Tag Archives: record

CoderDojo Coolest Projects 2017

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/coderdojo-coolest-projects-2017/

When I heard we were merging with CoderDojo, I was delighted. CoderDojo is a wonderful organisation with a spectacular community, and it’s going to be great to join forces with the team and work towards our common goal: making a difference to the lives of young people by making technology accessible to them.

You may remember that last year Philip and I went along to Coolest Projects, CoderDojo’s annual event at which their global community showcase their best makes. It was awesome! This year a whole bunch of us from the Raspberry Pi Foundation attended Coolest Projects with our new Irish colleagues, and as expected, the projects on show were as cool as can be.

Coolest Projects 2017 attendee

Crowd at Coolest Projects 2017

This year’s coolest projects!

Young maker Benjamin demoed his brilliant RGB LED table tennis ball display for us, and showed off his brilliant project tutorial website codemakerbuddy.com, which he built with Python and Flask. [Click on any of the images to enlarge them.]

Coolest Projects 2017 LED ping-pong ball display
Coolest Projects 2017 Benjamin and Oly

Next up, Aimee showed us a recipes app she’d made with the MIT App Inventor. It was a really impressive and well thought-out project.

Coolest Projects 2017 Aimee's cook book
Coolest Projects 2017 Aimee's setup

This very successful OpenCV face detection program with hardware installed in a teddy bear was great as well:

Coolest Projects 2017 face detection bear
Coolest Projects 2017 face detection interface
Coolest Projects 2017 face detection database

Helen’s and Oly’s favourite project involved…live bees!

Coolest Projects 2017 live bees

BEEEEEEEEEEES!

Its creator, 12-year-old Amy, said she wanted to do something to help the Earth. Her project uses various sensors to record data on the bee population in the hive. An adjacent monitor displays the data in a web interface:

Coolest Projects 2017 Aimee's bees

Coolest robots

I enjoyed seeing lots of GPIO Zero projects out in the wild, including this robotic lawnmower made by Kevin and Zach:

Raspberry Pi Lawnmower

Kevin and Zach’s Raspberry Pi lawnmower project with Python and GPIO Zero, showed at CoderDojo Coolest Projects 2017

Philip’s favourite make was a Pi-powered robot you can control with your mind! According to the maker, Laura, it worked really well with Philip because he has no hair.

Philip Colligan on Twitter

This is extraordinary. Laura from @CoderDojo Romania has programmed a mind controlled robot using @Raspberry_Pi @coolestprojects

And here are some pictures of even more cool robots we saw:

Coolest Projects 2017 coolest robot no.1
Coolest Projects 2017 coolest robot no.2
Coolest Projects 2017 coolest robot no.3

Games, toys, activities

Oly and I were massively impressed with the work of Mogamad, Daniel, and Basheerah, who programmed a (borrowed) Amazon Echo to make a voice-controlled text-adventure game using Java and the Alexa API. They’ve inspired me to try something similar using the AIY projects kit and adventurelib!

Coolest Projects 2017 Mogamad, Daniel, Basheerah, Oly
Coolest Projects 2017 Alexa text-based game

Christopher Hill did a brilliant job with his Home Alone LEGO house. He used sensors to trigger lights and sounds to make it look like someone’s at home, like in the film. I should have taken a video – seeing it in action was great!

Coolest Projects 2017 Lego home alone house
Coolest Projects 2017 Lego home alone innards
Coolest Projects 2017 Lego home alone innards closeup

Meanwhile, the Northern Ireland Raspberry Jam group ran a DOTS board activity, which turned their area into a conductive paint hazard zone.

Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 1
Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 2
Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 3
Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 4
Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 5
Coolest Projects 2017 NI Jam DOTS activity 6

Creativity and ingenuity

We really enjoyed seeing so many young people collaborating, experimenting, and taking full advantage of the opportunity to make real projects. And we loved how huge the range of technologies in use was: people employed all manner of hardware and software to bring their ideas to life.

Philip Colligan on Twitter

Wow! Look at that room full of awesome young people. @coolestprojects #coolestprojects @CoderDojo

Congratulations to the Coolest Projects 2017 prize winners, and to all participants. Here are some of the teams that won in the different categories:

Coolest Projects 2017 winning team 1
Coolest Projects 2017 winning team 2
Coolest Projects 2017 winning team 3

Take a look at the gallery of all winners over on Flickr.

The wow factor

Raspberry Pi co-founder and Foundation trustee Pete Lomas came along to the event as well. Here’s what he had to say:

It’s hard to describe the scale of the event, and photos just don’t do it justice. The first thing that hit me was the sheer excitement of the CoderDojo ninjas [the children attending Dojos]. Everyone was setting up for their time with the project judges, and their pure delight at being able to show off their creations was evident in both halls. Time and time again I saw the ninjas apply their creativity to help save the planet or make someone’s life better, and it’s truly exciting that we are going to help that continue and expand.

Even after 8 hours, enthusiasm wasn’t flagging – the awards ceremony was just brilliant, with ninjas high-fiving the winners on the way to the stage. This speaks volumes about the ethos and vision of the CoderDojo founders, where everyone is a winner just by being part of a community of worldwide friends. It was a brilliant introduction, and if this weekend was anything to go by, our merger certainly is a marriage made in Heaven.

Join this awesome community!

If all this inspires you as much as it did us, consider looking for a CoderDojo near you – and sign up as a volunteer! There’s plenty of time for young people to build up skills and start working on a project for next year’s event. Check out coolestprojects.com for more information.

The post CoderDojo Coolest Projects 2017 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

MPAA & RIAA Demand Tough Copyright Standards in NAFTA Negotiations

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/mpaa-riaa-demand-tough-copyright-standards-in-nafta-negotiations-170621/

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Canada, and Mexico was negotiated more than 25 years ago. With a quarter of a decade of developments to contend with, the United States wants to modernize.

“While our economy and U.S. businesses have changed considerably over that period, NAFTA has not,” the government says.

With this in mind, the US requested comments from interested parties seeking direction for negotiation points. With those comments now in, groups like the MPAA and RIAA have been making their positions known. It’s no surprise that intellectual property enforcement is high on the agenda.

“Copyright is the lifeblood of the U.S. motion picture and television industry. As such, MPAA places high priority on securing strong protection and enforcement disciplines in the intellectual property chapters of trade agreements,” the MPAA writes in its submission.

“Strong IPR protection and enforcement are critical trade priorities for the music industry. With IPR, we can create good jobs, make significant contributions to U.S. economic growth and security, invest in artists and their creativity, and drive technological innovation,” the RIAA notes.

While both groups have numerous demands, it’s clear that each seeks an environment where not only infringers can be held liable, but also Internet platforms and services.

For the RIAA, there is a big focus on the so-called ‘Value Gap’, a phenomenon found on user-uploaded content sites like YouTube that are able to offer infringing content while avoiding liability due to Section 512 of the DMCA.

“Today, user-uploaded content services, which have developed sophisticated on-demand music platforms, use this as a shield to avoid licensing music on fair terms like other digital services, claiming they are not legally responsible for the music they distribute on their site,” the RIAA writes.

“Services such as Apple Music, TIDAL, Amazon, and Spotify are forced to compete with services that claim they are not liable for the music they distribute.”

But if sites like YouTube are exercising their rights while acting legally under current US law, how can partners Canada and Mexico do any better? For the RIAA, that can be achieved by holding them to standards envisioned by the group when the DMCA was passed, not how things have panned out since.

Demanding that negotiators “protect the original intent” of safe harbor, the RIAA asks that a “high-level and high-standard service provider liability provision” is pursued. This, the music group says, should only be available to “passive intermediaries without requisite knowledge of the infringement on their platforms, and inapplicable to services actively engaged in communicating to the public.”

In other words, make sure that YouTube and similar sites won’t enjoy the same level of safe harbor protection as they do today.

The RIAA also requires any negotiated safe harbor provisions in NAFTA to be flexible in the event that the DMCA is tightened up in response to the ongoing safe harbor rules study.

In any event, NAFTA should not “support interpretations that no longer reflect today’s digital economy and threaten the future of legitimate and sustainable digital trade,” the RIAA states.

For the MPAA, Section 512 is also perceived as a problem. While noting that the original intent was to foster a system of shared responsibility between copyright owners and service providers, the MPAA says courts have subsequently let copyright holders down. Like the RIAA, the MPAA also suggests that Canada and Mexico can be held to higher standards.

“We recommend a new approach to this important trade policy provision by moving to high-level language that establishes intermediary liability and appropriate limitations on liability. This would be fully consistent with U.S. law and avoid the same misinterpretations by policymakers and courts overseas,” the MPAA writes.

“In so doing, a modernized NAFTA would be consistent with Trade Promotion Authority’s negotiating objective of ‘ensuring that standards of protection and enforcement keep pace with technological developments’.”

The MPAA also has some specific problems with Mexico, including unauthorized camcording. The Hollywood group says that 85 illicit audio and video recordings of films were linked to Mexican theaters in 2016. However, recording is not currently a criminal offense in Mexico.

Another issue for the MPAA is that criminal sanctions for commercial scale infringement are only available if the infringement is for profit.

“This has hampered enforcement against the above-discussed camcording problem but also against online infringement, such as peer-to-peer piracy, that may be on a scale that is immensely harmful to U.S. rightsholders but nonetheless occur without profit by the infringer,” the MPAA writes.

“The modernized NAFTA like other U.S. bilateral free trade agreements must provide for criminal sanctions against commercial scale infringements without proof of profit motive.”

Also of interest are the MPAA’s complaints against Mexico’s telecoms laws. Unlike in the US and many countries in Europe, Mexico’s ISPs are forbidden to hand out their customers’ personal details to rights holders looking to sue. This, the MPAA says, needs to change.

The submissions from the RIAA and MPAA can be found here and here (pdf)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Building Loosely Coupled, Scalable, C# Applications with Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS

Post Syndicated from Tara Van Unen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-loosely-coupled-scalable-c-applications-with-amazon-sqs-and-amazon-sns/

 
Stephen Liedig, Solutions Architect

 

One of the many challenges professional software architects and developers face is how to make cloud-native applications scalable, fault-tolerant, and highly available.

Fundamental to your project success is understanding the importance of making systems highly cohesive and loosely coupled. That means considering the multi-dimensional facets of system coupling to support the distributed nature of the applications that you are building for the cloud.

By that, I mean addressing not only the application-level coupling (managing incoming and outgoing dependencies), but also considering the impacts of of platform, spatial, and temporal coupling of your systems. Platform coupling relates to the interoperability, or lack thereof, of heterogeneous systems components. Spatial coupling deals with managing components at a network topology level or protocol level. Temporal, or runtime coupling, refers to the ability of a component within your system to do any kind of meaningful work while it is performing a synchronous, blocking operation.

