Tag Archives: PulseAudio

Schaller: Launching Pipewire

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/734103/rss

Christian Schaller announces
Pipewire
, a media system that is meant to eventually replace PulseAudio
and handle video as well. “Anyway as work progressed Wim decided to
also take a look at Jack, as supporting the pro-audio usecase was an area
PulseAudio had never tried to do, yet we felt that if we could ensure
Pipewire supported the pro-audio usecase in addition to consumer level
audio and video it would improve our multimedia infrastructure
significantly and ensure pro-audio became a first class citizen on the
Linux desktop.
” A video-only version will be shipping in
Fedora 27.

PulseAudio 11.0 released

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/732970/rss

Version 11.0 of the PulseAudio sound system has been released. New
features include more hardware support, a priority change so that external
sound devices are preferred over internal devices, support for operating as
a Bluetooth headset device, and the long awaited GNU Hurd port. See the
release notes
for details.

Raspbian Stretch has arrived for Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Simon Long original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspbian-stretch/

It’s now just under two years since we released the Jessie version of Raspbian. Those of you who know that Debian run their releases on a two-year cycle will therefore have been wondering when we might be releasing the next version, codenamed Stretch. Well, wonder no longer – Raspbian Stretch is available for download today!

Disney Pixar Toy Story Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Debian releases are named after characters from Disney Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. In case, like me, you were wondering: Stretch is a purple octopus from Toy Story 3. Hi, Stretch!

The differences between Jessie and Stretch are mostly under-the-hood optimisations, and you really shouldn’t notice any differences in day-to-day use of the desktop and applications. (If you’re really interested, the technical details are in the Debian release notes here.)

However, we’ve made a few small changes to our image that are worth mentioning.

New versions of applications

Version 3.0.1 of Sonic Pi is included – this includes a lot of new functionality in terms of input/output. See the Sonic Pi release notes for more details of exactly what has changed.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

The Chromium web browser has been updated to version 60, the most recent stable release. This offers improved memory usage and more efficient code, so you may notice it running slightly faster than before. The visual appearance has also been changed very slightly.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Bluetooth audio

In Jessie, we used PulseAudio to provide support for audio over Bluetooth, but integrating this with the ALSA architecture used for other audio sources was clumsy. For Stretch, we are using the bluez-alsa package to make Bluetooth audio work with ALSA itself. PulseAudio is therefore no longer installed by default, and the volume plugin on the taskbar will no longer start and stop PulseAudio. From a user point of view, everything should still work exactly as before – the only change is that if you still wish to use PulseAudio for some other reason, you will need to install it yourself.

Better handling of other usernames

The default user account in Raspbian has always been called ‘pi’, and a lot of the desktop applications assume that this is the current user. This has been changed for Stretch, so now applications like Raspberry Pi Configuration no longer assume this to be the case. This means, for example, that the option to automatically log in as the ‘pi’ user will now automatically log in with the name of the current user instead.

One other change is how sudo is handled. By default, the ‘pi’ user is set up with passwordless sudo access. We are no longer assuming this to be the case, so now desktop applications which require sudo access will prompt for the password rather than simply failing to work if a user without passwordless sudo uses them.

Scratch 2 SenseHAT extension

In the last Jessie release, we added the offline version of Scratch 2. While Scratch 2 itself hasn’t changed for this release, we have added a new extension to allow the SenseHAT to be used with Scratch 2. Look under ‘More Blocks’ and choose ‘Add an Extension’ to load the extension.

This works with either a physical SenseHAT or with the SenseHAT emulator. If a SenseHAT is connected, the extension will control that in preference to the emulator.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Fix for Broadpwn exploit

A couple of months ago, a vulnerability was discovered in the firmware of the BCM43xx wireless chipset which is used on Pi 3 and Pi Zero W; this potentially allows an attacker to take over the chip and execute code on it. The Stretch release includes a patch that addresses this vulnerability.

There is also the usual set of minor bug fixes and UI improvements – I’ll leave you to spot those!

How to get Raspbian Stretch

As this is a major version upgrade, we recommend using a clean image; these are available from the Downloads page on our site as usual.

Upgrading an existing Jessie image is possible, but is not guaranteed to work in every circumstance. If you wish to try upgrading a Jessie image to Stretch, we strongly recommend taking a backup first – we can accept no responsibility for loss of data from a failed update.

