Zero W, or to build something magnificent using wires, buttons, lights, and more, you’ll want to practice your soldering technique. Those of us inexperienced in soldering have been jumping for joy since the release of the Pimoroni solderless header. However, if you want to your project to progress from the ‘prototyping with a breadboard’ stage to a durable final build, soldering is the best option for connecting all its components together.

soldering raspberry pi gif

Hot glue just won’t cut it this time. Sorry.

I promise it’s not hard to do, and the final result will give you a warm feeling of accomplishment…made warmer still if, like me, you burn yourself due to your inability to pay attention to instructions. (Please pay attention to the instructions.)

Soldering 101

As Laura explains in the video, there are two types of solder to choose from for your project: the lead-free kind that requires a slightly higher temperature to melt, and the lead-containing kind that – surprise, surprise – has lead in it. Although you’ll find other types of solder, one of these two is what you want for tinkering.

soldering raspberry pi

The decision…is yours.

In order to heat your solder and apply it to your project, you’ll need either Kryptonian heat vision* or, on this planet at least, a soldering iron. There is a variety of soldering irons available on the market, and as your making skills improve you will probably upgrade. But for now, try not to break the bank and choose an iron that’s within your budget. You may also want to ask around, as someone you know might be able to lend you theirs and help you out with your first soldering attempt.

Safety first!

Make sure you always solder in a well-ventilated area. Before you start, remove any small people, four-legged friends, and other trip hazards from the space and check you have everything you need close at hand.

soldering raspberry pi

The lab at Pi Towers is well ventilated thanks to this handy ventilation pipe…thingy.

And never forget, things get hot when you heat them! Always allow a moment for cooling before you handle your wonderful soldering efforts. I remember the first time I tried soldering a button to a Raspberry Pi and…let’s just say that I still bear the scars incured because I didn’t follow my own safety advice.

Let’s do this!

Now you’re geared up and ready to solder, follow along with Laura and fit a header to your Raspberry Pi Zero! You can also read a complete transcript of the video in our free Getting started with soldering  resource.

If you use Laura’s video to help you complete a soldering project, make sure to share your final piece with us via social media using the hashtag #ThanksLauraSach.

 

 

*spoiler alert!

The post Getting started with soldering appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Pioneers: the second challenge is…

Post Syndicated from Olympia Brown original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/pioneers-second-challenge/

Pioneers, your next challenge is here!

Do you like making things? Do you fancy trying something new? Are you aged 11 to 16? The Pioneers programme is ready to challenge you to create something new using technology.

As you’ll know if you took part last time, Pioneers challenges are themed. So here’s the lovely Ana from ZSL London Zoo to reveal the theme of the next challenge:

Your next challenge, if you choose to accept it, is…

MakeYourIdeas The second Pioneers challenge is here! Wahoo! Have you registered your team yet? Make sure you do. Head to the Pioneers website for more details: http://www.raspberrypi.org/pioneers

Make it Outdoors

You have until the beginning of July to make something related to the outdoors. As Ana said, the outdoors is pretty big, so here are some ideas:

Resources and discounted kit

If you’re looking at all of these projects and thinking that you don’t know where to start, never fear! Our free resources offer a great starting point for any new project, and can help you to build on your existing skills and widen your scope for creating greatness.

We really want to see your creativity and ingenuity though, so we’d recommend using these projects as starting points rather than just working through the instructions. To help us out, the wonderful Pimoroni are offering 15 percent off kit for our Getting started with wearables and Getting started with picamera resources. You should also check out our new Poo near you resource for an example of a completely code-based project.



For this cycle of Pioneers, thanks to our friends at the Shell Centenary Scholarship Fund, we are making bursaries available to teams to cover the cost of these basic kits (one per team). This is for teens who haven’t taken part in digital making activities before, and for whom the financial commitment would be a barrier to taking part. Details about the bursaries and the discount will be sent to you when you register.

Your Pioneers team

We’ve introduced a few new things for this round of Pioneers, so pay special attention if you took part last time round!

Pioneers challenge: Make it Outdoors

We’re looking for UK-based teams of between two and five people, aged between 11 and 16, to work together to create something related to the outdoors. We’ve found that in our experience there are three main ways to run a Pioneers team. It’s up to you to decide how you’ll proceed when it comes to your participation in Pioneers.

  • You could organise a Group that meets once or twice a week. We find this method works well for school-based teams that can meet at the end of a school day for an hour or two every week.
  • You could mentor a Squad that is largely informal, where the members probably already have a good idea of what they’re doing. A Squad tends to be more independent, and meetings may be sporadic, informal or online only. This option isn’t recommended if it’s your first competition like this, or if you’re not a techie yourself.
  • You could join a local Event at a technology hub near you. We’re hoping to run more and more of these events around the country as Pioneers evolves and grows. If you think you’d like to help us run a Pioneers Event, get in touch! We love to hear from people who want to spread their love of making, and we’ll support you as much as we possibly can to get your event rocking along. If you want to run a Pioneers Event, you will need to preregister on the Pioneers website so that we can get you all the support you need well before you open your doors.

#MakeYourIdeas

As always, we’re excited to watch the progress of your projects via social media channels such as Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat. As you work on your build, make sure to share the ‘making of…’ stages with us using #MakeYourIdeas.

For inspiration from previous entries, here’s the winner announcement video for the last Pioneers challenge:

Winners of the first Pioneers challenge are…

After months of planning and making, the first round of Pioneers is over! We laid down the epic challenge of making us laugh. And boy, did the teams deliver. We can honestly say that my face hurt from all the laughing on judging day. Congratulations to everyone who took part.

Once you’ve picked a project, the first step is to register. What are you waiting for? Head to the Pioneers website to get started!

The post Pioneers: the second challenge is… appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Tinkernut’s do-it-yourself Pi Zero audio HAT

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tinkernut-diy-pi-zero-audio/

Why buy a Raspberry Pi Zero audio HAT when Tinkernut can show you how to make your own?

Adding Audio Output To The Raspberry Pi Zero – Tinkernut Workbench

The Raspberry Pi Zero W is an amazing miniature computer piece of technology. I want to turn it into an epic portable Spotify radio that displays visuals such as Album Art. So in this new series called “Tinkernut Workbench”, I show you step by step what it takes to build a product from the ground up.