The AWS messaging services, Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS, help you deal with these forms of coupling by providing mechanisms for:

  • Reliable, durable, and fault-tolerant delivery of messages between application components
  • Logical decomposition of systems and increased autonomy of components
  • Creating unidirectional, non-blocking operations, temporarily decoupling system components at runtime
  • Decreasing the dependencies that components have on each other through standard communication and network channels

Following on the recent topic, Building Scalable Applications and Microservices: Adding Messaging to Your Toolbox, in this post, I look at some of the ways you can introduce SQS and SNS into your architectures to decouple your components, and show how you can implement them using C#.

Walkthrough

To illustrate some of these concepts, consider a web application that processes customer orders. As good architects and developers, you have followed best practices and made your application scalable and highly available. Your solution included implementing load balancing, dynamic scaling across multiple Availability Zones, and persisting orders in a Multi-AZ Amazon RDS database instance, as in the following diagram.


In this example, the application is responsible for handling and persisting the order data, as well as dealing with increases in traffic for popular items.

One potential point of vulnerability in the order processing workflow is in saving the order in the database. The business expects that every order has been persisted into the database. However, any potential deadlock, race condition, or network issue could cause the persistence of the order to fail. Then, the order is lost with no recourse to restore the order.

With good logging capability, you may be able to identify when an error occurred and which customer’s order failed. This wouldn’t allow you to “restore” the transaction, and by that stage, your customer is no longer your customer.

As illustrated in the following diagram, introducing an SQS queue helps improve your ordering application. Using the queue isolates the processing logic into its own component and runs it in a separate process from the web application. This, in turn, allows the system to be more resilient to spikes in traffic, while allowing work to be performed only as fast as necessary in order to manage costs.


In addition, you now have a mechanism for persisting orders as messages (with the queue acting as a temporary database), and have moved the scope of your transaction with your database further down the stack. In the event of an application exception or transaction failure, this ensures that the order processing can be retired or redirected to the Amazon SQS Dead Letter Queue (DLQ), for re-processing at a later stage. (See the recent post, Using Amazon SQS Dead-Letter Queues to Control Message Failure, for more information on dead-letter queues.)

Scaling the order processing nodes

This change allows you now to scale the web application frontend independently from the processing nodes. The frontend application can continue to scale based on metrics such as CPU usage, or the number of requests hitting the load balancer. Processing nodes can scale based on the number of orders in the queue. Here is an example of scale-in and scale-out alarms that you would associate with the scaling policy.

Scale-out Alarm

aws cloudwatch put-metric-alarm --alarm-name AddCapacityToCustomerOrderQueue --metric-name ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible --namespace "AWS/SQS" 
--statistic Average --period 300 --threshold 3 --comparison-operator GreaterThanOrEqualToThreshold --dimensions Name=QueueName,Value=customer-orders
--evaluation-periods 2 --alarm-actions <arn of the scale-out autoscaling policy>

Scale-in Alarm

aws cloudwatch put-metric-alarm --alarm-name RemoveCapacityFromCustomerOrderQueue --metric-name ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible --namespace "AWS/SQS" 
 --statistic Average --period 300 --threshold 1 --comparison-operator LessThanOrEqualToThreshold --dimensions Name=QueueName,Value=customer-orders
 --evaluation-periods 2 --alarm-actions <arn of the scale-in autoscaling policy>

In the above example, use the ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible metric to discover the queue length and drive the scaling policy of the Auto Scaling group. Another useful metric is ApproximateAgeOfOldestMessage, when applications have time-sensitive messages and developers need to ensure that messages are processed within a specific time period.

Scaling the order processing implementation

On top of scaling at an infrastructure level using Auto Scaling, make sure to take advantage of the processing power of your Amazon EC2 instances by using as many of the available threads as possible. There are several ways to implement this. In this post, we build a Windows service that uses the BackgroundWorker class to process the messages from the queue.

Here’s a closer look at the implementation. In the first section of the consuming application, use a loop to continually poll the queue for new messages, and construct a ReceiveMessageRequest variable.

public static void PollQueue()
{
    while (_running)
    {
        Task<ReceiveMessageResponse> receiveMessageResponse;

        // Pull messages off the queue
        using (var sqs = new AmazonSQSClient())
        {
            const int maxMessages = 10;  // 1-10

            //Receiving a message
            var receiveMessageRequest = new ReceiveMessageRequest
            {
                // Get URL from Configuration
                QueueUrl = _queueUrl, 
                // The maximum number of messages to return. 
                // Fewer messages might be returned. 
                MaxNumberOfMessages = maxMessages, 
                // A list of attributes that need to be returned with message.
                AttributeNames = new List<string> { "All" },
                // Enable long polling. 
                // Time to wait for message to arrive on queue.
                WaitTimeSeconds = 5 
            };

            receiveMessageResponse = sqs.ReceiveMessageAsync(receiveMessageRequest);
        }

The WaitTimeSeconds property of the ReceiveMessageRequest specifies the duration (in seconds) that the call waits for a message to arrive in the queue before returning a response to the calling application. There are a few benefits to using long polling:

  • It reduces the number of empty responses by allowing SQS to wait until a message is available in the queue before sending a response.
  • It eliminates false empty responses by querying all (rather than a limited number) of the servers.
  • It returns messages as soon any message becomes available.

For more information, see Amazon SQS Long Polling.

After you have returned messages from the queue, you can start to process them by looping through each message in the response and invoking a new BackgroundWorker thread.

// Process messages
if (receiveMessageResponse.Result.Messages != null)
{
    foreach (var message in receiveMessageResponse.Result.Messages)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Received SQS message, starting worker thread");

        // Create background worker to process message
        BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += (obj, e) => ProcessMessage(message);
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("No messages on queue");
}

The event handler, ProcessMessage, is where you implement business logic for processing orders. It is important to have a good understanding of how long a typical transaction takes so you can set a message VisibilityTimeout that is long enough to complete your operation. If order processing takes longer than the specified timeout period, the message becomes visible on the queue. Other nodes may pick it and process the same order twice, leading to unintended consequences.

Handling Duplicate Messages

In order to manage duplicate messages, seek to make your processing application idempotent. In mathematics, idempotent describes a function that produces the same result if it is applied to itself:

f(x) = f(f(x))

No matter how many times you process the same message, the end result is the same (definition from Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions, Hohpe and Wolf, 2004).

There are several strategies you could apply to achieve this:

  • Create messages that have inherent idempotent characteristics. That is, they are non-transactional in nature and are unique at a specified point in time. Rather than saying “place new order for Customer A,” which adds a duplicate order to the customer, use “place order <orderid> on <timestamp> for Customer A,” which creates a single order no matter how often it is persisted.
  • Deliver your messages via an Amazon SQS FIFO queue, which provides the benefits of message sequencing, but also mechanisms for content-based deduplication. You can deduplicate using the MessageDeduplicationId property on the SendMessage request or by enabling content-based deduplication on the queue, which generates a hash for MessageDeduplicationId, based on the content of the message, not the attributes.
var sendMessageRequest = new SendMessageRequest
{
    QueueUrl = _queueUrl,
    MessageBody = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(order),
    MessageGroupId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N"),
    MessageDeduplicationId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N")
};
  • If using SQS FIFO queues is not an option, keep a message log of all messages attributes processed for a specified period of time, as an alternative to message deduplication on the receiving end. Verifying the existence of the message in the log before processing the message adds additional computational overhead to your processing. This can be minimized through low latency persistence solutions such as Amazon DynamoDB. Bear in mind that this solution is dependent on the successful, distributed transaction of the message and the message log.

Handling exceptions

Because of the distributed nature of SQS queues, it does not automatically delete the message. Therefore, you must explicitly delete the message from the queue after processing it, using the message ReceiptHandle property (see the following code example).

However, if at any stage you have an exception, avoid handling it as you normally would. The intention is to make sure that the message ends back on the queue, so that you can gracefully deal with intermittent failures. Instead, log the exception to capture diagnostic information, and swallow it.

By not explicitly deleting the message from the queue, you can take advantage of the VisibilityTimeout behavior described earlier. Gracefully handle the message processing failure and make the unprocessed message available to other nodes to process.

In the event that subsequent retries fail, SQS automatically moves the message to the configured DLQ after the configured number of receives has been reached. You can further investigate why the order process failed. Most importantly, the order has not been lost, and your customer is still your customer.

private static void ProcessMessage(Message message)
{
    using (var sqs = new AmazonSQSClient())
    {
        try
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Processing message id: {0}", message.MessageId);

            // Implement messaging processing here
            // Ensure no downstream resource contention (parallel processing)
            // <your order processing logic in here…>
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Thread {1}: {2}", DateTime.Now.ToString("s"), Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId, message.MessageId);
            
            // Delete the message off the queue. 
            // Receipt handle is the identifier you must provide 
            // when deleting the message.
            var deleteRequest = new DeleteMessageRequest(_queueName, message.ReceiptHandle);
            sqs.DeleteMessageAsync(deleteRequest);
            Console.WriteLine("Processed message id: {0}", message.MessageId);

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Do nothing.
            // Swallow exception, message will return to the queue when 
            // visibility timeout has been exceeded.
            Console.WriteLine("Could not process message due to error. Exception: {0}", ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

Using SQS to adapt to changing business requirements

One of the benefits of introducing a message queue is that you can accommodate new business requirements without dramatically affecting your application.

If, for example, the business decided that all orders placed over $5000 are to be handled as a priority, you could introduce a new “priority order” queue. The way the orders are processed does not change. The only significant change to the processing application is to ensure that messages from the “priority order” queue are processed before the “standard order” queue.

The following diagram shows how this logic could be isolated in an “order dispatcher,” whose only purpose is to route order messages to the appropriate queue based on whether the order exceeds $5000. Nothing on the web application or the processing nodes changes other than the target queue to which the order is sent. The rates at which orders are processed can be achieved by modifying the poll rates and scalability settings that I have already discussed.

Extending the design pattern with Amazon SNS

Amazon SNS supports reliable publish-subscribe (pub-sub) scenarios and push notifications to known endpoints across a wide variety of protocols. It eliminates the need to periodically check or poll for new information and updates. SNS supports:

  • Reliable storage of messages for immediate or delayed processing
  • Publish / subscribe – direct, broadcast, targeted “push” messaging
  • Multiple subscriber protocols
  • Amazon SQS, HTTP, HTTPS, email, SMS, mobile push, AWS Lambda

With these capabilities, you can provide parallel asynchronous processing of orders in the system and extend it to support any number of different business use cases without affecting the production environment. This is commonly referred to as a “fanout” scenario.

Rather than your web application pushing orders to a queue for processing, send a notification via SNS. The SNS messages are sent to a topic and then replicated and pushed to multiple SQS queues and Lambda functions for processing.

As the diagram above shows, you have the development team consuming “live” data as they work on the next version of the processing application, or potentially using the messages to troubleshoot issues in production.

Marketing is consuming all order information, via a Lambda function that has subscribed to the SNS topic, inserting the records into an Amazon Redshift warehouse for analysis.

All of this, of course, is happening without affecting your order processing application.

Summary

While I haven’t dived deep into the specifics of each service, I have discussed how these services can be applied at an architectural level to build loosely coupled systems that facilitate multiple business use cases. I’ve also shown you how to use infrastructure and application-level scaling techniques, so you can get the most out of your EC2 instances.