To upgrade, first modify the files /etc/apt/sources.list and /etc/apt/sources.list.d/raspi.list. In both files, change every occurrence of the word ‘jessie’ to ‘stretch’. (Both files will require sudo to edit.)

Then open a terminal window and execute

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade

Answer ‘yes’ to any prompts. There may also be a point at which the install pauses while a page of information is shown on the screen – hold the ‘space’ key to scroll through all of this and then hit ‘q’ to continue.

Finally, if you are not using PulseAudio for anything other than Bluetooth audio, remove it from the image by entering

sudo apt-get -y purge pulseaudio*

The post Raspbian Stretch has arrived for Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

PulseAudio 9.0 is out

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/692988/rss

The PulseAudio 9.0 release is out. Changes include improvements to
automatic routing, beamforming support, use of the Linux memfd mechanism for transport, higher
sample-rate support, and more; see the
release notes
for details.

See also: this
article from Arun Raghavan
on how the beamforming feature works.
The basic idea is that if you have a number of microphones (a mic
array) in some known arrangement, it is possible to ‘point’ or steer the
array in a particular direction, so sounds coming from that direction are
made louder, while sounds from other directions are rendered softer
(attenuated).

The latest update to Raspbian

Post Syndicated from Simon Long original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/another-update-raspbian/

No exciting new hardware announcement to tie it to this time, but we’ve just released a new version of our Raspbian image with some (hopefully) useful features. Read on for all the details of what has changed…

Bluetooth

When the Pi 3 launched back in February, we’d not had time to do much in terms of getting access to the new onboard Bluetooth hardware. There was a working software stack, but the UI was non-existent.

I’d hoped to be able to use one of the existing Linux Bluetooth UIs, but on trying them all, none were really what I was looking for in terms of usability and integration with the look and feel of the desktop. I really didn’t want to write one from scratch, but that ended up being what I did, which meant a fun few weeks trying to make head or tail of the mysteries of BlueZ and D-Bus. After a few false starts, I finally got something I felt was usable, and so there is now a Bluetooth plugin for the lxpanel taskbar.

btmenu

On the taskbar, to the left of the network icon, there is now a Bluetooth icon. Clicking this opens a menu which allows you to make the Pi discoverable by other devices, or to add or remove a Bluetooth device. Selecting the ‘Add Device…’ option opens a window which will gradually populate with any discoverable Bluetooth devices which are in range – just select the one you want to pair with and press the ‘Pair’ button.

btdialog

You will then be guided through the pairing procedure, the nature of which depends on the device. With many devices (such as mice or speakers), pairing is entirely automatic and requires no user interaction; on others you may be asked to enter a code or to confirm that a code displayed on a remote device matches that shown on the Pi. Follow the prompts, and (all being well), you should be rewarded with a dialog telling you that pairing was successful.

Paired devices are listed at the end of the Bluetooth menu – these menu entries can be used to connect or disconnect a paired device. To remove a pairing completely, use the ‘Remove Device…’ option in the menu.

Bluetooth support is limited at this stage; you can pair with pretty much anything, but you can only usefully connect to devices which support either the Human Interface Device or Audio Sink services – in other words, mice, keyboards and other UI devices, and speakers and headsets.

Devices should reconnect after a reboot or on powering up your Pi, but bear in mind that keyboards and mice may need you to press a key or click the mouse button to wake them from sleep when first used after a power-up.

The Bluetooth UI should also work with an external Bluetooth dongle on platforms other than Pi 3 – I’ve successfully tested it with a Targus dongle on all the earlier platforms.

Bluetooth audio

The UI now supports the use of Bluetooth speakers and headsets for audio output, with a few caveats, about which more below.

To connect an audio device, you pair it as described above – it will then be listed in the audio device menu, accessible by right-clicking the speaker icon on the taskbar.

audiomen

Selecting a Bluetooth device from the audio device menu will cause it to be selected as the default audio output device – there will be a few seconds’ pause while the connection is established. You can then use the volume control on the taskbar to control it, as for standard wired audio devices.

There is one issue with the support for Bluetooth audio, however. Due to the way the Bluetooth stack has been written, Bluetooth devices do not appear to the system as standard ALSA audio devices – they require the use of an intermediate audio layer called PulseAudio. The PulseAudio magic is all built into the UI – you don’t need to worry about setting it up – but the problem is that not all applications are able to send audio to the PulseAudio interface, and therefore cannot output audio over Bluetooth.

