Tag Archives: psn

Now Open – Third AWS Availability Zone in London

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-third-aws-availability-zone-in-london/

We expand AWS by picking a geographic area (which we call a Region) and then building multiple, isolated Availability Zones in that area. Each Availability Zone (AZ) has multiple Internet connections and power connections to multiple grids.

Today I am happy to announce that we are opening our 50th AWS Availability Zone, with the addition of a third AZ to the EU (London) Region. This will give you additional flexibility to architect highly scalable, fault-tolerant applications that run across multiple AZs in the UK.

Since launching the EU (London) Region, we have seen an ever-growing set of customers, particularly in the public sector and in regulated industries, use AWS for new and innovative applications. Here are a couple of examples, courtesy of my AWS colleagues in the UK:

Enterprise – Some of the UK’s most respected enterprises are using AWS to transform their businesses, including BBC, BT, Deloitte, and Travis Perkins. Travis Perkins is one of the largest suppliers of building materials in the UK and is implementing the biggest systems and business change in its history, including an all-in migration of its data centers to AWS.

Startups – Cross-border payments company Currencycloud has migrated its entire payments production, and demo platform to AWS resulting in a 30% saving on their infrastructure costs. Clearscore, with plans to disrupting the credit score industry, has also chosen to host their entire platform on AWS. UnderwriteMe is using the EU (London) Region to offer an underwriting platform to their customers as a managed service.

Public Sector -The Met Office chose AWS to support the Met Office Weather App, available for iPhone and Android phones. Since the Met Office Weather App went live in January 2016, it has attracted more than half a million users. Using AWS, the Met Office has been able to increase agility, speed, and scalability while reducing costs. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is using the EU (London) Region for services such as the Strategic Card Payments platform, which helps the agency achieve PCI DSS compliance.

The AWS EU (London) Region has achieved Public Services Network (PSN) assurance, which provides UK Public Sector customers with an assured infrastructure on which to build UK Public Sector services. In conjunction with AWS’s Standardized Architecture for UK-OFFICIAL, PSN assurance enables UK Public Sector organizations to move their UK-OFFICIAL classified data to the EU (London) Region in a controlled and risk-managed manner.

For a complete list of AWS Regions and Services, visit the AWS Global Infrastructure page. As always, pricing for services in the Region can be found on the detail pages; visit our Cloud Products page to get started.

Jeff;

The AWS EU (London) Region Achieves Public Services Network (PSN) Assurance

Post Syndicated from Oliver Bell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-uk-region-achieves-public-services-network-psn-assurance/

UK flag

AWS is excited to announce that the AWS EU (London) Region has achieved Public Services Network (PSN) assurance. This means that the EU (London) Region can now be connected to the PSN (or PSN customers) by PSN-certified AWS Direct Connect partners. PSN assurance demonstrates to our UK Public Sector customers that the EU (London) Region has met the stringent requirements of PSN and provides an assured platform on which to build UK Public Sector services. Customers are required to ensure that applications and configurations applied to their AWS instances meet the PSN standards, and they must undertake PSN certification for the content, platform, applications, systems, and networks they run on AWS (but no longer need to include AWS infrastructure and products in their certification).

In conjunction with our Standardized Architecture for UK-OFFICIAL, PSN assurance enables UK Public Sector organizations to move their UK-OFFICIAL classified data to the EU (London) Region in a controlled and risk-managed manner. AWS has also created a UK-OFFICIAL on AWS Quick Start, which provisions an environment suitable for UK-OFFICIAL classified data. This Quick Start includes guidance and controls that help public sector organizations manage risks and ensure security when handling UK-OFFICIAL information assets.

You can download the EU (London) Region PSN Code of Connection and Service Compliance certificates through AWS Artifact. For further information about using AWS in the context of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) UK’s Cloud Security Principles, see Using AWS in the Context of NCSC UK’s Cloud Security Principles.