One of the many benefits of using these managed services is how quickly and easily you can implement powerful messaging capabilities in your systems, and lower the capital and operational costs of managing your own messaging middleware.

Using Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS together can provide you with a powerful mechanism for decoupling application components. This should be part of design considerations as you architect for the cloud.

For more information, see the Amazon SQS Developer Guide and Amazon SNS Developer Guide. You’ll find tutorials on all the concepts covered in this post, and more. To can get started using the AWS console or SDK of your choice visit:

Happy messaging!

Shelfchecker Smart Shelf: build a home library system

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/smart-shelf-home-library/

Are you tired of friends borrowing your books and never returning them? Maybe you’re sure you own 1984 but can’t seem to locate it? Do you find a strange satisfaction in using the supermarket self-checkout simply because of the barcode beep? With the ShelfChecker smart shelf from maker Annelynn described on Instructables, you can be your own librarian and never misplace your books again! Beep!

Shelfchecker smart shelf annelynn Raspberry Pi

Harry Potter and the Aesthetically Pleasing Smart Shelf

The ShelfChecker smart shelf

Annelynn built her smart shelf utilising a barcode scanner, LDR light sensors, a Raspberry Pi, plus a few other peripherals and some Python scripts. She has created a fully integrated library checkout system with accompanying NeoPixel location notification for your favourite books.

This build allows you to issue your book-borrowing friends their own IDs and catalogue their usage of your treasured library. On top of that, you’ll be able to use LED NeoPixels to highlight your favourite books, registering their removal and return via light sensor tracking.

Using light sensors for book cataloguing

Once Annelynn had built the shelf, she drilled holes to fit the eight LDRs that would guard her favourite books, and separated them with corner brackets to prevent confusion.

Shelfchecker smart shelf annelynn Raspberry Pi

Corner brackets keep the books in place without confusion between their respective light sensors

Due to the limitations of the MCP3008 Adafruit microchip, the smart shelf can only keep track of eight of your favourite books. But this limitation won’t stop you from cataloguing your entire home library; it simply means you get to pick your ultimate favourites that will occupy the prime real estate on your wall.

Obviously, the light sensors sense light. So when you remove or insert a book, light floods or is blocked from that book’s sensor. The sensor sends this information to the Raspberry Pi. In response, an Arduino controls the NeoPixel strip along the ‘favourites’ shelf to indicate the book’s status.

Shelfchecker smart shelf annelynn Raspberry Pi

The book you are looking for is temporarily unavailable

Code your own library

While keeping a close eye on your favourite books, the system also allows creation of a complete library catalogue system with the help of a MySQL database. Users of the library can log into the system with a barcode scanner, and take out or return books recorded in the database guided by an LCD screen attached to the Pi.

Shelfchecker smart shelf annelynn Raspberry Pi

Beep!

I won’t go into an extensive how-to on creating MySQL databases here on the blog, because my glamourous assistant Janina has pulled up these MySQL tutorials to help you get started. Annelynn’s Github scripts are also packed with useful comments to keep you on track.

Raspberry Pi and books

We love books and libraries. And considering the growing number of Code Clubs and makespaces into libraries across the world, and the host of book-based Pi builds we’ve come across, the love seems to be mutual.

We’ve seen the Raspberry Pi introduced into the Wordery bookseller warehouse, a Pi-powered page-by-page book scanner by Jonathon Duerig, and these brilliant text-to-speech and page turner projects that use our Pis!

Did I say we love books? In fact we love them so much that members of our team have even written a few.*

If you’ve set up any sort of digital making event in a library, have in some way incorporated Raspberry Pi into your own personal book collection, or even managed to recreate the events of your favourite story using digital making, make sure to let us know in the comments below.

* Shameless plug**

Fancy adding some Pi to your home library? Check out these publications from the Raspberry Pi staff:

A Beginner’s Guide to Coding by Marc Scott

Adventures in Raspberry Pi by Carrie Anne Philbin

Getting Started with Raspberry Pi by Matt Richardson

Raspberry Pi User Guide by Eben Upton

The MagPi Magazine, Essentials Guides and Project Books

Make Your Own Game and Build Your Own Website by CoderDojo

** Shameless Pug

 

The post Shelfchecker Smart Shelf: build a home library system appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Internet Provider Refutes RIAA’s Piracy Allegations

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/internet-provider-refutes-riaas-piracy-allegations-170620/

For more than a decade copyright holders have been sending ISPs takedown notices to alert them that their subscribers are sharing copyrighted material.

Under US law, providers have to terminate the accounts of repeat infringers “in appropriate circumstances” and increasingly they are being held to this standard.

Earlier this year several major record labels, represented by the RIAA, filed a lawsuit in a Texas District Court, accusing ISP Grande Communications of failing to take action against its pirating subscribers.

“Despite their knowledge of repeat infringements, Defendants have permitted repeat infringers to use the Grande service to continue to infringe Plaintiffs’ copyrights without consequence,” the RIAA’s complaint read.

Grande and its management consulting firm Patriot, which was also sued, both disagree and have filed a motion to dismiss at the court this week. Grande argues that it doesn’t encourage any of its customers to download copyrighted works, and that it has no control over the content subscribers access.

The Internet provider doesn’t deny that it has received millions of takedown notices through the piracy tracking company Rightscorp. However, it believes that these notices are flawed as Rightscorp is incapable of monitoring actual copyright infringements.

“These notices are so numerous and so lacking in specificity, that it is infeasible for Grande to devote the time and resources required to meaningfully investigate them. Moreover, the system that Rightscorp employs to generate its notices is incapable of detecting actual infringement and, therefore, is incapable of generating notices that reflect real infringement,” Grande writes.

Grande says that if they acted on these notices without additional proof, its subscribers could lose their Internet access even though they are using it for legal purposes.

“To merely treat these allegations as true without investigation would be a disservice to Grande’s subscribers, who would run the risk of having their Internet service permanently terminated despite using Grande’s services for completely legitimate purposes.”

Even if the notices were able to prove actual infringement, they would still fail to identify the infringer, according to the ISP. The notices identify IP-addresses which may have been used by complete strangers, who connected to the network without permission.

The Internet provider admits that online copyright infringement is a real problem. But, they see themselves as a victim of this problem, not a perpetrator, as the record labels suggest.

“Grande does not profit or receive any benefit from subscribers that may engage in such infringing activity using its network. To the contrary, Grande suffers demonstrable losses as a direct result of purported copyright infringement conducted on its network.

“To hold Grande liable for copyright infringement simply because ‘something must be done’ to address this growing problem is to hold the wrong party accountable,” Grande adds.

In common with the previous case against Cox Communications, Rightscorp’s copyright infringement notices are once again at the center of a prominent lawsuit. According to Grande, Rightscorp’s system can’t prove that infringing content was actually downloaded by third parties, only that it was made available.

The Internet provider sees the lacking infringement notices as a linchpin that, if pulled, will take the entire case down.

It’s expected that, if the case moves forward, both parties will do all they can to show that the evidence is sufficient, or not. In the Cox lawsuit, this was the case, but that verdict is currently being appealed.

Grande Communication’s full motion to dismiss is avalaible here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

BPI Breaks Record After Sending 310 Million Google Takedowns

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/bpi-breaks-record-after-sending-310-million-google-takedowns-170619/

A little over a year ago during March 2016, music industry group BPI reached an important milestone. After years of sending takedown notices to Google, the group burst through the 200 million URL barrier.

The fact that it took BPI several years to reach its 200 million milestone made the surpassing of the quarter billion milestone a few months later even more remarkable. In October 2016, the group sent its 250 millionth takedown to Google, a figure that nearly doubled when accounting for notices sent to Microsoft’s Bing.

But despite the volumes, the battle hadn’t been won, let alone the war. The BPI’s takedown machine continued to run at a remarkable rate, churning out millions more notices per week.

As a result, yet another new milestone was reached this month when the BPI smashed through the 300 million URL barrier. Then, days later, a further 10 million were added, with the latter couple of million added during the time it took to put this piece together.

BPI takedown notices, as reported by Google

While demanding that Google places greater emphasis on its de-ranking of ‘pirate’ sites, the BPI has called again and again for a “notice and stay down” regime, to ensure that content taken down by the search engine doesn’t simply reappear under a new URL. It’s a position BPI maintains today.

“The battle would be a whole lot easier if intermediaries played fair,” a BPI spokesperson informs TF.

“They need to take more proactive responsibility to reduce infringing content that appears on their platform, and, where we expressly notify infringing content to them, to ensure that they do not only take it down, but also keep it down.”

The long-standing suggestion is that the volume of takedown notices sent would reduce if a “take down, stay down” regime was implemented. The BPI says it’s difficult to present a precise figure but infringing content has a tendency to reappear, both in search engines and on hosting sites.

“Google rejects repeat notices for the same URL. But illegal content reappears as it is re-indexed by Google. As to the sites that actually host the content, the vast majority of notices sent to them could be avoided if they implemented take-down & stay-down,” BPI says.

The fact that the BPI has added 60 million more takedowns since the quarter billion milestone a few months ago is quite remarkable, particularly since there appears to be little slowdown from month to month. However, the numbers have grown so huge that 310 billion now feels a lot like 250 million, with just a few added on top for good measure.

That an extra 60 million takedowns can almost be dismissed as a handful is an indication of just how massive the issue is online. While pirates always welcome an abundance of links to juicy content, it’s no surprise that groups like the BPI are seeking more comprehensive and sustainable solutions.

Previously, it was hoped that the Digital Economy Bill would provide some relief, hopefully via government intervention and the imposition of a search engine Code of Practice. In the event, however, all pressure on search engines was removed from the legislation after a separate voluntary agreement was reached.

All parties agreed that the voluntary code should come into effect two weeks ago on June 1 so it seems likely that some effects should be noticeable in the near future. But the BPI says it’s still early days and there’s more work to be done.

“BPI has been working productively with search engines since the voluntary code was agreed to understand how search engines approach the problem, but also what changes can and have been made and how results can be improved,” the group explains.

“The first stage is to benchmark where we are and to assess the impact of the changes search engines have made so far. This will hopefully be completed soon, then we will have better information of the current picture and from that we hope to work together to continue to improve search for rights owners and consumers.”

With more takedown notices in the pipeline not yet publicly reported by Google, the BPI informs TF that it has now notified the search giant of 315 million links to illegal content.

“That’s an astonishing number. More than 1 in 10 of the entire world’s notices to Google come from BPI. This year alone, one in every three notices sent to Google from BPI is for independent record label repertoire,” BPI concludes.

While it’s clear that groups like BPI have developed systems to cope with the huge numbers of takedown notices required in today’s environment, it’s clear that few rightsholders are happy with the status quo. With that in mind, the fight will continue, until search engines are forced into compromise. Considering the implications, that could only appear on a very distant horizon.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Man Faces Prison For Sharing Pirated Deadpool Movie on Facebook

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/man-faces-prison-for-sharing-pirated-deadpool-movie-on-facebook-170614/

With roughly two billion active users per month, Facebook is by far the largest social networking site around.