Most applications work just fine – videos and music work in the Epiphany and Iceweasel browsers, as does the command-line mplayer music player and the vlc media player. But at present neither Scratch nor Sonic Pi can output audio over Bluetooth – we are working with the authors of these programs to address this and are hopeful that both can be made compatible, so please bear with us!

The use of PulseAudio has one other effect that may cause issues for a small number of users – specifically, if you are already using PulseAudio for anything other than interfacing with Bluetooth devices. This plugin will automatically stop the PulseAudio service whenever a standard ALSA device is selected. If you are using PulseAudio for your own purposes, it would be best to remove the volumealsa plugin from the taskbar completely to avoid this – just right-click anywhere on the taskbar, choose ‘Add/Remove Panel Items’, and remove the “Volume Control (ALSA)” item from the list.

SD card copier

One query which comes up a lot on the forums is about the best way to back up your Pi. People also want to know how to migrate their Raspbian install to a new SD card which is larger or smaller than the one they are using at the moment. This has been difficult with the command-line tools that we’ve recommended in the past, so there is now a new application to help with this, and you’ll find it in the menu under ‘Accessories’.

sdcc

The SD Card Copier application will copy Raspbian from one card to another – that’s pretty much all it does – but there are several useful things that you can do as a result. To use it, you will need a USB SD card writer.

To take a common example: what if you want to back up your existing Raspbian installation? Put a blank SD card in your USB card writer and plug it into your Pi, and then launch SD Card Copier. In the ‘Copy From Device’ box, select “Internal SD Card”, and then select the USB card writer in the ‘Copy To Device’ box (where it will probably be the only device listed). Press ‘Start’, watch the messages on the screen and wait – in ten or fifteen minutes, you should have a clone of your current installation on the new SD card. You can test it by putting the newly-copied card into the Pi’s SD card slot and booting it; it should boot and look exactly the same as your original installation, with all your data and applications intact.

You can run directly from the backup, but if you want to recover your original card from your backup, simply reverse the process – boot your Pi from the backup card, put the card to which you want to restore into the SD card writer, and repeat the process above.

The program does not restrict you to only copying to a card the same size as the source; you can copy to a larger card if you are running out of space on your existing one, or even to a smaller card (as long as it has enough space to store all your files – the program will warn you if there isn’t enough space). It has been designed to work with Raspbian and NOOBS images; it may work with other OSes or custom card formats, but this can’t be guaranteed.

The only restriction is that you cannot write to the internal SD card reader, as that would overwrite the OS you are actually running, which would cause bad things to happen.

Please also bear in mind that everything on the destination card will be overwritten by this program, so do make sure you’ve got nothing you want to keep on the destination card before you hit Start!

pigpio

This image includes the pigpio library from abyz.co.uk – this provides a unified way of accessing the Pi’s GPIO pins from Python, C and other languages. It removes the need to use sudo in programs which want to access the GPIOs, and as a result Scratch now runs sudo-less for everyone.

Geany

One of the tools which is really useful for professional programmers is a good text editor – the simple editor provided with LXDE is fine for small tasks, but not really suitable for serious work.

geany

The image now includes the Geany editor, which is much better suited to big projects – it offers features like syntax highlighting, automatic indentation and management of multiple files. There’s good online help built into the program itself, or have a look at the Geany website.

New versions of applications

There are new versions of many of the standard programs included in the image, including Scratch, Sonic Pi, Node-RED, BlueJ and PyPy. Please see the relevant individual websites or changelists for details of what has changed in each of these.

New kernel

The Linux kernel has been upgraded to version 4.4. This change should have no noticeable effect for most users, but it does force the use of device tree; if you’ve been hacking about with your Raspbian install, particularly in terms of installing new hardware, you may find reading this forum post useful.

Tweaks

There are a lot of small user interface tweaks throughout the system which you may notice. Some of these include:

• A new Shutdown Options dialog

shutdown

• The Mouse and Keyboard Settings dialog now allows you to set the delay between double-clicks of the mouse button

mandk

• The Raspberry Pi Configuration dialog now allows you to enable or disable the single-wire interface, and to enable or disable remote access to the pigpio daemon

rcgui

• Right-clicking the Wastebasket icon on the desktop now gives the option to empty the wastebasket

ewaste

• The keyboard shortcut Ctrl-Alt-T can now be used to open a Terminal window

Finally, there are a couple of setup-related features:

• When flashing a new Raspbian image, the file system will automatically be expanded to use all the space on the card when it is first booted.

