Tag Archives: smart home

Amazon’s Door Lock Is Amazon’s Bid to Control Your Home

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/12/amazons_door_lo.html

Interesting essay about Amazon’s smart lock:

When you add Amazon Key to your door, something more sneaky also happens: Amazon takes over.

You can leave your keys at home and unlock your door with the Amazon Key app — but it’s really built for Amazon deliveries. To share online access with family and friends, I had to give them a special code to SMS (yes, text) to unlock the door. (Amazon offers other smartlocks that have physical keypads).

The Key-compatible locks are made by Yale and Kwikset, yet don’t work with those brands’ own apps. They also can’t connect with a home-security system or smart-home gadgets that work with Apple and Google software.

And, of course, the lock can’t be accessed by businesses other than Amazon. No Walmart, no UPS, no local dog-walking company.

Keeping tight control over Key might help Amazon guarantee security or a better experience. “Our focus with smart home is on making things simpler for customers ­– things like providing easy control of connected devices with your voice using Alexa, simplifying tasks like reordering household goods and receiving packages,” the Amazon spokeswoman said.

But Amazon is barely hiding its goal: It wants to be the operating system for your home. Amazon says Key will eventually work with dog walkers, maids and other service workers who bill through its marketplace. An Amazon home security service and grocery delivery from Whole Foods can’t be far off.

This is happening all over. Everyone wants to control your life: Google, Apple, Amazon…everyone. It’s what I’ve been calling the feudal Internet. I fear it’s going to get a lot worse.

2017 Holiday Gift Guide — Backblaze Style

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/2017-holiday-gift-guide-backblaze-style/


Here at Backblaze we have a lot of folks who are all about technology. With the holiday season fast approaching, you might have all of your gift buying already finished — but if not, we put together a list of things that the employees here at Backblaze are pretty excited about giving (and/or receiving) this year.

Smart Homes:

It’s no secret that having a smart home is the new hotness, and many of the items below can be used to turbocharge your home’s ascent into the future:

Raspberry Pi
The holidays are all about eating pie — well why not get a pie of a different type for the DIY fan in your life!

Wyze Cam
An inexpensive way to keep a close eye on all your favorite people…and intruders!

Snooz
Have trouble falling asleep? Try this portable white noise machine. Also great for the office!

Amazon Echo Dot
Need a cheap way to keep track of your schedule or play music? The Echo Dot is a great entry into the smart home of your dreams!

Google Wifi
These little fellows make it easy to Wifi-ify your entire home, even if it’s larger than the average shoe box here in Silicon Valley. Google Wifi acts as a mesh router and seamlessly covers your whole dwelling. Have a mansion? Buy more!

Google Home
Like the Amazon Echo Dot, this is the Google variant. It’s more expensive (similar to the Amazon Echo) but has better sound quality and is tied into the Google ecosystem.

Nest Thermostat
This is a smart thermostat. What better way to score points with the in-laws than installing one of these bad boys in their home — and then making it freezing cold randomly in the middle of winter from the comfort of your couch!

Wearables:

Homes aren’t the only things that should be smart. Your body should also get the chance to be all that it can be:

Apple AirPods
You’ve seen these all over the place, and the truth is they do a pretty good job of making sounds appear in your ears.

Bose SoundLink Wireless Headphones
If you like over-the-ear headphones, these noise canceling ones work great, are wireless and lovely. There’s no better way to ignore people this holiday season!

Garmin Fenix 5 Watch
This watch is all about fitness. If you enjoy fitness. This watch is the fitness watch for your fitness needs.

Apple Watch
The Apple Watch is a wonderful gadget that will light up any movie theater this holiday season.

Nokia Steel Health Watch
If you’re into mixing analogue and digital, this is a pretty neat little gadget.

Fossil Smart Watch
This stylish watch is a pretty neat way to dip your toe into smartwatches and activity trackers.

Pebble Time Steel Smart Watch
Some people call this the greatest smartwatch of all time. Those people might be named Yev. This watch is great at sending you notifications from your phone, and not needing to be charged every day. Bellissimo!

Random Goods:

A few of the holiday gift suggestions that we got were a bit off-kilter, but we do have a lot of interesting folks in the office. Hopefully, you might find some of these as interesting as they do:

Wireless Qi Charger
Wireless chargers are pretty great in that you don’t have to deal with dongles. There are even kits to make your electronics “wirelessly chargeable” which is pretty great!

Self-Heating Coffee Mug
Love coffee? Hate lukewarm coffee? What if your coffee cup heated itself? Brilliant!

Yeast Stirrer
Yeast. It makes beer. And bread! Sometimes you need to stir it. What cooler way to stir your yeast than with this industrial stirrer?

Toto Washlet
This one is self explanatory. You know the old rhyme: happy butts, everyone’s happy!

Good luck out there this holiday season!

blog-giftguide-present

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Marvellous retrofitted home assistants

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/retrofitted-home-assistants/

As more and more digital home assistants are appearing on the consumer market, it’s not uncommon to see the towering Amazon Echo or sleek Google Home when visiting friends or family. But we, the maker community, are rarely happy unless our tech stands out from the rest. So without further ado, here’s a roundup of some fantastic retrofitted home assistant projects you can recreate and give pride of place in your kitchen, on your bookshelf, or wherever else you’d like to talk to your virtual, disembodied PA.

Google AIY Robot Conversion

Turned an 80s Tomy Mr Money into a little Google AIY / Raspberry Pi based assistant.

Matt ‘Circuitbeard’ Brailsford’s Tomy Mr Money Google AIY Assistant is just one of many home-brew home assistants makers have built since the release of APIs for Amazon Alexa and Google Home. Here are some more…

Teddy Ruxpin

Oh Teddy, how exciting and mysterious you were when I unwrapped you back in the mideighties. With your awkwardly moving lips and twitching eyelids, you were the cream of the crop of robotic toys! How was I to know that during my thirties, you would become augmented with home assistant software and suddenly instil within me a fear unlike any I’d felt before? (Save for my lifelong horror of ET…)

Alexa Ruxpin – Raspberry Pi & Alexa Powered Teddy Bear

Please watch: “DIY Fidget LED Display – Part 1” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAZIc82Duzk -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- There are tons of virtual assistants out on the market: Siri, Ok Google, Alexa, etc. I had this crazy idea…what if I made the virtual assistant real…kinda. I decided to take an old animatronic teddy bear and hack it so that it ran Amazon Alexa.

Several makers around the world have performed surgery on Teddy to install a Raspberry Pi within his stomach and integrate him with Amazon Alexa Voice or Google’s AIY Projects Voice kit. And because these makers are talented, they’ve also managed to hijack Teddy’s wiring to make his lips move in time with his responses to your commands. Freaky…

Speaking of freaky: check out Zack’s Furlexa — an Amazon Alexa Furby that will haunt your nightmares.

Give old tech new life

Devices that were the height of technology when you purchased them may now be languishing in your attic collecting dust. With new and improved versions of gadgets and gizmos being released almost constantly, it is likely that your household harbours a spare whosit or whatsit which you can dismantle and give a new Raspberry Pi heart and purpose.

Take, for example, Martin Mander’s Google Pi intercom. By gutting and thoroughly cleaning a vintage intercom, Martin fashioned a suitable housing the Google AIY Projects Voice kit to create a new home assistant for his house:

1986 Google Pi Intercom

This is a 1986 Radio Shack Intercom that I’ve converted into a Google Home style device using a Raspberry Pi and the Google AIY (Artificial Intelligence Yourself) kit that came free with the MagPi magazine (issue 57). It uses the Google Assistant to answer questions and perform actions, using IFTTT to integrate with smart home accessories and other web services.

Not only does this build look fantastic, it’s also a great conversation starter for any visitors who had a similar device during the eighties.

Also take a look at Martin’s 1970s Amazon Alexa phone for more nostalgic splendour.

Put it in a box

…and then I’ll put that box inside of another box, and then I’ll mail that box to myself, and when it arrives…

A GIF from the emperors new groove - Raspberry Pi Home Assistant

A GIF. A harmless, little GIF…and proof of the comms team’s obsession with The Emperor’s New Groove.

You don’t have to be fancy when it comes to housing your home assistant. And often, especially if you’re working with the smaller people in your household, the results of a simple homespun approach are just as delightful.

Here are Hannah and her dad Tom, explaining how they built a home assistant together and fit it inside an old cigar box:

Raspberry Pi 3 Amazon Echo – The Alexa Kids Build!

My 7 year old daughter and I decided to play around with the Raspberry Pi and build ourselves an Amazon Echo (Alexa). The video tells you about what we did and the links below will take you to all the sites we used to get this up and running.

Also see the Google AIY Projects Voice kit — the cardboard box-est of home assistant boxes.

Make your own home assistant

And now it’s your turn! I challenge you all (and also myself) to create a home assistant using the Raspberry Pi. Whether you decide to fit Amazon Alexa inside an old shoebox or Google Home inside your sister’s Barbie, I’d love to see what you create using the free home assistant software available online.

Check out these other home assistants for Raspberry Pi, and keep an eye on our blog to see what I manage to create as part of the challenge.

Ten virtual house points for everyone who shares their build with us online, either in the comments below or by tagging us on your social media account.