– Oliver

P.A.R.T.Y.

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/p-a-r-t-y/

On 4 and 5 March 2017, more than 1,800 people got together in Cambridge to celebrate five years of Raspberry Pi and Code Club. We had cake, code, robots, explosions, and unicorn face paint. It was all kinds of awesome.

Celebrating five years of Raspberry Pi and Code Club

Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2017-03-10.

It’s hard to believe that it was only five years ago that we launched the first Raspberry Pi computer. Back then, our ambitions stretched to maybe a few tens of thousands of units, and our hope was simply that we could inspire more young people to study computer science.

Fast forward to 2017 and the Raspberry Pi is the third most successful computing platform of all time, with more than twelve and a half million units used by makers, educators, scientists, and entrepreneurs all over the world (you can read more about this in our Annual Review).

On 28 February, we announced the latest addition to our family of devices, the Raspberry Pi Zero W, which brings wireless connectivity and Bluetooth to the Pi Zero for an astonishing $10. You seemed to like it: in the four days between the product launch and the first day of the Birthday Party, we sold more than 100,000 units. We absolutely love seeing all the cool things you’re building with them!

Raspberry Pi Zero W

Celebrating our community

Low-cost, high-performance computers are a big part of the story, but they’re not the whole story. One of the most remarkable things about Raspberry Pi is the amazing community that has come together around the idea that more people should have the skills and confidence to get creative with technology.

For every person working for the Raspberry Pi Foundation, there are hundreds and thousands of community members outside the organisation who advance that mission every day. They run Raspberry Jams, volunteer at Code Clubs, write educational resources, moderate our forums, and so much more. The Birthday Party is one of the ways that we celebrate what they’ve achieved and say thank you to them for everything they’ve done.

Over the two days of the celebration, there were 57 workshops and talks from community members, including several that were designed and run by young people. I managed to listen to more of the talks this year, and I was really impressed by the breadth of subjects covered and the expertise on display.

All About Code on Twitter

Big thanks to @Raspberry_Pi for letting me run #PiParty @edu_blocks workshop and to @cjdell for his continuing help and support

Educators are an important part of our community and it was great to see so many of our Certified Educators leading sessions and contributing across the whole event.

Carrie Anne Philbin on Twitter

Thanks to my panel of @raspberry_pi certified educators – you are all amazing! #piparty https://t.co/0psnTEnfxq

Hands-on experiences

One of the goals for this year’s event was to give everyone the opportunity to get hands-on experience of digital making and, even if you weren’t able to get a place at one of the sold-out workshops, there were heaps of drop-in and ask-the-expert sessions, giving everyone the chance to get involved.

The marketplace was one of this year’s highlights: it featured more than 20 exhibitors including the awesome Pimoroni and Pi Hut, as well as some great maker creations, from the Tech Wishing Well to a game of robot football. It was great to see so many young people inspired by other people’s makes.

Child looking at a handmade robot at the Raspberry Pi fifth birthday weekend

Code Club’s celebrations

As I mentioned before, this year’s party was very much a joint celebration, marking five years of both Raspberry Pi and Code Club.

Since its launch in 2012, Code Club has established itself as one of the largest networks of after-school clubs in the world. As well as celebrating the milestone of 5,000 active Code Clubs in the UK, it was a real treat to welcome Code Club’s partners from across the world, including Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, France, New Zealand, South Korea, and Ukraine.

Representatives of Code Club International at the Raspberry Pi fifth birthday party

Representatives of Code Club International, up for a birthday party!

Our amazing team

There are so many people to thank for making our fifth Birthday Party such a massive success. The Cambridge Junction was a fantastic venue with a wonderful team (you can support their work here). Our friends at RealVNC provided generous sponsorship and practical demonstrations. ModMyPi packed hundreds of swag bags with swag donated by all of our exhibitors. Fuzzy Duck Brewery did us proud with another batch of their Irrational Ale.

