Tag Archives: pub/sub

Event-Driven Computing with Amazon SNS and AWS Compute, Storage, Database, and Networking Services

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/event-driven-computing-with-amazon-sns-compute-storage-database-and-networking-services/

Contributed by Otavio Ferreira, Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

Like other developers around the world, you may be tackling increasingly complex business problems. A key success factor, in that case, is the ability to break down a large project scope into smaller, more manageable components. A service-oriented architecture guides you toward designing systems as a collection of loosely coupled, independently scaled, and highly reusable services. Microservices take this even further. To improve performance and scalability, they promote fine-grained interfaces and lightweight protocols.

However, the communication among isolated microservices can be challenging. Services are often deployed onto independent servers and don’t share any compute or storage resources. Also, you should avoid hard dependencies among microservices, to preserve maintainability and reusability.

If you apply the pub/sub design pattern, you can effortlessly decouple and independently scale out your microservices and serverless architectures. A pub/sub messaging service, such as Amazon SNS, promotes event-driven computing that statically decouples event publishers from subscribers, while dynamically allowing for the exchange of messages between them. An event-driven architecture also introduces the responsiveness needed to deal with complex problems, which are often unpredictable and asynchronous.

What is event-driven computing?

Given the context of microservices, event-driven computing is a model in which subscriber services automatically perform work in response to events triggered by publisher services. This paradigm can be applied to automate workflows while decoupling the services that collectively and independently work to fulfil these workflows. Amazon SNS is an event-driven computing hub, in the AWS Cloud, that has native integration with several AWS publisher and subscriber services.

Which AWS services publish events to SNS natively?

Several AWS services have been integrated as SNS publishers and, therefore, can natively trigger event-driven computing for a variety of use cases. In this post, I specifically cover AWS compute, storage, database, and networking services, as depicted below.

Compute services

  • Auto Scaling: Helps you ensure that you have the correct number of Amazon EC2 instances available to handle the load for your application. You can configure Auto Scaling lifecycle hooks to trigger events, as Auto Scaling resizes your EC2 cluster.As an example, you may want to warm up the local cache store on newly launched EC2 instances, and also download log files from other EC2 instances that are about to be terminated. To make this happen, set an SNS topic as your Auto Scaling group’s notification target, then subscribe two Lambda functions to this SNS topic. The first function is responsible for handling scale-out events (to warm up cache upon provisioning), whereas the second is in charge of handling scale-in events (to download logs upon termination).

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk: An easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and web services developed in a number of programming languages. You can configure event notifications for your Elastic Beanstalk environment so that notable events can be automatically published to an SNS topic, then pushed to topic subscribers.As an example, you may use this event-driven architecture to coordinate your continuous integration pipeline (such as Jenkins CI). That way, whenever an environment is created, Elastic Beanstalk publishes this event to an SNS topic, which triggers a subscribing Lambda function, which then kicks off a CI job against your newly created Elastic Beanstalk environment.

  • Elastic Load Balancing: Automatically distributes incoming application traffic across Amazon EC2 instances, containers, or other resources identified by IP addresses.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on Elastic Load Balancing metrics, to automate the handling of events derived from Classic Load Balancers. As an example, you may leverage this event-driven design to automate latency profiling in an Amazon ECS cluster behind a Classic Load Balancer. In this example, whenever your ECS cluster breaches your load balancer latency threshold, an event is posted by CloudWatch to an SNS topic, which then triggers a subscribing Lambda function. This function runs a task on your ECS cluster to trigger a latency profiling tool, hosted on the cluster itself. This can enhance your latency troubleshooting exercise by making it timely.

Storage services

  • Amazon S3: Object storage built to store and retrieve any amount of data.You can enable S3 event notifications, and automatically get them posted to SNS topics, to automate a variety of workflows. For instance, imagine that you have an S3 bucket to store incoming resumes from candidates, and a fleet of EC2 instances to encode these resumes from their original format (such as Word or text) into a portable format (such as PDF).In this example, whenever new files are uploaded to your input bucket, S3 publishes these events to an SNS topic, which in turn pushes these messages into subscribing SQS queues. Then, encoding workers running on EC2 instances poll these messages from the SQS queues; retrieve the original files from the input S3 bucket; encode them into PDF; and finally store them in an output S3 bucket.