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AWS Hot Startups – August 2017

Post Syndicated from Tina Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-august-2017/

There’s no doubt about it – Artificial Intelligence is changing the world and how it operates. Across industries, organizations from startups to Fortune 500s are embracing AI to develop new products, services, and opportunities that are more efficient and accessible for their consumers. From driverless cars to better preventative healthcare to smart home devices, AI is driving innovation at a fast rate and will continue to play a more important role in our everyday lives.

This month we’d like to highlight startups using AI solutions to help companies grow. We are pleased to feature:

  • SignalBox – a simple and accessible deep learning platform to help businesses get started with AI.
  • Valossa – an AI video recognition platform for the media and entertainment industry.
  • Kaliber – innovative applications for businesses using facial recognition, deep learning, and big data.

SignalBox (UK)

In 2016, SignalBox founder Alain Richardt was hearing the same comments being made by developers, data scientists, and business leaders. They wanted to get into deep learning but didn’t know where to start. Alain saw an opportunity to commodify and apply deep learning by providing a platform that does the heavy lifting with an easy-to-use web interface, blueprints for common tasks, and just a single-click to productize the models. With SignalBox, companies can start building deep learning models with no coding at all – they just select a data set, choose a network architecture, and go. SignalBox also offers step-by-step tutorials, tips and tricks from industry experts, and consulting services for customers that want an end-to-end AI solution.

SignalBox offers a variety of solutions that are being used across many industries for energy modeling, fraud detection, customer segmentation, insurance risk modeling, inventory prediction, real estate prediction, and more. Existing data science teams are using SignalBox to accelerate their innovation cycle. One innovative UK startup, Energi Mine, recently worked with SignalBox to develop deep networks that predict anomalous energy consumption patterns and do time series predictions on energy usage for businesses with hundreds of sites.

SignalBox uses a variety of AWS services including Amazon EC2, Amazon VPC, Amazon Elastic Block Store, and Amazon S3. The ability to rapidly provision EC2 GPU instances has been a critical factor in their success – both in terms of keeping their operational expenses low, as well as speed to market. The Amazon API Gateway has allowed for operational automation, giving SignalBox the ability to control its infrastructure.

To learn more about SignalBox, visit here.

Valossa (Finland)

As students at the University of Oulu in Finland, the Valossa founders spent years doing research in the computer science and AI labs. During that time, the team witnessed how the world was moving beyond text, with video playing a greater role in day-to-day communication. This spawned an idea to use technology to automatically understand what an audience is viewing and share that information with a global network of content producers. Since 2015, Valossa has been building next generation AI applications to benefit the media and entertainment industry and is moving beyond the capabilities of traditional visual recognition systems.

Valossa’s AI is capable of analyzing any video stream. The AI studies a vast array of data within videos and converts that information into descriptive tags, categories, and overviews automatically. Basically, it sees, hears, and understands videos like a human does. The Valossa AI can detect people, visual and auditory concepts, key speech elements, and labels explicit content to make moderating and filtering content simpler. Valossa’s solutions are designed to provide value for the content production workflow, from media asset management to end-user applications for content discovery. AI-annotated content allows online viewers to jump directly to their favorite scenes or search specific topics and actors within a video.

Valossa leverages AWS to deliver the industry’s first complete AI video recognition platform. Using Amazon EC2 GPU instances, Valossa can easily scale their computation capacity based on customer activity. High-volume video processing with GPU instances provides the necessary speed for time-sensitive workflows. The geo-located Availability Zones in EC2 allow Valossa to bring resources close to their customers to minimize network delays. Valossa also uses Amazon S3 for video ingestion and to provide end-user video analytics, which makes managing and accessing media data easy and highly scalable.

To see how Valossa works, check out www.WhatIsMyMovie.com or enable the Alexa Skill, Valossa Movie Finder. To try the Valossa AI, sign up for free at www.valossa.com.

Kaliber (San Francisco, CA)

Serial entrepreneurs Ray Rahman and Risto Haukioja founded Kaliber in 2016. The pair had previously worked in startups building smart cities and online privacy tools, and teamed up to bring AI to the workplace and change the hospitality industry. Our world is designed to appeal to our senses – stores and warehouses have clearly marked aisles, products are colorfully packaged, and we use these designs to differentiate one thing from another. We tell each other apart by our faces, and previously that was something only humans could measure or act upon. Kaliber is using facial recognition, deep learning, and big data to create solutions for business use. Markets and companies that aren’t typically associated with cutting-edge technology will be able to use their existing camera infrastructure in a whole new way, making them more efficient and better able to serve their customers.

Computer video processing is rapidly expanding, and Kaliber believes that video recognition will extend to far more than security cameras and robots. Using the clients’ network of in-house cameras, Kaliber’s platform extracts key data points and maps them to actionable insights using their machine learning (ML) algorithm. Dashboards connect users to the client’s BI tools via the Kaliber enterprise APIs, and managers can view these analytics to improve their real-world processes, taking immediate corrective action with real-time alerts. Kaliber’s Real Metrics are aimed at combining the power of image recognition with ML to ultimately provide a more meaningful experience for all.

Kaliber uses many AWS services, including Amazon Rekognition, Amazon Kinesis, AWS Lambda, Amazon EC2 GPU instances, and Amazon S3. These services have been instrumental in helping Kaliber meet the needs of enterprise customers in record time.

Learn more about Kaliber here.

Thanks for reading and we’ll see you next month!

-Tina

 

MagPi 61: ten amazing Raspberry Pi Zero W projects

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-61-10-pi-zero-projects/

Hey folks! Rob here, with another roundup of the latest The MagPi magazine. MagPi 61 focuses on some incredible ‘must make’ Raspberry Pi Zero W projects, 3D printers and – oh, did someone mention the Google AIY Voice Projects Kit?

Cover of The MagPi magazine with a picture of the Pi Zero W - MagPi 61

Make amazing Raspberry Pi Zero W projects with our latest issue

Inside MagPi 61

In issue 61, we’re focusing on the small but mighty wonder that is the Raspberry Pi Zero W, and on some of the very best projects we’ve found for you to build with it. From arcade machines to robots, dash cams, and more – it’s time to make the most of our $10 computer.

And if that’s not enough, we’ve also delved deeper into the maker relationship between Raspberry Pi and Ardunio, with some great creations such as piano stairs, a jukebox, and a smart home system. There’s also a selection of excellent tutorials on building 3D printers, controlling Hue lights, and making cool musical instruments.

A spread of The MagPi magazine showing a DJ deck tutorial - MagPi 61

Spin it, DJ!

Get the MagPi 61

The new issue is out right now, and you can pick up a copy at WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center over the next few days. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android or iOS app. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

Subscribe for free goodies

Some of you have asked me about the goodies that we give out to subscribers. This is how it works: if you take out a twelve-month print subscription to The MagPi, you’ll get a Pi Zero W, Pi Zero case, and adapter cables, absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

Pre-order AIY Kits

We have some AIY Voice Kit news! Micro Center has opened pre-orders for the kits in America, and Pimoroni has set up a notification service for those closer to the UK.

We hope you all enjoy the issue. Oh, and if you’re at World Maker Faire, New York, come and see us at the Raspberry Pi stall! Otherwise – see you next month.

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OK Google, be aesthetically pleasing

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/aesthetically-pleasing-ok-google/

Maker Andrew Jones took a Raspberry Pi and the Google Assistant SDK and created a gorgeous-looking, and highly functional, alternative to store-bought smart speakers.

Raspberry Pi Google AI Assistant

In this video I get an “Ok Google” voice activated AI assistant running on a raspberry pi. I also hand make a nice wooden box for it to live in.

OK Google, what are you?

Google Assistant is software of the same ilk as Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Cortana. It’s a virtual assistant that allows you to request information, play audio, and control smart home devices via voice commands.

Infinite Looping Siri, Alexa and Google Home

One can barely see the iPhone’s screen. That’s because I have a privacy protection screen. Sorry, did not check the camera angle. Learn how to create your own loop, why we put Cortana out of the loop, and how to train Siri to an artificial voice: https://www.danrl.com/2016/12/01/looping-ais-siri-alexa-google-home.html

You probably have a digital assistant on your mobile phone, and if you go to the home of someone even mildly tech-savvy, you may see a device awaiting commands via a wake word such the device’s name or, for the Google Assistant, the phrase “OK, Google”.

Homebrew versions

Understanding the maker need to ‘put tech into stuff’ and upgrade everyday objects into everyday objects 2.0, the creators of these virtual assistants have allowed access for developers to run their software on devices such as the Raspberry Pi. This means that your common-or-garden homemade robot can now be controlled via voice, and your shed-built home automation system can have easy-to-use internet connectivity via a reliable, multi-device platform.

Andrew’s Google Assistant build

Andrew gives a peerless explanation of how the Google Assistant works:

There’s Google’s Cloud. You log into Google’s Cloud and you do a bunch of cloud configuration cloud stuff. And then on the Raspberry Pi you install some Python software and you do a bunch of configuration. And then the cloud and the Pi talk the clouds kitten rainbow protocol and then you get a Google AI assistant.

It all makes perfect sense. Though for more extra detail, you could always head directly to Google.

Andrew Jones Raspberry Pi OK Google Assistant

I couldn’t have explained it better myself

Andrew decided to take his Google Assistant-enabled Raspberry Pi and create a new body for it. One that was more aesthetically pleasing than the standard Pi-inna-box. After wiring his build and cannibalising some speakers and a microphone, he created a sleek, wooden body that would sit quite comfortably in any Bang & Olufsen shop window.

Find the entire build tutorial on Instructables.