Raspberry Pi Zero audio

Unlike their grown-up siblings, the Pi Zero and Zero W lack an onboard audio jack, but that doesn’t stop you from using them to run an audio output. Various audio HATs exist on the market, from Adafruit, Pimoroni and Pi Supply to name a few, providing easy audio output for the Zero. But where would the fun be in a Tinkernut video that shows you how to attach a HAT?

Tinkernut Pi Zero Audio

“Take this audio HAT, press it onto the header pins and, errr, done? So … how was your day?”

DIY Audio: Tinkernut style

For the first video in his Hipster Spotify Radio using a Raspberry Pi Tinkernut Workbench series, Tinkernut – real name Daniel Davis – goes through the steps of researching, prototyping and finishing his own audio HAT for his newly acquired Raspberry Pi Zero W.

The build utilises the GPIO pins on the Zero W, specifically pins #18 and #13. FYI, this hidden gem of information comes from the Adafruit Pi Zero PWM Audio guide. Before he can use #18 and #13, header pins need to be soldered. If the thought of soldering pins to the Pi is somewhat daunting, check out the Pimoroni Hammer Header.

Pimoroni Hammer Header for Raspberry Pi

You’re welcome.

Once complete, with Raspbian installed on the micro SD, and SSH enabled for remote access, he’s ready to start prototyping.

Ingredients

Tinkernut uses two 270 ohm resistors, two 150 ohm resistors, two 10μf electrolytic capacitors, two 0.01 μf polyester film capacitors, an audio jack and some wire. You’ll also need a breadboard for prototyping. For the final build, you’ll need a single row female pin header and some prototyping board, if you want to join in at home.

Tinkernut audio board Raspberry Pi Zero W

It should look like this…hopefully.

Once the prototype is working to run audio through to a cheap speaker (thanks to an edit of the config.txt file), the final board can be finished.

What’s next?

The audio board is just one step in the build.

Spotify is such an awesome music service. Raspberry Pi Zero is such an awesome ultra-mini computing device. Obviously, combining the two is something I must do!!! The idea here is to make something that’s stylish, portable, can play Spotify, and hopefully also display visuals such as album art.

Subscribe to Tinkernut’s YouTube channel to keep up to date with the build, and check out some of his other Raspberry Pi builds, such as his cheap 360 video camera, security camera and digital vintage camera.

Have you made your own Raspberry Pi HAT? Show it off in the comments below!

The post Tinkernut’s do-it-yourself Pi Zero audio HAT appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Incredible Raspberry Pi projects in issue 56 of The MagPi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-magazine-56/

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! It’s the last Thursday of the month and that means there’s a new issue of the official Raspberry Pi magazine: yay!

MagPi Magazine 56 cover image

Grab your copy today!

The MagPi Magazine 56

The MagPi 56 covers some incredible Raspberry Pi projects built by members of our community, from simple things you can make quickly, like an easy robot or LEGO Pi case, to more advanced projects to experiment with, like a set of Pinoculars.

Our news section looks at some great new happenings in the world of Pi, such as the new Pimoroni kits for Zero W, the Cambridge theme for PIXEL, and our fifth birthday celebrations.

Also not to be missed in this issue is our lowdown of every Raspberry Pi operating system: which is your favourite? While you’re weighing up the pros and cons of Raspbian vs. Ubuntu MATE, you can also read about our DJ Hero harmonograph, some hot command line tips, and much more.

The MagPi is the only monthly magazine written by and for the Pi community. Regardless of your experience with the Raspberry Pi, there’s something for everyone.

Get your copy

You can grab the latest issue of The MagPi today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively, you can order your copy online, or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

We also have a fantastic subscription offer to celebrate the new Raspberry Pi Zero W: grab a twelve-month subscription and you’ll get a Raspberry Pi Zero W absolutely free, along with a free official case and a bundle of adapter cables. Get yours online right now!

MagPi Magazine Free Pi Zero W

Free Creative Commons download

As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 56.

Don’t forget, though, that, as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue! That’s it until next month…

The post Incredible Raspberry Pi projects in issue 56 of The MagPi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

P.A.R.T.Y.

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/p-a-r-t-y/

On 4 and 5 March 2017, more than 1,800 people got together in Cambridge to celebrate five years of Raspberry Pi and Code Club. We had cake, code, robots, explosions, and unicorn face paint. It was all kinds of awesome.

Celebrating five years of Raspberry Pi and Code Club

Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2017-03-10.

It’s hard to believe that it was only five years ago that we launched the first Raspberry Pi computer. Back then, our ambitions stretched to maybe a few tens of thousands of units, and our hope was simply that we could inspire more young people to study computer science.

Fast forward to 2017 and the Raspberry Pi is the third most successful computing platform of all time, with more than twelve and a half million units used by makers, educators, scientists, and entrepreneurs all over the world (you can read more about this in our Annual Review).

On 28 February, we announced the latest addition to our family of devices, the Raspberry Pi Zero W, which brings wireless connectivity and Bluetooth to the Pi Zero for an astonishing $10. You seemed to like it: in the four days between the product launch and the first day of the Birthday Party, we sold more than 100,000 units. We absolutely love seeing all the cool things you’re building with them!

Raspberry Pi Zero W

Celebrating our community

Low-cost, high-performance computers are a big part of the story, but they’re not the whole story. One of the most remarkable things about Raspberry Pi is the amazing community that has come together around the idea that more people should have the skills and confidence to get creative with technology.

For every person working for the Raspberry Pi Foundation, there are hundreds and thousands of community members outside the organisation who advance that mission every day. They run Raspberry Jams, volunteer at Code Clubs, write educational resources, moderate our forums, and so much more. The Birthday Party is one of the ways that we celebrate what they’ve achieved and say thank you to them for everything they’ve done.

Over the two days of the celebration, there were 57 workshops and talks from community members, including several that were designed and run by young people. I managed to listen to more of the talks this year, and I was really impressed by the breadth of subjects covered and the expertise on display.

All About Code on Twitter

Big thanks to @Raspberry_Pi for letting me run #PiParty @edu_blocks workshop and to @cjdell for his continuing help and support

Educators are an important part of our community and it was great to see so many of our Certified Educators leading sessions and contributing across the whole event.