  • Amazon EFS: Provides simple and scalable file storage, for use with Amazon EC2 instances, in the AWS Cloud.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on EFS metrics, to automate the management of your EFS systems. For example, consider a highly parallelized genomics analysis application that runs against an EFS system. By default, this file system is instantiated on the “General Purpose” performance mode. Although this performance mode allows for lower latency, it might eventually impose a scaling bottleneck. Therefore, you may leverage an event-driven design to handle it automatically.Basically, as soon as the EFS metric “Percent I/O Limit” breaches 95%, CloudWatch could post this event to an SNS topic, which in turn would push this message into a subscribing Lambda function. This function automatically creates a new file system, this time on the “Max I/O” performance mode, then switches the genomics analysis application to this new file system. As a result, your application starts experiencing higher I/O throughput rates.

  • Amazon Glacier: A secure, durable, and low-cost cloud storage service for data archiving and long-term backup.You can set a notification configuration on an Amazon Glacier vault so that when a job completes, a message is published to an SNS topic. Retrieving an archive from Amazon Glacier is a two-step asynchronous operation, in which you first initiate a job, and then download the output after the job completes. Therefore, SNS helps you eliminate polling your Amazon Glacier vault to check whether your job has been completed, or not. As usual, you may subscribe SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints to your SNS topic, to be notified when your Amazon Glacier job is done.

  • AWS Snowball: A petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses secure appliances to transfer large amounts of data.You can leverage Snowball notifications to automate workflows related to importing data into and exporting data from AWS. More specifically, whenever your Snowball job status changes, Snowball can publish this event to an SNS topic, which in turn can broadcast the event to all its subscribers.As an example, imagine a Geographic Information System (GIS) that distributes high-resolution satellite images to users via Web browser. In this example, the GIS vendor could capture up to 80 TB of satellite images; create a Snowball job to import these files from an on-premises system to an S3 bucket; and provide an SNS topic ARN to be notified upon job status changes in Snowball. After Snowball changes the job status from “Importing” to “Completed”, Snowball publishes this event to the specified SNS topic, which delivers this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally creates a CloudFront web distribution for the target S3 bucket, to serve the images to end users.

Database services

  • Amazon RDS: Makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.RDS leverages SNS to broadcast notifications when RDS events occur. As usual, these notifications can be delivered via any protocol supported by SNS, including SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints.As an example, imagine that you own a social network website that has experienced organic growth, and needs to scale its compute and database resources on demand. In this case, you could provide an SNS topic to listen to RDS DB instance events. When the “Low Storage” event is published to the topic, SNS pushes this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which in turn leverages the RDS API to increase the storage capacity allocated to your DB instance. The provisioning itself takes place within the specified DB maintenance window.

  • Amazon ElastiCache: A web service that makes it easy to deploy, operate, and scale an in-memory data store or cache in the cloud.ElastiCache can publish messages using Amazon SNS when significant events happen on your cache cluster. This feature can be used to refresh the list of servers on client machines connected to individual cache node endpoints of a cache cluster. For instance, an ecommerce website fetches product details from a cache cluster, with the goal of offloading a relational database and speeding up page load times. Ideally, you want to make sure that each web server always has an updated list of cache servers to which to connect.To automate this node discovery process, you can get your ElastiCache cluster to publish events to an SNS topic. Thus, when ElastiCache event “AddCacheNodeComplete” is published, your topic then pushes this event to all subscribing HTTP endpoints that serve your ecommerce website, so that these HTTP servers can update their list of cache nodes.

  • Amazon Redshift: A fully managed data warehouse that makes it simple to analyze data using standard SQL and BI (Business Intelligence) tools.Amazon Redshift uses SNS to broadcast relevant events so that data warehouse workflows can be automated. As an example, imagine a news website that sends clickstream data to a Kinesis Firehose stream, which then loads the data into Amazon Redshift, so that popular news and reading preferences might be surfaced on a BI tool. At some point though, this Amazon Redshift cluster might need to be resized, and the cluster enters a ready-only mode. Hence, this Amazon Redshift event is published to an SNS topic, which delivers this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally deletes the corresponding Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, so that clickstream data uploads can be put on hold.At a later point, after Amazon Redshift publishes the event that the maintenance window has been closed, SNS notifies a subscribing Lambda function accordingly, so that this function can re-create the Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, and resume clickstream data uploads to Amazon Redshift.