Make your own

It’s more straightforward than Andrew’s explanation suggests, we promise! And with an array of useful resources online, you should be able to incorporate your choice of virtual assistants into your build.

There’s The Raspberry Pi Guy’s tutorial on setting up Amazon Alexa on the Raspberry Pi. If you’re looking to use Siri on your Pi, YouTube has a plethora of tutorials waiting for you. And lastly, check out Microsoft’s site for using Cortana on the Pi!

If you’re looking for more information on Google Assistant, check out issue 57 of The MagPi Magazine, free to download as a PDF. The print edition of this issue came with a free AIY Projects Voice Kit, and you can sign up for The MagPi newsletter to be the first to know about the kit’s availability for purchase.

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Google Pi Intercom with the AIY Projects kit

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/google-pi-intercom-aiy-projects/

When we released the Google AIY Projects kit with Issue 57 of The MagPi in May, we could hardly wait to see what you in the community would build with it. Being able to add voice interaction to your Raspberry Pi projects opens up a world of possibilities for exciting digital making.

One such project is maker Martin Mander‘s Google Pi Intercom. We love this build for its retro feel and modern functionality, a combination of characteristics shared by many of Martin’s creations.

1986 Google Pi Intercom

This is a 1986 Radio Shack Intercom that I’ve converted into a Google Home style device using a Raspberry Pi and the Google AIY (Artificial Intelligence Yourself) kit that came free with the MagPi magazine (issue 57). It uses the Google Assistant to answer questions and perform actions, using IFTTT to integrate with smart home accessories and other web services.

Inter-com again?

If you’ve paid any attention at all to the world of Raspberry Pi in the last few months, you’ve probably seen the Google AIY Projects kit that came free with The MagPi #57. It includes a practical cardboard housing, but of course makers everywhere have been upgrading their kits, for example by creating a laser-cut wooden box. Martin, however, has taken things to the next level: he’s installed his AIY kit in a wall-mounted intercom from 1986.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

The components of the Google Pi Intercom

It’s all (inter)coming together

Martin already had not one, but three vintage intercoms at home. So when he snatched up an AIY Projects kit, there was no doubt in his mind about how he was going to use it:

The moment I scooped the Google AIY kit, I knew that one of these old units would be a perfect match for it – after all, both were essentially based on a button, microphone, and loudspeaker, just with different technology in between.

Preparing the intercom housing

First, Martin gutted the intercom and ground away some of the excess plastic inside. This was necessary because integrating all the components was going to be a tight fit. To overhaul its look, he then gave the housing a good scrub and a new paint job. For a splash of colour, Martin affixed a strip of paper in the palette of the Google logo.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

BUBBLES!

Building the Google Pi Intercom

The intercom’s speaker wasn’t going to provide good enough sound quality. Moreover, Martin quickly realised that the one included in the AIY kit was too big for this make. He hunted down a small speaker online, and set about wiring everything up.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Assembling the electronics

Martin wanted the build to resemble the original intercom as closely as possible. Consequently, he was keen to use its tilting bar to activate the device’s voice command function. Luckily, it was easy to mount the AIY kit’s button behind the bar.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Using the intercom’s tilting bar switch

Finally it was only a matter of using some hot glue and a few screws and bolts to secure all the components inside the housing. Once he’d done that, Martin just had to set up the software of the Google Assistant, and presto! He had a voice-controlled smart device for home automation.

A pretty snazzy-looking build, isn’t it? If you’d like to learn more about Martin’s Google Pi Intercom, head over to the Instructables page for a complete rundown.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Awaiting your command

The AIY Projects Kit

Didn’t manage to snap up an AIY Projects kit? Find out how to get your hands on one over at The MagPi.

Or do you have an AIY kit at home? Lucky you! You can follow our shiny new learning resource to get started with using it. There are also lots of handy articles about the kit in The MagPi #57 – download the PDF version here. If you’re stuck, or looking for inspiration, check out our AIY Projects subforum. Ask your questions, and help others by answering theirs.

What have you built with your AIY Projects kit? Be sure to share your voice-controlled project with us in the comments.

 

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New: Server-Side Encryption for Amazon Kinesis Streams

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-server-side-encryption-for-amazon-kinesis-streams/

In this age of smart homes, big data, IoT devices, mobile phones, social networks, chatbots, and game consoles, streaming data scenarios are everywhere. Amazon Kinesis Streams enables you to build custom applications that can capture, process, analyze, and store terabytes of data per hour from thousands of streaming data sources. Since Amazon Kinesis Streams allows applications to process data concurrently from the same Kinesis stream, you can build parallel processing systems. For example, you can emit processed data to Amazon S3, perform complex analytics with Amazon Redshift, and even build robust, serverless streaming solutions using AWS Lambda.

Kinesis Streams enables several streaming use cases for consumers, and now we are making the service more effective for securing your data in motion by adding server-side encryption (SSE) support for Kinesis Streams. With this new Kinesis Streams feature, you can now enhance the security of your data and/or meet any regulatory and compliance requirements for any of your organization’s data streaming needs.
In fact, Kinesis Streams is now one of the AWS Services in Scope for the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliance program. PCI DSS is a proprietary information security standard administered by the PCI Security Standards Council founded by key financial institutions. PCI DSS compliance applies to all entities that store, process, or transmit cardholder data and/or sensitive authentication data which includes service providers. You can request the PCI DSS Attestation of Compliance and Responsibility Summary using AWS Artifact. But the good news about compliance with Kinesis Streams doesn’t stop there. Kinesis Streams is now also FedRAMP compliant in AWS GovCloud. FedRAMP stands for Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program and is a U.S. government-wide program that delivers a standard approach to the security assessment, authorization, and continuous monitoring for cloud products and services. You can learn more about FedRAMP compliance with AWS Services here.

Now are you ready to get into the keys? Get it, instead of get into the weeds. Okay a little corny, but it was the best I could do. Coming back to discussing SSE for Kinesis Streams, let me explain the flow of server-side encryption with Kinesis.  Each data record and partition key put into a Kinesis Stream using the PutRecord or PutRecords API is encrypted using an AWS Key Management Service (KMS) master key. With the AWS Key Management Service (KMS) master key, Kinesis Streams uses the 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES-256 GCM algorithm) to add encryption to the incoming data.

In order to enable server-side encryption with Kinesis Streams for new or existing streams, you can use the Kinesis management console or leverage one of the available AWS SDKs.  Additionally, you can audit the history of your stream encryption, validate the encryption status of a certain stream in the Kinesis Streams console, or check that the PutRecord or GetRecord transactions are encrypted using the AWS CloudTrail service.

 

Walkthrough: Kinesis Streams Server-Side Encryption

Let’s do a quick walkthrough of server-side encryption with Kinesis Streams. First, I’ll go to the Amazon Kinesis console and select the Streams console option.

Once in the Kinesis Streams console, I can add server-side encryption to one of my existing Kinesis streams or opt to create a new Kinesis stream.  For this walkthrough, I’ll opt to quickly create a new Kinesis stream, therefore, I’ll select the Create Kinesis stream button.

I’ll name my stream, KinesisSSE-stream, and allocate one shard for my stream. Remember that the data capacity of your stream is calculated based upon the number of shards specified for the stream.  You can use the Estimate the number of shards you’ll need dropdown within the console or read more calculations to estimate the number of shards in a stream here.  To complete the creation of my stream, now I click the Create Kinesis stream button.

 

With my KinesisSSE-stream created, I will select it in the dashboard and choose the Actions dropdown and select the Details option.


On the Details page of the KinesisSSE-stream, there is now a Server-side encryption section.  In this section, I will select the Edit button.

 

 

Now I can enable server-side encryption for my stream with an AWS KMS master key, by selecting the Enabled radio button. Once selected I can choose which AWS KMS master key to use for the encryption of  data in KinesisSSE-stream. I can either select the KMS master key generated by the Kinesis service, (Default) aws/kinesis, or select one of my own KMS master keys that I have previously generated.  I’ll select the default master key and all that is left is for me to click the Save button.


That’s it!  As you can see from my screenshots below, after only about 20 seconds, server-side encryption was added to my Kinesis stream and now any incoming data into my stream will be encrypted.  One thing to note is server-side encryption only encrypts incoming data after encryption has been enabled. Preexisting data that is in a Kinesis stream prior to server-side encryption being enabled will remain unencrypted.

 

Summary

Kinesis Streams with Server-side encryption using AWS KMS keys makes it easy for you to automatically encrypt the streaming data coming into your  stream. You can start, stop, or update server-side encryption for any Kinesis stream using the AWS management console or the AWS SDK. To learn more about Kinesis Server-Side encryption, AWS Key Management Service, or about Kinesis Streams review the Amazon Kinesis getting started guide, the AWS Key Management Service developer guide, or the Amazon Kinesis product page.

 

Enjoy streaming.

Tara

Make a PIR speaker system

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/make-a-pir-speaker-system/

I enjoy projects that can be made using items from around the home. Add a Raspberry Pi and a few lines of code, and great joy can be had from producing something smart, connected and/or just plain silly.

The concept of the IoT Smart Lobby Welcoming Music System fits into this category. Take a speaker, add a Raspberry Pi and a PIR sensor (both staples of any maker household, and worthwhile investments for the budding builder), and you can create a motion-sensor welcome system for your home or office.

[DIY] Make a smart lobby music system for your office or home

With this project, you will be able to automate a welcoming music for either your smart home or your smart office. As long as someone is around, the music will keep playing your favorite playlist at home or a welcome music to greet your customers or business partners while they wait in the lobby of your office.