Carrie Anne Philbin on Twitter

Thanks to my panel of @raspberry_pi certified educators – you are all amazing! #piparty https://t.co/0psnTEnfxq

Hands-on experiences

One of the goals for this year’s event was to give everyone the opportunity to get hands-on experience of digital making and, even if you weren’t able to get a place at one of the sold-out workshops, there were heaps of drop-in and ask-the-expert sessions, giving everyone the chance to get involved.

The marketplace was one of this year’s highlights: it featured more than 20 exhibitors including the awesome Pimoroni and Pi Hut, as well as some great maker creations, from the Tech Wishing Well to a game of robot football. It was great to see so many young people inspired by other people’s makes.

Child looking at a handmade robot at the Raspberry Pi fifth birthday weekend

Code Club’s celebrations

As I mentioned before, this year’s party was very much a joint celebration, marking five years of both Raspberry Pi and Code Club.

Since its launch in 2012, Code Club has established itself as one of the largest networks of after-school clubs in the world. As well as celebrating the milestone of 5,000 active Code Clubs in the UK, it was a real treat to welcome Code Club’s partners from across the world, including Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, France, New Zealand, South Korea, and Ukraine.

Representatives of Code Club International at the Raspberry Pi fifth birthday party

Representatives of Code Club International, up for a birthday party!

Our amazing team

There are so many people to thank for making our fifth Birthday Party such a massive success. The Cambridge Junction was a fantastic venue with a wonderful team (you can support their work here). Our friends at RealVNC provided generous sponsorship and practical demonstrations. ModMyPi packed hundreds of swag bags with swag donated by all of our exhibitors. Fuzzy Duck Brewery did us proud with another batch of their Irrational Ale.

We’re hugely grateful to Sam Aaron and Fran Scott who provided the amazing finales on Saturday and Sunday. No party is quite the same without an algorave and a lot of explosions.

Most of all, I want to say a massive thank you to all of our volunteers and community members: you really did make the Birthday Party possible, and we couldn’t have done it without you.

One of the things we stand for at Raspberry Pi is making computing and digital making accessible to all. There’s a long way to go before we can claim that we’ve achieved that goal, but it was fantastic to see so much genuine diversity on display.

Probably the most important piece of feedback I heard about the weekend was how welcoming it felt for people who were new to the movement. That is entirely down to the generous, open culture that has been created by our community. Thank you all.

Collage of Raspberry Pi and Code Club fifth birthday images

 

 

The post P.A.R.T.Y. appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

TEN BUCKS! TEN FREAKIN’ BUCKS! Zero W aftermath

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/ten-freakin-bucks-zero-w-aftermath/

Tuesday saw the launch of our brand-new $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W, the next step in the evolution of our tiniest computer, now equipped with wireless LAN and Bluetooth.

Steve Anderson 🇪🇺 on Twitter

looks around house* “I’ve got too many SBCs. Really must get rid of some…” *new @Raspberry_Pi Zero W released* “SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!

As we hoped, the Zero W was very well received, with units flying off the virtual shelves of our official distributors.

The Pi Hut on Twitter

Over 4000 #PiZeroW in first batch of parcels for the postie.

By close of business on launch day, Zero Ws were winging their way to tens of thousands of excited makers, all eager to retrofit their existing Zero projects, or find new ways to build with the updated tech.

Facebook Raspberry Pi Zero W

We wanted to highlight some of the best responses we’ve received over the last few days: a mix of tweets, status updates and videos that made us smile.

Andy definitely wins the prize for most excitable launch day video. His enthusiasm is infectious!

Andy’s Pick: Pi Zero W

Today, Raspberry Pi launched the Pi Zero W, an upgrade to their $10 Pi Zero, adding Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to the tiny computer. For the full episode, visit twit.tv/mbw/548

Pi Borg wasted no time in fitting the Zero W into one of their Pololu kits. We’re looking forward to seeing it in action at the Big Birthday Weekend on Saturday.

Raspberry Pi Zero W robot!

We’ve built a robot using the new Raspberry Pi Zero W, a Pololu kit hacked to fit some bigger motors and our secret new motor controller being revealed on Friday… stay tuned! http://www.piborg.org

Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Philip Colligan took the Zero W along with him yesterday when he joined the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport to help launch the UK Government’s Digital Strategy.

STEAM Co. on Twitter

CreativityIsGREAT DEFINED. @philipcolligan on @Raspberry_Pi launched with #UKDigitalStrategy @dcms @beisgovuk @MattHancockMP @BBCRoryCJ https://t.co/6s2Loetqwj

And there’s always an eruption of excitement from the Comms team when Wil jumps on board!

Wil Wheaton on Twitter

Oh boy!! @Raspberry_Pi zero with WiFi on-board is available, and @pimoroni has some really neat kits!! https://t.co/dqQzE5KHyD

We also saw some brilliant launch videos from members of our community.

NEW Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless – $10 with WiFi + Bluetooth!

On the 5th anniversary of the launch of the original Raspberry Pi in 2012, the Foundation have decided to treat the community with a brand new product. A fork of the Pi Zero, but with added WiFi and Bluetooth, say hello to the Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless!

Pi Zero W with wifi, bluetooth and a brand new official case

Raspberry Pi Zero W newly launched today sports WiFi and Bluetooth and costs $10 + shipping and taxes. More information here http://raspi.tv/?p=9964 Also a brand new case.

We even became a Twitter Moment which, for many of us avid Tweeters, was kinda a big deal. Plus, well… pizza.

This tiny device has wireless LAN and HDMI and costs less than a pizza

The Raspberry Pi has sold more than 12 million devices around the world in various forms. The latest – the Pi Zero W – solves a key problem with the original by adding built-in wireless LAN and bluetooth functionality.

All in all, a great fifth birthday launch day was had by all.

James @raspjamberlin on Twitter

I would love to take a moment to wish @Raspberry_Pi a very happy 5th birthday! Congratulations to everyone that works so hard to give us Pi

If you ordered a Pi Zero W, make sure you share your projects with us across all social media or in the comments below. We can’t wait to see what you get up to with our newborn bundle of joy!