  • AWS DMS: Helps you migrate databases to AWS quickly and securely. The source database remains fully operational during the migration, minimizing downtime to applications that rely on the database.DMS also uses SNS to provide notifications when DMS events occur, which can automate database migration workflows. As an example, you might create data replication tasks to migrate an on-premises MS SQL database, composed of multiple tables, to MySQL. Thus, if replication tasks fail due to incompatible data encoding in the source tables, these events can be published to an SNS topic, which can push these messages into a subscribing SQS queue. Then, encoders running on EC2 can poll these messages from the SQS queue, encode the source tables into a compatible character set, and restart the corresponding replication tasks in DMS. This is an event-driven approach to a self-healing database migration process.

Networking services

  • Amazon Route 53: A highly available and scalable cloud-based DNS (Domain Name System). Route 53 health checks monitor the health and performance of your web applications, web servers, and other resources.You can set CloudWatch alarms and get automated Amazon SNS notifications when the status of your Route 53 health check changes. As an example, imagine an online payment gateway that reports the health of its platform to merchants worldwide, via a status page. This page is hosted on EC2 and fetches platform health data from DynamoDB. In this case, you could configure a CloudWatch alarm for your Route 53 health check, so that when the alarm threshold is breached, and the payment gateway is no longer considered healthy, then CloudWatch publishes this event to an SNS topic, which pushes this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally updates the DynamoDB table that populates the status page. This event-driven approach avoids any kind of manual update to the status page visited by merchants.

  • AWS Direct Connect (AWS DX): Makes it easy to establish a dedicated network connection from your premises to AWS, which can reduce your network costs, increase bandwidth throughput, and provide a more consistent network experience than Internet-based connections.You can monitor physical DX connections using CloudWatch alarms, and send SNS messages when alarms change their status. As an example, when a DX connection state shifts to 0 (zero), indicating that the connection is down, this event can be published to an SNS topic, which can fan out this message to impacted servers through HTTP endpoints, so that they might reroute their traffic through a different connection instead. This is an event-driven approach to connectivity resilience.

More event-driven computing on AWS

In addition to SNS, event-driven computing is also addressed by Amazon CloudWatch Events, which delivers a near real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources. With CloudWatch Events, you can route each event type to one or more targets, including:

Many AWS services publish events to CloudWatch. As an example, you can get CloudWatch Events to capture events on your ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) jobs running on AWS Glue and push failed ones to an SQS queue, so that you can retry them later.

Conclusion

Amazon SNS is a pub/sub messaging service that can be used as an event-driven computing hub to AWS customers worldwide. By capturing events natively triggered by AWS services, such as EC2, S3 and RDS, you can automate and optimize all kinds of workflows, namely scaling, testing, encoding, profiling, broadcasting, discovery, failover, and much more. Business use cases presented in this post ranged from recruiting websites, to scientific research, geographic systems, social networks, retail websites, and news portals.

Start now by visiting Amazon SNS in the AWS Management Console, or by trying the AWS 10-Minute Tutorial, Send Fan-out Event Notifications with Amazon SNS and Amazon SQS.

 

Building Loosely Coupled, Scalable, C# Applications with Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS

Post Syndicated from Tara Van Unen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-loosely-coupled-scalable-c-applications-with-amazon-sqs-and-amazon-sns/

 
Stephen Liedig, Solutions Architect

 

One of the many challenges professional software architects and developers face is how to make cloud-native applications scalable, fault-tolerant, and highly available.

Fundamental to your project success is understanding the importance of making systems highly cohesive and loosely coupled. That means considering the multi-dimensional facets of system coupling to support the distributed nature of the applications that you are building for the cloud.