The Naran Build

IoT makers Naran have published their Smart Lobby build on Instructables, where you’ll find all the code and information you need to get making. You’ll also find their original walkthrough of how to use their free Prota OS for Raspberry Pi, which allows you to turn your Pi into a Smart Home hub.

Naran Prota IoT Sensor Speaker System

Their build allows you to use Telegram Bot to control the music played through their speaker. The music begins when movement is sensed, and you can control what happens next.

Telegram Bot for a Sensor Speaker System

It’s a great build for playing information for visitors or alerting you to an intrusion.

Tim Peake Welcoming Committee

A few months back, I made something similar in the lobby at Pi Towers:  I hid a sensor under our cardboard cutout of ESA astronaut Tim Peake. Visitors walking into the lobby triggered the sensor, and were treated to the opening music from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Sadly, with the meeting rooms across the lobby in constant use, the prank didn’t last long.

Alex J’rassic on Twitter

In honour of the #Principia anniversary, I pimped out cardboard @astro_timpeake at @Raspberry_Pi Towers. Listen. https://t.co/MBUOjrARtI

If you’re curious, the Christmas tree should be a clue as to why Tim is dressed like a nativity angel.

The Homebrew Edition

If you’re like me, you learn best by doing. Our free resources allow you to develop new skills as you build. You can then blend the skills you have learned to create your own interesting projects. I was very new to digital making when I put together the music sensor in the lobby. The skills I had developed by following step-by-step project tutorials provided the foundations for something new and original.

Why not make your own welcoming system? The process could teach you new skills, and develop your understanding of the Raspberry Pi. If you’d like to have a go, I’d suggest trying out the Parent Detector. This will show you how to use a PIR sensor with your Raspberry Pi. Once you understand that process, try the Burping Jelly Baby project. This will teach you how to tell your Raspberry Pi when to play an MP3 based on a trigger, such as the poke of a finger or the detection of movement.

From there, you should have all the tools you need to make a speaker system that plays an MP3 when someone or something approaches. Why not have a go this weekend? If you do, tell us about your final build in the comments below.

The post Make a PIR speaker system appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Introducing the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-the-aws-iot-button-enterprise-program/

The AWS IoT Button first made its appearance on the IoT scene in October of 2015 at AWS re:Invent with the introduction of the AWS IoT service.  That year all re:Invent attendees received the AWS IoT Button providing them the opportunity to get hands-on with AWS IoT.  Since that time AWS IoT button has been made broadly available to anyone interested in the clickable IoT device.

During this past AWS re:Invent 2016 conference, the AWS IoT button was launched into the enterprise with the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program.  This program is intended to help businesses to offer new services or improve existing products at the click of a physical button.  With the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program, enterprises can use a programmable AWS IoT Button to increase customer engagement, expand applications and offer new innovations to customers by simplifying the user experience.  By harnessing the power of IoT, businesses can respond to customer demand for their products and services in real-time while providing a direct line of communication for customers, all via a simple device.

 

 

AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program

Let’s discuss how the new AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program works.  Businesses start by placing a bulk order of the AWS IoT buttons and provide a custom label for the branding of the buttons.  Amazon manufactures the buttons and pre-provisions the IoT button devices by giving each a certificate and unique private key to grant access to AWS IoT and ensure secure communication with the AWS cloud.  This allows for easier configuration and helps customers more easily get started with the programming of the IoT button device.

Businesses would design and build their IoT solution with the button devices and creation of device companion applications.  The AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program provides businesses some complimentary assistance directly from AWS to ensure a successful deployment.  The deployed devices then would only need to be configured with Wi-Fi at user locations in order to function.

 

 

For enterprises, there are several use cases that would benefit from the implementation of an IoT button solution. Here are some ideas:

  • Reordering services or custom products such as pizza or medical supplies
  • Requesting a callback from a customer service agent
  • Retail operations such as a call for assistance button in stores or restaurants
  • Inventory systems for capturing products amounts for inventory
  • Healthcare applications such as alert or notification systems for the disabled or elderly
  • Interface with Smart Home systems to turn devices on and off such as turning off outside lights or opening the garage door
  • Guest check-in/check-out systems

 

AWS IoT Button

At the heart of the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program is the AWS IoT Button.  The AWS IoT button is a 2.4GHz Wi-Fi with WPA2-PSK enabled device that has three click types: Single click, Double click, and Long press.  Note that a Long press click type is sent if the button is pressed for 1.5 seconds or longer.  The IoT button has a small LED light with color patterns for the status of the IoT button.  A blinking white light signifies that the IoT button is connecting to Wi-Fi and getting an IP address, while a blinking blue light signifies that the button is in wireless access point (AP) mode.  The data payload that is sent from the device when pressed contains the device serial number, the battery voltage, and the click type.

Currently, there are 3 ways to get started building your AWS IoT button solution.  The first option is to use the AWS IoT Button companion mobile app.  The mobile app will create the required AWS IoT resources, including the creation of the TLS 1.2 certificates, and create an AWS IoT rule tied to AWS Lambda.  Additionally, it will enable the IoT button device via AWS IoT to be an event source that invokes a new AWS Lambda function of your choosing from the Lambda blueprints.  You can download the aforementioned mobile apps for Android and iOS below.

 

The second option is to use the AWS Lambda Blueprint Wizard as an easy way to start using your AWS IoT Button. Like the mobile app, the wizard will create the required AWS IoT resources for you and add an event source to your button that invokes a new Lambda function.

The third option is to follow the step by step tutorial in the AWS IoT getting started guide and leverage the AWS IoT console to create these resources manually.

Once you have configured your IoT button successfully and created a simple one-click solution using one of the aforementioned getting started guides, you should be ready to start building your own custom IoT button solution.   Using a click of a button, your business will be able to build new services for customers, offer new features for existing services, and automate business processes to operate more efficiently.

The basic technical flow of an AWS IoT button solution is as follows:

  • A button is clicked and secure connection is established with AWS IoT with TLS 1.2
  • The button data payload is sent to AWS IoT Device Gateway
  • The rules engine evaluates received messages (JSON) published into AWS IoT and performs actions or trigger AWS Services based defined business rules.
  • The triggered AWS Service executes or action is performed
  • The device state can be read, stored and set with Device Shadows
  • Mobile and Web Apps can receive and update data based upon action

Now that you have general knowledge about the AWS IoT button, we should jump into a technical walk-through of building an AWS IoT button solution.

 

AWS IoT Button Solution Walkthrough

We will dive more deeply into building an AWS IoT Button solution with a quick example of a use case for providing one-click customer service options for a business.

To get started, I will go to the AWS IoT console, register my IoT button as a Thing and create a Thing type.  In the console, I select the Registry and then Things options in console menu.

The name of my IoT thing in this example will be TEW-AWSIoTButton.  If you desire to categorize the IoT things, you can create a Thing type and assign a type to similar IoT ‘things’.  I will categorize my IoT thing, TEW-AWSIoTButton, as an IoTButton thing type with a One-click-device attribute key and select Create thing button.

After my AWS IoT button device, TEW-AWSIoTButton, is registered in the Thing Registry, the next step is to acquire the required X.509 certificate and keys.  I will have AWS IoT generate the certificate for this device, but the service allows for to use your own certificates.  Authenticating the connection with the X.509 certificates helps to protect the data exchange between your device and AWS IoT service.

When the certificates are generated with AWS IoT, it is important that you download and save all of the files created since the public and private keys will not be available after you leave the download page. Additionally, do not forget to download the root CA for AWS IoT from the link provided on the page with your generated certificates.

The newly created certificate will be inactive, therefore, it is vital that you activate the certificate prior to use.  AWS IoT uses the TLS protocol to authenticate the certificates using the TLS protocol’s client authentication mode.  The certificates enable asymmetric keys to be used with devices, and AWS IoT service will request and validate the certificate’s status and the AWS account against a registry of certificates.  The service will challenge for proof of ownership of the private key corresponding to the public key contained in the certificate.  The final step in securing the AWS IoT connection to my IoT button is to create and/or attach an IAM policy for authorization.

I will choose the Attach a policy button and then select Create a Policy option in order to build a specific policy for my IoT button.  In Name field of the new IoT policy, I will enter IoTButtonPolicy for the name of this new policy. Since the AWS IoT Button device only supports button presses, our AWS IoT button policy will only need to add publish permissions.  For this reason, this policy will only allow the iot:Publish action.

 

For the Resource ARN of the IoT policy, the AWS IoT buttons typically follow the format pattern of: arn: aws: iot: TheRegion: AWSAccountNumber: topic/ iotbutton /ButtonSerialNumber.  This means that the Resource ARN for this IoT button policy will be:

I should note that if you are creating an IAM policy for an IoT device that is not an AWS IoT button, the Resource ARN format pattern would be as follows: arn: aws: iot: TheRegion: AWSAccountNumber: topic/ YourTopic/ OptionalSubTopic/

The created policy for our AWS IoT Button, IoTButtonPolicy, looks as follows:

The next step is to return to the AWS IoT console dashboard, select Security and then Certificates menu options.  I will choose the certificate created in the aforementioned steps.

Then on the selected certificate page, I will select the Actions dropdown on the far right top corner.  In order to add the IoTButtonPolicy IAM policy to the certificate, I will click the Attach policy option.