 

The post TEN BUCKS! TEN FREAKIN’ BUCKS! Zero W aftermath appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Community Profile: Zach Igielman

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/community-profile-zach-igielman/

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Zachary Igielman

Zach Igielman

Category: Maker
Day job: Student
Website

You may recognise the name Zachary Igielman from issue #38, where he was mentioned during our review of the exciting Pimoroni Piano HAT. The Piano HAT, for those unaware, was inspired by Zach’s own creation, the PiPiano, a successful crowdfunded add-on board that hit 184% of its funding two years ago. Aged 14, Zach had decided to incorporate his passions for making, engineering, and music, building himself a PCB that could use physical keys to control electronic sound files and Sonic Pi code. The PCB, he explains, is a great classroom tool, educating students on the fundamentals of physically building digital tech and soldering, through to understanding sound generation through PWM frequencies.

Zachary Igielman

PiPiano: Zach taught himself how to build a PCB in order to bring the PiPiano to life. Using Indiegogo to fund his project, Zach hit 184% of his target before approaching Pimoroni to hand over the design. And from his homemade PCB, the Piano HAT was born.

Zach began to teach himself to code aged 11, soon discovering the Raspberry Pi and, later, the Cambridge Raspberry Jams. It was through this collective of like-minded individuals that Zach was inspired to broaden his making skills, moving on to create line-following robots that avoided objects by using sensors.

Moving forward, Zach visited the Raspberry Pi offices for work experience, continuing to work on and study robots and robotic guides, working alongside our engineers to build upon his knowledge. It was around this time, in October 2014, that Zach met Frank Thomas-Hockey via Twitter. Frank was looking for help in creating the first London Raspberry Jam and Zach was more than willing to lend a hand. Between them, they 
set up the Covent Garden Jam, welcoming over 100 visitors to their first event. Their most recent Jam – now with the additional help of volunteers Ben, Paul, and Joseph – allowed them to simultaneously run workshops on soldering, Sonic Pi, and Minecraft, while also highlighting maker projects through show-and-tell sessions and talks.

Zachary Igielman Covent Garden Jam

Covent Garden Raspberry Pi Jam: Through Twitter, Zach met Frank in 2014, a like-minded Pi enthusiast looking to start a London-based Raspberry Jam. Between the two of them, they launched the first event at Dragon Hall, continuing the success of the Jam to now include multiple workshops, show-and-tell sessions, and talks.

Finally finished with his GCSE exams and about to begin his sixth-form studies in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Computing, Zach now has the time to continue his recent collaboration with friend Jake Blumenow.

Zach met Jake and built a fast friendship online, lovingly referring to him as a fellow “computer geek”. The two have worked on projects together, including several websites, and spent time travelling, bouncing ideas off one another with the aim of creating something important. It’s their most recent venture that’s worthy of recognition.

“At Google Campus, we developed our business model: we believe people of all ages have the right to understand how the technological world around us works, so they can modify and create their own technology.”

Between the two of them, they aim to create complete Raspberry Pi education kits, inviting beginners in making and coding to create functional projects, such as an alarm system, thus cementing the pair’s desire to highlight the day-to-day importance of tech in our lives.

Zachary Igielman Jake Blumenow

Collaboration with Jake Blumenow: Zach and Jake believe everyone has the right to understand how technology builds the world around them. With this in mind, they formed a partnership, working to create Raspberry Pi educational kits, starting with a DIY alarm system.

The post Community Profile: Zach Igielman appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-raspberry-pi-christmas-shopping-list-2016/

Feeling stuck for what to buy the beloved maker in your life? Maybe your niece wants to get into Minecraft hacking, or your Dad fancies his hand at home automation on a budget?

Maybe you’ve seen Raspberry Pi in the news and figure it would be a fun activity for the family, or you’re stuck for what to buy the Pi pro who’s slowly filling your spare room with wires, servers, and a mysterious, unidentified object that keeps beeping?

Whatever the reason, you’re in the right place. The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List is here to help you out.

For the beginner

Here are some of our favourite bits to get them started.

  • A Raspberry Pi Starter Kit will give your budding maker everything they need to get started. There’s a whole host of options, from our own kit to project-specific collections from our friends at The Pi Hut and Pimoroni in the UK, Adafruit in the USA, Canakit in Canada, and RS Components across the globe.

Marc Scott Beginner's Guide to Coding Book

  • They may already have a screen, keyboard, and mouse, but having a separate display allows them free rein to play to their heart’s content. The pi-top takes the form of a laptop, while the pi-topCEED still requires a mouse and keyboard.

pi-top

CamJam EduKit

For the hobbyist

They’ve been tinkering with LEDs and servo motors for a while. Now it’s time to pull out the big guns.

  • Help to broaden their interest by introducing them to some of the brilliant products over at Bare Conductive. Pair up the Pi Cap with some Electric Paint, and they’ll create an interactive masterpiece by the time the Queen’s Speech is on.

Bare Conductive

  • Add to their maker toolkit with some of the great products in the RasPiO range. The GPIO Zero Ruler will be an instant hit, and a great stocking filler for anyone wanting to do more with the GPIO pins.

GPIO Zero Ruler

Camera Kit Adafruit

For the tech whizz

You don’t understand half the things they talk about at the dinner table, but they seem to be enthusiastic and that’s all that counts.

  • Help them organise their components with a handy Storage Organiser. We swear by them here at Pi Towers.

Storage

Helping Hand

  • And then there’s the PiBorg. Treat them to the superfast DiddyBorg and you’ll be hailed as gift-buyer supreme (sorry if you’ll have to better this next year).

Diddybord

  • And then there’s the Raspberry Pi Zero. Check out availability here and buy them the sought-after $5 beast of an SBC.

For the… I really have no idea what to buy them this year

There’s always one, right?

  • A physical subscription to The MagPi Magazine is sure to go down well. And with the added bonus of a free Raspberry Pi Zero, you’ll win this Christmastime. Well done, you!

MagPi_Logo

 

Stocking fillers for everyone

Regardless of their experience and tech know-how, here are some great stocking fillers that everyone will enjoy.

 

STEM-ish gifts that everyone will love

These books are top of everyone’s lists this year, and for good reason. Why not broaden the interest of the Pi fan in your life with one of these brilliant reads?