• If a wpa_supplicant.conf file is placed into the /boot/ directory, this will be moved to the /etc/wpa_supplicant/ directory the next time the system is booted, overwriting the network settings; this allows a Wifi configuration to be preloaded onto a card from a Windows or other machine that can only see the boot partition.

There are also a host of fixes for minor bugs in various parts of the system, and some general cleaning-up of themes and text.

How do I get it?

A full image and a NOOBS installer are available from the Downloads page on this website.

If you are running the current Jessie image, it can be updated to the new version by running

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get install piclone geany usb-modeswitch

As ever, your feedback on the new release is very welcome – feel free to comment here or in the forums.

The post The latest update to Raspbian appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Resolving Weirdness In Thinkpad T60 Hotkeys

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2014/06/08/volume-hotkeys-thinkpad-t60.html

In keeping with my tendency to write a blog post about any technical issue
I find that takes me more than five minutes to figure out when searching
the Internet, I include below a resolution to a problem that took me,
embarrassingly, nearly two and half hours across two different tries to
figure out.

The problem appeared when I took Debian 7 (wheezy) laptop hard drive out
of an Lenovo Thinkpad T61 that I was using that failed and into Lenovo
Thinkpad T60. (I’ve been trying to switch fully to the T60 for everything
because it is supported by Coreboot.)

image of a Lenovo T60 Thinkpad keyboard with volume buttons circled in purple.

When I switched, everything was working fine, except the volume buttons on
the Thinkpad T60 (those three buttons in the top left hand corner of the
keyboard, shown circled in purple in the image on the right) no longer did
what I expected. I expected they would ultimately control PulseAudio volume,
which does the equivalent of pactl set-sink-mute 0 0 and
appropriate pactl set-sink-volume 0 commands for my sound card.
I noticed this because when PulseAudio is running, and you type those
commands on the command line, all functions properly with the
volume, and, when running under X, I see the popup windows coming
from my desktop environment showing the volume changes. So, I knew nothing
was wrong with the sound configuration when I switched the hard drive to a
new machine, since the command line tools worked and did the right things.
Somehow, the buttons weren’t sending the same commands in whatever manner
they were used to.

I assumed at first that the buttons simply generated X events. It turns
out they do, but the story there is a bit more complex. When I
ran xev I saw those buttons did not, in fact, generate any X
events. So, that makes it clear that nothing from X windows
“up” (i.e, to the desktop software) had anything to do with the
situation.

So, I first proceed to research whether these volume keys were supposed to
generate X events. I discovered that there were indeed XF86VolumeUp,
XF86VolumeDown and XF86VolumeMute key events (I’d seen those before, in
fact, doing similar research years ago). However, the advice online was
highly conflicting whether or not the best way to solve this is to have
them generate X events. Most of the discussions I found assumed the keys
were already generating X events and had advice about how to bind those
keys to scripts or to your desktop setup of
choice0.

I found various old documentation about the thinkpad_acpi
daemon, which I quickly found quickly was out of date since long ago that
had been incorporated into Linux’s ACPI directly and didn’t require
additional daemons. This led me to just begin poking around about how the
ACPI subsystem for ACPI keys worked.

I quickly found the xev equivalent for
acpi: acpi_listen. This was the breakthrough I needed to
solve this problem. I ran acpi_listen and discovered that
while other Thinkpad key sequences, such as Fn-Home (to
increase brightness), generated output like:

video/brightnessup BRTUP 00000086 00000000 K
video/brightnessup BRTUP 00000086 00000000

but the volume up, down, and mute keys generated no output. Therefore, it’s
pretty clear at this point that the problem is something related to
configuration of ACPI in some way. I had a feeling this would be hard to
find a solution for.

That’s when I started poking around in /proc, and found
that /proc/acpi/ibm/volume was changing each time I
hit a these keys. So, Linux clearly was receiving notice that these keys
were pressed. So, why wasn’t the acpi subsystem notifying anything else,
including whatever interface acpi_listen talks to?