 

I will repeat all of the steps mentioned above but this time I will add the TEW-AWSIoTButton thing by selecting the Attach thing option.

All that is left is to add the certificate and private key to the physical AWS IoT button and connect the AWS IoT Button to Wi-Fi in order to have the IoT button be fully functional.

Important to note: For businesses that have signed up to participate in the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program, all of these aforementioned steps; Button logo branding, AWS IoT thing creation, obtaining certificate & key creation, and adding certificates to buttons, are completed for them by Amazon and AWS.  Again, this is to help make it easier for enterprises to hit the ground running in the development of their desired AWS IoT button solution.

Now, going back to the AWS IoT button used in our example, I will connect the button to Wi-Fi by holding the button until the LED blinks blue; this means that the device has gone into wireless access point (AP) mode.

In order to provide internet connectivity to the IoT button and start configuring the device’s connection to AWS IoT, I will connect to the button’s Wi-Fi network which should start with Button ConfigureMe. The first time the connection is made to the button’s Wi-Fi, a password will be required.  Enter the last 8 characters of the device serial number shown on the back of the physical AWS IoT button device.

The AWS IoT button is now configured and ready to build a system around it. The next step will be to add the actions that will be performed when the IoT button is pressed.  This brings us to the AWS IoT Rules engine, which is used to analyze the IoT device data payload coming from the MQTT topic stream and/or Device Shadow, and trigger AWS Services actions.  We will set up rules to perform varying actions when different types of button presses are detected.

Our AWS IoT button solution will be a simple one, we will set up two AWS IoT rules to respond to the IoT button being clicked and the button’s payload being sent to AWS IoT.  In our scenario, a single button click will represent that a request is being sent by a customer to a fictional organization’s customer service agent.  A double click, however, will represent that a text will be sent containing a customer’s fictional current account status.

The first AWS IoT rule created will receive the IoT button payload and connect directly to Amazon SNS to send an email only if the rule condition is fulfilled that the button click type is SINGLE. The second AWS IoT rule created will invoke a Lambda function that will send a text message containing customer account status only if the rule condition is fulfilled that the button click type is DOUBLE.

In order to create the AWS IoT rule that will send an email to subscribers of an SNS topic for requesting a customer service agent’s help, we will go to Amazon SNS and create a SNS topic.

I will create an email subscription to the topic with the fictional subscribed customer service email, which in this case is just my email address.  Of course, this could be several customer service representatives that are subscribed to the topic in order to receive emails for customer assistance requests.

Now returning to the AWS IoT console, I will select the Rules menu and choose the Create rule option. I first provide a name and description for the rule.

Next, I select the SQL version to be used for the AWS IoT rules engine.  I select the latest SQL version, however, if I did not choose to set a version, the default version of 2015-10-08 will be used. The rules engine uses a SQL-like syntax with statements containing the SELECT, FROM, and WHERE clauses.  I want to return a literal string for the message, which is not apart of the IoT button data payload.  I also want to return the button serial number as the accountnum, which are not apart of the payload.  Since the latest version, 2016-03-23, supports literal objects, I will be able to send a custom payload to Amazon SNS.

I have created the rule, all that is left is to add a rule action to perform when the rule is analyzed.  As I mentioned above, an email should be sent to customer service representatives when this rule is triggered by a single IoT button press.  Therefore, my rule action will be the Send a message as an SNS push notification to the SNS topic that I created to send an email to our fictional customer service reps aka me. Remember that the use of an IAM role is required to provide access to SNS resources; if you are using the console you have the option to create a new role or update an existing role to provide the correct permissions.  Also, since I am doing a custom message and pushing to SNS, I select the Message format type to be RAW.

Our rule has been created, now all that is left is for us to test that an email is successfully sent when the AWS IoT button is pressed once, and therefore the data payload has a click type of SINGLE.

A single press of our AWS IoT Button and the custom message is published to the SNS Topic, and the email shown below was sent to the subscribed customer service agents email addresses; in this example, to my email address.

 

In order to create the AWS IoT rule that will send a text via Lambda and a SNS topic for the scenario in which customers request account status to be sent when the IoT Button is pressed twice.  We will start by creating an AWS IoT rule with an AWS Lambda action.  To create this IoT rule, we first need to create a Lambda function and the SNS Topic with a SNS text based subscription.

First, I will go to the Amazon SNS console and create a SNS Topic. After the topic is created, I will create a SNS text subscription for our SNS topic and add a number that will receive the text messages. I will then copy the SNS Topic ARN for use in my Lambda function. Please note, that I am creating the SNS Topic in a different region than previously created SNS topic to use a region with support for sending SMS via SNS. In the Lambda function, I will need to ensure the correct region for the SNS Topic is used by including the region as a parameter of the constructor of the SNS object. The created SNS topic, aws-iot-button-topic-text is shown below.

 

We now will go to the AWS Lambda console and create a Lambda function with an AWS IoT trigger, an IoT Type as IoT Button, and the requested Device Serial Number will be the serial number on the back of our AWS IoT Button. There is no need to generate the certificate and keys in this step because the AWS IoT button is already configured with certificates and keys for secure communication with AWS IoT.

The next is to create the Lambda function,  IoTNotifyByText, with the following code that will receive the IoT button data payload and create a message to publish to Amazon SNS.

'use strict';

console.log('Loading function');
var AWS = require("aws-sdk");
var sns = new AWS.SNS({region: 'us-east-1'});

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    // Load the message as JSON object 
    var iotPayload = JSON.stringify(event, null, 2);
    
    // Create a text message from IoT Payload 
    var snsMessage = "Attention: Customer Info for Account #: " + event.accountnum + " Account Status: In Good Standing " + 
    "Balance is: 1234.56"
    
    // Log payload and SNS message string to the console and for CloudWatch Logs 
    console.log("Received AWS IoT payload:", iotPayload);
    console.log("Message to send: " + snsMessage);
    
    // Create params for SNS publish using SNS Topic created for AWS IoT button
    // Populate the parameters for the publish operation using required JSON format
    // - Message : message text 
    // - TopicArn : the ARN of the Amazon SNS topic  
    var params = {
        Message: snsMessage,
        TopicArn: "arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:xxxxxxxxxxxx:aws-iot-button-topic-text"
     };
     
     sns.publish(params, context.done);
};

All that is left is for us to do is to alter the AWS IoT rule automatically created when we created a Lambda function with an AWS IoT trigger. Therefore, we will go to the AWS IoT console and select Rules menu option. We will find and select the IoT button rule created by Lambda which usually has a name with a suffix that is equal to the IoT button device serial number.

 

Once the rule is selected, we will choose the Edit option beside the Rule query statement section.

We change the Select statement to return the serial number as the accountnum and click Update button to save changes to the AWS IoT rule.

Time to Test. I click the IoT button twice and wait for the green LED light to appear, confirming a successful connection was made and a message was published to AWS IoT. After a few seconds, a text message is received on my phone with the fictitious customer account information.

 

This was a simple example of how a business could leverage the AWS IoT Button in order to build business solutions for their customers.  With the new AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program which helps businesses in obtaining the quantities of AWS IoT buttons needed, as well as, providing AWS IoT service pre-provisioning and deployment support; Businesses can now easily get started in building their own customized IoT solution.

Available Now

The original 1st generation of the AWS IoT button is currently available on Amazon.com, and the 2nd generation AWS IoT button will be generally available in February.  The main difference in the IoT buttons are the amount of battery life and/or clicks available for the button.  Please note that right now if you purchase the original AWS IoT button, you will receive $20 in AWS credits when you register.

Businesses can sign up today for the AWS IoT Button Enterprise Program currently in Limited Preview. This program is designed to enable businesses to expand their existing applications or build new IoT capabilities with the cloud and a click of an IoT button device.  You can read more about the AWS IoT button and learn more about building solutions with a programmable IoT button on the AWS IoT Button product page.  You can also dive deeper into the AWS IoT service by visiting the AWS IoT developer guide, the AWS IoT Device SDK documentation, and/or the AWS Internet of Things Blog.

 

Tara

CES 2017: Trends For the Tech Savvy To Watch

Post Syndicated from Peter Cohen original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/ces-2017-trends-tech-savvy-watch/

This year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) just wrapped up in Las Vegas. The usual parade of cool tech toys created a lot of headlines this year, but there were some genuine trends to keep an eye on too. If you’re like us, you’re probably one of the first people around to adopt promising new technologies when they emerge. As early adopters we can sometimes lose the forest through the trees when it comes to understanding what this means for everyone else, so we’re going to look at it through that prism.

Alexa everywhere

2017 promises to be a big year for voice-activated “smart home” devices. The final landscape for this is still to be determined – all the expected players have their foot in it right now. Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft, even some smaller players.

Amazon deserves props after a holiday season that saw its Echo and Echo Dot devices in high demand. The company’s published an API that is Alexa is picking up plenty of support from third party manufacturers. Alexa’s testing for far beyond Echo, it seems.

Electronics giant LG is building Alexa into a line of robots designed for domestic duties and a refrigerator that also sports interior fridge cams, for example. Ford is integrating Alexa support into its Sync 3 automotive interface. Televisions, lighting devices, and home security products are among the many devices to feature Alexa integration.

Alexa is the new hotness, but the real trend here is in voice-assisted connectivity around the home. Even if Alexa runs out of steam, this tech is here to stay. The Internet of Things and voice activated interfaces are converging quickly, though that day isn’t today. It’s tantalizingly close. It’s still a niche, though, where it will stay for as long as consumers have to piece different things together to get it to work. That means there’s still room for disruption.