The post The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to Pi: Halloween Edition 2016

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-to-pi-halloween-edition-2016/

Happy Halloween, one and all. Whether you’ve planned a night of trick-or-treating, watching scary movies, or hiding from costumed children with the lights off, our How to Pi guide should get you ready for the evening’s festivities. Enjoy!

Costumes

This is definitely a Pi Towers favourite. The Disco Ball costume by Wolfie uses a drone battery and Raspberry Pi to create, well, a child-sized human disco ball. The video links on the project page seem to be down; however, all the ingredients needed for the project are listed at Thingiverse, and a walkthrough of the wiring can be seen here. Below, you’ll see the full effect of the costume, and I’m sure we can all agree that we need one here in the office.

Halloween 2016 Disco Ball

Some aerial shots of Serena’s halloween costume we made. It contains 288 full color LEDs, a dual battery system for power, and a Raspberry Pi B2 running the sequence that was created in xLights.

If you feel ‘too cool’ to fit inside a giant disco ball, how about fitting inside a computer… sort of? The Jacket houses a Raspberry Pi with a monitor in the sleeve because, well, why not?

‘The Jacket’ 2.0 My Cyberp…

lsquo;The Jacket’ 2.0 My Cyberpunk inspired jacket was completed just in time for a Halloween party last night. This year’s upgrades added to the EL tape and 5″ LCD, with spikes, a pi zero and an action cam (look for the missing chest spike).

 

Dealing with Trick-or-treaters

Trick or Trivia, the trivia-based Halloween candy dispenser from YouTube maker TheMakersWorkbench, dispenses candy based on correct answers to spooky themed questions. For example, Casper is a friendly what? Select ‘Ghost’ on the touchscreen and receive three pieces of candy. Select an incorrect answer and receive only one.

It’s one of the best ways to give out candy to trick-or-treaters, without having to answer the door or put in any effort whatsoever.

Trick Or Trivia Trivia-Based Halloween Candy Dispenser Servo Demo

This video is a companion video to a project series I am posting on Element14.com. The video demonstrates the candy dispensing system for the Trick or Trivia candy dispenser project. You can find the post that this video accompanies at the following link: http://bit.ly/TrickorTrivia If you like this video, please consider becoming out patron on Patreon.

Or just stop them knocking in the first place with this…

Raspberry Pi Motion Sensor Halloween Trick

A Raspberry Pi running Ubuntu Mate connected to an old laptop screen. I have a motion sensor hidden in the letterbox. When you approach the door it detects you. Next the pi sends a signal to a Wi Fi enabled WeMo switch to turn on the screen.

Scary pranks

When it comes to using a Raspberry Pi to prank people, the team at Circuit-Help have definitely come up with the goods. By using a setup similar to the magic mirror project, they fitted an ultrasonic sensor to display a zombie video within the mirror whenever an unsuspecting soul approaches. Next year’s The Walking Dead-themed Halloween party is sorted!

Haunted Halloween Mirror

This Raspberry Pi Halloween Mirror is perfect for both parties and pranks! http://www.circuit-help.com.ph/haunted-halloween-mirror/

If the zombie mirror isn’t enough, how about some animated portraits for your wall? Here’s Pi Borg’s Moving Eye Halloween portrait. Full instructions here.

Spooky Raspberry Pi controlled Halloween picture

Check out our quick Halloween Project, make your own Raspberry Pi powered spooky portrait! http://www.instructables.com/id/Halloween-painting-with-moving-eyes/

Pumpkins

We’ve seen a flurry of Raspberry Pi pumpkins this year. From light shows to motion-activated noise makers, it’s the year of the pimped-up pumpkin. Here’s Oliver with his entry into the automated pumpkin patch, offering up a motion-activated pumpkin jam-packed with LEDs.

Raspberry Pi Motion Sensor Light Up Pumpkin

Using a Raspberry Pi with a PIR motion sensor and a bunch of NeoPixels to make a scary Halloween Pumpkin

Or get super-fancy and use a couple of Pimoroni Unicorn HATs to create animated pumpkin eyes. Instructions here.

Raspberry Pi Pumpkin LED Matrix Eyes

Inspired by the many Halloween electronics projects we saw last year, we tried our own this year. Source code is on github https://github.com/mirkin/pi-word-clock

Ignore the world and get coding

If you’re one of the many who would rather ignore Halloween, close the curtains, and pretend not to be home, here are some fun, spooky projects to work on this evening. Yes, they’re still Halloween-themed… but c’mon, they’ll be fun regardless!

Halloween Music Light Project – Follow the tutorial at Linux.com to create this awesome and effective musical light show. You can replace the tune for a less Halloweeny experience.

Halloween Music-Light project created using Raspberry Pi and Lightshow project.

Uploaded by Swapnil Bhartiya on 2016-10-12.

Spooky Spot the Difference – Let the Raspberry Pi Foundation team guide you through this fun prank, and use the skills you learn to replace the images for other events and holidays.

spot_the_diff

Whatever you get up to with a Raspberry Pi this Halloween, make sure to tag us across social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, G+, and Vine. You can also check out our Spooky Pi board on Pinterest.

The post How to Pi: Halloween Edition 2016 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Halloween Pumpkin Light Effect Tutorial

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/halloween-pumpkin-light-effect-tutorial/

While browsing the Halloween section of my local supermarket, I stumbled across this adorable pumpkin light for £2. Given the fact I had a £2 coin in my pocket and an itching for a Halloween hack project, it came home with me at once.

Halloween Pumpkin BEFORE

Mediocre spooky

You’ll see, if you look hard enough, the small orange LED within the plastic shell. Controlled by a switch beneath, the light was less than impressive once illuminated. 

And so the hack seed was planted.

Now, I’ll admit to not having much coding knowledge. But what I lack in skills, I make up for in charm, and it didn’t take long for me to find help from a couple of Raspberry Pi staffers.

Pimoroni had been nice enough to send us some Blinkt! units a while back and while one is being used for our People in Space Indicator, I’d been wanting to use one myself for some sort of lighting effect. So, with their Getting Started guide in hand (or rather, on screen), I set up the Raspberry Pi 3 that lives on my desk, attached the Blinkt! HAT and got to work on creating this…

Halloween Pumpkin Light Effect

Use a Raspberry Pi and Pimoroni Blinkt! to create an realistic lighting effect for your Halloween Pumpkin. Learn how at www.