We’re hugely grateful to Sam Aaron and Fran Scott who provided the amazing finales on Saturday and Sunday. No party is quite the same without an algorave and a lot of explosions.

Most of all, I want to say a massive thank you to all of our volunteers and community members: you really did make the Birthday Party possible, and we couldn’t have done it without you.

One of the things we stand for at Raspberry Pi is making computing and digital making accessible to all. There’s a long way to go before we can claim that we’ve achieved that goal, but it was fantastic to see so much genuine diversity on display.

Probably the most important piece of feedback I heard about the weekend was how welcoming it felt for people who were new to the movement. That is entirely down to the generous, open culture that has been created by our community. Thank you all.

Collage of Raspberry Pi and Code Club fifth birthday images

 

 

The post P.A.R.T.Y. appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to Remediate Amazon Inspector Security Findings Automatically

Post Syndicated from Eric Fitzgerald original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-remediate-amazon-inspector-security-findings-automatically/

The Amazon Inspector security assessment service can evaluate the operating environments and applications you have deployed on AWS for common and emerging security vulnerabilities automatically. As an AWS-built service, Amazon Inspector is designed to exchange data and interact with other core AWS services not only to identify potential security findings, but also to automate addressing those findings.

Previous related blog posts showed how you can deliver Amazon Inspector security findings automatically to third-party ticketing systems and automate the installation of the Amazon Inspector agent on new Amazon EC2 instances. In this post, I show how you can automatically remediate findings generated by Amazon Inspector. To get started, you must first run an assessment and publish any security findings to an Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) topic. Then, you create an AWS Lambda function that is triggered by those notifications. Finally, the Lambda function examines the findings, and then implements the appropriate remediation based on the type of issue.

Use case

In this post’s example, I find a common vulnerability and exposure (CVE) for a missing update and use Lambda to call the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager to update the instance. However, this is just one use case and the underlying logic can be used for multiple cases such as software and application patching, kernel version updates, security permissions and roles changes, and configuration changes.

The solution

Overview

The solution in this blog post does the following:

  1. Launches a new Amazon EC2 instance, deploying the EC2 Simple Systems Manager (SSM) agent and its role to the instance.
  2. Deploys the Amazon Inspector agent to the instance by using EC2 Systems Manager.
  3. Creates an SNS topic to which Amazon Inspector will publish messages.
  4. Configures an Amazon Inspector assessment template to post finding notifications to the SNS topic.
  5. Creates the Lambda function that is triggered by notifications to the SNS topic and uses EC2 Systems Manager from within the Lambda function to perform automatic remediation on the instance.

1.  Launch an EC2 instance with EC2 Systems Manager enabled

In my previous Security Blog post, I discussed the use of EC2 user data to deploy the EC2 SSM agent to a Linux instance. To enable the type of autoremediation we are talking about, it is necessary to have the EC2 Systems Manager installed on your instances. If you already have EC2 Systems Manager installed on your instances, you can move on to Step 2. Otherwise, let’s take a minute to review how the process works:

  1. Create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role so that the on-instance EC2 SSM agent can communicate with EC2 Systems Manager. You can learn more about the process of creating a role while launching an instance.
  2. While launching the instance with the EC2 launch wizard, associate the role you just created with the new instance and provide the appropriate script as user data for your operating system and architecture to install the EC2 Systems Manager agent as the instance is launched. See the process and scripts.

Screenshot of configuring instance details

Note: You must change the scripts slightly when copying them from the instructions to the EC2 user data. The word region in the curl command must be replaced with the AWS region code (for example, us-east-1).

2.  Deploy the Amazon Inspector agent to the instance by using EC2 Systems Manager

You can deploy the Amazon Inspector agent with EC2 Systems Manager, with EC2 instance user data, or by connecting to an EC2 instance via SSH and running the installation steps manually. Because you just installed the EC2 SSM agent, you will use that method.