There’s especially ripe opportunity in underserved verticals. Take the home health market, for example: Natural language interfaces have huge implications for elderly and disabled care and assistance. Finding and developing solutions for those sorts of vertical markets is an awesome opportunity for the right players.

Of course, with great power comes great responsibility. A family of a six-year-old recently got stuck with a $160 bill after she told Alexa to order her cookies and a dollhouse. The family ended up donating the accidental order to charity. For what it’s worth, that problem can be avoided by activating a confirmation code feature in the Alexa software.

The Electric Vehicle (EV) Market Heats Up

One of the trickiest things to unpack from CES is hype from substance. Nowhere was that more apparent last week than the unveiling of Faraday Future’s FF91, a new Electric Vehicle (EV) positioned to go toe-to-toe with Tesla’s EV fleet.

The FF91 EV can purportedly go 378 miles on a single charge and also possesses autonomous driving capabilities (although its vaunted self-parking abilities didn’t demo as well as planned). When or if it’ll make it into production is still a head-scratcher, however. Faraday Future says it’ll be out next year, assuming that the company is beyond the production and manufacturing woes that have plagued it up until now.

While new vehicles and vehicle concepts are still largely the domain of auto shows, some auto manufacturers used CES to float new concepts ahead of the Detroit Auto Show, which happens this week. Toyota, for example, showed off its Concept-i, a car with artificial intelligence and natural language processing (like Siri or Alexa) designed to learn from you and adapt.

As we mentioned, Alexa is integrated into Ford’s Sync 3 platform, too. Already you can buy new cars with CarPlay and Android Auto, which makes it a lot easier to just talk with your mobile device to stay connected, get directions and entertain yourself on the morning commute simply by talking to your car instead of touching buttons. That’s a smart user interface change, but it’s still a potentially dangerous distraction for the driver. For this technology to succeed, it’s imperative that natural language interface designers make the experience as frictionless as possible.

Chrysler is making a play for future millennial families. We’re not making this up – they used “millennial” to describe the target market for this several times. The Portal concept is an electric minivan of sorts that’s chock-full of buzzwords: Facial recognition, Wi-Fi, media sharing, ten charging ports, semi-autonomous driving abilities and more).

2017 marks a pivot for car makers in this respect. For years the conventional wisdom that millennials were a lost cause for auto makers – Uber and Zipcar was all they needed. It turns out that was totally wrong. Economic pressures and diverse lifestyles may have delayed millennials’ trek toward auto ownership, but they’re turning out now in big numbers to buy wheels. Millennial families will need transportation just like generations before them back to the station wagon, which is why Chrysler says this “fifth-generation” family car will go into production sometime after 2018.

Volkswagen showed off its new I.D. concept car, a Golf-looking EV that also has all the requisite buzzwords. Speaking of buzzwords, what really excited us was the I.D. Buzz. This new EV resurrects the styling of the Hippy-era Microbus, with mood lighting, autonomous driving capabilities and a retractable steering wheel.

Rumors have persisted for years that VW was on the cusp of introducing a refreshed Microbus, but those rumors have never come to pass. And unfortunately, VW has no concrete plans to actually produce this – it seems to be a marketing effort to draw on nostalgic Boomer appeal, more than anything..

Both Buzz and Chrysler’s Portal do give us some insight about where auto makers are going when it comes to future generations of minivans: Electric, autonomous, customizable and more social than ever. If we are headed towards a future where vehicles drive themselves, family transportation will look very different than it is today.

Laptops At Both Extremes

CES saw the rollout of several new PC laptop models and concepts that will be hitting store shelves over the next several months.

Gamers looking for more real estate – a lot more real estate – were interested in Razer’s latest concept, Project Valerie. The laptop sports not one but three 4K displays which fold out on hinges. That’s 12K pixels of horizontal image space, mated to an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics processor. A unibody aluminum chassis keeps it relatively thin (1.5 inches) when closed, but the entire rig weighs more than 12 pounds. Razer doesn’t have any immediate production plans, which may explain why their prototype was stolen before the end of the show.

Unlike Razer, Acer has production plans – immediate plans – for its gargantuan 21-inch Predator 21X laptop, priced at $8,999 and headed to store shelves next month. It was announced last year, but Acer finally offered launch details last week. A 17-inch model is also coming soon.

Big gaming laptops make for pretty pictures and certainly have their place in the PC ecosystem, but they’re niche devices. After a ramp up on 2-in-1s and low-powered laptops, Intel’s Kaby Lake processors are finally ready for the premium and mid-range laptop market. Kaby Lake efficiency improvements are helping PC makers build thinner and lighter laptops with better battery life, 4K video processing, faster solid state storage and more.

HP, Asus, MSI, Dell (and its gaming arm Alienware) were among the many companies with sleek new Kaby Lake-equipped models.

Gaming in the cloud with Nvidia

Nvidia, makers of premium graphics processors, offers GeForce Now cloud gaming to users of its Shield, an Android-based gaming handheld. That service is expanding to Windows and Mac in March.

Gaming as a Service, if you will, isn’t a new idea. OnLive pioneered the concept more than a decade ago. Gaikai followed, then was acquired by Sony in 2012. Nvidia’s had limited success with GeForce Now, but it’s been a single-platform offering up until now.

Nvidia has robust data centers to handle the processing and traffic, so best of luck to them as they scale up to meet demand. Gaming is very sensitive to network disruption – no gamer appreciates lag – so it’ll be interesting to see how GeForce Now scales to accommodate the new devices.

Mesh Networking

Mesh networking delivers more consistent, stronger network reception and performance than a conventional Wi-Fi router. Some of us have set up routers and extenders to fix dead spots – mesh networking works differently through smart traffic and better radio management between multiple network bases.

Eero, Ubiquiti, and even Google (with Google Wifi) are already offering mesh networking products, and this market segment looks to expand big in 2017. Netgear, Linksys, Asus, TP-Link and others are among those with new mesh networking setups. Mesh networking gear is still hampered by a higher price than plain old routers. That means the value isn’t there for some of us who have networking gear that gets the job done, even with shortcomings like dead zones or slow zones. But prices are coming down fast as more companies get into the market. If you have an 802.11ac router you’re happy with, stick with it for now, and move to a mesh networking setup for your next Wi-Fi upgrade.

Getting Your Feet Into VR

Our award for wackiest CES product has to go to Cerevo Taclim. Tactile feedback shoes and wireless hand controllers that help you “feel” the surface you’re walking on. Crunching snow underfoot, splashing through water. At an expected $1,000-$1,500 a pop, these probably won’t be next year’s Hatchimals, but it’s fun to imagine what game devs can do with the technology. Strap these to your feet then break out your best Hadouken in Street Fighter VR!

CES isn’t the real world. Only a fraction of what’s shown off ever sees the light of day, but it’s always interesting to see the trend-focused consumer electronics market shift and change from year to year. At the end of the year we hope to look back and see how much of this stuff ended up resonating with the actual consumer the show is named for.

The post CES 2017: Trends For the Tech Savvy To Watch appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

2016: The Year In Tech, And A Sneak Peek Of What’s To Come

Post Syndicated from Peter Cohen original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/2016-year-tech-sneak-peek-whats-come/

2016 is safely in our rear-view mirrors. It’s time to take a look back at the year that was and see what technology had the biggest impact on consumers and businesses alike. We also have an eye to 2017 to see what the future holds.

AI and machine learning in the cloud

Truly sentient computers and robots are still the stuff of science fiction (and the premise of one of 2016’s most promising new SF TV series, HBO’s Westworld). Neural networks are nothing new, but 2016 saw huge strides in artificial intelligence and machine learning, especially in the cloud.

Google, Amazon, Apple, IBM, Microsoft and others are developing cloud computing infrastructures designed especially for AI work. It’s this technology that’s underpinning advances in image recognition technology, pattern recognition in cybersecurity, speech recognition, natural language interpretation and other advances.

Microsoft’s newly-formed AI and Research Group is finding ways to get artificial intelligence into Microsoft products like its Bing search engine and Cortana natural language assistant. Some of these efforts, while well-meaning, still need refinement: Early in 2016 Microsoft launched Tay, an AI chatbot designed to mimic the natural language characteristics of a teenage girl and learn from interacting with Twitter users. Microsoft had to shut Tay down after Twitter users exploited vulnerabilities that caused Tay to begin spewing really inappropriate responses. But it paves the way for future efforts that blur the line between man and machine.

Finance, energy, climatology – anywhere you find big data sets you’re going to find uses for machine learning. On the consumer end it can help your grocery app guess what you might want or need based on your spending habits. Financial firms use machine learning to help predict customer credit scores by analyzing profile information. One of the most intriguing uses of machine learning is in security: Pattern recognition helps systems predict malicious intent and figure out where exploits will come from.

Meanwhile we’re still waiting for Rosie the Robot from the Jetsons. And flying cars. So if Elon Musk has any spare time in 2017, maybe he can get on that.

AR Games

Augmented Reality (AR) games have been around for a good long time – ever since smartphone makers put cameras on them, game makers have been toying with the mix of real life and games.

AR games took a giant step forward with a game released in 2016 that you couldn’t get away from, at least for a little while. We’re talking about Pokémon GO, of course. Niantic, makers of another AR game called Ingress, used the framework they built for that game to power Pokémon GO. Kids, parents, young, old, it seemed like everyone with an iPhone that could run the game caught wild Pokémon, hatched eggs by walking, and battled each other in Pokémon gyms.