By that, I mean addressing not only the application-level coupling (managing incoming and outgoing dependencies), but also considering the impacts of of platform, spatial, and temporal coupling of your systems. Platform coupling relates to the interoperability, or lack thereof, of heterogeneous systems components. Spatial coupling deals with managing components at a network topology level or protocol level. Temporal, or runtime coupling, refers to the ability of a component within your system to do any kind of meaningful work while it is performing a synchronous, blocking operation.

The AWS messaging services, Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS, help you deal with these forms of coupling by providing mechanisms for:

  • Reliable, durable, and fault-tolerant delivery of messages between application components
  • Logical decomposition of systems and increased autonomy of components
  • Creating unidirectional, non-blocking operations, temporarily decoupling system components at runtime
  • Decreasing the dependencies that components have on each other through standard communication and network channels

Following on the recent topic, Building Scalable Applications and Microservices: Adding Messaging to Your Toolbox, in this post, I look at some of the ways you can introduce SQS and SNS into your architectures to decouple your components, and show how you can implement them using C#.

Walkthrough

To illustrate some of these concepts, consider a web application that processes customer orders. As good architects and developers, you have followed best practices and made your application scalable and highly available. Your solution included implementing load balancing, dynamic scaling across multiple Availability Zones, and persisting orders in a Multi-AZ Amazon RDS database instance, as in the following diagram.


In this example, the application is responsible for handling and persisting the order data, as well as dealing with increases in traffic for popular items.

One potential point of vulnerability in the order processing workflow is in saving the order in the database. The business expects that every order has been persisted into the database. However, any potential deadlock, race condition, or network issue could cause the persistence of the order to fail. Then, the order is lost with no recourse to restore the order.

With good logging capability, you may be able to identify when an error occurred and which customer’s order failed. This wouldn’t allow you to “restore” the transaction, and by that stage, your customer is no longer your customer.

As illustrated in the following diagram, introducing an SQS queue helps improve your ordering application. Using the queue isolates the processing logic into its own component and runs it in a separate process from the web application. This, in turn, allows the system to be more resilient to spikes in traffic, while allowing work to be performed only as fast as necessary in order to manage costs.


In addition, you now have a mechanism for persisting orders as messages (with the queue acting as a temporary database), and have moved the scope of your transaction with your database further down the stack. In the event of an application exception or transaction failure, this ensures that the order processing can be retired or redirected to the Amazon SQS Dead Letter Queue (DLQ), for re-processing at a later stage. (See the recent post, Using Amazon SQS Dead-Letter Queues to Control Message Failure, for more information on dead-letter queues.)

Scaling the order processing nodes

This change allows you now to scale the web application frontend independently from the processing nodes. The frontend application can continue to scale based on metrics such as CPU usage, or the number of requests hitting the load balancer. Processing nodes can scale based on the number of orders in the queue. Here is an example of scale-in and scale-out alarms that you would associate with the scaling policy.

Scale-out Alarm

aws cloudwatch put-metric-alarm --alarm-name AddCapacityToCustomerOrderQueue --metric-name ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible --namespace "AWS/SQS" 
--statistic Average --period 300 --threshold 3 --comparison-operator GreaterThanOrEqualToThreshold --dimensions Name=QueueName,Value=customer-orders
--evaluation-periods 2 --alarm-actions <arn of the scale-out autoscaling policy>

Scale-in Alarm

aws cloudwatch put-metric-alarm --alarm-name RemoveCapacityFromCustomerOrderQueue --metric-name ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible --namespace "AWS/SQS" 
 --statistic Average --period 300 --threshold 1 --comparison-operator LessThanOrEqualToThreshold --dimensions Name=QueueName,Value=customer-orders
 --evaluation-periods 2 --alarm-actions <arn of the scale-in autoscaling policy>

In the above example, use the ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible metric to discover the queue length and drive the scaling policy of the Auto Scaling group. Another useful metric is ApproximateAgeOfOldestMessage, when applications have time-sensitive messages and developers need to ensure that messages are processed within a specific time period.

Scaling the order processing implementation

On top of scaling at an infrastructure level using Auto Scaling, make sure to take advantage of the processing power of your Amazon EC2 instances by using as many of the available threads as possible. There are several ways to implement this. In this post, we build a Windows service that uses the BackgroundWorker class to process the messages from the queue.