To deploy the Amazon Inspector agent:

  1. Navigate to the EC2 console in the desired region. In the navigation pane, choose Command History under Commands near the bottom of the list.
  2. Choose Run a command.
  3. Choose the AWS-RunShellScript command document, and then choose Select instances to specify the instance that you created previously. Note: If you do not see the instance in that list, you probably did not successfully install the EC2 SSM agent. This means you have to start over with the previous section. Common mistakes include failing to associate a role with the instance, failing to associate the correct policy with the role, or providing an incorrect user data script.
  4. Paste the following script in the Commands.
    #!/bin/bash
    cd /tmp
    curl -O https://d1wk0tztpsntt1.cloudfront.net/linux/latest/install
    chmod a+x /tmp/install
    bash /tmp/install

  5. Choose Run to execute the script on the instance.

Screenshot of deploying the Amazon Inspector agent

3.  Create an SNS topic to which Amazon Inspector will publish messages

Amazon SNS uses topics, communication channels for sending messages and subscribing to notifications. You will create an SNS topic for this solution to which Amazon Inspector publishes messages whenever there is a security finding. Later, you will create a Lambda function that subscribes to this topic and receives a notification whenever a new security finding is generated.

To create an SNS topic:

  1. In the AWS Management Console, navigate to the SNS console.
  2. Choose Create topic. Type a topic name and a display name, and choose Create topic.
  3. From the list of displayed topics, choose the topic that you just created by selecting the check box to the left of the topic name, and then choose Edit topic policy from the Other topic actions drop-down list.
  4. In the Advanced view tab, find the Principal section of the policy document. In that section, replace the line that says “AWS”: “*” with the following text: “Service”: “inspector.amazonaws.com” (see the following screenshot).
  5. Choose Update policy to save the changes.
  6. Choose Edit topic policy On the Basic view tab, set the topic policy to allow Only me (topic owner) to subscribe to the topic, and choose Update policy to save the changes.

Screenshot of editing the topic policy

4.  Configure an Amazon Inspector assessment template to post finding notifications to the SNS topic

An assessment template is a configuration that tells Amazon Inspector how to construct a specific security evaluation. For example, an assessment template can tell Amazon Inspector which EC2 instances to target and which rules packages to evaluate. You can configure a template to tell Amazon Inspector to generate SNS notifications when findings are identified. In order to enable automatic remediation, you either create a new template or modify an existing template to set up SNS notifications to the SNS topic that you just created.

To enable automatic remediation:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and navigate to the Amazon Inspector console.
  2. Choose Assessment templates in the navigation pane.
  3. Choose one of your existing Amazon Inspector assessment templates. If you need to create a new Amazon Inspector template, type a name for the template and choose the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures rules package. Then go back to the list and select the template.
  4. Expand the template so that you can see all the settings by choosing the right-pointing arrowhead in the row for that template.
  5. Choose the pencil icon next to the SNS topics.
  6. Add the SNS topic that you created in the previous section by choosing it from the Select a new topic to notify of events drop-down list (see the following screenshot).
  7. Choose Save to save your changes.

Screenshot of configuring the SNS topic

5.  Create the Lambda autoremediation function

Now, create a Lambda function that listens for Amazon Inspector to notify it of new security findings, and then tells the EC2 SSM agent to run the appropriate system update command (apt-get update or yum update) if the finding is for an unpatched CVE vulnerability.

Step 1: Create an IAM role for the Lambda function to send EC2 Systems Manager commands

A Lambda function needs specific permissions to interact with your AWS resources. You provide these permissions in the form of an IAM role, and the role has a policy attached that permits the Lambda function to receive SNS notifications and to send commands to the Amazon Inspector agent via EC2 Systems Manager.