For a few weeks, anyway.

Technical glitches, problems with scale and limited gameplay value ultimately hurt Pokémon GO’s longevity. Today the game only garners a fraction of the public interest it did at peak. It continues to be successful, albeit not at the stratospheric pace it first set.

Niantic, the game’s developer, was able to tie together several factors to bring such an explosive and – if you’ll pardon the overused euphemism – disruptive – game to bear. One was its previous work with a game called Ingress, another AR-enhanced game that uses geomap data. In fact, Pokémon GO uses the same geomap data as Ingress, so Niantic had already done a huge amount of legwork needed to get Pokémon GO up and running. Niantic cleverly used Google Maps data to form the basis of both games, relying on already-identified public landmarks and other locations tagged by Ingress players (Ingress has been around since 2011).

Then, of course, there’s the Pokémon connection – an intensely meaningful gaming property that’s been popular with generations of video games and cartoon watchers since the 1990s. The dearth of Pokémon-branded games on smartphones meant an instant explosion of popularity upon Pokémon GO’s release.

2016 also saw the introduction of several new virtual reality (VR) headsets designed for home and mobile use. Samsung Gear VR and Google Daydream View made a splash. As these products continue to make consumer inroads, we’ll see more games push the envelope of what you can achieve with VR and AR.

Hybrid Cloud

Hybrid Cloud services combine public cloud storage (like B2 Cloud Storage) or public compute (like Amazon Web Services) with a private cloud platform. Specialized content and file management software glues it all together, making the experience seamless for the user.

Businesses get the instant access and speed they need to get work done, with the ability to fall back on on-demand cloud-based resources when scale is needed. B2’s hybrid cloud integrations include OpenIO, which helps businesses maintain data storage on-premise until it’s designated for archive and stored in the B2 cloud.

The cost of entry and usage of Hybrid Cloud services have continued to fall. For example, small and medium-sized organizations in the post production industry are finding Hybrid Cloud storage is now a viable strategy in managing the large amounts of information they use on a daily basis. This strategy is enabled by the low cost of B2 Cloud Storage that provides ready access to cloud-stored data.

There are practical deployment and scale issues that have kept Hybrid Cloud services from being used widespread in the largest enterprise environments. Small to medium businesses and vertical markets like Media & Entertainment have found promising, economical opportunities to use it, which bodes well for the future.

Inexpensive 3D printers

3D printing, once a rarified technology, has become increasingly commoditized over the past several years. That’s been in part thanks to the “Maker Movement:” Thousands of folks all around the world who love to tinker and build. XYZprinting is out in front of makers and others with its line of inexpensive desktop da Vinci printers.

The da Vinci Mini is a tabletop model aimed at home users which starts at under $300. You can download and tweak thousands of 3D models to build toys, games, art projects and educational items. They’re built using spools of biodegradable, non-toxic plastics derived from corn starch which dispense sort of like the bobbin on a sewing machine. The da Vinci Mini works with Macs and PCs and can connect via USB or Wi-Fi.

DIY Drones

Quadcopter drones have been fun tech toys for a while now, but the new trend we saw in 2016 was “do it yourself” models. The result was Flybrix, which combines lightweight drone motors with LEGO building toys. Flybrix was so successful that they blew out of inventory for the 2016 holiday season and are backlogged with orders into the new year.

Each Flybrix kit comes with the motors, LEGO building blocks, cables and gear you need to build your own quad, hex or octocopter drone (as well as a cheerful-looking LEGO pilot to command the new vessel). A downloadable app for iOS or Android lets you control your creation. A deluxe kit includes a handheld controller so you don’t have to tie up your phone.

If you already own a 3D printer like the da Vinci Mini, you’ll find plenty of model files available for download and modification so you can print your own parts, though you’ll probably need help from one of the many maker sites to know what else you’ll need to aerial flight and control.

5D Glass Storage

Research at the University of Southampton may yield the next big leap in optical storage technology meant for long-term archival. The boffins at the Optoelectronics Research Centre have developed a new data storage technique that embeds information in glass “nanostructures” on a storage disc the size of a U.S. quarter.

A Blu-Ray Disc can hold 50 GB, but one of the new 5D glass storage discs – only the size of a U.S. quarter – can hold 360 TB – 7200 times more. It’s like a super-stable supercharged version of a CD. Not only is the data inscribed on much smaller structures within the glass, but reflected at multiple angles, hence “5D.”

An upside to this is an absence of bit rot: The glass medium is extremely stable, with a shelf life predicted in billions of years. The downside is that this is still a write-once medium, so it’s intended for long term storage.

This tech is still years away from practical use, but it took a big step forward in 2016 when the University announced the development of a practical information encoding scheme to use with it.

Smart Home Tech

Are you ready to talk to your house to tell it to do things? If you’re not already, you probably will be soon. Google’s Google Home is a $129 voice-activated speaker powered by the Google Assistant. You can use it for everything from streaming music and video to a nearby TV to reading your calendar or to do list. You can also tell it to operate other supported devices like the Nest smart thermostat and Philips Hue lights.

Amazon has its own similar wireless speaker product called the Echo, powered by Amazon’s Alexa information assistant. Amazon has differentiated its Echo offerings by making the Dot – a hockey puck-sized device that connects to a speaker you already own. So Amazon customers can begin to outfit their connected homes for less than $50.

Apple’s HomeKit software kit isn’t a speaker like Amazon Echo or Google Home. It’s software. You use the Home app on your iOS 10-equipped iPhone or iPad to connect and configure supported devices. Use Siri, Apple’s own intelligent assistant, on any supported Apple device. HomeKit turns on lights, turns up the thermostat, operates switches and more.

Smart home tech has been coming in fits and starts for a while – the Nest smart thermostat is already in its third generation, for example. But 2016 was the year we finally saw the “Internet of things” coalescing into a smart home that we can control through voice and gestures in a … well, smart way.

Welcome To The Future

It’s 2017, welcome to our brave new world. While it’s anyone’s guess what the future holds, there are at least a few tech trends that are pretty safe to bet on. They include:

  • Internet of Things: More smart-connected devices are coming online in the home and at work every day, and this trend will accelerate in 2017 with more and more devices requiring some form of Internet connectivity to work. Expect to see a lot more appliances, devices, and accessories that make use of the API’s promoted by Google, Amazon, and Apple to help let you control everything in your life just using your voice and a smart speaker setup.
  • Blockchain security: Blockchain is the digital ledger security technology that makes Bitcoin work. Its distribution methodology and validation system help you make certain that no one’s tampered with the records, which make it well-suited for applications besides cryptocurrency, like make sure your smart thermostat (see above) hasn’t been hacked). Expect 2017 to be the year we see more mainstream acceptance, use, and development of blockchain technology from financial institutions, the creation of new private blockchain networks, and improved usability aimed at making blockchain easier for regular consumers to use. Blockchain-based voting is here too. It also wouldn’t surprise us, given all this movement, to see government regulators take a much deeper interest in blockchain, either.
  • 5G: Verizon is field-testing 5G on its wireless network, which it says deliver speeds 30-50 times faster than 4G LTE. We’ll be hearing a lot more about 5G from Verizon and other wireless players in 2017. In fairness, we’re still a few years away from widescale 5G deployment, but field-testing has already started.

Your Predictions?

Enough of our bloviation. Let’s open the floor to you. What do you think were the biggest technology trends in 2016? What’s coming in 2017 that has you the most excited? Let us know in the comments!

The post 2016: The Year In Tech, And A Sneak Peek Of What’s To Come appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Of course smart homes are targets for hackers

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/45483.html

The Wirecutter, an in-depth comparative review site for various electrical and electronic devices, just published an opinion piece on whether users should be worried about security issues in IoT devices. The summary: avoid devices that don’t require passwords (or don’t force you to change a default and devices that want you to disable security, follow general network security best practices but otherwise don’t worry – criminals aren’t likely to target you.

This is terrible, irresponsible advice. It’s true that most users aren’t likely to be individually targeted by random criminals, but that’s a poor threat model. As I’ve mentioned before, you need to worry about people with an interest in you. Making purchasing decisions based on the assumption that you’ll never end up dating someone with enough knowledge to compromise a cheap IoT device (or even meeting an especially creepy one in a bar) is not safe, and giving advice that doesn’t take that into account is a huge disservice to many potentially vulnerable users.

Of course, there’s also the larger question raised by the last week’s problems. Insecure IoT devices still pose a threat to the wider internet, even if the owner’s data isn’t at risk. I may not be optimistic about the ease of fixing this problem, but that doesn’t mean we should just give up. It is important that we improve the security of devices, and many vendors are just bad at that.

So, here’s a few things that should be a minimum when considering an IoT device:

  • Does the vendor publish a security contact? (If not, they don’t care about security)
  • Does the vendor provide frequent software updates, even for devices that are several years old? (If not, they don’t care about security)
  • Has the vendor ever denied a security issue that turned out to be real? (If so, they care more about PR than security)
  • Is the vendor able to provide the source code to any open source components they use? (If not, they don’t know which software is in their own product and so don’t care about security, and also they’re probably infringing my copyright)
  • Do they mark updates as fixing security bugs? (If not, they care more about hiding security issues than fixing them)
  • Has the vendor ever threatened to prosecute a security researcher? (If so, again, they care more about PR than security)
  • Does the vendor provide a public minimum support period for the device? (If not, they don’t care about security or their users)

    I’ve worked with big name vendors who did a brilliant job here. I’ve also worked with big name vendors who responded with hostility when I pointed out that they were selling a device with arbitrary remote code execution. Going with brand names is probably a good proxy for many of these requirements, but it’s insufficient.