While most of the content posted to the site is relatively harmless, some people use it to share things they are not supposed to.

This is also what 21-year-old Trevon Maurice Franklin from Fresno, California, did early last year. Just a week after the box-office hit Deadpool premiered in theaters, he shared a pirated copy of the movie on the social network.

Franklin, who used the screen name “Tre-Von M. King,” saw his post go viral as it allegedly reached five million views. This didn’t go unnoticed by Twentieth Century Fox, and soon after the feds were involved as well.

The FBI began to investigate the possibly criminal Facebook post and decided to build a case. This eventually led to an indictment, and the alleged “pirate” was arrested soon after.

Facebook post from early 2016

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California, which released the news a few hours ago, states that Franklin faces up to three years in prison for the alleged copyright infringement.

“Franklin is charged in a one-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury on April 7 with reproducing and distributing a copyrighted work, a felony offense that carries a statutory maximum penalty of three years in federal prison,” the office wrote in a press release.

According to comments on Facebook, posted last year, several people warned “Tre-Von M. King” that it wasn’t wise to post copyright-infringing material on Facebook. However, Franklin said he wasn’t worried that he would get in trouble.

Comment from early 2016

While the case is significant, there are also plenty of questions that remain unanswered.

Was the defendant involved in recording the copyright infringing copy? Was it already widely available elsewhere? Are the reported five million “views” people who watched a large part of the movie, or is this just the number of people who might have seen it in their feeds?

Thus far we have not seen a copy of the indictment in the court records, but a follow-up may be warranted when it becomes available.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Making Waves: print out sound waves with the Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/printed-sound-wave/

For fun, Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, and Bomani McClendon have worked together to create Waves, an audiovisual project that records people’s spoken responses to personal questions and prints them in the form of a sound wave as a gift for being truthful.

Waves

Waves is a Raspberry Pi project centered around transforming the transience of the spoken word into something concrete and physical. In our setup, a user presses a button corresponding to an intimate question (ex: what’s your motto?) and answers it into a microphone while pressing down on the button.

What are you grateful for?

“I’m grateful for finishing this project,” admits maker Eunice Lee as she presses a button and speaks into the microphone that is part of the Waves project build. After a brief moment, her confession appears on receipt paper as a waveform, and she grins toward the camera, happy with the final piece.

Eunice testing Waves

Waves is a Raspberry Pi project centered around transforming the transience of the spoken word into something concrete and physical. In our setup, a user presses a button corresponding to an intimate question (ex: what’s your motto?) and answers it into a microphone while pressing down on the button.

Sound wave machine

Alongside a Raspberry Pi 3, the Waves device is comprised of four tactile buttons, a standard USB microphone, and a thermal receipt printer. This type of printer has become easily available for the maker movement from suppliers such as Adafruit and Pimoroni.

Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, Bomani McClendon - Sound Wave Raspberry Pi

Definitely more fun than a polygraph test

The trio designed four colour-coded cards that represent four questions, each of which has a matching button on the breadboard. Press the button that belongs to the question to be answered, and Python code directs the Pi to record audio via the microphone. Releasing the button stops the audio recording. “Once the recording has been saved, the script viz.py is launched,” explains Lee. “This script takes the audio file and, using Python matplotlib magic, turns it into a nice little waveform image.”

From there, the Raspberry Pi instructs the thermal printer to produce a printout of the sound wave image along with the question.

Making for fun

Eunice, Bomani, and Matt, students of design and computer science at Northwestern University in Illinois, built Waves as a side project. They wanted to make something at the intersection of art and technology and were motivated by the pure joy of creating.

Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, Bomani McClendon - Sound Wave Raspberry Pi

Making makes people happy

They have noted improvements that can be made to increase the scope of their sound wave project. We hope to see many more interesting builds from these three, and in the meantime we invite you all to look up their code on Eunice’s GitHub to create your own Waves at home.

The post Making Waves: print out sound waves with the Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Who’s To Blame For The Kodi Crackdown?

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/whos-to-blame-for-the-kodi-crackdown-170611/

Perfectly legal as standard, the Kodi media player can be easily modified to turn it into the ultimate streaming piracy machine.

Uptake by users has been nothing short of phenomenal. Millions of people are now consuming illicit media through third-party Kodi addons. With free movies, TV shows, sports, live TV and more on tap, it’s not difficult to see why the system is so popular.

As a result, barely a day goes by without Kodi making headlines and this week was no exception. On Monday, TorrentFreak broke the news that the ZEMTV addon and TV Addons, one of the most popular addon communities, were being sued by Dish Network for copyright infringement.

Within hours of the announcement and apparently as a direct result, several addons (including the massively popular Phoenix) decided to throw in the towel. Quite understandably, users of the platforms were disappointed, and that predictably resulted in people attempting to apportion blame.

The first comment to catch the eye was posted directly beneath our article. Interestingly, it placed the blame squarely on our shoulders.

“Thanks Torrentfreak, for ruining Kodi,” it read.

While shooting the messenger is an option, it’s historically problematic. Town criers were the original newsreaders, delivering important messages to the public. Killing a town crier was considered treason, but it was also pointless – it didn’t change the facts on the ground.

So if we can’t kill those who read about a lawsuit in the public PACER system and reported it, who’s left to blame? Unsurprisingly, there’s no shortage of targets, but most of them fall short.

The underlying theme is that most people voicing a negative opinion about the profile of Kodi do not appreciate their previously niche piracy system being in the spotlight. Everything was just great when just a few people knew about the marvelous hidden world of ‘secret’ XBMC/Kodi addons, many insist, but seeing it in the mainstream press is a disaster. It’s difficult to disagree.

However, the point where this all falls down is when people are asked when the discussion about Kodi should’ve stopped. We haven’t questioned them all, of course, but it’s almost guaranteed that while most with a grievance didn’t want Kodi getting too big, they absolutely appreciate the fact that someone told them about it. Piracy and piracy techniques spread by word of mouth so unfortunately, people can’t have it both ways.

Interestingly, some people placed the blame on TV Addons, the site that hosts the addons themselves. They argued that the addon scene didn’t need such a high profile target and that the popularity of the site only brought unwanted attention. However, for every critic, there are apparently thousands who love what the site does to raise the profile of Kodi. Without that, it’s clear that there would be fewer users and indeed, fewer addons.

For TV Addons’ part, they’re extremely clear who’s responsible for bringing the heat. On numerous occasions in emails to TF, the operators of the repository have blamed those who have attempted to commercialize the Kodi scene. For them, the responsibility must be placed squarely on the shoulders of people selling ‘Kodi boxes’ on places like eBay and Amazon. Once big money got involved, that attracted the authorities, they argue.

With this statement in mind, TF spoke with a box seller who previously backed down from selling on eBay due to issues over Kodi’s trademark. He didn’t want to speak on the record but admitted to selling “a couple of thousand” boxes over the past two years, noting that all he did was respond to demand with supply.

And this brings us full circle and a bit closer to apportioning blame for the Kodi crackdown.

The bottom line is that when it comes to piracy, Kodi and its third-party ‘pirate’ addons are so good at what they do, it’s no surprise they’ve been a smash hit with Internet users. All of the content that anyone could want – and more – accessible in one package, on almost any platform? That’s what consumers have been demanding for more than a decade and a half.

That brings us to the unavoidable conclusion that modified Kodi simply got too good at delivering content outside controlled channels, and that success was impossible to moderate or calm. Quite simply, every user that added to the Kodi phenomenon by installing the software with ‘pirate’ addons has to shoulder some of the blame for the crackdown.

That might sound harsh but in the piracy world it’s never been any different. Without millions of users, The Pirate Bay raid would never have happened. Without users, KickassTorrents might still be rocking today. But of course, what would be the point?

Users might break sites and services, but they also make them. That’s the piracy paradox.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

NSA Document Outlining Russian Attempts to Hack Voter Rolls

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/nsa_document_ou.html

This week brought new public evidence about Russian interference in the 2016 election. On Monday, the Intercept published a top-secret National Security Agency document describing Russian hacking attempts against the US election system. While the attacks seem more exploratory than operational ­– and there’s no evidence that they had any actual effect ­– they further illustrate the real threats and vulnerabilities facing our elections, and they point to solutions.

The document describes how the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence agency, attacked a company called VR Systems that, according to its website, provides software to manage voter rolls in eight states. The August 2016 attack was successful, and the attackers used the information they stole from the company’s network to launch targeted attacks against 122 local election officials on October 27, 12 days before the election.

That is where the NSA’s analysis ends. We don’t know whether those 122 targeted attacks were successful, or what their effects were if so. We don’t know whether other election software companies besides VR Systems were targeted, or what the GRU’s overall plan was — if it had one. Certainly, there are ways to disrupt voting by interfering with the voter registration process or voter rolls. But there was no indication on Election Day that people found their names removed from the system, or their address changed, or anything else that would have had an effect — anywhere in the country, let alone in the eight states where VR Systems is deployed. (There were Election Day problems with the voting rolls in Durham, NC ­– one of the states that VR Systems supports ­– but they seem like conventional errors and not malicious action.)

And 12 days before the election (with early voting already well underway in many jurisdictions) seems far too late to start an operation like that. That is why these attacks feel exploratory to me, rather than part of an operational attack. The Russians were seeing how far they could get, and keeping those accesses in their pocket for potential future use.

Presumably, this document was intended for the Justice Department, including the FBI, which would be the proper agency to continue looking into these hacks. We don’t know what happened next, if anything. VR Systems isn’t commenting, and the names of the local election officials targeted did not appear in the NSA document.

So while this document isn’t much of a smoking gun, it’s yet more evidence of widespread Russian attempts to interfere last year.

The document was, allegedly, sent to the Intercept anonymously. An NSA contractor, Reality Leigh Winner, was arrested Saturday and charged with mishandling classified information. The speed with which the government identified her serves as a caution to anyone wanting to leak official US secrets.

The Intercept sent a scan of the document to another source during its reporting. That scan showed a crease in the original document, which implied that someone had printed the document and then carried it out of some secure location. The second source, according to the FBI’s affidavit against Winner, passed it on to the NSA. From there, NSA investigators were able to look at their records and determine that only six people had printed out the document. (The government may also have been able to track the printout through secret dots that identified the printer.) Winner was the only one of those six who had been in e-mail contact with the Intercept. It is unclear whether the e-mail evidence was from Winner’s NSA account or her personal account, but in either case, it’s incredibly sloppy tradecraft.

With President Trump’s election, the issue of Russian interference in last year’s campaign has become highly politicized. Reports like the one from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in January have been criticized by partisan supporters of the White House. It’s interesting that this document was reported by the Intercept, which has been historically skeptical about claims of Russian interference. (I was quoted in their story, and they showed me a copy of the NSA document before it was published.) The leaker was even praised by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who up until now has been traditionally critical of allegations of Russian election interference.

This demonstrates the power of source documents. It’s easy to discount a Justice Department official or a summary report. A detailed NSA document is much more convincing. Right now, there’s a federal suit to force the ODNI to release the entire January report, not just the unclassified summary. These efforts are vital.