To create the IAM role:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console, and navigate to the IAM console.
  2. Choose Roles in the navigation pane, and then choose Create new role.
  3. Type a name for the role. You should (but are not required to) use a descriptive name such as Amazon Inspector-agent-autodeploy-lambda. Regardless of the name you choose, remember the name because you will need it in the next section.
  4. Choose the AWS Lambda role type.
  5. Attach the policies AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole and AmazonSSMFullAccess.
  6. Choose Create the role.

Step 2: Create the Lambda function that will update the host by sending the appropriate commands through EC2 Systems Manager

Now, create the Lambda function. You can download the source code for this function from the .zip file link in the following procedure. Some things to note about the function are:

  • The function listens for notifications on the configured SNS topic, but only acts on notifications that are from Amazon Inspector that report a finding and are reporting a CVE vulnerability.
  • The function checks to ensure that the EC2 SSM agent is installed, running, and healthy on the EC2 instance for which the finding was reported.
  • The function checks the operating system of the EC2 instance and determines if it is a supported Linux distribution (Ubuntu or Amazon Linux).
  • The function sends the distribution-appropriate package update command (apt-get update or yum update) to the EC2 instance via EC2 Systems Manager.
  • The function does not reboot the agent. You either have to add that functionality yourself or reboot the agent manually.

To create the Lambda function:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console in the region that you intend to use, and navigate to the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create a Lambda function.
  3. On the Select a blueprint page, choose the Hello World Python blueprint and choose Next.
  4. On the Configure triggers page, choose SNS as the trigger, and choose the SNS topic that you created in the last section. Choose the Enable trigger check box and choose Next.
  5. Type a name and description for the function. Choose Python 2.7 runtime.
  6. Download and save this .zip file.
  7. Unzip the .zip file, and copy the entire contents of lambda-auto-remediate.py to your clipboard.
  8. Choose Edit code inline under Code entry type in the Lambda function, and replace all the existing text with the text that you just copied from lambda-auto-remediate.py.
  9. Select Choose an existing role from the Role drop-down list, and then in the Existing role box, choose the IAM role that you created in Step 1 of this section.
  10. Choose Next and then Create function to complete the creation of the function.

You now have a working system that monitors Amazon Inspector for CVE findings and will patch affected Ubuntu or Amazon Linux instances automatically. You can view or modify the source code for the function in the Lambda console. Additionally, Lambda and EC2 Systems Manager will generate logs whenever the function causes an agent to patch itself.

Note: If you have multiple CVE findings for an instance, the remediation commands might be executed more than once, but the package managers for Linux handle this efficiently. You still have to reboot the instances yourself, but EC2 Systems Manager includes a feature to do that as well.

Summary

Using Amazon Inspector with Lambda allows you to automate certain security tasks. Because Lambda supports Python and JavaScript, development of such automation is similar to automating any other kind of administrative task via scripting. Even better, you can take actions on EC2 instances in response to Amazon Inspector findings by using Lambda to invoke EC2 Systems Manager. This enables you to take instance-specific actions based on issues that Amazon Inspector finds. Combining these capabilities allows you to build event-driven security automation to help better secure your AWS environment in near real time.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about implementing the solution in this post, start a new thread on the Amazon Inspector forum.

– Eric

How to Simplify Security Assessment Setup Using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager and Amazon Inspector

Post Syndicated from Eric Fitzgerald original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-simplify-security-assessment-setup-using-ec2-systems-manager-and-amazon-inspector/

In a July 2016 AWS Blog post, I discussed how to integrate Amazon Inspector with third-party ticketing systems by using Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) and AWS Lambda.

This AWS Security Blog post continues in the same vein, describing how to use Amazon Inspector to automate various aspects of security management. In this post, I show you how to install the Amazon Inspector agent automatically through the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager when a new Amazon EC2 instance is launched. In a subsequent post, I will show you how to update EC2 instances automatically that run Linux when Amazon Inspector discovers a missing security patch.