    So here’s my recommendations to The Wirecutter – talk to a wide range of security experts about the issues that users should be concerned about, and figure out how to test these things yourself. Don’t just ask vendors whether they care about security, ask them what their processes and procedures look like. Look at their history. And don’t assume that just because nobody’s interested in you, everybody else’s level of risk is equal.

  • comment count unavailable comments

    Of course smart homes are targets for hackers

    Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original http://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/45483.html

    The Wirecutter, an in-depth comparative review site for various electrical and electronic devices, just published an opinion piece on whether users should be worried about security issues in IoT devices. The summary: avoid devices that don’t require passwords (or don’t force you to change a default and devices that want you to disable security, follow general network security best practices but otherwise don’t worry – criminals aren’t likely to target you.

    This is terrible, irresponsible advice. It’s true that most users aren’t likely to be individually targeted by random criminals, but that’s a poor threat model. As I’ve mentioned before, you need to worry about people with an interest in you. Making purchasing decisions based on the assumption that you’ll never end up dating someone with enough knowledge to compromise a cheap IoT device (or even meeting an especially creepy one in a bar) is not safe, and giving advice that doesn’t take that into account is a huge disservice to many potentially vulnerable users.

    Of course, there’s also the larger question raised by the last week’s problems. Insecure IoT devices still pose a threat to the wider internet, even if the owner’s data isn’t at risk. I may not be optimistic about the ease of fixing this problem, but that doesn’t mean we should just give up. It is important that we improve the security of devices, and many vendors are just bad at that.

    So, here’s a few things that should be a minimum when considering an IoT device:

  • Does the vendor publish a security contact? (If not, they don’t care about security)
  • Does the vendor provide frequent software updates, even for devices that are several years old? (If not, they don’t care about security)
  • Has the vendor ever denied a security issue that turned out to be real? (If so, they care more about PR than security)
  • Is the vendor able to provide the source code to any open source components they use? (If not, they don’t know which software is in their own product and so don’t care about security, and also they’re probably infringing my copyright)
  • Do they mark updates as fixing security bugs? (If not, they care more about hiding security issues than fixing them)
  • Has the vendor ever threatened to prosecute a security researcher? (If so, again, they care more about PR than security)
  • Does the vendor provide a public minimum support period for the device? (If not, they don’t care about security or their users)

    I’ve worked with big name vendors who did a brilliant job here. I’ve also worked with big name vendors who responded with hostility when I pointed out that they were selling a device with arbitrary remote code execution. Going with brand names is probably a good proxy for many of these requirements, but it’s insufficient.

    So here’s my recommendations to The Wirecutter – talk to a wide range of security experts about the issues that users should be concerned about, and figure out how to test these things yourself. Don’t just ask vendors whether they care about security, ask them what their processes and procedures look like. Look at their history. And don’t assume that just because nobody’s interested in you, everybody else’s level of risk is equal.

  • comment count unavailable comments

    element14 Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenge

    Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/element14-pi-iot-smarter-spaces-design-challenge/

    Earlier this year, I was asked to be a judge for the element14 Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenge. It has been fantastic to be involved in a contest where so many brilliant ideas were developed.

    The purpose of the competition was to get designers to use a kit of components that included Raspberry Pi, various accessories, and EnOcean products, to take control of the spaces they are in. Spaces could be at home, at work, outdoors, or any other space the designer could think of.

    Graphic showing a figure reflected in a mirror as they select breakfast from a menu displayed on its touchscreen surface

    Each entrant provided an initial outline of what they wanted to achieve, after which they were given three months to design, build, and implement their system. All the designers have detailed their work fantastically on the element14 website, and if you’re looking for inspiration for your next project I would recommend you read through the entries to this challenge. It has been excellent to see such a great breadth of projects undertaken, all of which had a unique perspective on what “space” was and how it needed to be controlled.

    3rd place

    Gerrit Polder developed his Plant Health Camera. Gerrit’s project was fantastic, combining regular and NoIR Raspberry Pi Camera Modules with some very interesting software to monitor plant health in real time.

    Pi IoT Plant Health Camera Summary

    Element14 Pi IoT challenge Plant Health Camera Summary. For info about this project, visit: https://www.element14.com/community/community/design-challenges/pi-iot/blog/2016/08/29/pi-iot-plant-health-camera-11-summary

    2nd place

    Robin Eggenkamp created a system called Thuis – that’s Danish for “at home”, and is pronounced “thoosh”! Robin presented a comprehensive smart home system that connects to a variety of sensors and features in his home, including a keyless door lock and remote lighting control, and incorporates mood lighting and a home cinema system. He also produced a great video of the system in action.

    Thuis app demo

    Final demo of the Thuis app

    1st place

    Overall winner Frederick Vandenbosch constructed his Pi IoT Alarm Clock. Frederick produced a truly impressive set of devices which look fantastic and enable a raft of smart home technologies. The devices used in the system range from IP cameras, to energy monitors that can be dotted around the home, to a small bespoke unit that keeps track of house keys. These are controlled from well-designed hubs: an interactive one that includes a display and keypad, as well as the voice-activated alarm clock. The whole system comes together to provide a truly smart space, and I’d recommend reading Frederick’s blog to find out more.

    My entry for element14’s PiIoT Design Challenge

    This is my demonstration video for element14’s Pi IoT Design Challenge, sponsored by Duratool and EnOcean, in association with Raspberry Pi. Have feedback on this project? Ideas for another? Let me know in the comments!

    Thanks to each and every designer in this competition, and to all the people in the element14 community who have helped make this a great competition to be part of. If you’re interested in taking part in a future design challenge run by element14, they are run regularly with some great topics – and the prizes aren’t bad, either.

    I urge everyone to keep on designing, building, experimenting, and creating!

    Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenges Winners Announcement

    No Description

     

    The post element14 Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenge appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

    Identifying The Hallway Whistler

    Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/identifying-hallway-whistler/

    Becky Stern suffers from that same condition that many of us apartment dwellers are affected by: a curiosity about who is making noise outside the door.

    Living within a large New York City apartment, Becky wanted to be able to see out of her peep hole without having to leave her desk. After all, the constant comings and goings of any shared property, though expected, can often be distracting.

    (And seriously, whoever keeps slamming their door in my apartment block at 4am WILL suffer my wrath!)

    So she decided to use a motion detector to trigger a Pi camera at her door. The camera would then stream live video back to a monitor within her apartment: a wireless peep hole, allowing her the freedom to be productive without having her eye to the door.

    Peep Hole Cam

    Becky used a Pi Zero for the project and took to the internet to educate herself on how to code a live streaming camera with motion detection. Tony D’s Cloud Cam tutorial gave her everything she needed to get the project working… and a handful of magnets, plus an old makeup bag, finished off the job.

    Pi Zero Peep Hole Camera

    Tutorial: http://www.instructables.com/id/Pi-Zero-Peep-Hole-Camera/ Subscribe for new videos Mondays and Thursdays! http://www.youtube.com/user/bekathwia previous video: https://youtu.be/p7uUcNFfP3Q tech playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxW5bBHPfdBzmynozxfEPv2DJgyoFiqgn this time last year: https://youtu.be/kZmyXzzXqfc Connect with Becky: http://www.instructables.com/member/bekathwia https://twitter.com/bekathwia http://instagram.com/bekathwia http://bekathwia.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/bekathwia/ https://www.snapchat.com/add/bekathwia tip jar: https://www.patreon.com/beckystern Music is “Marxist Arrow” from the YouTube Music Library

    Along with live streaming, the camera could be set up to take and upload photos and video to a cloud server; a handy tool to aid in home security. Taking the project further afield, she could allow remote access to the camera, allowing her to view the hallway while away from home. Did the delivery man leave your expected package? Which of the neighbours kids is the one trailing mud across the carpet?

    And seriously… who keeps whistling every time they come home?!

    The post Identifying The Hallway Whistler appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

    Using Wi-Fi Signals to Identify People by Body Shape

    Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/08/using_wi-fi_sig.html

    Another paper on using Wi-Fi for surveillance. This one is on identifying people by their body shape. “FreeSense:Indoor Human Identification with WiFi Signals“:

    Abstract: Human identification plays an important role in human-computer interaction. There have been numerous methods proposed for human identification (e.g., face recognition, gait recognition, fingerprint identification, etc.). While these methods could be very useful under different conditions, they also suffer from certain shortcomings (e.g., user privacy, sensing coverage range). In this paper, we propose a novel approach for human identification, which leverages WIFI signals to enable non-intrusive human identification in domestic environments. It is based on the observation that each person has specific influence patterns to the surrounding WIFI signal while moving indoors, regarding their body shape characteristics and motion patterns. The influence can be captured by the Channel State Information (CSI) time series of WIFI. Specifically, a combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) techniques is used for CSI waveform-based human identification. We implemented the system in a 6m*5m smart home environment and recruited 9 users for data collection and evaluation. Experimental results indicate that the identification accuracy is about 88.9% to 94.5% when the candidate user set changes from 6 to 2, showing that the proposed human identification method is effective in domestic environments.