This hack will certainly come up at the Senate hearing where former FBI director James B. Comey is scheduled to testify Thursday. Last year, there were several stories about voter databases being targeted by Russia. Last August, the FBI confirmed that the Russians successfully hacked voter databases in Illinois and Arizona. And a month later, an unnamed Department of Homeland Security official said that the Russians targeted voter databases in 20 states. Again, we don’t know of anything that came of these hacks, but expect Comey to be asked about them. Unfortunately, any details he does know are almost certainly classified, and won’t be revealed in open testimony.

But more important than any of this, we need to better secure our election systems going forward. We have significant vulnerabilities in our voting machines, our voter rolls and registration process, and the vote tabulation systems after the polls close. In January, DHS designated our voting systems as critical national infrastructure, but so far that has been entirely for show. In the United States, we don’t have a single integrated election. We have 50-plus individual elections, each with its own rules and its own regulatory authorities. Federal standards that mandate voter-verified paper ballots and post-election auditing would go a long way to secure our voting system. These attacks demonstrate that we need to secure the voter rolls, as well.

Democratic elections serve two purposes. The first is to elect the winner. But the second is to convince the loser. After the votes are all counted, everyone needs to trust that the election was fair and the results accurate. Attacks against our election system, even if they are ultimately ineffective, undermine that trust and ­– by extension ­– our democracy. Yes, fixing this will be expensive. Yes, it will require federal action in what’s historically been state-run systems. But as a country, we have no other option.

This essay previously appeared in the Washington Post.

How The Intercept Outed Reality Winner

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/06/how-intercept-outed-reality-winner.html

Today, The Intercept released documents on election tampering from an NSA leaker. Later, the arrest warrant request for an NSA contractor named “Reality Winner” was published, showing how they tracked her down because she had printed out the documents and sent them to The Intercept. The document posted by the Intercept isn’t the original PDF file, but a PDF containing the pictures of the printed version that was then later scanned in.

As the warrant says, she confessed while interviewed by the FBI. Had she not confessed, the documents still contained enough evidence to convict her: the printed document was digitally watermarked.

The problem is that most new printers print nearly invisibly yellow dots that track down exactly when and where documents, any document, is printed. Because the NSA logs all printing jobs on its printers, it can use this to match up precisely who printed the document.

In this post, I show how.

You can download the document from the original article here. You can then open it in a PDF viewer, such as the normal “Preview” app on macOS. Zoom into some whitespace on the document, and take a screenshot of this. On macOS, hit [Command-Shift-3] to take a screenshot of a window. There are yellow dots in this image, but you can barely see them, especially if your screen is dirty.

We need to highlight the yellow dots. Open the screenshot in an image editor, such as the “Paintbrush” program built into macOS. Now use the option to “Invert Colors” in the image, to get something like this. You should see a roughly rectangular pattern checkerboard in the whitespace.

It’s upside down, so we need to rotate it 180 degrees, or flip-horizontal and flip-vertical:

Now we go to the EFF page and manually click on the pattern so that their tool can decode the meaning:

This produces the following result:

The document leaked by the Intercept was from a printer with model number 54, serial number 29535218. The document was printed on May 9, 2017 at 6:20. The NSA almost certainly has a record of who used the printer at that time.

The situation is similar to how Vice outed the location of John McAfee, by publishing JPEG photographs of him with the EXIF GPS coordinates still hidden in the file. Or it’s how PDFs are often redacted by adding a black bar on top of image, leaving the underlying contents still in the file for people to read, such as in this NYTime accident with a Snowden document. Or how opening a Microsoft Office document, then accidentally saving it, leaves fingerprints identifying you behind, as repeatedly happened with the Wikileaks election leaks. These sorts of failures are common with leaks. To fix this yellow-dot problem, use a black-and-white printer, black-and-white scanner, or convert to black-and-white with an image editor.

Copiers/printers have two features put in there by the government to be evil to you. The first is that scanners/copiers (when using scanner feature) recognize a barely visible pattern on currency, so that they can’t be used to counterfeit money, as shown on this $20 below:

The second is that when they print things out, they includes these invisible dots, so documents can be tracked. In other words, those dots on bills prevent them from being scanned in, and the dots produced by printers help the government track what was printed out.

Yes, this code the government forces into our printers is a violation of our 3rd Amendment rights.


While I was writing up this post, these tweets appeared first:


Comments:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14494818

TheDarkOverlord Leaks Eight Episodes of an Unreleased ABC Show

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/thedarkoverlord-leaks-eight-episodes-of-unreleased-abc-show-170605/

Late April, a hacking group calling itself TheDarkOverlord (TDO) warned that unless a ransom was paid, it would begin leaking a trove of unreleased TV shows and movies.

Almost immediately it carried through with its threat by leaking the season five premiere of Netflix’s Orange is The New Black. The leak was just the start though, with another nine episodes quickly following. Netflix had clearly refused to pay any ransom.

Ever since there have been suggestions that TDO could leak additional material. It was previously established that the Orange is the New Black leak was the result of a breach at post-production studio Larson Studios. TDO previously indicated that it had more content up its sleeve from the same location.

During the past few hours that became evident when a message sent to TF heralded a new leak of yet another unaired show.

“We’ve just released ABC’s ‘Steve Harvey’s Funderdome’ Season 01 Episodes 01 through 08. This is a completely unaired show,” TDO told TF.

TDO refused to confirm where it had obtained the content but since the show was present in an earlier list distributed by TDO, it seems possible if not probable that the episodes were also obtained from Larson.

“We’re unwilling to discuss the source of this material, but we’ll go on the record stating that this is content that is owned by American Broadcasting Company and it’s just been released on the world wide web for everyone’s consumption,” TDO said.

As can be seen from the image below, the series is now being distributed on The Pirate Bay.

At the time of writing, interest in the episodes is low, with less than a dozen peers reported on the torrent. Those numbers are likely to increase as the day goes on but it’s safe to say that interest is at a much lower level than when Orange is the New Black was dumped online.

Interest levels aside, the reason that both series were leaked appears to be the same. Although TDO wouldn’t go into specifics, the hacking entity told TF that it contacted ABC with demands but had no success.

“We approached ABC with a most handsome business proposal, but we were so rudely denied an audience. Therefore, we decided to bestow a gift upon the good people of the internet,” TDO said.

On June 2, TDO already indicated that ABC could be the next target with a short announcement on Twitter. “American Broadcasting Company may be up next, ladies and gentlemen,” TDO wrote.

Interestingly, there’s a suggestion that TDO views the Netflix and ABC leaks as being different, in that it views the companies’ routes to market as dissimilar.

“This is a different model than Netflix as ABC’s profits are generated much differently,” TDO concludes.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Building High-Throughput Genomics Batch Workflows on AWS: Workflow Layer (Part 4 of 4)

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-high-throughput-genomics-batch-workflows-on-aws-workflow-layer-part-4-of-4/

Aaron Friedman is a Healthcare and Life Sciences Partner Solutions Architect at AWS

Angel Pizarro is a Scientific Computing Technical Business Development Manager at AWS

This post is the fourth in a series on how to build a genomics workflow on AWS. In Part 1, we introduced a general architecture, shown below, and highlighted the three common layers in a batch workflow:

  • Job
  • Batch
  • Workflow

In Part 2, you built a Docker container for each job that needed to run as part of your workflow, and stored them in Amazon ECR.

In Part 3, you tackled the batch layer and built a scalable, elastic, and easily maintainable batch engine using AWS Batch. This solution took care of dynamically scaling your compute resources in response to the number of runnable jobs in your job queue length as well as managed job placement.

In part 4, you build out the workflow layer of your solution using AWS Step Functions and AWS Lambda. You then run an end-to-end genomic analysis―specifically known as exome secondary analysis―for many times at a cost of less than $1 per exome.

Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of your applications using visual workflows. Building applications from individual components that each perform a single function lets you scale and change your workflow quickly. You can use the graphical console to arrange and visualize the components of your application as a series of steps, which simplify building and running multi-step applications. You can change and add steps without writing code, so you can easily evolve your application and innovate faster.

An added benefit of using Step Functions to define your workflows is that the state machines you create are immutable. While you can delete a state machine, you cannot alter it after it is created. For regulated workloads where auditing is important, you can be assured that state machines you used in production cannot be altered.

In this blog post, you will create a Lambda state machine to orchestrate your batch workflow. For more information on how to create a basic state machine, please see this Step Functions tutorial.

All code related to this blog series can be found in the associated GitHub repository here.

Build a state machine building block

To skip the following steps, we have provided an AWS CloudFormation template that can deploy your Step Functions state machine. You can use this in combination with the setup you did in part 3 to quickly set up the environment in which to run your analysis.

The state machine is composed of smaller state machines that submit a job to AWS Batch, and then poll and check its execution.

The steps in this building block state machine are as follows:

  1. A job is submitted.
    Each analytical module/job has its own Lambda function for submission and calls the batchSubmitJob Lambda function that you built in the previous blog post. You will build these specialized Lambda functions in the following section.
  2. The state machine queries the AWS Batch API for the job status.
    This is also a Lambda function.
  3. The job status is checked to see if the job has completed.
    If the job status equals SUCCESS, proceed to log the final job status. If the job status equals FAILED, end the execution of the state machine. In all other cases, wait 30 seconds and go back to Step 2.

Here is the JSON representing this state machine.

{
  "Comment": "A simple example that submits a Job to AWS Batch",
  "StartAt": "SubmitJob",
  "States": {
    "SubmitJob": {
      "Type": "Task",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:<account-id>::function:batchSubmitJob",
      "Next": "GetJobStatus"
    },
    "GetJobStatus": {
      "Type": "Task",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:<account-id>:function:batchGetJobStatus",
      "Next": "CheckJobStatus",
      "InputPath": "$",
      "ResultPath": "$.status"
    },
    "CheckJobStatus": {
      "Type": "Choice",
      "Choices": [
        {
          "Variable": "$.status",
          "StringEquals": "FAILED",
          "End": true
        },
        {
          "Variable": "$.status",
          "StringEquals": "SUCCEEDED",
          "Next": "GetFinalJobStatus"
        }
      ],
      "Default": "Wait30Seconds"
    },
    "Wait30Seconds": {
      "Type": "Wait",
      "Seconds": 30,
      "Next": "GetJobStatus"
    },
    "GetFinalJobStatus": {
      "Type": "Task",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:<account-id>:function:batchGetJobStatus",
      "End": true
    }
  }
}

Building the Lambda functions for the state machine

You need two basic Lambda functions for this state machine. The first one submits a job to AWS Batch and the second checks the status of the AWS Batch job that was submitted.

In AWS Step Functions, you specify an input as JSON that is read into your state machine. Each state receives the aggregate of the steps immediately preceding it, and you can specify which components a state passes on to its children. Because you are using Lambda functions to execute tasks, one of the easiest routes to take is to modify the input JSON, represented as a Python dictionary, within the Lambda function and return the entire dictionary back for the next state to consume.