An overview of EC2 Systems Manager and EC2 Simple Systems Manager (SSM)

Amazon EC2 Systems Manager is a set of services that makes it easy to manage your Windows or Linux hosts running on EC2 instances. EC2 Systems Manager does this through an agent called EC2 Simple Systems Manager (SSM), which is installed on your instances. With SSM on your EC2 instances, you can save yourself an SSH or RDP session to the instance to perform management tasks.

With EC2 Systems Manager, you can perform various tasks at scale through a simple API, CLI, or EC2 Run Command. The EC2 Run Command can execute a Unix shell script on Linux instances or a Windows PowerShell script on Windows instances. When you use EC2 Systems Manager to run a script on an EC2 instance, the output is piped to a text file in Amazon S3 for you automatically. Therefore, you can examine the output without visiting the system or inventing your own mechanism for capturing console output.

The solution

Step 1: Enable EC2 Systems Manager and install the EC2 SSM agent

Setting up EC2 Systems Manager is relatively straightforward, but you must set up EC2 Systems Manager at the time you launch the instance. This is because the SSM agent will use an instance role to communicate with the EC2 Systems Manager securely. When launched with the appropriately configured IAM role, the EC2 instance is provided with a set of credentials that allows the SSM agent to perform actions on behalf of the account owner. The policy on the IAM role determines the permissions associated with these credentials.

The easiest way I have found to do this is to create the role, and then each time you launch an instance, associate the role with the instance and provide the SSM agent installation script in the instance’s user data in the launch wizard or API. Here’s how:

  1. Create an instance role so that the on-instance SSM agent can communicate with EC2 Systems Manager. If you already need an instance role for some other purpose, use the IAM console to attach the AmazonEC2RoleforSSM managed policy to your existing role.
  2. When launching the instance with the EC2 launch wizard, associate the role you just created with the new instance.
  3. When launching the instance with the EC2 launch wizard, provide the appropriate script as user data for your operating system and architecture to install the SSM agent as the instance is launched. To see this process and scripts in full, see Installing the SSM Agent.

Note: You must change the scripts slightly when copying them from the instructions to the EC2 user data: the word region in the curl command must be replaced with the AWS region code (for example, us-east-1).

When your instance starts, the SSM agent is installed. Having the SSM agent on the instance is the key component to the automated installation of the Amazon Inspector agent on the instance.

Step 2: Automatically install the Amazon Inspector agent when new EC2 instances are launched

Let’s assume that you will install the SSM agent when you first launch your instances. With that assumption in mind, you have two methods for installing the Amazon Inspector agent.

Method 1: Install the Amazon Inspector agent with user data

Just as we did above with the SSM agent, we can use the user data feature of EC2 to execute the Amazon Inspector agent installation script during instance launch. This is useful if you have decided not to install the SSM agent, but it is more work than necessary if you are in the habit of deploying the SSM agent at the launch of an instance.

To install the Amazon Inspector agent with user data on Linux systems, simply add the following commands to the User data box in the instance launch wizard (as shown in the following screenshot). This script works without modification on any Linux distribution that Amazon Inspector supports.

#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp
curl -O https://d1wk0tztpsntt1.cloudfront.net/linux/latest/install
chmod +x /tmp/install
/tmp/install

Note: If you are adding these commands to existing user data, be sure that only the first line of user data is #!/bin/bash. You should not have multiple copies of this line.

Finish launching the EC2 instance and the Amazon Inspector agent is installed as the instance is starting for the first time. To read more about this process, see Working with AWS Agents on Linux-based Operating Systems.

Method 2: Install the Amazon Inspector agent whenever a new EC2 instance starts

In environments that launch new instances continually, installing the Amazon Inspector agent automatically when an instance starts prevents some additional work. As we discussed in the previous method, you need to modify your instance launch process to include the EC2 SSM agent. This means you need to configure your instances with an EC2 Systems Manager role, as well as run the EC2 SSM agent.