If you’d like to create your own pumpkin light effect, you’ll need:

  • A Raspberry Pi (Make sure you use one that fits in your pumpkin!)
  • A Pimoroni Blinkt!
  • A power supply (plus monitor, mouse, and keyboard for setup)
  • A pumpkin

Take your Blinkt! and attach it to your Pi. If you’re using a 1-3 model, this will be easy enough, but make sure the Pi fits in your pumpkin! If, like me, you need to go smaller, you’ll have to solder your header pins to a Zero before attaching the HAT.

You might want to make sure Raspbian is running on the newest version. Why? Well, why not? You don’t have to upgrade to PIXEL, but you totally should as it’s very pretty. Its creator, Simon Long, was my soldering master for this project. His skills are second to none. To upgrade to Pixel, follow the steps here.

In the terminal, you’ll need to install the Pimoroni Blinkt! library. Use the following to achieve this:

curl -sS get.pimoroni.com/blinkt | bash

You’ll need to reboot the Raspberry Pi to allow the changes to take effect. You can do this by typing:

sudo reboot

At this point, you’re more than welcome to go your own way with the Blinkt! and design your own light show (this may help). However, and with major thanks to Jonic Linley, we’ve created a pumpkin fire effect for you.

Within the terminal, type:

git clone https://github.com/AlexJrassic/fire_effect.git

This will bring the code to your Raspberry Pi from GitHub. Next, we need to tell the Raspberry Pi to automatically start the fire_effect.py code when you power up. To do this, type:

nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

At end of the file, add this line:

@python /home/pi/fire_effect/fire_effect.py

Save and then reboot:

sudo reboot

Now you’re good to go. 

Halloween Pumpkin AFTER

To add more of a spread to the light effect, I created a diffuser to cover the Blinkt! LEDs. In the video above, you’ll see I used a tissue. I wouldn’t suggest this for prolonged use, due to the unit getting a little warm; I won’t be responsible for any  subsequent tissue fires. I would suggest using a semi-opaque bowl (the ones you get a Christmas pudding in) or a piece of plastic from a drinks bottle, and go to town on it with some fine sandpaper.

We also drilled a small hole in the back for the micro-USB lead to reach the Zero. I used a battery pack for power, but you could use a lead directly into the mains. With a larger pumpkin, you could put a battery pack inside with the Pi.

If you use this code, please share a photo with us below, or across social media. We’d love to see what you get up to.

And if you want to buy the Blinkt!, the team at Pimoroni have kindly agreed to extend the cut-off for postage on Friday from midday to 3pm, allowing you the chance to get the unit through your door on Monday (so long as you live in the UK). You can also purchase the Blinkt! from Adafruit if you live across the pond.

The post Halloween Pumpkin Light Effect Tutorial appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Docker comes to Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/docker-comes-to-raspberry-pi/

If you’re not already familiar with Docker, it’s a method of packaging software to include not only your code, but also other components such as a full file system, system tools, services, and libraries. You can then run the software on multiple machines without a lot of setup. Docker calls these packages containers.

Mayview Maersk by Flickr user Kees Torn

Mayview Maersk by Flickr user Kees Torn

Think of it like a shipping container and you’ve got some idea of how it works. Shipping containers are a standard size so that they can be moved around at ports, and shipped via sea or land. They can also contain almost anything. Docker containers can hold your software’s code and its dependencies, so that it can easily run on many different machines. Developers often use them to create a web application server that runs on their own machine for development, and is then pushed to the cloud for the public to use.

While we’ve noticed people using Docker on Raspberry Pi for a while now, the latest release officially includes Raspbian Jessie installation support. You can now install the Docker client on your Raspberry Pi with just one terminal command:

curl -sSL get.docker.com | sh

From there, you can create your own container or download pre-made starter containers for your projects. The documentation is thorough and easy to follow.

Docker Swarm

One way you can use Raspberry Pi and Docker together is for Swarm. Used together, they can create a computer cluster. With Swarm containers on a bunch of networked Raspberry Pis, you can build a powerful machine and explore how a Docker Swarm works. Alex Ellis shows you how in this video:

Docker Swarm mode Deep Dive on Raspberry Pi (scaled)

Get all the details @ http://blog.alexellis.io/live-deep-dive-pi-swarm/

You can follow along with Alex’s written tutorial as well. He has even taken it further by using Pi Zero’s USB gadget capabilities to create a tiny Docker Swarm:

Alex Ellis on Twitter

Look ma, no Ethernet! 8 core @Docker 1.12 swarm boom USB OTG @Raspberry_Pi @pimoronipic.twitter.com/frlSQ9ePpr

The Raspberry Pi already makes many computing tasks easier; why not add deploying remote applications to that list with Docker?

The post Docker comes to Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Wearable Pi Zero Camera from Adafruit

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/wearable-pi-zero-camera/

Over in a land of palm trees and breezy sunsets, Adafruit’s Noe Ruiz has been making things. (My Noe story: I waltzed up to him in the Adafruit factory once, grabbed his hand, pumped his arm up and down and said: “SO good to see you again. How’s your brother?” He looked deeply confused. Turns out we’d never met; I’d just recognised him, and his brother Pedro, from YouTube. I’m still red with embarrassment a couple of years later.)

Anyway. Camera.

adafruit camera_hero-lanyard

This build’s a great project for those of you with access to a 3d printer. It’s a teeny-weeny wearable camera which you can program to take a continuous stream or (more fun) use to take a time-lapse recording of your day.

Wearable Camera using Raspberry Pi Zero #3DPrinting

Worn on a lanyard or clipped to a pocket or pack, this adorable camera snaps a photo every few seconds. Slide the SD card into your computer to review the day’s activities or merge all the images into a timelapse animation. Powered by the diminutive and affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, this DIY project is eminently configurable and customizable!

Sample time-lapse output was showcased on Adafruit’s 3d Thursday Hangout. You can see some here:

3D Hangouts – Wearable Pi #3DThursday #3DPrinting

Hang out with Noe & Pedro Ruiz and discover 3D printing! Get your 3D news, projects, design tutorials and more each week on Google+ Hangouts On Air. Subscribe to the Adafruit and follow us on Google+ to catch future broadcasts. We’re warming up our printers, come hang out with us this Thursday!