Building the batchSubmitIsaacJob Lambda function

For Step 1 above, you need a Lambda function for each of the steps in your analysis workflow. As you created a generic Lambda function in the previous post to submit a batch job (batchSubmitJob), you can use that function as the basis for the specialized functions you’ll include in this state machine. Here is such a Lambda function for the Isaac aligner.

from __future__ import print_function

import boto3
import json
import traceback

lambda_client = boto3.client('lambda')



def lambda_handler(event, context):
    try:
        # Generate output put
        bam_s3_path = '/'.join([event['resultsS3Path'], event['sampleId'], 'bam/'])

        depends_on = event['dependsOn'] if 'dependsOn' in event else []

        # Generate run command
        command = [
            '--bam_s3_folder_path', bam_s3_path,
            '--fastq1_s3_path', event['fastq1S3Path'],
            '--fastq2_s3_path', event['fastq2S3Path'],
            '--reference_s3_path', event['isaac']['referenceS3Path'],
            '--working_dir', event['workingDir']
        ]

        if 'cmdArgs' in event['isaac']:
            command.extend(['--cmd_args', event['isaac']['cmdArgs']])
        if 'memory' in event['isaac']:
            command.extend(['--memory', event['isaac']['memory']])

        # Submit Payload
        response = lambda_client.invoke(
            FunctionName='batchSubmitJob',
            InvocationType='RequestResponse',
            LogType='Tail',
            Payload=json.dumps(dict(
                dependsOn=depends_on,
                containerOverrides={
                    'command': command,
                },
                jobDefinition=event['isaac']['jobDefinition'],
                jobName='-'.join(['isaac', event['sampleId']]),
                jobQueue=event['isaac']['jobQueue']
            )))

        response_payload = response['Payload'].read()

        # Update event
        event['bamS3Path'] = bam_s3_path
        event['jobId'] = json.loads(response_payload)['jobId']
        
        return event
    except Exception as e:
        traceback.print_exc()
        raise e

In the Lambda console, create a Python 2.7 Lambda function named batchSubmitIsaacJob and paste in the above code. Use the LambdaBatchExecutionRole that you created in the previous post. For more information, see Step 2.1: Create a Hello World Lambda Function.

This Lambda function reads in the inputs passed to the state machine it is part of, formats the data for the batchSubmitJob Lambda function, invokes that Lambda function, and then modifies the event dictionary to pass onto the subsequent states. You can repeat these for each of the other tools, which can be found in the tools//lambda/lambda_function.py script in the GitHub repo.

Building the batchGetJobStatus Lambda function

For Step 2 above, the process queries the AWS Batch DescribeJobs API action with jobId to identify the state that the job is in. You can put this into a Lambda function to integrate it with Step Functions.

In the Lambda console, create a new Python 2.7 function with the LambdaBatchExecutionRole IAM role. Name your function batchGetJobStatus and paste in the following code. This is similar to the batch-get-job-python27 Lambda blueprint.

from __future__ import print_function

import boto3
import json

print('Loading function')

batch_client = boto3.client('batch')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    # Log the received event
    print("Received event: " + json.dumps(event, indent=2))
    # Get jobId from the event
    job_id = event['jobId']

    try:
        response = batch_client.describe_jobs(
            jobs=[job_id]
        )
        job_status = response['jobs'][0]['status']
        return job_status
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        message = 'Error getting Batch Job status'
        print(message)
        raise Exception(message)

Structuring state machine input

You have structured the state machine input so that general file references are included at the top-level of the JSON object, and any job-specific items are contained within a nested JSON object. At a high level, this is what the input structure looks like:

{
        "general_field_1": "value1",
        "general_field_2": "value2",
        "general_field_3": "value3",
        "job1": {},
        "job2": {},
        "job3": {}
}

Building the full state machine

By chaining these state machine components together, you can quickly build flexible workflows that can process genomes in multiple ways. The development of the larger state machine that defines the entire workflow uses four of the above building blocks. You use the Lambda functions that you built in the previous section. Rename each building block submission to match the tool name.

We have provided a CloudFormation template to deploy your state machine and the associated IAM roles. In the CloudFormation console, select Create Stack, choose your template (deploy_state_machine.yaml), and enter in the ARNs for the Lambda functions you created.

Continue through the rest of the steps and deploy your stack. Be sure to check the box next to "I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources."

Once the CloudFormation stack is finished deploying, you should see the following image of your state machine.

In short, you first submit a job for Isaac, which is the aligner you are using for the analysis. Next, you use parallel state to split your output from "GetFinalIsaacJobStatus" and send it to both your variant calling step, Strelka, and your QC step, Samtools Stats. These then are run in parallel and you annotate the results from your Strelka step with snpEff.

Putting it all together

Now that you have built all of the components for a genomics secondary analysis workflow, test the entire process.

We have provided sequences from an Illumina sequencer that cover a region of the genome known as the exome. Most of the positions in the genome that we have currently associated with disease or human traits reside in this region, which is 1–2% of the entire genome. The workflow that you have built works for both analyzing an exome, as well as an entire genome.

Additionally, we have provided prebuilt reference genomes for Isaac, located at:

s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/reference/

If you are interested, we have provided a script that sets up all of that data. To execute that script, run the following command on a large EC2 instance:

make reference REGISTRY=<your-ecr-registry>

Indexing and preparing this reference takes many hours on a large-memory EC2 instance. Be careful about the costs involved and note that the data is available through the prebuilt reference genomes.

Starting the execution

In a previous section, you established a provenance for the JSON that is fed into your state machine. For ease, we have auto-populated the input JSON for you to the state machine. You can also find this in the GitHub repo under workflow/test.input.json:

{
  "fastq1S3Path": "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/SRR1919605_1.fastq.gz",
  "fastq2S3Path": "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/SRR1919605_2.fastq.gz",
  "referenceS3Path": "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/reference/hg38.fa",
  "resultsS3Path": "s3://<bucket>/genomic-workflow/results",
  "sampleId": "NA12878_states_1",
  "workingDir": "/scratch",
  "isaac": {
    "jobDefinition": "isaac-myenv:1",
    "jobQueue": "arn:aws:batch:us-east-1:<account-id>:job-queue/highPriority-myenv",
    "referenceS3Path": "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/reference/isaac/"
  },
  "samtoolsStats": {
    "jobDefinition": "samtools_stats-myenv:1",
    "jobQueue": "arn:aws:batch:us-east-1:<account-id>:job-queue/lowPriority-myenv"
  },
  "strelka": {
    "jobDefinition": "strelka-myenv:1",
    "jobQueue": "arn:aws:batch:us-east-1:<account-id>:job-queue/highPriority-myenv",
    "cmdArgs": " --exome "
  },
  "snpEff": {
    "jobDefinition": "snpeff-myenv:1",
    "jobQueue": "arn:aws:batch:us-east-1:<account-id>:job-queue/lowPriority-myenv",
    "cmdArgs": " -t hg38 "
  }
}

You are now at the stage to run your full genomic analysis. Copy the above to a new text file, change paths and ARNs to the ones that you created previously, and save your JSON input as input.states.json.

In the CLI, execute the following command. You need the ARN of the state machine that you created in the previous post:

aws stepfunctions start-execution --state-machine-arn <your-state-machine-arn> --input file://input.states.json

Your analysis has now started. By using Spot Instances with AWS Batch, you can quickly scale out your workflows while concurrently optimizing for cost. While this is not guaranteed, most executions of the workflows presented here should cost under $1 for a full analysis.

Monitoring the execution

The output from the above CLI command gives you the ARN that describes the specific execution. Copy that and navigate to the Step Functions console. Select the state machine that you created previously and paste the ARN into the search bar.

The screen shows information about your specific execution. On the left, you see where your execution currently is in the workflow.

In the following screenshot, you can see that your workflow has successfully completed the alignment job and moved onto the subsequent steps, which are variant calling and generating quality information about your sample.

You can also navigate to the AWS Batch console and see that progress of all of your jobs reflected there as well.

Finally, after your workflow has completed successfully, check out the S3 path to which you wrote all of your files. If you run a ls –recursive command on the S3 results path, specified in the input to your state machine execution, you should see something similar to the following:

2017-05-02 13:46:32 6475144340 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/bam/sorted.bam
2017-05-02 13:46:34    7552576 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/bam/sorted.bam.bai
2017-05-02 13:46:32         45 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/bam/sorted.bam.md5
2017-05-02 13:53:20      68769 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/stats/bam_stats.dat
2017-05-02 14:05:12        100 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/stats/runStats.tsv
2017-05-02 14:05:12        359 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/stats/runStats.xml
2017-05-02 14:05:12  507577928 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/genome.S1.vcf.gz
2017-05-02 14:05:12     723144 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/genome.S1.vcf.gz.tbi
2017-05-02 14:05:12  507577928 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/genome.vcf.gz
2017-05-02 14:05:12     723144 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/genome.vcf.gz.tbi
2017-05-02 14:05:12   30783484 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/variants.vcf.gz
2017-05-02 14:05:12    1566596 genomic-workflow/results/NA12878_run1/vcf/variants/variants.vcf.gz.tbi

Modifications to the workflow

You have now built and run your genomics workflow. While diving deep into modifications to this architecture are beyond the scope of these posts, we wanted to leave you with several suggestions of how you might modify this workflow to satisfy additional business requirements.

  • Job tracking with Amazon DynamoDB
    In many cases, such as if you are offering Genomics-as-a-Service, you might want to track the state of your jobs with DynamoDB to get fine-grained records of how your jobs are running. This way, you can easily identify the cost of individual jobs and workflows that you run.
  • Resuming from failure
    Both AWS Batch and Step Functions natively support job retries and can cover many of the standard cases where a job might be interrupted. There may be cases, however, where your workflow might fail in a way that is unpredictable. In this case, you can use custom error handling with AWS Step Functions to build out a workflow that is even more resilient. Also, you can build in fail states into your state machine to fail at any point, such as if a batch job fails after a certain number of retries.
  • Invoking Step Functions from Amazon API Gateway
    You can use API Gateway to build an API that acts as a "front door" to Step Functions. You can create a POST method that contains the input JSON to feed into the state machine you built. For more information, see the Implementing Serverless Manual Approval Steps in AWS Step Functions and Amazon API Gateway blog post.

Conclusion

While the approach we have demonstrated in this series has been focused on genomics, it is important to note that this can be generalized to nearly any high-throughput batch workload. We hope that you have found the information useful and that it can serve as a jump-start to building your own batch workloads on AWS with native AWS services.

For more information about how AWS can enable your genomics workloads, be sure to check out the AWS Genomics page.

Other posts in this four-part series:

Please leave any questions and comments below.

EU Piracy Filter Proposals Being Sabotaged Says MEP Julia Reda

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/eu-piracy-filter-proposals-being-sabotaged-says-mep-julia-reda-170601/

After complaining about “rogue” sites and services for more than 15 years, the music business is now concentrating on the so-called “value gap”.

The theory is that platforms like YouTube are able to avoid paying expensive licensing fees for music by exploiting the safe harbor protections of the DMCA and similar legislation. Effectively, pirate music uploaded by site users becomes available to the public at no cost to the platform and due to safe harbor rules, there is no legal recourse for the labels.