Well, this was a hard one to find an answer to. I have to admit that I
found the answer through pure serendipity. I had already
loaded this
old bug report for an GNU/Linux distribution waning in popularity
and
found that someone resolved the ticket with the command:

cp /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_all_mask /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_mask

This command:

# cat /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_all_mask /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_mask
0x00ffffff
0x008dffff

quickly showed that that the masks didn’t match. So I did:

# cat /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_all_mask > /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/hotkey_mask

and that single change caused the buttons to work again as expected,
including causing the popup notifications of volume changes and the like.

Additional searching
show this
hotkey issue is documented in Linux, in its Thinkpad ACPI
documentation
, which states:

The hot key bit mask allows some control over which hot keys generate events.
If a key is “masked” (bit set to 0 in the mask), the firmware will handle it.
If it is “unmasked”, it signals the firmware that thinkpad-acpi would prefer
to handle it, if the firmware would be so kind to allow it (and it often
doesn’t!).

I note that on my system, running the command the document recommends to
reset to defaults yields me back to the wrong state:

# cat /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey
status: enabled
mask: 0x00ffffff
commands: enable, disable, reset, <mask>
# echo reset > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey
# cat /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey
status: enabled
mask: 0x008dffff
commands: enable, disable, reset, <mask>
# echo 0xffffffff > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey

So, I added that last command above to restore it to enabled Linux’s control
of all the ACPI hot keys, which I suspect is what I want. I’ll update the
post if doing that causes other problems that I hadn’t seen before. I’ll
also update the post to note whether this setting is saved over reboots, as
I haven’t rebooted the machine since I did this. 🙂

0Interestingly, as has
happened to me often recently, much of the most useful information that I
find about any complex topic regarding how things work in modern GNU/Linux
distributions is found on the Arch or Crunchbang online fora and wikis. It’s
quite interesting to me that these two distributions appear to be the primary
place where the types of information that every distribution once needed to
provide are kept. Their wikis are becoming the canonical references of how a
distribution is constructed, since much of the information found therein
applies to all distributions, but distributions like Fedora and Debian
attempt to make it less complex for the users to change the
configuration.

PulseAudio vs. AudioFlinger

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/aruns-numbers.html

Arun
put an awesome article up
, detailing how PulseAudio compares to Android’s
AudioFlinger in terms of power consumption and suchlike. Suffice to say,
PulseAudio rocks, but go and read the whole thing, it’s worth it.

Apparently, AudioFlinger is a great choice if you want to shorten your
battery life.

PulseAudio vs. AudioFlinger

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/aruns-numbers.html

Arun
put an awesome article up
, detailing how PulseAudio compares to Android’s
AudioFlinger in terms of power consumption and suchlike. Suffice to say,
PulseAudio rocks, but go and read the whole thing, it’s worth it.

Apparently, AudioFlinger is a great choice if you want to shorten your
battery life.

PulseAudio vs. AudioFlinger

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/aruns-numbers.html

Arun
put an awesome article up
, detailing how PulseAudio compares to Android’s
AudioFlinger in terms of power consumption and suchlike. Suffice to say,
PulseAudio rocks, but go and read the whole thing, it’s worth it.

Apparently, AudioFlinger is a great choice if you want to shorten your
battery life.

Prague

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/linuxcon-europe.html

If you make it to Prague the coming week for the LinuxCon/ELCE/GStreamer/Kernel Summit/… superconference, make sure not to miss:

All of that at the Clarion Hotel. See you in Prague!

Prague

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/linuxcon-europe.html

If you make it to Prague the coming week for the LinuxCon/ELCE/GStreamer/Kernel Summit/… superconference, make sure not to miss:

The Linux Audio BoF with numerous Linux audio hackers, 5pm, on Sunday (23rd, i.e. today).

Latest
developments in PulseAudio
by Arun Raghavan. 4pm, on Tuesday, GStreamer
Summit

Linux
Kernel Developer Panel
, a shared session of LinuxCon and ELCE. Panelists
are Linus Torvalds, Alan Cox, Thomas Gleixner and Paul McKenney. Moderated by
yours truly. 9:30am, on Wednesday

systemd
Administration in the Enterprise
by Kay Sievers and yours truly. 4:15pm, on
Wednesday, LinuxCon

Integrating
systemd: Booting Userspace in Less Than 1 Second
by Koen Kooi. 11:15am, on
Friday, ELCE

All of that at the Clarion Hotel. See you in Prague!