Here’s a closer look at the implementation. In the first section of the consuming application, use a loop to continually poll the queue for new messages, and construct a ReceiveMessageRequest variable.

public static void PollQueue()
{
    while (_running)
    {
        Task<ReceiveMessageResponse> receiveMessageResponse;

        // Pull messages off the queue
        using (var sqs = new AmazonSQSClient())
        {
            const int maxMessages = 10;  // 1-10

            //Receiving a message
            var receiveMessageRequest = new ReceiveMessageRequest
            {
                // Get URL from Configuration
                QueueUrl = _queueUrl, 
                // The maximum number of messages to return. 
                // Fewer messages might be returned. 
                MaxNumberOfMessages = maxMessages, 
                // A list of attributes that need to be returned with message.
                AttributeNames = new List<string> { "All" },
                // Enable long polling. 
                // Time to wait for message to arrive on queue.
                WaitTimeSeconds = 5 
            };

            receiveMessageResponse = sqs.ReceiveMessageAsync(receiveMessageRequest);
        }

The WaitTimeSeconds property of the ReceiveMessageRequest specifies the duration (in seconds) that the call waits for a message to arrive in the queue before returning a response to the calling application. There are a few benefits to using long polling:

  • It reduces the number of empty responses by allowing SQS to wait until a message is available in the queue before sending a response.
  • It eliminates false empty responses by querying all (rather than a limited number) of the servers.
  • It returns messages as soon any message becomes available.

For more information, see Amazon SQS Long Polling.

After you have returned messages from the queue, you can start to process them by looping through each message in the response and invoking a new BackgroundWorker thread.

// Process messages
if (receiveMessageResponse.Result.Messages != null)
{
    foreach (var message in receiveMessageResponse.Result.Messages)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Received SQS message, starting worker thread");

        // Create background worker to process message
        BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += (obj, e) => ProcessMessage(message);
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("No messages on queue");
}

The event handler, ProcessMessage, is where you implement business logic for processing orders. It is important to have a good understanding of how long a typical transaction takes so you can set a message VisibilityTimeout that is long enough to complete your operation. If order processing takes longer than the specified timeout period, the message becomes visible on the queue. Other nodes may pick it and process the same order twice, leading to unintended consequences.

Handling Duplicate Messages

In order to manage duplicate messages, seek to make your processing application idempotent. In mathematics, idempotent describes a function that produces the same result if it is applied to itself:

f(x) = f(f(x))

No matter how many times you process the same message, the end result is the same (definition from Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions, Hohpe and Wolf, 2004).

There are several strategies you could apply to achieve this:

  • Create messages that have inherent idempotent characteristics. That is, they are non-transactional in nature and are unique at a specified point in time. Rather than saying “place new order for Customer A,” which adds a duplicate order to the customer, use “place order <orderid> on <timestamp> for Customer A,” which creates a single order no matter how often it is persisted.
  • Deliver your messages via an Amazon SQS FIFO queue, which provides the benefits of message sequencing, but also mechanisms for content-based deduplication. You can deduplicate using the MessageDeduplicationId property on the SendMessage request or by enabling content-based deduplication on the queue, which generates a hash for MessageDeduplicationId, based on the content of the message, not the attributes.
var sendMessageRequest = new SendMessageRequest
{
    QueueUrl = _queueUrl,
    MessageBody = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(order),
    MessageGroupId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N"),
    MessageDeduplicationId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N")
};
  • If using SQS FIFO queues is not an option, keep a message log of all messages attributes processed for a specified period of time, as an alternative to message deduplication on the receiving end. Verifying the existence of the message in the log before processing the message adds additional computational overhead to your processing. This can be minimized through low latency persistence solutions such as Amazon DynamoDB. Bear in mind that this solution is dependent on the successful, distributed transaction of the message and the message log.

Handling exceptions

Because of the distributed nature of SQS queues, it does not automatically delete the message. Therefore, you must explicitly delete the message from the queue after processing it, using the message ReceiptHandle property (see the following code example).