To close this loophole, the EU is currently moving forward with reforms that could limit the protections currently enjoyed by platforms like YouTube. In short, sites that allow users to upload content will be forced to partner up with content providers to aggressively filter all user uploads for infringing content, thus limiting the number of infringing works eventually communicated to the public.

Even as they stand the proposals are being heavily protested (1,2,3) but according to Member of the European Parliament Julia Reda, a new threat has appeared on the horizon.

Ahead of a crucial June 8 vote on how to move forward, Reda says that some in the corridors of power are now “resorting to dirty tactics” to defend and extend the already “disastrous plans” by any means.

Specifically, Reda accuses MEP Pascal Arimont from the European People’s Party (EPP) of trying to sabotage the Parliamentary process, by going behind negotiators’ backs and pushing a new filtering proposal text that makes the “original bad proposal look tame in comparison.”

Reda says that in the face of other MEPs’ efforts to come up with a compromise text upon which all of them are agreed, Arimont has been encouraging some MEPs to rebel against their negotiators. He wants them to support his own super-aggressive “alternative compromise” text that shows disregard for the Charter of Fundamental Rights and principles of EU law.

Arimont’s text is certainly an interesting read and a document that could have been formulated by the record labels themselves. It tightens just about every aspect of the text proposed by the Commission while running all over the compromise text put together by Reda and other MEPs.

For example, where others are agreed on the phrase “Where information society
service providers store and provide access to the public to copyright protected works or other subject-matter uploaded by their users”, Arimont’s text removes the key word “store”.

This means that his filtering demands go beyond sites like YouTube that actually host content, to encompass those that merely carry links. It doesn’t take much imagination to see the potential for chaos there.

Also, where the Commission is happy with the proposed rules only affecting sites that store and provide access to “large amounts” of copyright protected works uploaded by users, Arimont wants the “store” part removed and “large” changed to “significant”.

“[Arimont] doesn’t want [filtering rules] to just apply to services hosting ‘large amounts’ of copyrighted content, as proposed by the Commission, but to any service facilitating the availability of such content, even if the service is not actually hosting anything at all,” Reda explains.

The text also ignores proposals by MEPs that anti-piracy measures to be taken by platforms should be proportionate to their profit and size. That being said, Arimont does accept that start-ups would probably face “insurmountable financial obstacles” if required to deploy filtering technologies, so he proposes they should be exempt.

While that sounds reasonable, any business that’s over five years old would need to comply and Reda warns that the threshold could be set particularly low.

“So if you’ve been self-employed for more than 5 years, rules the Commission wrote with the likes of YouTube and Facebook in mind would suddenly also apply to your personal website,” she warns.

But Arimont’s proposal goes further still and has the potential to have privacy advocates up in arms.

In order to check that all user uploaded content is non-infringing, platforms would necessarily be required to check every single piece of data uploaded by users. This raises considerable privacy concerns and potential conflicts with EU law, for instance with Article 15 of the E-Commerce Directive, which prohibits general monitoring obligations for service providers.

Indeed, during the Netlog filtering case that went before the EU Court of Justice (CJEU) in 2012, the Court held that requiring an online platform to install broad piracy filters is incompatible with EU law.

Nevertheless, Arimont sees bridging the “value gap” as somehow different.

“The use of technical measures is essential for the functioning of online licensing and rights management purposes. Such technical measures therefore do not require the identity of uploaders and hence do not pose any risk for privacy of individual end users,” his proposal reads.

“Furthermore, those technical measures involve a highly targeted technical cooperation of rightholders and information society service providers based on the data provided by rightholders, and therefore do not lead to general obligation to monitor and find facts about the content.”

But what should really raise alarm bells for user-uploaded content platforms is how Arimont proposes to strip them of their safe harbor protections, if they optimize the presentation of that content to users. That, as Reda points out, could be something as benign as listing content in alphabetical order.

Julia Reda’s article has some information at the end for those who want to protest Arimont’s proposals (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Building High-Throughput Genomic Batch Workflows on AWS: Batch Layer (Part 3 of 4)

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-high-throughput-genomic-batch-workflows-on-aws-batch-layer-part-3-of-4/

Aaron Friedman is a Healthcare and Life Sciences Partner Solutions Architect at AWS

Angel Pizarro is a Scientific Computing Technical Business Development Manager at AWS

This post is the third in a series on how to build a genomics workflow on AWS. In Part 1, we introduced a general architecture, shown below, and highlighted the three common layers in a batch workflow:

  • Job
  • Batch
  • Workflow

In Part 2, you built a Docker container for each job that needed to run as part of your workflow, and stored them in Amazon ECR.

In Part 3, you tackle the batch layer and build a scalable, elastic, and easily maintainable batch engine using AWS Batch.

AWS Batch enables developers, scientists, and engineers to easily and efficiently run hundreds of thousands of batch computing jobs on AWS. It dynamically provisions the optimal quantity and type of compute resources (for example, CPU or memory optimized instances) based on the volume and specific resource requirements of the batch jobs that you submit. With AWS Batch, you do not need to install and manage your own batch computing software or server clusters, which allows you to focus on analyzing results, such as those of your genomic analysis.

Integrating applications into AWS Batch

If you are new to AWS Batch, we recommend reading Setting Up AWS Batch to ensure that you have the proper permissions and AWS environment.

After you have a working environment, you define several types of resources:

  • IAM roles that provide service permissions
  • A compute environment that launches and terminates compute resources for jobs
  • A custom Amazon Machine Image (AMI)
  • A job queue to submit the units of work and to schedule the appropriate resources within the compute environment to execute those jobs
  • Job definitions that define how to execute an application

After the resources are created, you’ll test the environment and create an AWS Lambda function to send generic jobs to the queue.

This genomics workflow covers the basic steps. For more information, see Getting Started with AWS Batch.

Creating the necessary IAM roles

AWS Batch simplifies batch processing by managing a number of underlying AWS services so that you can focus on your applications. As a result, you create IAM roles that give the service permissions to act on your behalf. In this section, deploy the AWS CloudFormation template included in the GitHub repository and extract the ARNs for later use.

To deploy the stack, go to the top level in the repo with the following command:

aws cloudformation create-stack --template-body file://batch/setup/iam.template.yaml --stack-name iam --capabilities CAPABILITY_NAMED_IAM

You can capture the output from this stack in the Outputs tab in the CloudFormation console:

Creating the compute environment

In AWS Batch, you will set up a managed compute environments. Managed compute environments automatically launch and terminate compute resources on your behalf based on the aggregate resources needed by your jobs, such as vCPU and memory, and simple boundaries that you define.

When defining your compute environment, specify the following:

  • Desired instance types in your environment
  • Min and max vCPUs in the environment
  • The Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to use
  • Percentage value for bids on the Spot Market and VPC subnets that can be used.

AWS Batch then provisions an elastic and heterogeneous pool of Amazon EC2 instances based on the aggregate resource requirements of jobs sitting in the RUNNABLE state. If a mix of CPU and memory-intensive jobs are ready to run, AWS Batch provisions the appropriate ratio and size of CPU and memory-optimized instances within your environment. For this post, you will use the simplest configuration, in which instance types are set to "optimal" allowing AWS Batch to choose from the latest C, M, and R EC2 instance families.

While you could create this compute environment in the console, we provide the following CLI commands. Replace the subnet IDs and key name with your own private subnets and key, and the image-id with the image you will build in the next section.

ACCOUNTID=<your account id>
SERVICEROLE=<from output in CloudFormation template>
IAMFLEETROLE=<from output in CloudFormation template>
JOBROLEARN=<from output in CloudFormation template>
SUBNETS=<comma delimited list of subnets>
SECGROUPS=<your security groups>
SPOTPER=50 # percentage of on demand
IMAGEID=<ami-id corresponding to the one you created>
INSTANCEROLE=<from output in CloudFormation template>
REGISTRY=${ACCOUNTID}.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
KEYNAME=<your key name>
MAXCPU=1024 # max vCPUs in compute environment
ENV=myenv

# Creates the compute environment
aws batch create-compute-environment --compute-environment-name genomicsEnv-$ENV --type MANAGED --state ENABLED --service-role ${SERVICEROLE} --compute-resources type=SPOT,minvCpus=0,maxvCpus=$MAXCPU,desiredvCpus=0,instanceTypes=optimal,imageId=$IMAGEID,subnets=$SUBNETS,securityGroupIds=$SECGROUPS,ec2KeyPair=$KEYNAME,instanceRole=$INSTANCEROLE,bidPercentage=$SPOTPER,spotIamFleetRole=$IAMFLEETROLE

Creating the custom AMI for AWS Batch

While you can use default Amazon ECS-optimized AMIs with AWS Batch, you can also provide your own image in managed compute environments. We will use this feature to provision additional scratch EBS storage on each of the instances that AWS Batch launches and also to encrypt both the Docker and scratch EBS volumes.

AWS Batch has the same requirements for your AMI as Amazon ECS. To build the custom image, modify the default Amazon ECS-Optimized Amazon Linux AMI in the following ways:

  • Attach a 1 TB scratch volume to /dev/sdb
  • Encrypt the Docker and new scratch volumes
  • Mount the scratch volume to /docker_scratch by modifying /etcfstab

The first two tasks can be addressed when you create the custom AMI in the console. Spin up a small t2.micro instance, and proceed through the standard EC2 instance launch.

After your instance has launched, record the IP address and then SSH into the instance. Copy and paste the following code:

sudo yum -y update
sudo parted /dev/xvdb mklabel gpt
sudo parted /dev/xvdb mkpart primary 0% 100%
sudo mkfs -t ext4 /dev/xvdb1
sudo mkdir /docker_scratch
sudo echo -e '/dev/xvdb1\t/docker_scratch\text4\tdefaults\t0\t0' | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab
sudo mount -a

This auto-mounts your scratch volume to /docker_scratch, which is your scratch directory for batch processing. Next, create your new AMI and record the image ID.

Creating the job queues

AWS Batch job queues are used to coordinate the submission of batch jobs. Your jobs are submitted to job queues, which can be mapped to one or more compute environments. Job queues have priority relative to each other. You can also specify the order in which they consume resources from your compute environments.

In this solution, use two job queues. The first is for high priority jobs, such as alignment or variant calling. Set this with a high priority (1000) and map back to the previously created compute environment. Next, set a second job queue for low priority jobs, such as quality statistics generation. To create these compute environments, enter the following CLI commands:

aws batch create-job-queue --job-queue-name highPriority-${ENV} --compute-environment-order order=0,computeEnvironment=genomicsEnv-${ENV}  --priority 1000 --state ENABLED
aws batch create-job-queue --job-queue-name lowPriority-${ENV} --compute-environment-order order=0,computeEnvironment=genomicsEnv-${ENV}  --priority 1 --state ENABLED

Creating the job definitions

To run the Isaac aligner container image locally, supply the Amazon S3 locations for the FASTQ input sequences, the reference genome to align to, and the output BAM file. For more information, see tools/isaac/README.md.