Prague

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/linuxcon-europe.html

If you make it to Prague the coming week for the LinuxCon/ELCE/GStreamer/Kernel Summit/… superconference, make sure not to miss:

All of that at the Clarion Hotel. See you in Prague!

PulseAudio Saves Power

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/pa-and-power.html

#nocomments yes

D.
Jansen has put up a blog story
including some power saving results when
running PulseAudio on modern HDA drivers.
This shows off some work Pierre-Louis Bossart from Intel did on the HDA drivers
which now enables the timer-based scheduling code in PulseAudio I added quite
some time ago to come to its full potential. You can save half a Watt and
reduce wakeups while playing audio to 1 wakeup/s.

Previously there was little public profiling data available about the
benefits PA brings you for low-power devices. Thanks to Dennis’ data there’s now
public data available that hopefully explains why PA is the best choice for
low-power devices as well as desktops. Hopefully this cleans up some misconceptions.

Pierre-Louis, thanks for your work!

Update: Arun Raghavan has posted a follow-up to this.

PulseAudio Saves Power

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/pa-and-power.html

#nocomments yes

D.
Jansen has put up a blog story
including some power saving results when
running PulseAudio on modern HDA drivers.
This shows off some work Pierre-Louis Bossart from Intel did on the HDA drivers
which now enables the timer-based scheduling code in PulseAudio I added quite
some time ago to come to its full potential. You can save half a Watt and
reduce wakeups while playing audio to 1 wakeup/s.

Previously there was little public profiling data available about the
benefits PA brings you for low-power devices. Thanks to Dennis’ data there’s now
public data available that hopefully explains why PA is the best choice for
low-power devices as well as desktops. Hopefully this cleans up some misconceptions.

Pierre-Louis, thanks for your work!

Update: Arun Raghavan has posted a follow-up to this.

PulseAudio Saves Power

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/pa-and-power.html

#nocomments yes

D.
Jansen has put up a blog story
including some power saving results when
running PulseAudio on modern HDA drivers.
This shows off some work Pierre-Louis Bossart from Intel did on the HDA drivers
which now enables the timer-based scheduling code in PulseAudio I added quite
some time ago to come to its full potential. You can save half a Watt and
reduce wakeups while playing audio to 1 wakeup/s.

Previously there was little public profiling data available about the
benefits PA brings you for low-power devices. Thanks to Dennis’ data there’s now
public data available that hopefully explains why PA is the best choice for
low-power devices as well as desktops. Hopefully this cleans up some misconceptions.

Pierre-Louis, thanks for your work!

Update: Arun Raghavan has posted a follow-up to this.

GNOME 3.0 Is Out!

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/gnome3.html

The next generation desktop has arrived. I am running it as I type this, and so should you. So, go, get it!

If you are in Berlin on Friday you should also attend our GNOME
3.0 Release Party
. It’s at the world famous c-base, in the remains of an alien spaceship
that crashed into Berlin 4.5 billion years ago (no kidding!). We’ve got
Ubuntu’s Daniel Holbach as DJ, and a
few folks from the GNOME community will do a talk or two (including that
annoying dude who created Avahi, PulseAudio and systemd). We even got Mirko Boehm
from the KDE side to say a few things. And there are going to be GNOME 3
goodies! How awesome is that? See the
wiki page for further details.

And here’s your homework until Friday: Try out GNOME 3.0!

I am GNOME

GNOME 3.0 Is Out!

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/gnome3.html

The next generation desktop has arrived. I am running it as I type this, and so should you. So, go, get it!

If you are in Berlin on Friday you should also attend our GNOME
3.0 Release Party
. It’s at the world famous c-base, in the remains of an alien spaceship
that crashed into Berlin 4.5 billion years ago (no kidding!). We’ve got
Ubuntu’s Daniel Holbach as DJ, and a
few folks from the GNOME community will do a talk or two (including that
annoying dude who created Avahi, PulseAudio and systemd). We even got Mirko Boehm
from the KDE side to say a few things. And there are going to be GNOME 3
goodies! How awesome is that? See the
wiki page for further details.

And here’s your homework until Friday: Try out GNOME 3.0!

I am GNOME