However, if at any stage you have an exception, avoid handling it as you normally would. The intention is to make sure that the message ends back on the queue, so that you can gracefully deal with intermittent failures. Instead, log the exception to capture diagnostic information, and swallow it.

By not explicitly deleting the message from the queue, you can take advantage of the VisibilityTimeout behavior described earlier. Gracefully handle the message processing failure and make the unprocessed message available to other nodes to process.

In the event that subsequent retries fail, SQS automatically moves the message to the configured DLQ after the configured number of receives has been reached. You can further investigate why the order process failed. Most importantly, the order has not been lost, and your customer is still your customer.

private static void ProcessMessage(Message message)
{
    using (var sqs = new AmazonSQSClient())
    {
        try
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Processing message id: {0}", message.MessageId);

            // Implement messaging processing here
            // Ensure no downstream resource contention (parallel processing)
            // <your order processing logic in here…>
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Thread {1}: {2}", DateTime.Now.ToString("s"), Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId, message.MessageId);
            
            // Delete the message off the queue. 
            // Receipt handle is the identifier you must provide 
            // when deleting the message.
            var deleteRequest = new DeleteMessageRequest(_queueName, message.ReceiptHandle);
            sqs.DeleteMessageAsync(deleteRequest);
            Console.WriteLine("Processed message id: {0}", message.MessageId);

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Do nothing.
            // Swallow exception, message will return to the queue when 
            // visibility timeout has been exceeded.
            Console.WriteLine("Could not process message due to error. Exception: {0}", ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

Using SQS to adapt to changing business requirements

One of the benefits of introducing a message queue is that you can accommodate new business requirements without dramatically affecting your application.

If, for example, the business decided that all orders placed over $5000 are to be handled as a priority, you could introduce a new “priority order” queue. The way the orders are processed does not change. The only significant change to the processing application is to ensure that messages from the “priority order” queue are processed before the “standard order” queue.

The following diagram shows how this logic could be isolated in an “order dispatcher,” whose only purpose is to route order messages to the appropriate queue based on whether the order exceeds $5000. Nothing on the web application or the processing nodes changes other than the target queue to which the order is sent. The rates at which orders are processed can be achieved by modifying the poll rates and scalability settings that I have already discussed.

Extending the design pattern with Amazon SNS

Amazon SNS supports reliable publish-subscribe (pub-sub) scenarios and push notifications to known endpoints across a wide variety of protocols. It eliminates the need to periodically check or poll for new information and updates. SNS supports:

  • Reliable storage of messages for immediate or delayed processing
  • Publish / subscribe – direct, broadcast, targeted “push” messaging
  • Multiple subscriber protocols
  • Amazon SQS, HTTP, HTTPS, email, SMS, mobile push, AWS Lambda

With these capabilities, you can provide parallel asynchronous processing of orders in the system and extend it to support any number of different business use cases without affecting the production environment. This is commonly referred to as a “fanout” scenario.

Rather than your web application pushing orders to a queue for processing, send a notification via SNS. The SNS messages are sent to a topic and then replicated and pushed to multiple SQS queues and Lambda functions for processing.

As the diagram above shows, you have the development team consuming “live” data as they work on the next version of the processing application, or potentially using the messages to troubleshoot issues in production.

Marketing is consuming all order information, via a Lambda function that has subscribed to the SNS topic, inserting the records into an Amazon Redshift warehouse for analysis.

All of this, of course, is happening without affecting your order processing application.

Summary

While I haven’t dived deep into the specifics of each service, I have discussed how these services can be applied at an architectural level to build loosely coupled systems that facilitate multiple business use cases. I’ve also shown you how to use infrastructure and application-level scaling techniques, so you can get the most out of your EC2 instances.

One of the many benefits of using these managed services is how quickly and easily you can implement powerful messaging capabilities in your systems, and lower the capital and operational costs of managing your own messaging middleware.

Using Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS together can provide you with a powerful mechanism for decoupling application components. This should be part of design considerations as you architect for the cloud.

For more information, see the Amazon SQS Developer Guide and Amazon SNS Developer Guide. You’ll find tutorials on all the concepts covered in this post, and more. To can get started using the AWS console or SDK of your choice visit:

Happy messaging!