Wearable cameras are fun – they’re great for recording events like parties or weddings, for keeping a record of holidays, or for dedicated diarists. They’ve also got a more serious side; there’s plenty of research available on using wearable cameras to aid people with memory impairments, not only acting as a piece of bionic memory, but also supporting the brain’s ability to build memories by enabling it to review material.

This being an Adafruit project, it’s documented down to the tiniest detail; there are even instructions to build the device using other models of Raspberry Pi if you haven’t got your hands on a Zero yet. (Good news: Zero availability at the four distributors, Pimoroni, The Pi Hut, Adafruit and Micro Center, is much improved, with stock appearing at each location weekly now – sign up to their newsletters to be notified when stock arrives.)

camera_test-circuit

Adafruit have made files for your 3d printer available, and they’ve provided a ready-to-download SD card image for the project along with instructions on rolling your own if you want a bit more of a challenge. You’ll find an easy-to-follow wiring tutorial, and a user-guide.

Big thanks are due to Philip Burgess and both Ruiz brothers. We loved the whole thing: it’s a brilliant project, a perfect write-up, and it offers so much opportunity for expansion. Thanks all!

 

 

The post Wearable Pi Zero Camera from Adafruit appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Our Creative Technologists have graduated!

Post Syndicated from Rachel Rayns original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/creative-technologists-have-graduated/

Hello, Rachel here, with a story that’s best told through images – warning, LOTS of photos ahead!

Happy Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists celebrate by dancing

When I explain how I started working at Raspberry Pi, it ends up being a pretty long story, with lots of interests that became jobs, unexpected opportunities and chance meetings. At the time it didn’t seem very connected – I just followed what I was interested in at the time, found like-minded people, and tried to share what I love with new people too. Before I joined Raspberry Pi as Artist in Residence in 2013, I ran a small arts venue focused on celluloid film with a darkroom and film lab – I wanted everyone to try shooting and developing their own photos!

I’ve now been at the Raspberry Pi Foundation for three years and I’ve had the chance to meet loads of people involved in digital making, from lots of different backgrounds: computer science professionals, teachers, engineers, design agencies, musicians, artists, tinkerers, makers. The thing that every one of them has in common: they follow what they are interested in, don’t worry too much about what label they have, and just concentrate on doing interesting things they enjoy and sharing them with others.

I had an opportunity last year to run an ambitious programme for a small group of young people. Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists was a one-off project to see how a (mostly) online digital-making mentor programme might work. I wanted to make sure people from lots of different backgrounds were involved.

We had loads of fantastic applications – although almost everyone left it until a minute before the deadline to submit, leaving my nerves in shreds!

We picked a great group of young people:

Andrew
Connor
Bawar
A cartoon sketch of Hannah Burdett, Raspberry Pi Creative Technologist
Maddy
Milton
Owen
Yasmin

They all wanted to explore how digital technology could enhance their creative pursuits, and their enthusiasms spanned everything from storytelling to animation to circus skills.

. on Twitter

First feature in new @TheMagP1 is our amazing Creative Technologists. Well done folks! #RPCT https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/issues/36/ …pic.twitter.com/C0TJ1M986d

Over the next 12 months, they developed their interests and skills through mentoring and field trips, starting in Cambridge at Raspberry Pi HQ:

Andrew Mulholland on Twitter

Been great weekend meeting fellow Creative Technologists! Big thanks to @RachelRayns, @ben_nuttall and @Raspberry_Pi!pic.twitter.com/Wz3lOyhkEO

Then in Newcastle for Makerfaire UK:

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Creative Technologists soldering their @makerfaire_uk badges #rpctpic.twitter.com/DtJ9RfE3tB

Helen Lynn on Twitter

Fantastic series of texts from @RachelRayns to the @Raspberry_Pi Creative Technologists at #makerfaireuk today #RPCTpic.twitter.com/VyNPL3Ocgk

In Sheffield with the Pimoroni crew:

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

Our Creative Technologists start their first workshop at @pimoroni: Intro to using the Camera Module with APIs #RPCTpic.twitter.com/wNK34QUg2n

In London at Hellicar & Lewis for an openFrameworks masterclass and Tim Hunkin’s Novelty Automation:

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

It’s only half ten and this is what we’ve become. @Raspberry_Pi #RPCT @connorbanonapic.twitter.com/VsZRXB9Jsp

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

Our Creative Technologists had an amazing time at Tim Hunkin’s @NovAutomation yesterday.Thanks for having us! #RPCTpic.twitter.com/08NMDyNAxO

Back in Cambridge again for Raspberry Pi’s fourth birthday party, where they ran and supported workshops and gave talks:

RPiCreativeTech 2016 on Twitter

Come and find us at the dots board table and make an airplane or rocket! Bundles of Painting Pi fun! #RPCTpic.twitter.com/2yH7d8P6oV

In Manchester at the FutureEverything festival, where they ran more workshops:

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

About to head off for the first day of @FuturEverything 😀 Ready to be INSPIRED.

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

Chatting to Ruby at Manchester Art Gallery #TheImitationGamepic.twitter.com/o4WDY9i5i5

As the creative technologists began to dig into the programme, some found that it challenged their perceptions of their own interests and strengths, and drew on this experience in making decisions to change direction, both within the programme and in their lives outside it:

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Proud of #rpct programme for what @radicxl has written! http://catchaneye.tumblr.com/post/125082608175/a-more-personal-post#125082608175 … /cc @RachelRaynspic.twitter.com/DrwKn8Fbrt

The programme culminated with the group’s New Works exhibition, where they revealed the varied and accomplished works that they have developed. They announced it at the Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Bash!