First, create an IAM role that gives your Lambda function the permissions it needs to deploy the Amazon Inspector agent. Then, create the Lambda job that uses the SSM RunShellScript to install the Amazon Inspector agent. Finally, set up Amazon CloudWatch Events to run the Lambda job whenever a new instance enters the Running state.

Here are the details of the three-step process:

Step 1 – Create an IAM role for the Lambda function to use to send commands to EC2 Systems Manager:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and navigate to the IAM console.
  2. Choose Roles in the navigation pane. Choose Create new role.
  3. Type a name for a role. You should (but are not required to) use a descriptive name such as Inspector-agent-autodeploy-Lambda. Remember the name you choose because you will need it in Step 2.
  4. Choose the AWS Lambda role type.
  5. Attach the policies AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole and AmazonSSMFullAccess.
  6. Choose Create the role to finish.

Step 2 – Create the Lambda function that will run EC2 Systems Manager commands to install the Amazon Inspector agent:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console in your chosen region and navigate to the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create a Lambda function.
  3. Skip Select blueprint.
  4. On the Configure triggers page, choose Next. Type a Name and Description for the function. Choose Python 2.7 for Runtime.
  5. Download and save autodeploy.py. Unzip the file, and copy the entire contents of autodeploy.py.
  6. From the Code entry type drop-down list, choose Edit code inline, and replace all the existing text with the text that you just copied from autodeploy.py.
  7. From the Role drop-down list, choose Choose an existing role, and then from the Existing role drop-down list, choose the role that you created in Step 1.
  8. Choose Next and then Create function to finish creating the function.

Step 3 – Set up CloudWatch Events to trigger the function:

  1. In the AWS Management Console in the same region as you used in Step 2, navigate to the CloudWatch console and then choose Events in the navigation pane.
  2. Choose Create rule. From the Select event source drop-down list, choose Amazon EC2.
  3. Choose Specific state(s) and Running. This tells CloudWatch to generate an event when an instance enters the Running state.
  4. Under Targets, choose Add target and then Lambda function.
  5. Choose the function that you created in Step 2.
  6. Click Configure details. Type a name and description for the event, and choose Create rule.

Summary

You have completed the setup! Now, whenever an EC2 instance enters the Running state (either on initial creation or on reboot), CloudWatch Events triggers an event that invokes the Lambda function that you created. The Lambda function then uses EC2 System Manager to install the Amazon Inspector agent on the instance.

In a subsequent AWS Security Blog post, I will show you how to take your security assessment automation a step further by automatically performing remediations for Amazon Inspector findings by using EC2 System Manager and Lambda.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have implementation questions, start a new thread on the Amazon Inspector forum.

– Eric

Merry Christmas & A Happy New Year 2017

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/j207lPpRgHY/

Wishing you all happy holidays, a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2017 – enjoy the gift of giving. Be jolly, merry and don’t DDoS the PSN Network, or Steam or XBox.. We need our gaming! Have a great one – love Darknet.

The post Merry Christmas & A Happy New Year 2017 appeared first on Darknet – The Darkside.

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

Now Open – AWS London Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-london-region/

Last week we launched our 15th AWS Region and today we are launching our 16th. We have expanded the AWS footprint into the United Kingdom with a new Region in London, our third in Europe. AWS customers can use the new London Region to better serve end-users in the United Kingdom and can also use it to store data in the UK.

The Details
The new London Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon EMR, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support API, Elastic Load Balancing, VM Import/Export, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53, AWS WAF, AWS Trusted Advisor, and AWS Direct Connect (follow the links for pricing and other information).

The London Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, and X1 instances.

Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are getting ready to use this new Region. Here’s a very small sample:

Trainline is Europe’s number one independent rail ticket retailer. Every day more than 100,000 people travel using tickets bought from Trainline. Here’s what Mark Holt (CTO of Trainline) shared with us:

We recently completed the migration of 100 percent of our eCommerce infrastructure to AWS and have seen awesome results: improved security, 60 percent less downtime, significant cost savings and incredible improvements in agility. From extensive testing, we know that 0.3s of latency is worth more than 8 million pounds and so, while AWS connectivity is already blazingly fast, we expect that serving our UK customers from UK datacenters should lead to significant top-line benefits.