The Docker container itself also requires some information on a suitable mountable volume so that it can read and write files temporary files without running out of space.

Note: In the following example, the FASTQ files as well as the reference files to run are in a publicly available bucket.

FASTQ1=s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/SRR1919605_1.fastq.gz
FASTQ2=s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/SRR1919605_2.fastq.gz
REF=s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/reference/isaac/
BAM=s3://mybucket/genomic-workflow/test_results/bam/

mkdir ~/scratch

docker run --rm -ti -v $(HOME)/scratch:/scratch $REPO_URI --bam_s3_folder_path $BAM \
--fastq1_s3_path $FASTQ1 \
--fastq2_s3_path $FASTQ2 \
--reference_s3_path $REF \
--working_dir /scratch 

Locally running containers can typically expand their CPU and memory resource headroom. In AWS Batch, the CPU and memory requirements are hard limits and are allocated to the container image at runtime.

Isaac is a fairly resource-intensive algorithm, as it creates an uncompressed index of the reference genome in memory to match the query DNA sequences. The large memory space is shared across multiple CPU threads, and Isaac can scale almost linearly with the number of CPU threads given to it as a parameter.

To fit these characteristics, choose an optimal instance size to maximize the number of CPU threads based on a given large memory footprint, and deploy a Docker container that uses all of the instance resources. In this case, we chose a host instance with 80+ GB of memory and 32+ vCPUs. The following code is example JSON that you can pass to the AWS CLI to create a job definition for Isaac.

aws batch register-job-definition --job-definition-name isaac-${ENV} --type container --retry-strategy attempts=3 --container-properties '
{"image": "'${REGISTRY}'/isaac",
"jobRoleArn":"'${JOBROLEARN}'",
"memory":80000,
"vcpus":32,
"mountPoints": [{"containerPath": "/scratch", "readOnly": false, "sourceVolume": "docker_scratch"}],
"volumes": [{"name": "docker_scratch", "host": {"sourcePath": "/docker_scratch"}}]
}'

You can copy and paste the following code for the other three job definitions:

aws batch register-job-definition --job-definition-name strelka-${ENV} --type container --retry-strategy attempts=3 --container-properties '
{"image": "'${REGISTRY}'/strelka",
"jobRoleArn":"'${JOBROLEARN}'",
"memory":32000,
"vcpus":32,
"mountPoints": [{"containerPath": "/scratch", "readOnly": false, "sourceVolume": "docker_scratch"}],
"volumes": [{"name": "docker_scratch", "host": {"sourcePath": "/docker_scratch"}}]
}'

aws batch register-job-definition --job-definition-name snpeff-${ENV} --type container --retry-strategy attempts=3 --container-properties '
{"image": "'${REGISTRY}'/snpeff",
"jobRoleArn":"'${JOBROLEARN}'",
"memory":10000,
"vcpus":4,
"mountPoints": [{"containerPath": "/scratch", "readOnly": false, "sourceVolume": "docker_scratch"}],
"volumes": [{"name": "docker_scratch", "host": {"sourcePath": "/docker_scratch"}}]
}'

aws batch register-job-definition --job-definition-name samtoolsStats-${ENV} --type container --retry-strategy attempts=3 --container-properties '
{"image": "'${REGISTRY}'/samtools_stats",
"jobRoleArn":"'${JOBROLEARN}'",
"memory":10000,
"vcpus":4,
"mountPoints": [{"containerPath": "/scratch", "readOnly": false, "sourceVolume": "docker_scratch"}],
"volumes": [{"name": "docker_scratch", "host": {"sourcePath": "/docker_scratch"}}]
}'

The value for "image" comes from the previous post on creating a Docker image and publishing to ECR. The value for jobRoleArn you can find from the output of the CloudFormation template that you deployed earlier. In addition to providing the number of CPU cores and memory required by Isaac, you also give it a storage volume for scratch and staging. The volume comes from the previously defined custom AMI.

Testing the environment

After you have created the Isaac job definition, you can submit the job using the AWS Batch submitJob API action. While the base mappings for Docker run are taken care of in the job definition that you just built, the specific job parameters should be specified in the container overrides section of the API call. Here’s what this would look like in the CLI, using the same parameters as in the bash commands shown earlier:

aws batch submit-job --job-name testisaac --job-queue highPriority-${ENV} --job-definition isaac-${ENV}:1 --container-overrides '{
"command": [
			"--bam_s3_folder_path", "s3://mybucket/genomic-workflow/test_batch/bam/",
            "--fastq1_s3_path", "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/ SRR1919605_1.fastq.gz",
            "--fastq2_s3_path", "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/fastq/SRR1919605_2.fastq.gz",
            "--reference_s3_path", "s3://aws-batch-genomics-resources/reference/isaac/",
            "--working_dir", "/scratch",
			"—cmd_args", " --exome ",]
}'

When you execute a submitJob call, jobId is returned. You can then track the progress of your job using the describeJobs API action:

aws batch describe-jobs –jobs <jobId returned from submitJob>

You can also track the progress of all of your jobs in the AWS Batch console dashboard.

To see exactly where a RUNNING job is at, use the link in the AWS Batch console to direct you to the appropriate location in CloudWatch logs.

Completing the batch environment setup

To finish, create a Lambda function to submit a generic AWS Batch job.

In the Lambda console, create a Python 2.7 Lambda function named batchSubmitJob. Copy and paste the following code. This is similar to the batch-submit-job-python27 Lambda blueprint. Use the LambdaBatchExecutionRole that you created earlier. For more information about creating functions, see Step 2.1: Create a Hello World Lambda Function.

from __future__ import print_function

import json
import boto3

batch_client = boto3.client('batch')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    # Log the received event
    print("Received event: " + json.dumps(event, indent=2))
    # Get parameters for the SubmitJob call
    # http://docs.aws.amazon.com/batch/latest/APIReference/API_SubmitJob.html
    job_name = event['jobName']
    job_queue = event['jobQueue']
    job_definition = event['jobDefinition']
    
    # containerOverrides, dependsOn, and parameters are optional
    container_overrides = event['containerOverrides'] if event.get('containerOverrides') else {}
    parameters = event['parameters'] if event.get('parameters') else {}
    depends_on = event['dependsOn'] if event.get('dependsOn') else []
    
    try:
        response = batch_client.submit_job(
            dependsOn=depends_on,
            containerOverrides=container_overrides,
            jobDefinition=job_definition,
            jobName=job_name,
            jobQueue=job_queue,
            parameters=parameters
        )
        
        # Log response from AWS Batch
        print("Response: " + json.dumps(response, indent=2))
        
        # Return the jobId
        event['jobId'] = response['jobId']
        return event
    
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        message = 'Error getting Batch Job status'
        print(message)
        raise Exception(message)

Conclusion

In part 3 of this series, you successfully set up your data processing, or batch, environment in AWS Batch. We also provided a Python script in the corresponding GitHub repo that takes care of all of the above CLI arguments for you, as well as building out the job definitions for all of the jobs in the workflow: Isaac, Strelka, SAMtools, and snpEff. You can check the script’s README for additional documentation.

In Part 4, you’ll cover the workflow layer using AWS Step Functions and AWS Lambda.

Please leave any questions and comments below.

Pornhub Piracy Stopped Me Producing Porn, Jenna Haze Says

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/pornhub-piracy-stopped-me-producing-porn-jenna-haze-says-170531/

Last week, adult ‘tube’ site Pornhub celebrated its 10th anniversary, and what a decade it was.

Six months after its May 2007 launch, the site was getting a million visitors every day. Six months after that, traffic had exploded five-fold. Such was the site’s success, by November 2008 Pornhub entered the ranks of the top 100 most-visited sites on the Internet.

As a YouTube-like platform, Pornhub traditionally relied on users to upload content to the site. Uploaders have to declare that they have the rights to do so but it’s clear that amid large quantities of fully licensed material, content exists on Pornhub that is infringing copyright.

Like YouTube, however, the site says it takes its legal responsibilities seriously by removing content whenever a valid DMCA notice is received. Furthermore, it also has a Content Partner Program which allows content owners to monetize their material on the platform.

But despite these overtures, Pornhub has remained a divisive operation. While some partners happily generate revenue from the platform and use it to drive valuable traffic to their own sites, others view it as a parasite living off their hard work. Today those critics were joined by one of the biggest stars the adult industry has ever known.

After ten years as an adult performer, starring in more than 600 movies (including one that marked her as the first adult performer to appear on Blu-ray format), in 2012 Jenna Haze decided on a change of pace. No longer interested in performing, she headed to the other side of the camera as a producer and director.

“Directing is where my heart is now. It’s allowed me to explore a creative side that is different from what performing has offered me,” she said in a statement.

“I am very satisfied with what I was able to accomplish in 10 years of performing, and now I’m enjoying the challenges of being on the other side of the camera and running my studio.”

But while Haze enjoyed success with 15 movies, it wasn’t to last. The former performer eventually backed away from both directing and producing adult content. This morning she laid the blame for that on Pornhub and similar sites.

It all began with a tweet from Conan O’Brien, who belatedly wished Pornhub a happy 10th anniversary.

In response to O’Brien apparently coming to the party late, a Twitter user informed him how he’d been missing out on Jenna Haze. That drew a response from Haze herself, who accused Pornhub of pirating her content.

“Please don’t support sites like porn hub,” she wrote. “They are a tube site that pirates content that other adult companies produce. It’s like Napster!”

In a follow-up, Haze went on to accuse Pornhub of theft and blamed the site for her exit from the business.

“Well they steal my content from my company, as do many other tube sites. It’s why I don’t produce or direct anymore,” Haze wrote.

“Maybe not all of their content is stolen, but I have definitely seen my content up there, as well as other people’s content.”

Of course, just like record companies can do with YouTube, there’s always the option for Haze to file a DMCA notice with Pornhub to have offending content taken down. However, it’s a route she claims to have taken already, but without much success.

“They take the videos down and put [them] back up. I’m not saying they don’t do legitimate business as well,” she said.

While Pornhub has its critics, the site does indeed do masses of legitimate business. The platform is owned by Mindgeek, whose websites receive a combined 115 million visitors per day, fueled in part by content supplied by Brazzers and Digital Playground, which Mindgeek owns. That being said, Mindgeek’s position in the market has always been controversial.

Three years ago, it became evident that Mindgeek had become so powerful in the adult industry that performers (some of whom felt their content was being exploited by the company) indicated they were scared to criticize it.

Adult actress and outspoken piracy critic Tasha Reign, who also had her videos uploaded to Pornhub without her permission, revealed she was in a particularly tight spot.

“It’s like we’re stuck between a rock and a hard place in a way, because if I want to shoot content then I kinda have to shoot for [Mindgeek] because that’s the company that books me because they own…almost…everything,” Reign said.

In 2017, Mindgeek’s dominance is clearly less of a problem for Haze, who is now concentrating on other things. But for those who remain in the industry, Mindgeek is a force to be reckoned with, so criticism will probably remain somewhat muted.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.