RPiCreativeTech 2016 on Twitter

It’s official: #RPCT Exhibition to be held at @Raspberry_Pi HQ on the 23rd of April! Stay tuned for a free ticket!pic.twitter.com/MKxbj0Knf2

The exhibition was hosted at the new Raspberry Pi HQ:

Joel Gethin Lewis on Twitter

Wonderfully effective capacitance based rope interaction from @OwenDaughtery @RasPiCTpic.twitter.com/zJCLvZzsgQ

Emily Jayne Bowers on Twitter

This was addictive! @connorbanona @iamrobharvey #RPCTpic.twitter.com/V3ARkIVh0s

Hannah Burdett on Twitter

Wrapping up the exhibition. It’s been an amazing day! Thanks to all for coming. #ThaliasQuest #rpctpic.twitter.com/FPakC13idC

Yasmin Curren on Twitter

My interactive video is set up at the #RPCT exhibition. Follow @WhoIsTerror to see the true identity of Terror!pic.twitter.com/YcjhZzBHsM

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

And @radicxl has made this RIDONCULOUS projection-mapped popup book. One of many pages – we’re speechless w…https://vine.co/v/iUBLlg605hg

Joel Gethin Lewis on Twitter

3D printed light clock from @miltonio94 @RasPiCTpic.twitter.com/hha0cRfviL

One of the best parts of the programme for me was seeing the creative technologists share their work and their new skills with others. They ran workshops at MozFest, FutureEverything and our Big Birthday Bash, as well as meeting with school groups.

Connor on Twitter

Day one of #mozfest was awesome! Bring on tomorrow!pic.twitter.com/job7F1Puxn

Heather Paprika on Twitter

RaspberryPi & #Scratch workshop at @WhitworthArt with @radamar @AmyMediaUK & @RasPiCT guys #Futr16 @FuturEverythingpic.twitter.com/GJoUyIRhYv

Philip Colligan on Twitter

Lovely vibe in the @Raspberry_Pi office today thanks to visits from @MaryMagsPiClub and our #creative technologistspic.twitter.com/AzcHZT173N

And, as if that weren’t enough, four of the group also completed an Arts Award Gold qualification as part of the programme!

. on Twitter

@radicxl <3pic.twitter.com/TZveypqZKx

maddy on Twitter

little message from the @Raspberry_Pi creative technologistspic.twitter.com/GvN3yPBRKX

I’m incredibly proud of our newly graduated creative technologists and I can’t wait to see what they do next. We’ve gained a great deal from the understanding the programme has given us of working with young people, introducing digital making to an audience from diverse backgrounds, and delivering online mentoring and support. It’s been a hugely valuable experience, and it’s one that will help to shape the work we do in future.

The post Our Creative Technologists have graduated! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Zero grows a camera connector

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/zero-grows-camera-connector/

When we launched Raspberry Pi Zero last November, it’s fair to say we were blindsided by the level of demand. We immediately sold every copy of MagPi issue 40 and every Zero in stock at our distributors; and every time a new batch of Zeros came through from the factory they’d sell out in minutes. To complicate matters, Zero then had to compete for factory space with Raspberry Pi 3, which was ramping for launch at the end of February.

Happily, Mike was able to take advantage of the resulting production hiatus to add the most frequently demanded “missing” feature to Zero: a camera connector. Through dumb luck, the same fine-pitch FPC connector that we use on the Compute Module Development Kit just fits onto the right hand side of the board, as you can see here.

Caption

Raspberry Pi Zero, now with added camera goodness

To connect the camera to the Zero, we offer a custom six-inch adapter cable. This converts from the fine-pitch connector format to the coarser pitch used by the camera board. Liz has a great picture of Mooncake, the official Raspberry Pi cat, attempting to eat the camera cable. She won’t let me use it in this post so that you aren’t distracted from the pictures of the new Zero itself. I’ve a feeling she’ll be tweeting it later today.

Cable

FPC adapter cable

To celebrate our having designed the perfect high altitude ballooning (HAB) controller, Dave Akerman will be launching a Zero, a camera and the new GPS+RTTY+LoRa radio board that he designed with Anthony Stirk, from a field in the Welsh Marches later today. You can follow along here and here, and in the meantime marvel at the Jony Ive-quality aesthetics of today’s payload.

Give me blue styrofoam and a place to stand...

Give me blue styrofoam and a place to stand…

You can buy Raspberry Pi Zero in Europe from our friends at The Pi Hut and Pimoroni, and in the US from Adafruit and in-store at your local branch of Micro Center. There are roughly 30,000 new Zeros out there today, and we’ll be making thousands more each day until demand is met.

The post Zero grows a camera connector appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Gesture control for your TV

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/gesture-control-tv/

Frederick Vandenbosch has been at it again. This time, inspired by watching his kids use tablet devices, he’s built a gesture control device for his TV, which manages to be both functional and very elegant.

gesture_remote

At the core of this device is a Model A Raspberry Pi, and a Pimoroni Skywriter HAT. The Skywriter is a near-field electrical sensor that can detect 3d movements and gestures as well as swipes and taps – it’s one of my favourite HATs on the market at the moment (I have one which I’ve mostly been playing with in music projects). Here’s a naked Skywriter, doing its thing. Do the clickety thing with the audio button.

Jonathan Williamson’s post on Vine

Watch Jonathan Williamson’s Vine taken on 9 December 2014. It has 2 likes. The entertainment network where videos and personalities get really big, really fast. Download Vine to watch videos, remixes and trends before they blow up.

One of the great things about this particular HAT is that it still works if you hide it from sight under a sheet of something non-conductive – which is exactly what Frederick’s doing in this build. It’s always a real pleasure to see projects with this level of finish; this (non-conductive) case is just some simply sanded and polished ply, but it looks fantastic and wouldn’t be out of place on the coffee table next to your sofa. (We also applaud the choice of very handsome USB cable that Frederick’s using to supply power. Little things can make all the difference.)

gesture box

This gesture controller talks to the TV using LIRC (Linux Infra-red Control); Frederick’s built an IR led to transmit, and an IR receiver, into the box; that’s what those two little holes in the front are for.

Here’s a video guiding you through the build.

Gesture based TV Remote Control Using Raspberry Pi and Skywriter HAT

Ever wanted to control your TV using gestures instead of a remote control? In this project, I use the Raspberry Pi and Skywriter HAT to convert gestures to infrared signals capable of controlling the TV. Have feedback on this project? Ideas for another? Let me know in the comments!

Being Frederick (we’ve featured one of his meticulous projects here before), he’s documented the whole build minutely, so you’ll find it a doddle to make your own. Head over to his website for full instructions and code; and let us know if you build one of these for yourself!

The post Gesture control for your TV appeared first on Raspberry Pi.