Kainos Evolve Electronic Medical Records (EMR) automates the creation, capture and handling of medical case notes and operational documents and records, allowing healthcare providers to deliver better patient safety and quality of care for several leading NHS Foundation Trusts and market leading healthcare technology companies.

Travis Perkins, the largest supplier of building materials in the UK, is implementing the biggest systems and business change in its history including the migration of its datacenters to AWS.

Just Eat is the world’s leading marketplace for online food delivery. Using AWS, JustEat has been able to experiment faster and reduce the time to roll out new feature updates.

OakNorth, a new bank focused on lending between £1m-£20m to entrepreneurs and growth businesses, became the UK’s first cloud-based bank in May after several months of working with AWS to drive the development forward with the regulator.

Partners
I’m happy to report that we are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in the United Kingdom. Here’s a partial list:

  • AWS Premier Consulting Partners – Accenture, Claranet, Cloudreach, CSC, Datapipe, KCOM, Rackspace, and Slalom.
  • AWS Consulting Partners – Attenda, Contino, Deloitte, KPMG, LayerV, Lemongrass, Perfect Image, and Version 1.
  • AWS Technology Partners – Splunk, Sage, Sophos, Trend Micro, and Zerolight.
  • AWS Managed Service Partners – Claranet, Cloudreach, KCOM, and Rackspace.
  • AWS Direct Connect Partners – AT&T, BT, Hutchison Global Communications, Level 3, Redcentric, and Vodafone.

Here are a few examples of what our partners are working on:

KCOM is a professional services provider offering consultancy, architecture, project delivery and managed service capabilities to large UK-based enterprise businesses. The scalability and flexibility of AWS gives them a significant competitive advantage with their enterprise and public sector customers. The new Region will allow KCOM to build innovative solutions for their public sector clients while meeting local regulatory requirements.

Splunk is a member of the AWS Partner Network and a market leader in analyzing machine data to deliver operational intelligence for security, IT, and the business. They use cloud computing and big data analytics to help their customers to embrace digital transformation and continuous innovation. The new Region will provide even more companies with real-time visibility into the operation of their systems and infrastructure.

Redcentric is a NHS Digital-approved N3 Commercial Aggregator. Their work allows health and care providers such as NHS acute, emergency and mental trusts, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), and the ISV community to connect securely to AWS. The London Region will allow health and care providers to deliver new digital services and to improve outcomes for citizens and patients.

Visit the AWS Partner Network page to read some case studies and to learn how to join.

Compliance & Connectivity
Every AWS Region is designed and built to meet rigorous compliance standards including ISO 27001, ISO 9001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1, SOC 2, SOC3, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. Our Cloud Compliance page includes information about these standards, along with those that are specific to the UK, including Cyber Essentials Plus.

The UK Government recognizes that local datacenters from hyper scale public cloud providers can deliver secure solutions for OFFICIAL workloads. In order to meet the special security needs of public sector organizations in the UK with respect to OFFICIAL workloads, we have worked with our Direct Connect Partners to make sure that obligations for connectivity to the Public Services Network (PSN) and N3 can be met.

Use it Today
The London Region is open for business now and you can start using it today! If you need additional information about this Region, please feel free to contact our UK team at [email protected].

Jeff;

The Dyn DNS DDoS That Killed Half The Internet

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/wJNQgzKbLTI/

Last week the Dyn DNS DDoS took out most of the East coast US websites including monsters like Spotify, Twitter, Netflix, Github, Heroku and many more. Hopefully it wasn’t because I shared the Mirai source code and some script kiddies got hold of it and decided to talk half of the US websites out. A […]

The post The Dyn DNS DDoS That Killed…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk